Author Topic: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019  (Read 27197 times)

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #450 on: May 22, 2019, 05:35:36 AM »
Thanks for the slug and chicken advice.

@Buntastic for the first couple days after I put the bully hen back in with the others she was doing better, but yesterday all three of the new hen had been pecked over pretty badly - one was bleeding and another had lost the tip of her beak. So I put all the new chickens in a separate coop for their own safety. They seemed super grateful - I doubt they've been getting much to eat. My plan is to keep them there until they recover, then switch them back to the main coop and put the bully hen in the small coop for several days, then try to put them all in the same coop again. Does that sound like a good plan? Also, any tips on the beak injury? She seems to be able to eat and drink okay.

If she just lost the tip of her beak, it should grow back.  If it's a little more than that it may not grow back. 

If you are really limited on space, then the bullying will likely repeat itself when you reintegrate, unfortunately.  If you can enlarge the space somehow, and give the lower ranking hens room to get out of Bully Hen's way and hide, then it might work. 

Another idea might be pinless "Peepers".  It's a clip-on device that blocks a chickens forward vision, like opaque "glasses": https://www.ebay.com/i/161753792440?chn=ps   With those on a chicken can still see to the sides, can eat, etc.  But it takes the edge off her confidence -- takes a little vinegar out of her.  We used them a couple times on a feather-picker hen we had, and it worked.  We left them on just long enough for the picked-on chicken to grow her feathers back, then took them off.  When putting the Peepers on, just be sure to stretch the plastic a little so the little tabs aren't so close together, but are separated.  That way it will just perch on the top of the chicken's beak, but not poke or pierce her nasal septum.   You also don't need the tool they sell -- they are just as easy to put on with your hands.  Just be sure to bend them back and forth a bit first, and separate the prongs.  You'll need to have someone hold the chicken while you are putting them on, but otherwise it's easy. 

Sugaree

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #451 on: May 22, 2019, 08:10:14 AM »
So every single one of the peaches I had on my trees have fallen off.  They never developed any flesh around the pit.  Any idea what happened?


And the stupid birds ate the three whole cherries on my new trees...

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #452 on: May 22, 2019, 08:51:20 AM »
So every single one of the peaches I had on my trees have fallen off.  They never developed any flesh around the pit.  Any idea what happened?


And the stupid birds ate the three whole cherries on my new trees...

Failure to pollinate, wind, squirrels or other varmints. I lost all but one peach last year.

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #453 on: May 22, 2019, 08:59:04 AM »
(Cross post with my Journal)

I spent a full day in the garden yesterday. It was one of those garden sessions where it almost felt like I was in a trance like state, just flowing from task to task instinctively without to much conscious thinking about what I was doing - almost as if I've been doing this for a while now. ;) The day flew by, and before long shade enveloped my garden, but not before the setting sun lit the redwood up in a blaze of colour. I've long enjoyed this reward at the end of the days labours. And there was that full body fatigue which I now welcome like an old friend.



I'll put in another day today (joined by a canine companion) and with that I'll have EVERYTHING in the ground for this year, with the exception of my cucumbers that I'll be bringing back with me when I'm in Vancouver next. I'll be  planting one more crop of peas (the 4th, first planting was in March) and a few more bean crops (the first have now emerged) but by the end of today will mark the end of the INTENSIVE work phase. From here on it will be mainly a bit of watering (keeping the Oyas full), a bit of weeding and mulching when it gets hot....but mostly it will be about enjoying watching my vegetables grow and revelling in the bountiful harvest to come very soon. Though I've already been enjoying lettuce (so have the slugs), spinach (had a warm spinach salad last night that was amazeballs) and kale and chard. Turnips and beets are getting close. Exciting times. My fellow gardeners understand. :D


Tris Prior

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #454 on: May 22, 2019, 09:19:40 AM »
Hm, one of my lettuces just shriveled up and died overnight? No idea what happened. It was a variety I've never grown before - Flashy Trout Back. Green with pretty red speckles. Maybe it didn't like the pot it was in? I'd stuck it in a pot because I ran out of room in the raised bed. I have plenty of other lettuce growing and that's all doing really well so I am not that fussed about it, but I've never had greens go from fine to dead in one night. At least, not unless we had a freak heat wave, which we most decidedly have NOT been having right now.

Serendip

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #455 on: May 22, 2019, 10:00:54 AM »
@Jon_Snow --your garden looks beautiful!

Mine is still in the fledgling state but is coming along. So far our mesh cover is working to keep birds out and now we have our container garden starting on the patio.

@Tris Prior too bad about the lettuce--I have a few that are struggling but not sure why yours would have collapsed so suddenly!

sol

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #456 on: May 22, 2019, 03:05:16 PM »
Something is eating my beans.  I think it's bunnies.

