Author Topic: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019  (Read 2714 times)

Malaysia41

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Re: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019
« Reply #50 on: January 26, 2019, 09:53:16 AM »

Have you all seen the new Canada Food Guide from our Fed Govt? It is a VAST improvement on the previous ones and leans very heavily towards WFPB. Thought I would share! https://food-guide.canada.ca/en/

Another Canadian here.  This is a home run in my opinion!  I am seriously impressed with what they have done including things like "be mindful of how you eat".  "Cook at home".  Drink water.

Agreed, @FIRE_at_45 :) (fellow Vancouverite, I see! Hi!) What a huge difference, now that Big Ag lobby groups were not influencing the guide.  Science FTW!  Especially impressed by the new "protein foods" section which is heavily plant-based and has absorbed the previous separate meat and dairy categories.

Relatedly, I have been noticing that more and more people I know are adopting plant-based eating, or at least a "plant-slant." Now this could be that Vancouver / the PNW are a bit of a veggie bubble, but I do feel it is spreading more and more. It is just so much easier now than it was when I first started (1997!). So many options, a wide range of compelling arguments, and much more mainstream awareness/acceptance. It gives me hope!

I'd like to borrow some of that hope. The most recent video I made,  about methane emissions from animal ag, got me feeling less hopeful. But hey, you wake up everyday and keep trying.  I head to DC in two weeks to lobby congress to end animal ag subsidies, so there's that. I'm feeling terribly outmatched, though.  But science is on our side. And Americans tend to hate the idea of market-distorting subsidies, so we've got that going for us. Which is nice.

We need to take a cue from Canada and put up a fire-wall between our USDA scientists and industry. We also need to end the conflicting goals of the USDA to both recommend nutrition and market animal foods to us. And do campaign finance reform, public financing of election campaigns, etc. Oh wait, sorry, what thread am I in?

Oh yeah. my husband made this the other night - yum:  https://elavegan.com/vegan-mushroom-stroganoff-gluten-free-recipe/

Caoineag

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Re: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019
« Reply #51 on: January 27, 2019, 10:59:09 AM »
That mushroom Stroganoff looks yummy. It reminds me that I need to make my country gravy meatless as well. I had planned to substitute mushrooms for the meat and keep the sausage spices (I always did my own seasoning mix so that makes the substitution easy)so it still has that flavor.

Strangely I find that mushrooms are my go to meat replacement not legumes, probably because they stop the other things I am eating from messing with my blood sugar. Legumes just aren't as effective for me.

zygote

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Re: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019
« Reply #52 on: February 07, 2019, 06:15:55 PM »
Thanks for posting that mushroom stroganoff recipe. I made it tonight and it was delicious. I just got this new mushroom umami spice mix from Trader Joeís, and I used it as the flavor base instead of the spice mix in the recipe. The only other spice I added was paprika. It tasted amazing. The sauce didnít quite get thick enough, but that was because I used up some extra coconut beverage from a carton instead of real coconut milk from a can. Iíll switch it up next time.

Caoineag

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Re: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019
« Reply #53 on: February 08, 2019, 05:23:16 PM »
Did Korean vegetable pancakes recently and they were delicious. We got our recipe from Maangchi's website. Her pancake just used flour and water and we had no problem with them holding together. Not sure why so many other recipes try to add egg. It's completely unnecessary for holding it together.

We seem to have decided that for us non fish meat can easily be limited to once per month and fish we don't limit because we tend to only get that once per month on average anyways. We are about 2 1/2 months into this jourmey. Whether we will cut back even more will depend on who we are eating with since both sets of parents seem to think that meat should be at least twice a day. On the other hand, most of my extended family on one side is mostly vegan or vegetarian in their dietary habits so that will be much easier.

I figure for us it will be a journey over time to see just how little animal products we can get away with consuming, especially since I won't do vegan frankenfoods anymore than I will do regular frankenfoods (food chemicals and I do not get along) so some items will simply have to go out of our diet completely once given up (ie butter sigh). We even decided that one of the restaurants we used to visit as a treat will probably be a never again since they are so meat centric that there are maybe 2 items on their massive menu that we could eat and there are other restaurants that do better with having non meat options.

Since there seems to be only one milk replacement that doesn't add gums and occasionally it's hard to find while traveling, we are going to try making our own oat milk. If that works, it will be cheaper and easier than what we are currently buying so that will help (especially since we have a hard time finishing off 16 oz prior to it going bad so we could make smaller batches).

