Author Topic: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017  (Read 34979 times)

Linda_Norway

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #400 on: June 21, 2017, 11:11:35 AM »
DH has bought two new grape bushes, this time of best type suited for northern climate, Solaris.

We have eaten the first strawberries, nice and sweet.

StarBright

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #401 on: June 21, 2017, 11:14:46 AM »
I had my first strawberry this morning and picked a ton of snap peas!

My son (who usually hates peas) wants to eat them for dinner so I'm quite excited about our garden's affect on my kids' eating habits :)

Trifele

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #402 on: June 22, 2017, 04:30:45 AM »
I had my first strawberry this morning and picked a ton of snap peas!

My son (who usually hates peas) wants to eat them for dinner so I'm quite excited about our garden's affect on my kids' eating habits :)

+1. Peas fresh out of the garden are glorious!   One of the very best things about gardening.  Our kids munch those -- and the fresh green beans -- down as well. 
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 05:32:53 AM by Trifele »

bender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #403 on: June 22, 2017, 11:05:07 AM »
My peas are finally starting to flower, and I have 4-5 cherry tomatoes growing.  Pretty exciting!  Just ate a bunch of lettuce from the garden as well. 

pekklemafia

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #404 on: June 22, 2017, 12:23:49 PM »
We've been eating spinach/lettuce/other green thinnings for about a week now! So good.

Tomatoes (mountain princess, determinate) are starting to set fruit. Like the poster above mentioned, I also pruned back my tomatoes - I'm trying to grow them up a string trellis this year, so they need one strong vine. From what I hear, anything foliage that doesn't have tomatoes on it needs to go! This encourages bigger and better fruit.

My pepper plants that are in pots are loaded with flowers... whereas the ones I have in the ground just look yellowish and sad. Won't be doing peppers in the ground after this year.

We've also been snacking on our haskap berries - they're probably 3-4 year old shrubs, and so far providing about a handful of berries each. Quite tasty when they're ripe.

full-time dilettante.

bender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #405 on: June 22, 2017, 02:54:56 PM »
I'm going to start composting for next year's garden.  I know almost nothing about composting, but I eat a lot of veggies and I've been saving the peelings.  I think I'm doing it right because I've had them in a paper shopping bag all week inside and it doesn't stink at all. 

I want to start dumping this outside in a pile.  Is it OK to just throw it in a big cardboard box?  Do I need a fancy pants plastic compost bin or ultra fancy composter that rotates?  I'll buy one if it's needed (saw one for around $60 that looks adequate), but if there's a cheap way to do this I'll try it.  How about laying out a tarp or flattening some cardboard boxes to make a base for a pile?  Doesn't sound great - maybe you veteran gardeners have a better idea?  I have all sorts of wild animals in my area, but I'm not sure if they would eat my rotting veggie scraps.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #406 on: June 22, 2017, 04:19:20 PM »
I've learned that I'm not very good at growing things, generally. But I can still preserve the harvest when it's in a glut season and down to a buck a kilo. I find that's cheaper for me than spending money on a garden that I still haven't managed to get to be productive! I try a new veg or something every few years, but there are only one or two things I've managed to get the hang of. I'm good at growing peas and beans. Not much else!

jlcnuke

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #407 on: June 22, 2017, 05:53:14 PM »
First full harvest of the main garden for this year today. Also have ~12 cayenne peppers and 10 or so super chili peppers not shown. Not including herbs in pics from the garden.

Beans are growing pretty well now (11 bush bean plants) but they'll be a little while.

I've had a TON of blight on my tomatoes this year, so I don't know how long I'll be able to keep the plants alive, but I'm going to enjoy their fruit until they die...

jlcnuke

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #408 on: June 22, 2017, 05:57:46 PM »
I'm going to start composting for next year's garden.  I know almost nothing about composting, but I eat a lot of veggies and I've been saving the peelings.  I think I'm doing it right because I've had them in a paper shopping bag all week inside and it doesn't stink at all. 

I want to start dumping this outside in a pile.  Is it OK to just throw it in a big cardboard box?  Do I need a fancy pants plastic compost bin or ultra fancy composter that rotates?  I'll buy one if it's needed (saw one for around $60 that looks adequate), but if there's a cheap way to do this I'll try it.  How about laying out a tarp or flattening some cardboard boxes to make a base for a pile?  Doesn't sound great - maybe you veteran gardeners have a better idea?  I have all sorts of wild animals in my area, but I'm not sure if they would eat my rotting veggie scraps.

