Author Topic: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019  (Read 27647 times)

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #550 on: June 07, 2019, 06:52:36 AM »
Personally, I think bourbon or a dark rum (either standard proof or 151) makes the best tincture base, not vodka.

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #551 on: June 07, 2019, 06:58:18 AM »
Personally, I think bourbon or a dark rum (either standard proof or 151) makes the best tincture base, not vodka.

Oooh.  That sounds good.  We have a distillery near here that makes really good rum, and a number of bourbon and whiskey places as well.  Some experiments may be needed here.  It's a tough job, but someone has to.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #552 on: June 07, 2019, 07:11:47 AM »
My great grandmother used to make elderberry wine. (And plum wine and apple cider)  But it was always for medicinal purposes......


Indio

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #553 on: June 07, 2019, 11:28:14 AM »
I second the idea of using bourbon with the elderberries. I make vanilla extract using good quality bourbon and it makes a huge difference in baked desserts, pancakes, coffee cakes, etc. A few years ago, I made a quart size infusion of vodka and valerian root. It tastes awful but a few drops in water about an hour before bed helps me with sleepless nights. Got the idea when I noticed an organic version of this for sale in Whole Foods and decided to make it myself.

It's so nice reading everybody's garden updates. Loved the videos of your chicken/rabbit set up and garden @Buntastic, especially that hardcore nest box you added. Having all of that rabbit manure must make your plants huge. We used to have an angora rabbit, for spinning the fur, and the manure was amazing since it didn't need to age/compost. If I planted up my front sidewalk area, my neighbors would think it was for them to pick. They are just that kind of people. Instead I have roses planted along the street in front of my house. I harvest the rose petals to dry them and put in the nest boxes along with mint, oregano, and comfrey. It smells and looks so good next to the shavings.

My garden is fully planted now. The first flowers on the peas have come out. The pink and purple colors are so pretty.  Sadly, June peach drop has begun in earnest. Squeezed in two celery plants and 3 broccoli plants I found at the garden shop, while picking up hay mulch to put on top of the soaker hoses. Have been feeding the tomatoes with fish emulsion and seeped comfrey water. Will attempt homemade worm casting foliar spray next week. I have comfrey coming up all over the place. The chickens are so happy to get their morning comfrey snacks. They race into the run every morning excitedly looking for it. Ten week old pullets are almost finished with their chick starter and will be upgraded to pellets soon.

The kiwi vine has really taken off this year. Last year it branched out a lot but I was able to tame it, not sure that will be possible this year because it's growing so rapidly. I hope this means it puts out a lot more larger fruit.

Have graduation party coming up so I've been weeding, trimming and weed wacking to keep everything under control so it isn't a massive last minute effort.

Out of curiosity, has anybody been to any of the mother earth news fairs that are offered around the country? I've been following them for a few years and have wanted to check out the PA event.




Tris Prior

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #554 on: June 07, 2019, 11:33:48 AM »
My sugar snap pea plant is making pea pods!

Two of my mini bell pepper plants have their first tiny tiny baby pepper on them!

Lettuce still at "OMG, how are we going to eat all this" levels. I picked a big pile of dill to dry. Tomorrow I'll pick some thyme to dry because that's nice and bushy now.

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #555 on: June 07, 2019, 02:26:38 PM »
@Indio the only thing I know from friends who have gone is that if you’re trying to see (insert big name speaker) it is worth paying more for some sort of dedicated ticket instead of waiting in line for a first come, first serve seat.

They have had one near me several times but timing has never worked out.

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #556 on: June 07, 2019, 05:54:18 PM »
Beautiful peas @Jon_Snow !  I have big pea plans for next year.  Love them.  And I'm now in a really good climate for them.  And I have a deer fence!  Joy.

Yes, go big with peas next year! From your comments I'm going to guess that you have moved from a warmer climate. Peas do love a bit of coolness to truly thrive. Between peas and brassicas, I'd be hard pressed to say which crop loves the cooling effect of the Pacific more. I took a tape measure to my peas today and they are mere inches away from 8 feet high! The seed pack says a trellis of 6 feet should be sufficient. I say they are mistaken. ;)

Question for @Buntastic and everyone else -- What do you do with elderberries?  Mine have taken off and I will have a bumper crop, even if I leave half of them for the birds.  I can make jelly, but I'd also like to get creative.  Has anyone made wine (is it called wine? Or is it a cyser?)  Or -- schnaps?  I don't have a still yet, but I'm thinking hard about it.  I've also heard you can infuse vodka with elderberry.  I'm not clear on that last one, whether it would be more medicinal, or if it would be tasty enough to drink just because.