Tris Prior

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #457 on: May 22, 2019, 07:52:53 PM »
Well, that explains it; when I got home from work I examined the dead lettuce (had noticed it in the morning while rushing out the door and had no time for anything other than "shit, that's dead, welp, gotta run!") and the entire plant was sheared off at dirt level. I guess that would do it! So either something ate it (and ONLY that plant, everything else is fine) or it got damaged in the thunderstorms we had in the middle of the night. That's weird, though, because everything else looks good.

Behold the first Salad That I Grew of the season!
Romaine, buttercrunch lettuce, arugula, purple mizuna, Red Kitten spinach, regular spinach. The tomatoes are from the hanging basket I bought at the farmer's market, which has thus far produced four tomatoes in May!


Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #458 on: May 23, 2019, 05:40:18 AM »
Behold the first Salad That I Grew of the season!
Romaine, buttercrunch lettuce, arugula, purple mizuna, Red Kitten spinach, regular spinach. The tomatoes are from the hanging basket I bought at the farmer's market, which has thus far produced four tomatoes in May!

Spectacular!!!

Tris Prior

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #459 on: May 23, 2019, 08:28:22 AM »
My little scrap of backyard garden is pretty much planted now. I just need to find a place to hang the tomato basket, and I have one dwarf tomato (Fred's Tie Dye- sounds fun!) that I still need to put in a container.

One of my raspberry bushes is going insane - I'm so excited, it looks so happy.

I put another tomato and a pepper in the community garden last night but didn't get a pic. I still need to put the basil in but there are still some low 50s in the forecast so I'm probably going to hold off for a while. And I, uh, realized I have room for 2 more tomato plants. I don't have anything yellow yet. And I probably could use one more "normal" tomato (not cherry, not a weird color). I'm going to have a whole rainbow of tomatoes this year - orange, white, purple, blue, brown, pink.... :)

(ETA: Only the stuff in the raised bed and the containers is mine. The stuff in the ground are all native ornamentals that my landlord planted. They draw lots of bees!)
« Last Edit: May 23, 2019, 08:36:47 AM by Tris Prior »

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #460 on: May 24, 2019, 05:31:35 AM »
Your garden is beautiful @Tris Prior!  That raspberry looks very happy indeed -- really well leafed out.

 

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #461 on: May 24, 2019, 10:55:03 AM »
@Jon_Snow --your garden looks beautiful!

Thanks @Serendip! As I mentioned in an earlier post, I try to strike a balance between maintaining my gardens beauty AND productivity. I could easily do some cutting down/trimming of some trees (NOT the redwood) to the East to get sun on my garden an hour earlier in the morning. I could do the same to the West and receive full sun of my garden an hour later into the day. But doing so would diminish the beauty of the entire scene...but, for now, I'm willing to sacrifice some yield to keep the beautiful status-quo. In the picture of my garden you can see a rather large blackberry thicket bordering the far end. I COULD clear that out and expand my garden significantly...but I like the natural green border of the blackberries rather than the deer fence that lies 40 feet within that tangle somewhere. And of course, there is the massive blackberry haul and the fact that it attracts a legion of pollinators to the vicinity of my garden. The sound of the bees pollinating those blackberries is one of the other joys I have come to treasure over these past 5 years.

Something is eating my beans.  I think it's bunnies.

No bunnies in my area, but I know for a FACT that wood bugs (called pill bugs, wood lice, roly polys by some) love to chow down on my newly germinated bean plants. Near the edges of my raised beds (where the little bastards hide) my beans almost NEVER make it to adulthood. Once the beans are a few inches high, the plants are pretty much safe from this pests relatively weak mandibles. If your beans are being eaten by something when they are fairly well established I'd say bunnies are a good bet.

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #462 on: May 24, 2019, 04:20:18 PM »
@sol Rabbit is pretty freakin delicious, all Iím gonna say ;)

Money Badger

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #463 on: May 24, 2019, 06:13:18 PM »
For anyone dealing with plants dying this early, water and compost are your allies...  Lowes has a very good micro-watering section and the smaller 1/2 inch pipe systems and a $40 timer work wonders...   a very mustachian $300 will yield easily well north of a $1000 in produce annually this way with 300í if tubing, back flow balve, pressure reduction valve (to 60 psi), mister nozzles that just plug in with a small auger tool  and a timer with 2 zones to distribute the love.  The initial setup is a bit of work but the payoff is awesome...   Down south here, beans are coming in as are herbs... first tomatoes are about 30 days out...   corn about 45.   Did i mention blackberry cobbler?  ;-)

Roadrunner53

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #464 on: May 24, 2019, 06:15:29 PM »
I just planted green bean seeds in two 5 gallon pails. I did this two year ago and it worked out great! They are on my deck on a chrome cart with wheels so I can wheel them into the sunshine and out or bad weather. I also planted basil seeds. OMG, I love basil! They are planted in regular planters and on a chrome rack with wheels so I can wheel them into the sunshine. I have a deck with an awning so it does prevent the sunshine on about 80% of the deck

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #465 on: May 25, 2019, 06:06:33 AM »
So I had to leave town for a couple weeks (family emergency -- all ok now), and I'm having serious garden withdrawal y'all.  DH is doing a fine job holding down the fort, but I'm missing some good stuff!  Our cherries are coming ripe.  DH and the kids are covering the trees with tulle (less durable, but works way better than bird netting) and should be picking in 2-3 days.     