I'm just getting into composting, but from all of my reading you're much better off just composting leaves than trying to compost scraps. A pile is all you really need too. A bin or something similar (preferable with worms or access for worms) will speed up the process though.

G-dog

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #409 on: June 22, 2017, 06:16:31 PM »
First full harvest of the main garden for this year today. Also have ~12 cayenne peppers and 10 or so super chili peppers not shown. Not including herbs in pics from the garden.

Beans are growing pretty well now (11 bush bean plants) but they'll be a little while.

I've had a TON of blight on my tomatoes this year, so I don't know how long I'll be able to keep the plants alive, but I'm going to enjoy their fruit until they die...

Lovely!

Trifele

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #410 on: June 23, 2017, 03:51:53 AM »
I'm going to start composting for next year's garden.  I know almost nothing about composting, but I eat a lot of veggies and I've been saving the peelings.  I think I'm doing it right because I've had them in a paper shopping bag all week inside and it doesn't stink at all. 

I want to start dumping this outside in a pile.  Is it OK to just throw it in a big cardboard box?  Do I need a fancy pants plastic compost bin or ultra fancy composter that rotates?  I'll buy one if it's needed (saw one for around $60 that looks adequate), but if there's a cheap way to do this I'll try it.  How about laying out a tarp or flattening some cardboard boxes to make a base for a pile?  Doesn't sound great - maybe you veteran gardeners have a better idea?  I have all sorts of wild animals in my area, but I'm not sure if they would eat my rotting veggie scraps.

I'm just getting into composting, but from all of my reading you're much better off just composting leaves than trying to compost scraps. A pile is all you really need too. A bin or something similar (preferable with worms or access for worms) will speed up the process though.

Leaves are great, but for balanced composting, you'll want a mix of kitchen scraps plus things like paper, leaves, etc.  Here's a guide: http://ccetompkins.org/resources/compost-home-composting-brochure

You'll want to set your compost pile outside on the ground somewhere.  Many people use a container (drum with no bottom) or else a 3- or 4-sided open top bin made of anything -- hardware cloth, pallets, scrap wood, etc.   @jlcnuke --
 you could use a cardboard box, but it won't last long.  It'll become part of the compost.  :)   You can also just make a pile on the ground if you don't care how it looks or if critters dig in it.   (That doesn't always happen.  It depends on where you live and what mix of wild and domestic critters you have). 

When you've got your location just throw in a mix of "greens" (kitchen scraps) and "browns" (things like leaves, shredded newspaper, used paper towels, etc).  You can stir it/flip it over periodically if you like. It helps it "cook" faster.  You'll know by the smell when the pile is happy and has the right mix of greens and browns.   It will also have a healthy population of bugs and worms in it.  If it stinks in a bad way, your mix may be too "green";  try adding some "browns". 

Pretty much all kitchen scraps are fine to add, though many people don't add bones, meat, or grease because of the unwanted animal attention that draws.  Personally I also don't add citrus fruit peels or pineapple trimmings because they don't break down fast enough for my taste.  Egg shells and coffee grounds are AOK -- pure gold in fact.   Tomatoes and peppers LOVE egg shells in their compost dressing.   

When it is done cooking it will look and smell pretty much like black soil.   Good luck and have fun.   

Roots&Wings

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #411 on: June 23, 2017, 05:38:47 AM »
^ The super easy (or lazy) compost method is to just dig a small hole and bury it. Where I live, it becomes rich soil in about 2 weeks. Citrus peels and avocado can take a bit longer to fully break down. There's an occasional raccoon that visits my fruit/veggie scraps.

ooeei

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own
« Reply #412 on: June 23, 2017, 06:47:45 AM »
I'm going to start composting for next year's garden.  I know almost nothing about composting, but I eat a lot of veggies and I've been saving the peelings.  I think I'm doing it right because I've had them in a paper shopping bag all week inside and it doesn't stink at all. 

I want to start dumping this outside in a pile.  Is it OK to just throw it in a big cardboard box?  Do I need a fancy pants plastic compost bin or ultra fancy composter that rotates?  I'll buy one if it's needed (saw one for around $60 that looks adequate), but if there's a cheap way to do this I'll try it.  How about laying out a tarp or flattening some cardboard boxes to make a base for a pile?  Doesn't sound great - maybe you veteran gardeners have a better idea?  I have all sorts of wild animals in my area, but I'm not sure if they would eat my rotting veggie scraps.