I am following this discussion closely. I am now wondering if I can make use of my ample supply of salal berries in this way. This is a shot of a portion of my salal "wall" that forms a living barrier at the back of my garden. Each one of those little blossoms will become a dark purple berry with a flavour reminiscent of a combo of blueberries and Concord grape. 3x the nutritional value of blueberries as well. A virtually unknown Superfood.





Getting close to my last harvest of Spinach. Planted in early March, I have been enjoying it quite a bit and am sad to see it all start to bolt before I could quite use it all up. As an aside, if someone had told me 5 years ago I would possess such feelings about SPINACH I would have chortled mightily. Or outright scoffed.



Inspired by our resident master urban gardener, I'm going to post a video of my garden here soon. Just a side to side panning shot, with no commentary....sorry. :)

BONUS PIC: Lots going on here....beautiful broc on the way, calendula patch, umpteenth planting of lettuce, gorgeous Swiss chard (wish it tasted as good as it looks), and the bottom of my SNOW peas. And....a random piece of brick....because...I'm not really sure. :D



« Last Edit: June 07, 2019, 06:02:06 PM by Jon_Snow »

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #557 on: June 08, 2019, 04:56:44 AM »
Gorgeous pics as always @Jon_Snow!  Your chard doesn't taste good? Or you just don't like chard?

@Indio -- yes, I went for one day to the Mother Earth News Fair in Asheville a few years ago.  It was a last minute decision, so no research done beforehand on topics or speakers.  I was there with a ten year old who only wanted to visit the [hundreds of] vendors with his birthday money and hold baby goats, so I wasn't able to do as much as I hoped.  It was fun though, and I did manage to sit in on a few talks and watch a couple of interesting demonstrations.  The speakers I saw were high quality.  If you ever want to attend the Asheville event you're welcome to stay at our place.  :)

And hey!  I've been researching homemade liqueur, and I'm going to try it with some of my own fruit.  I was always thinking I'd make schnapps someday when I got a pot still, but infused liqueur looks easier for a beginner.  I'm picking black raspberries right now (huge bumper crop this year), and I'm thinking that might make a fine liqueur.       

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #558 on: June 08, 2019, 05:33:16 AM »
Beautiful peas @Jon_Snow !  I have big pea plans for next year.  Love them.  And I'm now in a really good climate for them.  And I have a deer fence!  Joy.

Yes, go big with peas next year! From your comments I'm going to guess that you have moved from a warmer climate. Peas do love a bit of coolness to truly thrive. Between peas and brassicas, I'd be hard pressed to say which crop loves the cooling effect of the Pacific more. I took a tape measure to my peas today and they are mere inches away from 8 feet high! The seed pack says a trellis of 6 feet should be sufficient. I say they are mistaken. ;)

In Wisconsin (where I used to live) you get 5+ solid months of winter, and then spring is very short -- almost nonexistent some years.  Our last freeze date was end of May, and temperatures jumped up in June.
And summers were hot.  Peppers and tomatoes -- heck yes, they grow like crazy.  But crops that like mild temperatures were a challenge.  Here the spring is extremely long and gradual, and the summers aren't quite so harsh. 

Those are sugar snap peas that are getting so tall for you?  What variety?

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #559 on: June 08, 2019, 06:03:52 AM »
@Trifele a friend of mine made what he called mulberry brandy by infusing vodka with mulberries for several months. It was really fucking tasty.

Erica at NWEdible has an old article about infusions that may/may not be of value to you.

Raenia

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #560 on: June 08, 2019, 06:37:39 AM »
@Trifele a friend of mine made what he called mulberry brandy by infusing vodka with mulberries for several months. It was really fucking tasty.

Erica at NWEdible has an old article about infusions that may/may not be of value to you.

I may have to try that one, it's looking like I'm not going to harvest enough mulberries from our tree to make jam or wine, but infusions I can do!  Probably will use white rum instead of vodka, though, as I already have some and we don't generally drink vodka.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2019, 06:42:49 AM by Raenia »

Rural

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #561 on: June 08, 2019, 11:37:03 AM »
@Trifele I use elderberries in a lot of things. I do make pie, but also use them like blueberries in muffins or pancakes. They are too seedy for a pleasant cobbler, I've found, but a mixed berry cobbler can include them. I find it's more fun to make syrup than a tincture, so usually that's what I do - then I can make it into a drink or just put it on biscuits or pancakes. Works pretty well sweetened with stevia, but of course then you don't get syrup consistency.