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #466 on: May 25, 2019, 06:16:41 AM »
So I had to leave town for a couple weeks (family emergency -- all ok now), and I'm having serious garden withdrawal y'all.  DH is doing a fine job holding down the fort, but I'm missing some good stuff!  Our cherries are coming ripe.  DH and the kids are covering the trees with tulle (less durable, but works way better than bird netting) and should be picking in 2-3 days.   

How has the tulle been holding up? Last year was your first year with it, right? Or is it 2 years now?

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #467 on: May 25, 2019, 06:58:01 AM »
So I had to leave town for a couple weeks (family emergency -- all ok now), and I'm having serious garden withdrawal y'all.  DH is doing a fine job holding down the fort, but I'm missing some good stuff!  Our cherries are coming ripe.  DH and the kids are covering the trees with tulle (less durable, but works way better than bird netting) and should be picking in 2-3 days.   

How has the tulle been holding up? Last year was your first year with it, right? Or is it 2 years now?

This is year 2 with the tulle.  It held up well over the winter, folded up in our shed, and looks fine for another year's duty. 

It is too thin to stand up to rabbits, deer, or woodchucks, but for birds it seems close to ideal. I'll keep you all posted on how many years' use we get out of it.  So far, if not dealing with four legged predators it has bird netting beaten hands down.  It doesn't snag on branches or pull fruit off, and critters don't get tangled in it.  I'm planning to use it for the cherries, blueberries, and elderberries again. 

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #468 on: May 25, 2019, 08:17:11 AM »
So I had to leave town for a couple weeks (family emergency -- all ok now), and I'm having serious garden withdrawal y'all.  DH is doing a fine job holding down the fort, but I'm missing some good stuff!  Our cherries are coming ripe.  DH and the kids are covering the trees with tulle (less durable, but works way better than bird netting) and should be picking in 2-3 days.   

How has the tulle been holding up? Last year was your first year with it, right? Or is it 2 years now?

This is year 2 with the tulle.  It held up well over the winter, folded up in our shed, and looks fine for another year's duty. 

It is too thin to stand up to rabbits, deer, or woodchucks, but for birds it seems close to ideal. I'll keep you all posted on how many years' use we get out of it.  So far, if not dealing with four legged predators it has bird netting beaten hands down.  It doesn't snag on branches or pull fruit off, and critters don't get tangled in it.  I'm planning to use it for the cherries, blueberries, and elderberries again.

Cool :) Unfortunately here I lose my cherries and larger fruit to squirrels. Birds get some of the elderberries but I still have plenty. Nothing hits my raspberries too bad, weirdly enough. Squirrels get some but only ones that are close to the ground.   

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #469 on: May 25, 2019, 10:24:29 AM »
So I had to leave town for a couple weeks (family emergency -- all ok now), and I'm having serious garden withdrawal y'all.  DH is doing a fine job holding down the fort, but I'm missing some good stuff!  Our cherries are coming ripe.  DH and the kids are covering the trees with tulle (less durable, but works way better than bird netting) and should be picking in 2-3 days.   

How has the tulle been holding up? Last year was your first year with it, right? Or is it 2 years now?

This is year 2 with the tulle.  It held up well over the winter, folded up in our shed, and looks fine for another year's duty. 

It is too thin to stand up to rabbits, deer, or woodchucks, but for birds it seems close to ideal. I'll keep you all posted on how many years' use we get out of it.  So far, if not dealing with four legged predators it has bird netting beaten hands down.  It doesn't snag on branches or pull fruit off, and critters don't get tangled in it.  I'm planning to use it for the cherries, blueberries, and elderberries again.

Cool :) Unfortunately here I lose my cherries and larger fruit to squirrels. Birds get some of the elderberries but I still have plenty. Nothing hits my raspberries too bad, weirdly enough. Squirrels get some but only ones that are close to the ground.

That sucks about your cherries and large fruit.  Sorry to hear that.  Tulle would definitely not stand up to squirrels. 

Do you think squirrel tastes pretty good too?  ;)

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #470 on: May 25, 2019, 01:59:24 PM »
So I had to leave town for a couple weeks (family emergency -- all ok now), and I'm having serious garden withdrawal y'all.  DH is doing a fine job holding down the fort, but I'm missing some good stuff!  Our cherries are coming ripe.  DH and the kids are covering the trees with tulle (less durable, but works way better than bird netting) and should be picking in 2-3 days.   

How has the tulle been holding up? Last year was your first year with it, right? Or is it 2 years now?

This is year 2 with the tulle.  It held up well over the winter, folded up in our shed, and looks fine for another year's duty. 