If you're just doing veggie scraps, look into starting up a worm bin too.  It's slightly more maintenance than a compost pile, but works better with having lots of "greens" (nitrogen rich) instead of "browns" (carbon rich) in your waste.  For a compost pile to work most efficiently, you need a ratio of about 20 browns to greens (by weight). 

In reality, anything will eventually decompose and be fine. The difference is whether it takes a few weeks or a few months, and whether it's smell free or stinky and attracting pests. The guides for how to do it "right" online generally assume you want it as fast and as smell free as possible.


In garden news, my tomato plants in the earthtainers are ridiculously massive, but due to the Texas heat have stopped putting on fruit.  A few of the cherry varieties still are, but noticeably slower than before.  Guess now I just have to keep them alive until Fall and hope for a better crop then.

I've also had quite a bit of issue with birds destroying tomatoes. I read that putting up a bird bath should help since usually they eat them because they're thirsty, I just haven't gotten around to it yet.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2017, 06:58:10 AM by ooeei »

mikedom

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #413 on: June 23, 2017, 07:32:18 AM »
Our garden (Zone 5 in Michigan) has already yielded lettuce, spinach, and beets and now I have some open space. What can I direct sow this late in the season? I recently put in some more beet seeds, but am curious about other options.

jlcnuke

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #414 on: June 23, 2017, 08:24:08 AM »
Our garden (Zone 5 in Michigan) has already yielded lettuce, spinach, and beets and now I have some open space. What can I direct sow this late in the season? I recently put in some more beet seeds, but am curious about other options.

The "yellow" zone on this chart is the "sow directly into ground" area for zone 5.


horsepoor

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #415 on: June 23, 2017, 08:51:04 AM »
I'm going to start composting for next year's garden.  I know almost nothing about composting, but I eat a lot of veggies and I've been saving the peelings.  I think I'm doing it right because I've had them in a paper shopping bag all week inside and it doesn't stink at all. 

I want to start dumping this outside in a pile.  Is it OK to just throw it in a big cardboard box?  Do I need a fancy pants plastic compost bin or ultra fancy composter that rotates?  I'll buy one if it's needed (saw one for around $60 that looks adequate), but if there's a cheap way to do this I'll try it.  How about laying out a tarp or flattening some cardboard boxes to make a base for a pile?  Doesn't sound great - maybe you veteran gardeners have a better idea?  I have all sorts of wild animals in my area, but I'm not sure if they would eat my rotting veggie scraps.

No, you don't need anything fancy.  A cardboard box will disintegrate if the pile is getting adequate moisture though.  My compost bins are made out of 2x4" wire mesh.  Squirrels and birds get in, but I haven't had problems with larger wildlife even though we're on larger lots outside of city limits.

Cardboard can be shredded and go in the pile as a brown.   You'll want to add dried leaves and "browns" along with your veggie scraps, which are a "green" to get proper composting and not just a pile of slime.  Since you don't plan to use the compost until next year, you can employ the same lazy method that I use, which is: 1) put things in a pile 2) wait.  Next spring flip everything over and the bottom will be beautiful, rich compost.

bender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #416 on: June 23, 2017, 08:51:15 AM »
Thanks for all the composting info!

jlcnuke

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #417 on: June 23, 2017, 10:32:22 AM »
This, and other similar papers/discussions from agriculture department personnel, is where I got the info telling me that kitchen scraps etc aren't needed for compost. Just FYI.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9OhxKlrWwc

Trifele

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #418 on: June 23, 2017, 11:50:44 AM »
This, and other similar papers/discussions from agriculture department personnel, is where I got the info telling me that kitchen scraps etc aren't needed for compost. Just FYI.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9OhxKlrWwc

Sure, you can just do leaves.  It's just a different thing.  I consider that "mulch" rather than compost.  Shredded leaves are great for the soil, but they don't have the nutritional benefits that compost does.  I have both a leaf bin and a true compost pile.  I use the leaves to mulch around plants, and the compost to feed the plants.  One is mostly a protective barrier/blanket for the plants, and the other is mostly food.  Both good things.     
« Last Edit: June 23, 2017, 12:06:11 PM by Trifele »

Tris Prior

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #419 on: June 23, 2017, 05:44:54 PM »
I tried composting for the first time this spring, just throwing kitchen scraps into a pile. This caused a fly situation that was Out Of Control. As soon as I stopped adding to the pile, the flies were much less, so I assume it was the compost drawing them. Has this happened to anyone else?