I either freeze or dry the berries for storage and make tea from them (with honey and lime or lemon juice) during flu season. For me, anyway; husband usually just throws some in his coffee but then he's a heathen. :)


During the flowering season, I pick blossoms for fritters (don't eat the stems, and I don't usually use the confectioner's sugar mentioned as they don't need anything): http://www.lilvienna.com/elderflower-fritters/
« Last Edit: June 08, 2019, 12:52:27 PM by Rural »

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #562 on: June 08, 2019, 12:24:53 PM »
Those are sugar snap peas that are getting so tall for you?  What variety?

Just good ‘ol Super Sugar Snap from West Coast Seeds.. Says right on the package “5 - 6 foot tall vines”. I am heading back to the city right now, but after I filled my cooler up with a veggie bounty I took a tape measure out to get an official pea elevation. 8 feet confirmed...and there is still lots of growing and blossom formation at the top. It’s really quite something. Where will it be when I return?

« Last Edit: June 08, 2019, 12:52:27 PM by Jon_Snow »

Telecaster

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #563 on: June 08, 2019, 12:52:21 PM »
Inspired by our resident master urban gardener, I'm going to post a video of my garden here soon. Just a side to side panning shot, with no commentary....sorry. :)

BONUS PIC: Lots going on here....beautiful broc on the way, calendula patch, umpteenth planting of lettuce, gorgeous Swiss chard (wish it tasted as good as it looks), and the bottom of my SNOW peas. And....a random piece of brick....because...I'm not really sure. :D





What are your chard secrets?  Mine are about a third that size.  Great looking broccoli too. 

jengod

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #564 on: June 08, 2019, 02:06:58 PM »
Been harvesting a basket or more of boysenberries every day for a couple of weeks now. They’ll run out by the end of June but they are a treat!

Had to drastically prune the grapevine portion of a new plant guild—we had so many grapes and vines that it was pulling down the young walnut tree on which it was “trellised.” The whole reason for the guild is to block afternoon sun so I need a vertical growth habit. Hopefully both plants will continue to thrive. There are at least a dozen remaining clusters so hopefully we will still get a crop.


Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #565 on: June 08, 2019, 04:43:09 PM »
@Rural -- Thanks for the ideas for the elderberries!  I like the syrup idea especially.  Also interesting that you mention the flowers.  I was reading about uses for those too.  So many possibilities. . .

And yes @Buntastic -- that's what I'm talking about -- a homemade liqueur by taking vodka or another base and then infusing fruit into it.  A light bulb went on for me yesterday when I remembered having some ultra tasty homemade limoncello once at a friend's house.  And I wondered if people do that with other fruit, did some googling, and oh yes.  They do.   Mmmmm.   

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #566 on: June 08, 2019, 05:29:42 PM »

BONUS PIC: Lots going on here....beautiful broc on the way, calendula patch, umpteenth planting of lettuce, gorgeous Swiss chard (wish it tasted as good as it looks), and the bottom of my SNOW peas. And....a random piece of brick....because...I'm not really sure. :D



[LOVELY CHARD IMAGE]

What are your chard secrets?  Mine are about a third that size.  Great looking broccoli too.

I’m pretty sure my chard was once a third of its current size...so perhaps give it a few weeks? 😉

Or do you have the sense it’s maxed out?



Gorgeous pics as always @Jon_Snow!  Your chard doesn't taste good? Or you just don't like chard?   

I like it fine. Just not to the extent of other things eaten right off the vine. I don’t often wander around the garden munching on a stalk of chard. 😁 In addition to the first peas, I also had my first sungold tomato. That’s unusually early to experience that particular garden season milestone.

Indio

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #567 on: June 08, 2019, 09:08:16 PM »
Wow... the speaker line up at the April Mother Earth fair in Asheville looked really good. Lots of interesting topics, especially one about beepods, a modified top bar hive. I can see why reserving a seat would make sense for the well-known speakers. It looks as if there's about a 90% agenda overlap with the PA event in September, but the timing isn't great for me. It's always fun going to farming/homesteading events to meet like-minded people. One of these days, I will make it to Asheville @Trifele and will definitely let you know.

All this convo about alcohol, berries and limoncello, reminded me of a book called "The Drunken Botanist." It has plant based, mostly infusion type, recipes. There's even a cordial recipe with elderflowers, lemons and oranges. However, the author mentions  a caution that parts of the elderberry plant can be toxic. Hadn't heard this before.

Most of the infusions we have been making are the thirst quenching kind with cucumber, blueberries, mint, and lemon balm in water.