It is too thin to stand up to rabbits, deer, or woodchucks, but for birds it seems close to ideal. I'll keep you all posted on how many years' use we get out of it.  So far, if not dealing with four legged predators it has bird netting beaten hands down.  It doesn't snag on branches or pull fruit off, and critters don't get tangled in it.  I'm planning to use it for the cherries, blueberries, and elderberries again.

Hmm, I should try that on this year's cherries, assuming they ever bloom and get pollinated.  (Right now the leaf buds are just breaking.)  And the strawberries.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #471 on: May 25, 2019, 08:59:57 PM »
Worked like a dog in my garden today.  All day. 

Pulled all the plants out of the greenhouse for hardening off.
Planted cukes, squash, zukes, melons and pumpkins out and constructed a shade shelter to shield them from the sun and hail (for the love of...) and torrential downpours that happened twice today.  There was an inch of rain around 5pm - I was sheltered in the greenhouse marvelling at the volume and hoping all the little guys weren't too beaten up. 
Got the raised pots leveled and filled with soil for tomatoes. 
I am going to grow 4 eggplants and six sweet banana peppers in the greenhouse.

Tomorrow is planting the seedlings in the church garden with the family church.  Must get to bed!

happyuk

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #472 on: May 26, 2019, 06:03:22 AM »
Just an update on a previous post of mine:

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/throw-down-the-gauntlet/plantinggrowing-your-own-2019/msg2282935/#msg2282935

I don't know if sowing onions and garlic in the autumn/fall makes them tougher and more likely to endure the frosts in the following year, but they seem to have weathered the worst and come out fine.  Elephant garlic, ordinary garlic and red onions respectively:

https://plot-30.blogspot.com/2018/09/planting-of-garlic-and-onions-autumn.html



« Last Edit: May 26, 2019, 06:08:45 AM by happyuk »

horsepoor

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #473 on: May 26, 2019, 10:26:03 AM »
It's been cool and rainy, and I'm amazed at how much growth my cool-weather crops put on while I was gone for 6 days!  We'll definitely be eating a few salads in the next few weeks. The horseradish patch looks like it's about to take over the earth, and my garlic plants are about 2' tall, but no scapes yet.  OTOH, the peppers and tomatoes don't look too enthusiastic, and are waiting for things to warm up. 

I'm relieved that my major work travel is done for the foreseeable future, and I have leave to burn, so I should be able to get a handle on the weeds as the rain tapers off.  Yesterday walking out there and harvesting a bunch of radishes was about all I had the energy to do, but should make some headway today and tomorrow if the weather holds.  Still need to plant out okra and cucurbits.  I stopped by the local greenhouse yesterday and bought some basil, additional peppers, and a few other things to round out where I didn't get things successfully started from seeds.

Might also need to invest in some tulle for my cherry tree.  I've netted it before, and it's a PITA, and also a hazard to birds.

jengod

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Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #474 on: May 26, 2019, 03:22:19 PM »
Eating Golden Dorset apples and boysenberries out of the garden.

Need to harvest some rhubarb and make rhubarb crumble before it gets too late.

Started seeds for chamomile, basil, hyacinth bean and Swiss chard yesterday.

Planted three goji berries last year; two more years before they really fruit, so letting them grow wild this year and will prune into a proper tree shape next year.

Have a baby almond tree that will grow slowly and realized I probably need a second almond to pollinate it properly. Will start looking in hopes of getting that in this year.

Last but not least, repotted the aloe vera plant we use treating for minor burns. I know it could get huge if we took better care of it.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2019, 05:10:56 PM by jengod »

Serendip

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #475 on: May 26, 2019, 09:26:29 PM »
I had a patio cucumber fail completely and when I pulled it up, the roots were completely rotten and there were small white bugs in the soil. Yikes! they didn't look like aphids, almost like teeny little spiders. Tried to figure out how to upload a photo but didn't have any luck but I couldn't really photograph the bugs, only the roots.
**figured out how to attach photos!

Anyhow, hopefully none of the other containers have the same problem. So far everything else looks healthy!

« Last Edit: May 26, 2019, 09:38:09 PM by Serendip »

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #476 on: May 27, 2019, 07:20:39 AM »
My hands are tired just like the rest of my body.  I worked so darn hard all weekend but it shows.

Now at the optimist phase where everything can work out and there is so much potential.


cassafrass

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #477 on: May 28, 2019, 07:11:44 AM »
I got to enjoy the first bounty from my garden this weekend! My kids and I chomped on some radish microgreens that I pulled out while thinning out the radish rows. Maybe not super exciting for the veteran growers around here, but it's the first thing I've ever grown to eat and it's very satisfying. I was also pleasantly surprised that even my 1-year-old liked them.

With the exception of my bell pepper plants that are being chewed on by something, everything else in the garden is looking great. I'm looking forward to spending more time out in the garden now that summer is officially here.