I was more concerned about rats, as I'm in the city. Didn't consider Epic Fly Population.

I think the issue may have been not enough brown - but I rent and did not have a source of dried leaves when we moved in this spring. Maybe if I start collecting dried leaves in the fall? We don't have trees in our yard, though.... hmmmm.

My pepper plants that are in pots are loaded with flowers... whereas the ones I have in the ground just look yellowish and sad. Won't be doing peppers in the ground after this year.

I am having the same issue. Well, the ones in the ground aren't yellowish, but they are not growing that much and are not even considering making any flowers. I thought it was because they're not getting enough sun; I planted "dwarf" tomatoes around them that are now enormous. I pruned the tomatoes so that they're not blocking the peppers so maybe that will help - but the peppers definitely like containers better. I have at least 6 peppers starting on my mini yellow bell - that's early, for here.

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #420 on: June 23, 2017, 09:04:39 PM »
We (Chicago area) seem to have zero to none flying insects to pollinate cucumbers. They look complete shit. They start blooming, growing a bit and die off. I'm trying to hand pollinate them with male flowers but it doesn't  seem to work at all, may be one or two.

Tomatoes are doing OK. Peppers are slow (don't forget to top yours if you haven't done it yet). 

Blissful Biker

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #421 on: June 23, 2017, 10:09:35 PM »
Tomatoes are doing OK. Peppers are slow (don't forget to top yours if you haven't done it yet).

Thanks!  I had not heard of topping peppers.  Googled it and now heading out to cut off those tops.

Trifele

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #422 on: June 24, 2017, 04:07:02 AM »
We (Chicago area) seem to have zero to none flying insects to pollinate cucumbers. They look complete shit. They start blooming, growing a bit and die off. I'm trying to hand pollinate them with male flowers but it doesn't  seem to work at all, may be one or two.

Tomatoes are doing OK. Peppers are slow (don't forget to top yours if you haven't done it yet).

Hey Ferrumb5 -- there are some cucumbers that don't require pollination (gynoecious/parthenocarpic). You could try those.    One that I had great luck with was Corinto.   Seed is expensive though.

I had the same pollination problems as you before I switched.  I remember being out there with a Qtip trying to hand pollinate them, until I had enough of that.

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #423 on: June 24, 2017, 11:48:38 AM »
Trifele, those are great tips. I will put it in my garden logbook for next year. I was not aware of self-poll cukes. Thanks!!

ender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #424 on: June 24, 2017, 05:08:18 PM »
I didn't see this thread. Been less active on the forums recently...

Anyways, we've picked off a bunch of Japanese beetles in the past few days. No real obvious damage (just a bit on the peas?) which is good, so hopefully either they have better food or our garden is so prolific that they can't do much damage. Anyone have good ideas for this? Internet seems to suggest just manually plucking them.

Some pictures of our adventure this year. If you have slow internet I'm sorry.

Here's the garden map. Had we planned better it would have been a lot more organized, particularly with the peppers. I don't think we anticipated so many this year, but that's my fault for spontaneously buying more constantly :-)





Next our peas/beans and a row of peppers (and the rhubarb):



Looking nice!

Tomatoes are more or less doing well. We've picked a few cherries already (top) and have a few ripening Early Girl tomatoes:





Translated raspberry roots (from inlaws) seem to actually be doing well enough to fruit this year. They had them quite a few years with none... turns out sun is important?



Obligatory "lol zuchinni" pic:



Some ripening peppers!

ender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #425 on: June 24, 2017, 05:15:18 PM »
Tomatoes are doing OK. Peppers are slow (don't forget to top yours if you haven't done it yet).

Thanks!  I had not heard of topping peppers.  Googled it and now heading out to cut off those tops.

Same. I'm not sure we can do it now as multiple of our plants are already producing fruit, but it seems like a crazy good benefit!

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #426 on: June 24, 2017, 08:08:36 PM »
Oh yes! You will love it next year. I made an experiment last year - left a couple just as is... and the ones that were topped were like a huge fat fur tree with plenty of fruit while the ones that were not topped - just a plain ok pepper (still got fruits from them of course). DO TOP YOUR PEPPERS folks!

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #427 on: June 24, 2017, 08:13:43 PM »
Ah! Basil tips:

Tips for good basil (applies to peppers too) - when a plant develops at least 2 (3 is better) sets of true leaves, TOP it right away (and don't be scared - it's really good for the plant!): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jhmOC5uVjA

Tip number 2: NEVER EVER let basil bloom - it ruins the taste of the WHOLE plant immediately. It just turns to bitter grass. If you see flowers starting to develop - cut this part quickly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOW--OqJo8M


Cressida

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #428 on: June 24, 2017, 10:58:54 PM »
This topping business - is it just for hot peppers, or is it for sweet peppers too?