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #568 on: June 09, 2019, 04:17:37 AM »
So just a few weeks ago I was reading A Midsummer Night's Dream with my kids, and there's a scene where Oberon, King of the Faeries, says: 

I know a bank where the wild thyme blows
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows
Quite overcanopied with luscious woodbine
With sweet muskroses and with eglantine.


Notice the word "blow" at the end of the first line?  The footnote in our book says it means not only blow, like blow in the wind, but also "to flower."  That's a use of the word "blow" from medieval times.

And then yesterday when following up on some of the ideas @Rural mentioned, I came across a recipe for Elder-Blow Wine.  :)  Just a neat little bit of synchronicity . . .  From that little linguistic clue it looks like people have been using elderflowers for a very long time. 

There seems to be something special about elderflowers.  I've never seen flowers with such a wide variety of insect visitors.  Mine are absolutely covered with beetles, bees, wasps, stinkbugs, and ones that look like orange lightning bugs (not sure what they are).   

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #569 on: June 09, 2019, 05:39:46 AM »
Yeah, all parts of the elderberry except the flowers and fruit are toxic. There are known cases of poisonings (I believe fatal, not sure) from using hollow stems of elderberries as a drinking straw, for example.  Some species of elderberry (only found in wild, not cultivated) the fruit is toxic unless cooked. I’ve seen some debate over whether the seeds are toxic or not, they can’t be very toxic given how common pies, etc are.

Rural

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #570 on: June 09, 2019, 09:59:26 AM »
Yes, no eating leaves or stems (it's why I made a point of saying not to with the fritters - you just gnaw the fried flowers off and discard the stem).


If you want to keep the blossom head intact for berries later, you can wait until the petals are about ready to drop, put a bag over the flowerhead, and shake off the petals into the bag. That works well for wine, or so my great-grandfather told me.


I don't think I believe the seeds of Sambicus nigra are toxic, even mildly so (not an expert on other species since we don't have much other here). I've personally eaten too many of them with no effect at all.

On the word "blow" meaning flower - that's why we still call a rose that's completely opened a "full-blown" rose. Or maybe that's regional phrasing?

Telecaster

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #571 on: June 09, 2019, 01:47:17 PM »
So just a few weeks ago I was reading A Midsummer Night's Dream with my kids, and there's a scene where Oberon, King of the Faeries, says: 

I know a bank where the wild thyme blows
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows
Quite overcanopied with luscious woodbine
With sweet muskroses and with eglantine.


Notice the word "blow" at the end of the first line?  The footnote in our book says it means not only blow, like blow in the wind, but also "to flower."  That's a use of the word "blow" from medieval times.

And then yesterday when following up on some of the ideas @Rural mentioned, I came across a recipe for Elder-Blow Wine.  :)  Just a neat little bit of synchronicity . . .  From that little linguistic clue it looks like people have been using elderflowers for a very long time. 

There seems to be something special about elderflowers.  I've never seen flowers with such a wide variety of insect visitors.  Mine are absolutely covered with beetles, bees, wasps, stinkbugs, and ones that look like orange lightning bugs (not sure what they are).

This is such a great board. 

ender

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #572 on: June 09, 2019, 04:42:04 PM »
Irrigation setup. Yay!

Weeded some too and pulled a bunch of volunteer tomatillos from our plants last year. Too bad none of them were in spots that we could have just let them go.

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #573 on: June 09, 2019, 06:47:56 PM »
On the word "blow" meaning flower - that's why we still call a rose that's completely opened a "full-blown" rose.

Cool @Rural!  I've never thought about that idiom "full blown", but that makes perfect sense!

Today DH and I were picking black raspberries from a wild patch, and he bravely waded into the middle of it to get some good ones.  He picked a few, but then came back out because the thorns were shredding him.  As he came out he said "the rest of those are for the birds."  And we started laughing, wondering if that's where that phrase came from -- "for the birds."   

horsepoor

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #574 on: June 09, 2019, 06:55:57 PM »
I had a productive day in the yard today.  Finally planted my cucurbits, okra, and the last few onions.  I still have a pack of leeks and two packs of peppers I picked up on impulse, and need to get in the ground. It was down to 40F a few nights ago, but set to climb to highs of 90 this week, so I'm glad I waited to plant the okra.

However, the main project for today was cleaning up the approximately 10x40' bed along the side of the house.  It was full of weeds and had a couple shrubs that needed to come out.  I got the section along the fence all cleared out and put a 3' wide strip of weed fabric in place.  The next step will be to dig rock mulch out of a couple other beds and get it cleaned and spread over there.  That will allow me to get THOSE beds tidied up, and then they will get fresh rock mulch.  The big bed will get planted with volunteer native perennials from my front yard this fall.  In the past I've used this area to grow corn and squash and things, but really need to decrease maintenance demands.