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #478 on: May 28, 2019, 07:34:41 AM »
I got to enjoy the first bounty from my garden this weekend! My kids and I chomped on some radish microgreens that I pulled out while thinning out the radish rows. Maybe not super exciting for the veteran growers around here, but it's the first thing I've ever grown to eat and it's very satisfying.

Congratulations @cassafrass!  Yes it is very satisfying.  And it never gets old!

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #479 on: May 28, 2019, 08:06:16 AM »
I got to enjoy the first bounty from my garden this weekend! My kids and I chomped on some radish microgreens that I pulled out while thinning out the radish rows. Maybe not super exciting for the veteran growers around here, but it's the first thing I've ever grown to eat and it's very satisfying. I was also pleasantly surprised that even my 1-year-old liked them.

With the exception of my bell pepper plants that are being chewed on by something, everything else in the garden is looking great. I'm looking forward to spending more time out in the garden now that summer is officially here.

Thatís surprising a young kid liked that! Many adults wouldnít even like the spicy flavor of those.

Tris Prior

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #480 on: May 28, 2019, 08:14:49 AM »
I am looking at the forecast and it is STILL not warm enough to plant out the basil and I am VERY cranky about this.

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #481 on: May 28, 2019, 08:25:01 AM »
I am looking at the forecast and it is STILL not warm enough to plant out the basil and I am VERY cranky about this.

Iím north of you (I think at least) and if I was growing basil this year it would have already been outside for two weeks by now (all my tomatos and peppers have been outside that long).

A lot of yíall seem way too cautious about planting your tender crops out. If temps are 38+F (3C+) they go outside.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #482 on: May 28, 2019, 09:09:16 AM »
I haven't planted out the basil yet.  It gets brown spots if it gets cold.  I need to get it in the ground though - it is starving in the soil mix.


Indio

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #483 on: May 28, 2019, 09:28:46 AM »
A holiday weekend at home was just what I needed to get the garden fully planted. I'm behind schedule due to weather and work, but not hugely.

Moved the 3 blue cochin 7 week old pullets from the brooder to the mini-cooper their transition coop until they are old enough to be integrated with the flock. To make space for the chicks, I rehomed 2 Maran hens that are no longer laying. Made a split from a bee hive and added a new queen on Saturday. She's still in her cage until the bees get accustomed to her. Later today, I will take the tape that is covering the hard candy plug to allow the bees to eat through it and release the queen in 4-5 days. One of the new beekeepers that I'm mentoring, had one of his 1st year nucs swarm on Friday so we set up a lure hive in the hope of coaxing the swarm into it. It took off late on Saturday afternoon. Sunday morning I led an inspection with the other mentees of his hives and found 4 hatched queen cells in the first hive and 1 capped queen cell in the other hive. Very unusual behavior for nucs with plenty of space.

Saturday and Sunday I moved slightly aged chicken manure and compost to the raised beds. I forked the manure deep into the beds to allow it to compost in place. Then I put the finished cold compost on top, and set up the soaker hose and timer. Planted 10 assorted bell peppers, 16 bush tomatoes, 8 mixed variety (cherokee purple, etc), basil, parsley, cilantro. Put in seeds for 8 summer squash, about 70 dragon tongue pole beans, dill, sunflower, calendula, and hollyhocks. I like to mix flowers among the veg to entice the bees to neighboring plants. Mixed epsom salt, eggshells, worm compost in all of the holes before planting the tomatoes to encourage growth. Then applied a foliar spray to feed.

The green and purple bush beans are about 7-10 inches tall with two sets of leaves. I noticed something was chewing on them, likely slugs or pill bugs, so I sprinkled about 2 cups of  lightly crushed eggshells around the plants to deter the pests that would have to climb over the sharp shells to get to the plants. That seems to have slowed the pests down.

The cucumbers finally germinated after being planted 2 weeks ago. Sugar snap and snow peas are getting taller and the tree branches pruned off the trees in January aren't tall enough to give the tendrils enough support. Added stakes to hold them up. Moved wayward blackberry canes that rooted where they didn't belong. Blueberries are coming along nicely and will be covered with mosquito netting in three weeks.

Started cleaning out the canning jars and taking inventory of the lids and rings to prepare everything for the upcoming canning season. Looking for new salsa and relish recipes to try out.

Next up I need to tackle a new location for the compost pile and locate another goji berry plant to companion plant with an existing plant. Mulching beds will happen this week too.

Wishing your gardens sunny days and rain only at night.



Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #484 on: May 28, 2019, 09:38:07 AM »
Most of us got our start in gardening from someone, and for me it was my dad.  He grew up in the country and moved to the city after high school. Since 1965 he has gardened on the small city lot where I grew up.  When I was a kid, his garden produced an astonishing amount of food that fed not only us, but friends and neighbors as well.  As his kids grew up and moved away, the size of his garden shrank a bit and he focused on planting the things that gave him real joy.  Even though he's in the city, my dad is remarkably connected to nature.  He'is intimately connected with everything that grows, crawls, walks and flies in his yard.  It's in his bones and blood.  He is generous with his time and knowledge, and always glad to teach.  I live far away now, but when I visit we always spend time in the garden and talk plants.  A few weeks ago my dad had some health problems, and I came to town.  The immediate crisis is past, but it's not clear how much longer he will be able to manage alone at his place.