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #429 on: June 24, 2017, 11:13:18 PM »
All peppers. Just do it when 3 true leaves grow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vj3EZYcjyyI

Cressida

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #430 on: June 25, 2017, 07:29:50 PM »
All peppers. Just do it when 3 true leaves grow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vj3EZYcjyyI

Oh, quite a bit too late then. Oh well. Hopefully they did it at the nursery!  :)

Thanks.

Trifele

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #431 on: June 26, 2017, 04:53:17 AM »
It was a beautiful weekend full of gardening challenges here.   

The GD deer browsed down my new blackberries to nothing.  Why???   Last year we moved from the upper midwest down to our new place in the southeast.  We had lots of deer up north, so we are no strangers to them, but the northern deer didn't go after plantings like these southern deer.   These deer eat everything -- trees, shrubs, garden plants they are not supposed to like, like tomatoes.  (In 20 years of gardening, I have never had any animals eat tomato plants, yet these deer do.)  I cannot figure this out. We have several acres of beautiful meadow, as do our neighbors.  The deer are not hurting for food.  Gah!  Getting really tired of this.   

Also the slugs have been eating the leaves off my peppers something fierce.  I'm going to have to get after them.   And a rabbit or woodchuck got under the garden fence, walked right by the chard patch, and ate about half of my Red Russian kale.   Whatever it was has good taste, at least.   :)  But we won't be getting any big harvests this year. 


Fishindude

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #432 on: June 26, 2017, 07:05:04 AM »
Great looking garden pics !
Thus far, we've only harvested radishes and some lettuce, but cucumbers are now about 5" long and baby peppers and tomatoes are taking shape on the plants.

Tris Prior

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #433 on: June 29, 2017, 09:48:40 AM »
Tips on supporting really tall tomato plants that are too heavy for their cages? Went outside last weekend and two of my tomatoes that are in big containers were practically horizontal, cage and all. I added a stake to each, and tied the main stem to the stake. Went out yesterday - horizontal again! The plants, cages, and stakes were now all tipped over.

What else can I use? I can't get a better cage on it at this point; the plants are too big. Stakes all the way around the plant, maybe? The ground that the container is sitting on is very hard and dense and full of tough tentacle-like roots that I haven't been able to identify or entirely dig up, so I think maybe the stake wasn't deep enough. I just don't know how to get it deeper. I need someone with upper body strength, I guess, haha.

I mean, seriously, these only have a few baby tomatoes on them (and they're heirlooms that produce big tomatoes) so this is only going to get worse. And I've been pruning them diligently so that they don't spread; they're just really, really tall. And it's only June! In Chicago! This is only the start of our tomato season!

bender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #434 on: June 29, 2017, 11:38:33 AM »
Can you build some sort of support structure outside of the bin?  A simple example is 2 stakes in the ground on either side of the container with a string tied between them that will support the plant.  You can expand with more stakes and strings running between them at different heights.  It may not look great, but it will be functional.

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #435 on: June 29, 2017, 12:51:48 PM »
All peppers. Just do it when 3 true leaves grow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vj3EZYcjyyI

Oh, quite a bit too late then. Oh well. Hopefully they did it at the nursery!  :)

Thanks.

I mean, when at least 3 sets of true leaves grow. Not earlier, but it definitely can be done later, unless your peppers already producing.

bender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #436 on: June 29, 2017, 01:07:19 PM »
I have a green pepper plant that I bought and had 2 peppers on it.  That was over a month ago.  These peppers are probably 1/3 the normal green pepper size and don't seem to be growing at all.  Should I just pick them?  The plant seems healthy otherwise and has set a lot of other flowers and is growing one other pepper now.

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #437 on: June 29, 2017, 01:21:08 PM »
I have a green pepper plant that I bought and had 2 peppers on it.  That was over a month ago.  These peppers are probably 1/3 the normal green pepper size and don't seem to be growing at all.  Should I just pick them?  The plant seems healthy otherwise and has set a lot of other flowers and is growing one other pepper now.

Are there any other flower buds forming on it? Is it inside/outside? Bed/container?

bender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #438 on: June 29, 2017, 02:11:37 PM »
It's growing other flowers and has one small new pepper growing.  It's in an outside raised bed.