Dinner tonight was salmon graced with dill and tarragon and accompanied by baby beets and sauteed mizuna from the garden:

jengod

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #575 on: June 09, 2019, 07:37:33 PM »
Staked up the pomegranate and one of the goji berries so they grow straight, and then gave the pom and all three gojis a bucket full of beautiful worm compost from the bins.

It’s almost time to move the bins—if nothing else they’re much lower than the surrounding ground because we’ve built up the soil so much.

Serendip

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #576 on: June 11, 2019, 10:05:46 AM »

There seems to be something special about elderflowers.  I've never seen flowers with such a wide variety of insect visitors.  Mine are absolutely covered with beetles, bees, wasps, stinkbugs, and ones that look like orange lightning bugs (not sure what they are).

Agree @Trifele --elderflowers are wonderful for the creatures! My sister used the petals to flavor sparkling water kefir (with lemon)--it was one of the most delicious things I have ever tasted in my life! A botanical champagne.

If you have black elderberries in your area you are indeed lucky, we only have red which are inedible for humans.
However, I bought some dried black ones and have been experimenting with oxymels (a mixture of honey/vinegar and herbs) and a vanilla/elder flavored port.

Speaking of inspiration: if any of you are on IG--there is a man named Pascal Baudar who wildbrews beautiful drinks and ferments all sorts of veggie matter. He has a few books (one called The Wildcrafting Brewer which I am buying for a father's day gift for my dad)

In other news--the garden is doing so well. Mesclun greens, radishes, everything is so healthy since the birds haven't been able to access it. Our *cage* seemed extreme at first in the community garden..but has turned out to protect everything from annihilation. Our neighbors radishes are all eaten on the tops and everyone has bites out of their greenery. Clever creatures.

diapasoun

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #577 on: June 11, 2019, 02:37:48 PM »
Jon_Snow, after seeing your photos, I think what we have mixed in with our blackberry bush is salal! I'll have to double double check (I'm so wary of unknown berries), but this could be Super Cool. I love that so much of our (rented!) yard is edible -- roses, nasturtiums, blackberries, lemons, plums, persimmons. I'm so grateful to whoever first planted this yard years ago, because they made it so easy for me to eat from the yard with zero effort.

Our plum tree is fruiting for the first time -- it was planted two years ago and this is the first time it's just full of fruit. So exciting.

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #578 on: June 12, 2019, 04:57:44 AM »
@diapasoun if there’s an ag extension office for your county, they can help you with positive ID if you’re unsure after research.

———

My garden is plugging away. This is my first week of no teaching and trying to find the right balance between work on the farm and doing fun things with the kids. I decided to tackle a construction project first (building a structure to support more rabbit cages, as we will need more space soon), so the weeds are growing growing growing. But I took a garden walk yesterday to see how things are progressing.

Potatoes are setting flowers, peas just started blooming, rhubarb is ready for another cut, cucumbers are putting on first true leaves. Second sowing of green beans is germinating. First sowing has true leaves and putting on growth. Raspberries are in full bloom, hoping the ripe fruit doesn’t come while we are gone in a couple weeks. I hate leaving the farm.

New pullets getting closer to point of lay, but still probably a couple weeks to a month yet. Ended up needing to process two cockerels but I’m pretty sure all the rest are pullets.

Rabbits are doing well. The last round of litters is all past the danger zone after weaning where I tend to have mortality with zero losses. Got a first time doe due tomorrow, unsure if she took or not. Discovered the joys of making jerky, so now I really want more rabbit meat just to meet (pun intended) our own needs! The new construction will give us 8 (and I realized possibly a 9th tacked on to the end depending on how I like the roof overhang) 24x48”cages, or potentially some other sizes, unsure of final cage design yet). This will be my first time building all wire cages completely from scratch. Need to place my wire and other supplies order later today.

diapasoun

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #579 on: June 12, 2019, 10:04:41 AM »
@Buntastic, yeah, there's definitely an ag extension; I was thinking about that last night. Unfortunately, the thing that I think are salal are also completely sun-damaged at this point. The poor berries are all shrivelled up with the heat.

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #580 on: June 12, 2019, 10:36:19 AM »
They could probwbly give an ID with just branches/leaves. But you’re also super busy right now too, so obviously up to you :)

Sun Hat

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #581 on: June 13, 2019, 08:00:04 AM »
Things are taking shape in my garden, I'm trying to eat as much spinach as I can while it lasts, the peas are starting to climb their trellises, with the beans not far behind. The tomatoes are flowering and the squash and cucumber have emerged - this is the first year where I haven't planted the squash out as seedlings, so I'm cheering them on with anticipation.