For the first time this year, my dad was not able to plant his garden.  After 54 years, he just can't any more.  I am so thankful to still have my dad, but I am mourning this, for him and for me.  Mourning this the way maybe only other gardeners can understand.

So I planted for him.  I kept it small and simple, 4 tomato plants and 4 peppers.  I planted them the best I know how.  I mulched them deep with the chopped leaves he set by last fall.  I set up trellis poles the way he likes around the tomatoes, so he can tie them up when it's time. 

I hope he enjoys the plants, but I also wanted to show him the love of gardening that he kindled in me.  That the torch has been passed, and it's burning bright.  And as long as he's here I'll plant something in the spring for him. 

Thanks, Dad.       

Tris Prior

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #485 on: May 28, 2019, 10:25:48 AM »
I am looking at the forecast and it is STILL not warm enough to plant out the basil and I am VERY cranky about this.

Iím north of you (I think at least) and if I was growing basil this year it would have already been outside for two weeks by now (all my tomatos and peppers have been outside that long).

A lot of yíall seem way too cautious about planting your tender crops out. If temps are 38+F (3C+) they go outside.

I thought the rule for basil was, temps need to be 55 for it not to turn brown and die? I've lost basil before to temps in the 50s. We're going down to 48 tonight.

Tomatoes and peppers seem unfazed, though; I've got most of those in the ground already.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #486 on: May 28, 2019, 10:54:51 AM »
I am looking at the forecast and it is STILL not warm enough to plant out the basil and I am VERY cranky about this.

Iím north of you (I think at least) and if I was growing basil this year it would have already been outside for two weeks by now (all my tomatos and peppers have been outside that long).

A lot of yíall seem way too cautious about planting your tender crops out. If temps are 38+F (3C+) they go outside.

I thought the rule for basil was, temps need to be 55 for it not to turn brown and die? I've lost basil before to temps in the 50s. We're going down to 48 tonight.

Tomatoes and peppers seem unfazed, though; I've got most of those in the ground already.

I dunno, maybe Iím wrong? Iíve only grown it a handful of times, maybe those years we had warmer Mays and my memory is shoddy.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #487 on: May 28, 2019, 10:57:44 AM »
I thought the rule for basil was, temps need to be 55 for it not to turn brown and die?
Testing that rule this year....

Rural

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #488 on: May 28, 2019, 10:58:14 AM »
Most of us got our start in gardening from someone, and for me it was my dad.  He grew up in the country and moved to the city after high school. Since 1965 he has gardened on the small city lot where I grew up.  When I was a kid, his garden produced an astonishing amount of food that fed not only us, but friends and neighbors as well.  As his kids grew up and moved away, the size of his garden shrank a bit and he focused on planting the things that gave him real joy.  Even though he's in the city, my dad is remarkably connected to nature.  He'is intimately connected with everything that grows, crawls, walks and flies in his yard.  It's in his bones and blood.  He is generous with his time and knowledge, and always glad to teach.  I live far away now, but when I visit we always spend time in the garden and talk plants.  A few weeks ago my dad had some health problems, and I came to town.  The immediate crisis is past, but it's not clear how much longer he will be able to manage alone at his place.

For the first time this year, my dad was not able to plant his garden.  After 54 years, he just can't any more.  I am so thankful to still have my dad, but I am mourning this, for him and for me.  Mourning this the way maybe only other gardeners can understand.

So I planted for him.  I kept it small and simple, 4 tomato plants and 4 peppers.  I planted them the best I know how.  I mulched them deep with the chopped leaves he set by last fall.  I set up trellis poles the way he likes around the tomatoes, so he can tie them up when it's time. 

I hope he enjoys the plants, but I also wanted to show him the love of gardening that he kindled in me.  That the torch has been passed, and it's burning bright.  And as long as he's here I'll plant something in the spring for him. 

Thanks, Dad.     


Oh, how wonderful. You should share this post with him, too.

CalBal

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #489 on: May 28, 2019, 11:32:25 AM »
I thought the rule for basil was, temps need to be 55 for it not to turn brown and die?
Testing that rule this year....

Mine has done ok outside down to mid- to high-40s, but below that the leaves brown. I almost lost them when it went down to around 38 last month, they looked really bad and their growth became stunted for some time. It might depend on variety also.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #490 on: May 28, 2019, 11:37:25 AM »
I bought too many green bean seeds. Does anyone know if I save the unplanted seeds will they grow next year? If so, is there a preferred method of storing them like in the refrigerator? Vacuum packed?

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #491 on: May 28, 2019, 12:13:48 PM »
I bought too many green bean seeds. Does anyone know if I save the unplanted seeds will they grow next year? If so, is there a preferred method of storing them like in the refrigerator? Vacuum packed?