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #439 on: June 29, 2017, 03:02:17 PM »
It's growing other flowers and has one small new pepper growing.  It's in an outside raised bed.

If the stem is already the "V"-shape (or "Y"), it's probably too late. If not, go for it :) watch some you tube videos on it.

Tris Prior

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #440 on: June 29, 2017, 05:20:33 PM »
Can you build some sort of support structure outside of the bin?  A simple example is 2 stakes in the ground on either side of the container with a string tied between them that will support the plant.  You can expand with more stakes and strings running between them at different heights.  It may not look great, but it will be functional.

Maybe? Or maybe several stakes all around the pot, with rope going all the way around? Sort of making a secondary "cage" around the outside? That could work. I just have to figure out how to get the stakes deep enough into the very unyielding ground so that the entire thing doesn't tip.

I have a green pepper plant that I bought and had 2 peppers on it.  That was over a month ago.  These peppers are probably 1/3 the normal green pepper size and don't seem to be growing at all.  Should I just pick them?  The plant seems healthy otherwise and has set a lot of other flowers and is growing one other pepper now.

What's your weather been like? I've found that when we've had cooler summers, or wildly swinging up and down temps, my peppers will just kind of halt where they are until it gets hot again. They seem to really need the heat in order to grow and ripen the peppers.

ender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #441 on: June 29, 2017, 05:31:32 PM »
Anyone have good suggestions for getting rid of Japanese beetles?

Been crushing many a day here...

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #442 on: June 29, 2017, 05:44:37 PM »
Anyone have good suggestions for getting rid of Japanese beetles?

Been crushing many a day here...

Call Mr President and get them deported. I'm sure they don't have visas or green cards :)
Having same issue here. Just bought bug-in-a-bag kit, will try this weekend

horsepoor

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #443 on: June 29, 2017, 10:42:08 PM »
I have a green pepper plant that I bought and had 2 peppers on it.  That was over a month ago.  These peppers are probably 1/3 the normal green pepper size and don't seem to be growing at all.  Should I just pick them?  The plant seems healthy otherwise and has set a lot of other flowers and is growing one other pepper now.

You can eat them as green anytime if you want.  As far as I know, all bell peppers will turn another color when they ripen, so you could watch for some yellow, red or orange to appear.  That is a signal that they aren't going to get any bigger.

Tris Prior  If you have a sledge hammer, some t-posts with rope between them might be the answer for you.  It should be possible to pound them into the ground where it's too hard to dig.

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #444 on: July 01, 2017, 01:31:15 PM »
This Prior, all IL residents. What's going on? Most of my cucumbers just died. And the ones that are still alive are all yellow leaves, nevermind producing any fruit (literally no bees here). AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!

Tris Prior

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #445 on: July 01, 2017, 02:43:11 PM »
Too much rain, maybe? We had some pretty serious downpours here.

I've never had success with cukes, zukes, or anything in that family, and have since given up.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #446 on: July 02, 2017, 08:30:53 AM »
We have been able to eat 6 of our strawberries per day.
The tomatoe plants have been collapsing, so we have tied them around a stick. The peppers plants are still tiny.
My avocado plants is growing well, getting many big leaves. I just put it in a bigger pot. Unfortunate that it will take about 7 years before it will grow avocadoes, if it does at all.

Tris Prior

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #447 on: July 02, 2017, 09:59:59 AM »
I found one of those foldable zigzagging tomato supports in the "free" pile at the community garden! Score! I put it around the most horizontal tomato, outside the pot, in sort of a triangle shape. It wouldn't connect at the sides as the pot's too big, so I strung rope in that area. The plant has now stayed vertical since yesterday afternoon!

Also bought some stakes and did essentially the same thing with another tomato and that seems to be holding as well. Fingers crossed.

bender

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #448 on: July 02, 2017, 10:53:31 AM »
Thanks all for the advise on the stunted pepper plant.  I decided to leave the peppers on until they yellow or otherwise show they are overripe. 

Maybe the plant is stressed / diseased as many of the mature leaves had some brown on them - most likely some kind of blight.  I removed all the damaged leaves and hoping for the best.  Hopefully it doesn't spread to my other healthy plants!

KMMK

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Re: Planting / Growing Your Own - 2017
« Reply #449 on: July 02, 2017, 08:56:14 PM »
First harvest!



I also plucked a bell pepper but it was inedible. Will try leaving them for longer.