My tiny pear tree has had some sort of blight, so I've had to cut about half of the branches off. I'll be surprised if it survives the year. It's only a few years old and hasn't borne fruit yet, so I'm not especially attached, though I had hoped that it would grow to shade my house at noon. If it dies, I'll just have to plant something hardier in it's place.

The flower bed is proving to be quite rewarding, with a happy buzz of visitors enjoying the blooms and scents. Speaking of insects, my apple trees are all doing quite well now that I've planted chives at their bases to fend off aphids. Plus, I now have heaps of chives to add to my meals! Happy days in the garden!

Serendip

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #582 on: June 13, 2019, 12:26:10 PM »
Satisfying radish haul today, three different types. I will use the greens for saag paneer or make chips out of them (similar to kale chips which I just made a heap of and they are so tasty)


Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #583 on: June 17, 2019, 06:18:48 AM »
Things are moving along in our garden.  The cabbage worms finally got the upper hand on the kale, so we did another planting, and also planted more potatoes because they are doing well this year and why not.

I also planted some onion plants that were given to me.  I'm curious about those, since they are a long-day Walla Walla, and I no longer live in a long-day location.  Our location is listed as intermediate day, and most people here plant short.   But I decided to go ahead and stick the Walla Wallas in the ground to see what happens.  Not sure if they will bulb or not, but I figure if we are intermediate there's a chance.  Walla Wallas wouldn't be my first choice of onions to grow since they are very short keepers, but we'll give it a whirl.  Next year I'll go back to my tried-and-true long storage onions where we can get 5-8 months.

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #584 on: June 17, 2019, 06:33:26 AM »
Probably going to be a very good potato year for a lot of folks. They love cool and wet weather.

birdie55

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #585 on: June 17, 2019, 07:49:55 AM »
Trifele,

Your Long day onions should grow fine, but they will bolt a little earlier than the Short or Intermediate day.  My gardening group did a trial on all 3 types of onions and that was what we found.  I am in California and SD and ID has the same results. 

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #586 on: June 17, 2019, 08:15:30 AM »
Thanks @birdie55 -- that's really interesting.

Serendip

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #587 on: June 17, 2019, 11:22:52 AM »
Best discovery this growing season has been mesclun greens.
For me, they are more effective to grow than lettuce, since it's like picking a pre-mixed salad when you thin them out!
We have been eating them like crazy and will continue re-sowing as they are good to grow all summer.

Potatoes in cedar box are doing well (inspired by @Jon_Snow, I hope to build sides and try to grow them vertically) and we've had our first successful batch of pak choi.

Japanese turnips are coming up nicely..hopefully won't get nibbled by anything.

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #588 on: June 18, 2019, 08:51:08 AM »
Potatoes in cedar box are doing well (inspired by @Jon_Snow, I hope to build sides and try to grow them vertically) and we've had our first successful batch of pak choi.

Haven't checked in on this thread in a while having shifted my garden talk to my Journal of late. But happy to follow your "@" summons Serendip! Glad your potato box is looking promising. My own potato rig now features some incredibly healthy taters burst out over the top.

Jon_Snow, after seeing your photos, I think what we have mixed in with our blackberry bush is salal! I'll have to double double check (I'm so wary of unknown berries), but this could be Super Cool. I love that so much of our (rented!) yard is edible -- roses, nasturtiums, blackberries, lemons, plums, persimmons. I'm so grateful to whoever first planted this yard years ago, because they made it so easy for me to eat from the yard with zero effort.

Unfortunately, the thing that I think are salal are also completely sun-damaged at this point. The poor berries are all shrivelled up with the heat.

Ack. Just seeing these posts now. @diapasoun, I so wish you had given me an official @mention. If it is indeed salal, you are probably at the very southern extent of it's range....and its likely that it is struggling in the heat and dryness of your area. But still very cool that you have it (assuming that's what it is. I would have loved to have seen a picture). I am still developing plans on what I'm going to do with the salal haul. Salmonberries are just about done, and salal is next, then closely followed by blackberries.



I dropped these images in my Journal in recent days....so why not crosspost them here? My garden is looking so great. I'm starting to think my seaweed mulch technique is paying these bountiful dividends.


Look at my turnip. :) (slightly nibbled upon by an unknown critter)


My peas. The top of the trellis pole is 9 feet tall. So I estimate that my peas have reach a record 8.5 feet tall this year.


Two green cabbage are ready to harvest. I was tempted to pull at least one. But I'm going to let them swell a little bit more.