They last 2-3 years at room temperature if kept dry. Longer in the freezer.  I have a jar in the freezer full of 8 year old beans I saved that are still viable.  Not sure what vacuum packing would do. 

Buntastic

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #492 on: May 28, 2019, 12:18:43 PM »
I bought too many green bean seeds. Does anyone know if I save the unplanted seeds will they grow next year? If so, is there a preferred method of storing them like in the refrigerator? Vacuum packed?

They last 2-3 years at room temperature if kept dry. Longer in the freezer.  I have a jar in the freezer full of 8 year old beans I saved that are still viable.  Not sure what vacuum packing would do.

Yeah if youíll use them up next year Iíd just keep them in a cool, dry, dark place. I notice weak plants and poor germination past that at normal room or basement temps. Fridge is safest place to extend life, freezer is technically best but if seeds have too high a moisture content they can be damaged.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #493 on: May 28, 2019, 11:51:55 PM »
Most of us got our start in gardening from someone, and for me it was my dad.  He grew up in the country and moved to the city after high school. Since 1965 he has gardened on the small city lot where I grew up.  When I was a kid, his garden produced an astonishing amount of food that fed not only us, but friends and neighbors as well.  As his kids grew up and moved away, the size of his garden shrank a bit and he focused on planting the things that gave him real joy.  Even though he's in the city, my dad is remarkably connected to nature.  He'is intimately connected with everything that grows, crawls, walks and flies in his yard.  It's in his bones and blood.  He is generous with his time and knowledge, and always glad to teach.  I live far away now, but when I visit we always spend time in the garden and talk plants.  A few weeks ago my dad had some health problems, and I came to town.  The immediate crisis is past, but it's not clear how much longer he will be able to manage alone at his place.

For the first time this year, my dad was not able to plant his garden.  After 54 years, he just can't any more.  I am so thankful to still have my dad, but I am mourning this, for him and for me.  Mourning this the way maybe only other gardeners can understand.

So I planted for him.  I kept it small and simple, 4 tomato plants and 4 peppers.  I planted them the best I know how.  I mulched them deep with the chopped leaves he set by last fall.  I set up trellis poles the way he likes around the tomatoes, so he can tie them up when it's time. 

I hope he enjoys the plants, but I also wanted to show him the love of gardening that he kindled in me.  That the torch has been passed, and it's burning bright.  And as long as he's here I'll plant something in the spring for him. 

Thanks, Dad.     

Beautiful tribute and what a gift to pass on the love of gardening!!

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #494 on: May 29, 2019, 05:37:50 AM »
Love your update @Indio!  I hope to start with bees next year (though I've been saying that for three years now haha).  We need to build an electric fence set up (we have bears) and other projects have kept us from addressing that.  Hopefully we can finally do that over the winter.  I'm hoping to get up to Spikenard Farm for one of their classes in the spring too. 

A question for you -- when you say you plant flowers among the vegetables, exactly how do you do that?  Like between the plants?  Between rows?  It sounds like you don't want those flowers to self-seed, right?  Thanks! 

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #495 on: May 29, 2019, 07:09:16 AM »
I know that you asked Indio, but I plant a few flowers among my vegetables and a few vegetables among my flowers. I use raised beds for my vegetables and will either leave a space for a flower when planting, or will pop a flower in a spot left empty where something doesn't germinate, dies, or gets eaten by critters. I'll plant marigolds most often because they deter some sort of pest, are easy to grow from seed and are easy to keep from self-seeding if I just deadhead them when spent. Last year I also used petunias because they're cheap, pretty and smell gorgeous. I like to think that the pollinators find them attractive too.  Between my raised beds, I have a few pots of annuals as well, for appearance, the bees, and to trip over.

This is my first year with an in-ground bed devoted to flowering things to attract bees and butterflies, but I've still popped a few veg in there as well. I have a butternut squash planted near a tiny pear tree, where I hope that it will act as a living mulch, herbs acting as border plants, chives planted at the base of an apple tree to repel aphids, and a couple of peppers among the flowers. I've also moved my rhubarb to the flower bed where it will get more sun than in the corner I started it in.

horsepoor

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #496 on: May 29, 2019, 07:48:38 AM »
Most of us got our start in gardening from someone, and for me it was my dad.  He grew up in the country and moved to the city after high school. Since 1965 he has gardened on the small city lot where I grew up.  When I was a kid, his garden produced an astonishing amount of food that fed not only us, but friends and neighbors as well.  As his kids grew up and moved away, the size of his garden shrank a bit and he focused on planting the things that gave him real joy.  Even though he's in the city, my dad is remarkably connected to nature.  He'is intimately connected with everything that grows, crawls, walks and flies in his yard.  It's in his bones and blood.  He is generous with his time and knowledge, and always glad to teach.  I live far away now, but when I visit we always spend time in the garden and talk plants.  A few weeks ago my dad had some health problems, and I came to town.  The immediate crisis is past, but it's not clear how much longer he will be able to manage alone at his place.