Shot from the "green wall" at the back of the garden.



And one more Redwood Sunset after a day in the garden.



« Last Edit: June 18, 2019, 08:58:23 AM by Jon_Snow »

sol

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #589 on: June 18, 2019, 09:00:14 AM »
I am still developing plans on what I'm going to do with the salal haul.

The local tribes used to mix it with soapberry and whip it up into a frothy dessert like concoction.  You can probably find instructions/recipes online, if you're interested.  It's not exactly ice cream, but I like the idea of perpetuating specific dishes that people in our corner of the country have been eating for thousands of years.  It's like eating a piece of history.

YogiKitti

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #590 on: June 18, 2019, 10:17:38 AM »
I'm joining in! This will be my second summer gardening. Due to various reasons, both years we haven't hard the robust start for the plants that we should've, but things are growing anyways.

We added a potato bed and threw some onion bulbs in an unused area of the yard and both are coming along well. Last year we weren't able to harvest any bell peppers or watermelon, so hoping I've changed that this year.

Sun Hat

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #591 on: June 20, 2019, 07:41:33 AM »
Have any of you grown red chard next to pole beans? I have my chard growing between rows of pole beans and have just come across a guide that says that they shouldn't be planted together. So far the plants look healthy, but the beans aren't growing as fast as a different variety that I have planted elsewhere. Do you think that it's worth tearing the chard out?

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #592 on: June 20, 2019, 07:53:15 AM »
Have any of you grown red chard next to pole beans? I have my chard growing between rows of pole beans and have just come across a guide that says that they shouldn't be planted together. So far the plants look healthy, but the beans aren't growing as fast as a different variety that I have planted elsewhere. Do you think that it's worth tearing the chard out?

I wouldn’t. I have a pretty dim opinion of “Carrots Love Tomatoes” type companion planting guides.

It could be varietal difference, soil difference, or nutrient competition. But even if it is nutrient competition, ask yourself if the beans would improve enough to justify the lost yield from removing the chard. Probably not.

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #593 on: June 20, 2019, 10:05:40 AM »
Harvests are getting bigger.  Yesterday I picked beans, cukes, tomatoes, carrots, and zucchini.  Had a lovely stir fry for dinner.   

The kale and potatoes I planted last week are off to a roaring start.  They are practically jumping out of the ground.  They are in the new in-ground bed I layered with a truckload of aged horse manure.  Boy do they like it!

Sun Hat

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #594 on: June 21, 2019, 06:48:07 AM »
Have any of you grown red chard next to pole beans? I have my chard growing between rows of pole beans and have just come across a guide that says that they shouldn't be planted together. So far the plants look healthy, but the beans aren't growing as fast as a different variety that I have planted elsewhere. Do you think that it's worth tearing the chard out?

I wouldn’t. I have a pretty dim opinion of “Carrots Love Tomatoes” type companion planting guides.

It could be varietal difference, soil difference, or nutrient competition. But even if it is nutrient competition, ask yourself if the beans would improve enough to justify the lost yield from removing the chard. Probably not.

Thanks!

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #595 on: June 21, 2019, 05:19:18 PM »
I am still developing plans on what I'm going to do with the salal haul.

The local tribes used to mix it with soapberry and whip it up into a frothy dessert like concoction.  You can probably find instructions/recipes online, if you're interested.  It's not exactly ice cream, but I like the idea of perpetuating specific dishes that people in our corner of the country have been eating for thousands of years.  It's like eating a piece of history.

Thanks for that.

The first few years of FIRE I had every intention to explore foraging opportunities in our region, with an eye to attempt to recreate some of the things the indigenous peoples did. I think I got sidetracked/distracted by other delights of FIRE. I really want to revisit this now. I know the tribes of my islands made salal based "cakes" of some sort which they like to soak (or dip) in seal oil. I have rather unique access to seals but I don't foresee exploring THAT aspect. ;)

This discussion reminds me that I think there used to be a foraging thread kicking around somewhere.
Harvests are getting bigger.  Yesterday I picked beans, cukes, tomatoes, carrots, and zucchini.  Had a lovely stir fry for dinner.   

Sounds like a wonderful harvest! It really is the fundamental reason why we put in all this work, is it not?

Indio

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #596 on: June 22, 2019, 08:17:13 AM »
Weeding season is in full swing here. Everyday the chickens get to indulge in a buckets full of weeds they can pick through.  Have been harvesting lemon balm, rose petals, mint, and oregano for drying. Keep some for cooking and some gets set aside for the chicken nest boxes.

Blueberries are slowly ripening. A few bushes weren't producing so I added 3 new Patriot bushes to the grouping protected by mosquito netting to keep the chipmunks and birds out.

Peas are still producing prolifically. It's almost time to start planning what will replace them in the raised bed when they get pulled out in a few weeks. Cilantro is going to seed. Will plant the next cilantro crop this week. It's one of my favorite herbs and is eaten almost daily. Tulsi or sacred basil has it's own dedicated hugelkulter stock tank which is overflowing with plants. In a few more inches, it will be ready for selective trimming and drying for use in tea.

All of the tomato, bean and pepper plants have flowers and small fruit on them. Pinched off the suckers on the low branches to keep the plant focusing its growth on center for the indeterminate plants. For this first time, I'm experimenting with bush tomatoes and learning if they need different care.

Bees are happily doing their thing. Had to requeen a split three weeks and she's laying in a big way. Hive inspection yesterday had three full brood frames. Other hives are still strong, though one had a lot more drone brood than the other. No worries about overcrowding in any of the hives.


Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #597 on: June 22, 2019, 11:43:30 AM »
Today’s big project is trying to weed as much of the garden as I can because most of the remaining days until we leave for a week will be rainy. Making good progress.

Peas have pods but won’t be filled in until sometime while we’re gone. No complaints, the friend we hire every year to take care of our animals LOVES snap peas. Ditto the raspberries, looks like they may start ripening while we’re gone.

Everything else is still a bit off. First planting of green beans will likely start flowering soon, second planting is up and growing, just planted third planting. Will do a 4th planting (borderline right against frost for maturity) when I pull the garlic mid/late next month to test a tighter spacing I want to see if it works.

New pullets are almost to point of lay (15.5 weeks today), curious to see when they’ll start since this is the first time I’ve used non-hybrids. I know the Jersey Giants and Easter Eggers will be slower (21-24 weeks) but I know Barred Rocks could start soon.

Rabbits are doing well, zero mortality on the last round of litters. Most of the does either needed and/or got a slight break so that we didn’t have litters while I’m gone. My “farmhand” friend has helped us for several years now, but I didn’t want to walk him through all the steps of weaning and preparing a nestbox. Nothing too complicated, but felt like it was too much to ask.

Finished up a major expansion in my rabbitry, looks really sweet. Takes me from 17 “holes” to 29. I’ve posted pics on my OMD journal and on my Buntastic Gardens FB page. If anyone’s interested I can post the link to a video I took showing it, I just hate resizing images to post here.

Unsure how many breeders I will take it up to. 8, possibly a 9th, is feasible with the cage space I have and my preferred breeding intensity, where you really want 3 cages per doe for the growouts.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #598 on: June 23, 2019, 02:13:38 PM »
Our garden is a bit of loosely organized chaos at the moment. The pumpkins are doing great. The tomatoes are almost as tall as I am and are starting bunches of green fruit. The cucumbers are putting out their first flowers. The strawberries are pretty much done so we're growing off a few runners to expand plants next year. I was really surprised that the lettuce did well enough that we've had salads a few times a week.

Our zucchinis aren't doing much at all because we didn't have a bed filled for them - they're in soil mounds on top of loosened Virginia clay. It's definitely interesting to see the difference between plants grown in our unamended heavy clay and plants in the 8-10 inch raised beds. This is the first year we've had a garden here so we're happy taking the relaxed any harvest is a bonus approach.

I'm fighting a ton of invasive Japanese stilt grass. It takes over any ground that isn't fully and heavily covered by something else - even working into the grass and chickweed between the beds. The wildflower section I tried to plant on the other side of the garden this spring was completely inundated. In the fall we're going to heavily plant with clover and grasses between the garden beds and elsewhere throughout the yard. Hopefully it'll grow in enough through the early spring that we can slowly out compete the stilt grass problem.



Sun Hat

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #599 on: June 23, 2019, 03:53:45 PM »
My spinach is bolting, so it's a race to see how much of it I can eat. I'm considering harvesting it all to make a batch of palak paneer for the freezer. It's less healthy than huge spinach salads, but in the interest of avoiding waste, I'll make the sacrifice and prep my all-time favorite dish.

I'm going to do my first round of blanching and freezing greens in the next few days, as I thin the beets and harvest the first of the chard and kale. My peas and tomatoes are blooming and the assorted squashes are getting bigger every time I check on them.

The tiny pear tree that I planted from bare roots two and a half years ago is going to have to come out, as it has some sort of blight. I had cut back half of the branches last week, but most of the remaining branches are showing signs of infection. Alas.

On the bright side, my new flower bed is taking off, with roses blooming and an audible buzz of happy bees among the speedwell.