For the first time this year, my dad was not able to plant his garden.  After 54 years, he just can't any more.  I am so thankful to still have my dad, but I am mourning this, for him and for me.  Mourning this the way maybe only other gardeners can understand.

So I planted for him.  I kept it small and simple, 4 tomato plants and 4 peppers.  I planted them the best I know how.  I mulched them deep with the chopped leaves he set by last fall.  I set up trellis poles the way he likes around the tomatoes, so he can tie them up when it's time. 

I hope he enjoys the plants, but I also wanted to show him the love of gardening that he kindled in me.  That the torch has been passed, and it's burning bright.  And as long as he's here I'll plant something in the spring for him. 

Thanks, Dad.     

Aww, I think I have something in my eye.  Hoping for better health for your dad; I'm sure tending to his smaller garden will do him good, for both body and soul.

@Indio wow, you have been busy!  Bee keeping sounds fascinating.

Chugging along here - I did a ton of weeding on Monday and planted basil, tomatillos, ancho chiles and an artichoke. Transplanted volunteer oakleaf lettuces that were volunteering among the weed patch.  Still have a pony pack of onions to put in since I let me original starts die due to negligence. This weekend I'll put in the okra and cucurbits so I can shut down the grow bench for the year.  We are continuing to get rainstorms blowing through, and I'm happy to not have to water, even if the warm-weather crops are pouting a little.

The natives in the front yard are starting to bloom, which is a nice thing to come home to.

A couple nights ago I quartered up a bunch of radishes and sauteed them with butter, then added in their chopped greens and some herbs.  Makes a nice side dish when you're buried in radishes and can only eat so many raw.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2019, 07:50:13 AM by horsepoor »

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #497 on: May 29, 2019, 08:07:45 AM »
Most of us got our start in gardening from someone, and for me it was my dad.  He grew up in the country and moved to the city after high school. Since 1965 he has gardened on the small city lot where I grew up.  When I was a kid, his garden produced an astonishing amount of food that fed not only us, but friends and neighbors as well.  As his kids grew up and moved away, the size of his garden shrank a bit and he focused on planting the things that gave him real joy.  Even though he's in the city, my dad is remarkably connected to nature.  He'is intimately connected with everything that grows, crawls, walks and flies in his yard.  It's in his bones and blood.  He is generous with his time and knowledge, and always glad to teach.  I live far away now, but when I visit we always spend time in the garden and talk plants.  A few weeks ago my dad had some health problems, and I came to town.  The immediate crisis is past, but it's not clear how much longer he will be able to manage alone at his place.

For the first time this year, my dad was not able to plant his garden.  After 54 years, he just can't any more.  I am so thankful to still have my dad, but I am mourning this, for him and for me.  Mourning this the way maybe only other gardeners can understand.

So I planted for him.  I kept it small and simple, 4 tomato plants and 4 peppers.  I planted them the best I know how.  I mulched them deep with the chopped leaves he set by last fall.  I set up trellis poles the way he likes around the tomatoes, so he can tie them up when it's time. 

I hope he enjoys the plants, but I also wanted to show him the love of gardening that he kindled in me.  That the torch has been passed, and it's burning bright.  And as long as he's here I'll plant something in the spring for him. 

Thanks, Dad.     
This is my first season without my Dad planting with me or telling me how to the right way.  Unfortunately though, it is because he is gone suddenly from a car accident just before Christmas.  I am deep in grief and this years garden is helping me cope with that grief and the subsequent trauma. Having my hands in soil potting up the thousand seedlings I grew or hauling compost to exhaust my body is just perfect medicine for my whirring brain.
Eating the first asparagus this season brought both joy and sadness as I am sure will continue this whole season with each crop.  So last season I used to thank my paternal grandmother for all the knowledge and talent she gave me, I now add my Dad as well. But with fresh tears.

Trifele

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #498 on: May 29, 2019, 08:23:21 AM »
@Frugal Lizard, I am so sorry for the loss of your dad.  Itís never easy to lose a parent, and to have it happen suddenly must be especially painful.  My deepest condolences, and may your time in the garden continue to help you work through it.

Thanks for the flower guidance, @Sun Hat.  Sounds like there are loads of possibilities. I donít know anything about flowers, but am looking forward to learning. 


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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own 2019
« Reply #499 on: May 29, 2019, 08:56:09 AM »
@Indio, I made a couple of small splits last weekend.  I'm hoping to have at least one full hive and two 4-over-4 nucs going into winter.  Our spring flow looks to be mostly over unless we get some significant rain soon to rebloom the clover (they are actually forecasting drought conditions...boo), so I don't think the nucs will end up big enough to go into their own boxes by winter.  We'll get another fall flow, so hopefully that will be enough to get them through.  I lost last season to SHBs and a tornado, so I'm pretty much starting from scratch.