Caoineag

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Re: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019
« Reply #54 on: February 09, 2019, 04:05:30 PM »
Hopping on to note that the oat milk is a success! Quick too since you just add the oats and the water to the food processor, whirl till milky enough and then strain. We plan on using the ground oatmeal in our pan fry bread and oatmeal. The flavor of the milk is definitely milder than what we had been using.

LG89

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Re: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019
« Reply #55 on: February 10, 2019, 04:25:27 PM »
Love this! PTF.

I'm coming up on my 1 year vegan anniversary in the next few weeks. It's definitely cheaper and healthier to eat WFPB but I'm guilty of vegan snacks/treats/specialty items. Monthly spend is still cheaper than if I ate animal/animal products.

Since there seems to be only one milk replacement that doesn't add gums and occasionally it's hard to find while traveling, we are going to try making our own oat milk. If that works, it will be cheaper and easier than what we are currently buying so that will help (especially since we have a hard time finishing off 16 oz prior to it going bad so we could make smaller batches).

Are you buying Oatly? I was never a big milk drink and I'm still not but a carton of that stuff last absolutely forever in my refrigerator. Granted, I've found things halfway frozen in my fridge so maybe its how cold I've got it set on, but my Oatly milk has never gone bad on me (and I take forever to finish).

Caoineag

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Re: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019
« Reply #56 on: February 11, 2019, 08:53:33 PM »
...

Since there seems to be only one milk replacement that doesn't add gums and occasionally it's hard to find while traveling, we are going to try making our own oat milk. If that works, it will be cheaper and easier than what we are currently buying so that will help (especially since we have a hard time finishing off 16 oz prior to it going bad so we could make smaller batches).

Are you buying Oatly? I was never a big milk drink and I'm still not but a carton of that stuff last absolutely forever in my refrigerator. Granted, I've found things halfway frozen in my fridge so maybe its how cold I've got it set on, but my Oatly milk has never gone bad on me (and I take forever to finish).

Nope westsoy unsweetened soy milk. Only ingredients are soybeans and water. But because there are no preservatives you have 7-10 days to finish it once you open it. We don't actually drink milk but do use it for cream or gravy sauces and baking when needed. I have seen Oatly before but that's definitely not one common to most grocery stores and since we travel in a lot of rural areas, available options tend to be limited.

That said, it's surprising how many vegan/vegetarian items have made it to America's rural grocery stores. Tofu can be found everywhere, I have found vegan kimchi at rural grocery stores and they all have non dairy milk even if it's the type of milk I won't drink. I am pretty sure even 10 years back that wouldn't have been as common.

imadandylion

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Re: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019
« Reply #57 on: February 15, 2019, 07:36:01 PM »
@imadandylion  I have similar issues and see a naturopathic doctor. You should definitely check out Dr. Gundry's book. The Plant Paradox. It will explain why the elimination diet works and then why it quits working. I did that elimination over 6 years ago and healed my gut, but things came back. He explains why that is and it's very eye opening.

@Malaysia41 The nightshades have lectin in them. That's the big thing Gundry says we need to remove. Apparently GMO is making that worse, but also some cultures didn't have many of the lectin containing fruits and vegetables until Columbus opened up trading. All of a sudden things that weren't native were being consumed. Our bodies did not have time for our DNA to change to deal with them. Fun fact: Columbus brought tomatoes to Italy and Italians actually refused to eat them for 2 years. They also got smart in consumption by creating the roma strain. It contained way fewer seeds which cause the most problems and they remove the skins which also cause problems.

@Malaysia41  Thank you!! I'm just super glad to have found something that helps me.

@sisto  That's interesting, I never knew that about nightshades. I will definitely check out the Plant Paradox book.

@wenchsenior Yes, several years back I was diagnosed that by a dermatologist and became a patient of their PCOS clinic. The naturopath and others have suggested this as well, but it's hard to say for sure. I never went on spironolactone, and when I did want to try it, a PCP at the time strongly recommended I didn't. With hormone-focused tests, my naturopath determined that both DHEA, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, and estrogen levels were all really low for some reason. I need to get retested to determine if this situation has now been improved in a month or two, but so far I'm really happy. Skin is looking fantastic, and the hormonal acne I tend to get along the chin and jawline are really minimal.

wenchsenior

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Re: Go Whole Food Plant Based (WFPB) in 2019
« Reply #58 on: February 16, 2019, 08:26:01 AM »
@imadandylion  I have similar issues and see a naturopathic doctor. You should definitely check out Dr. Gundry's book. The Plant Paradox. It will explain why the elimination diet works and then why it quits working. I did that elimination over 6 years ago and healed my gut, but things came back. He explains why that is and it's very eye opening.

@Malaysia41 The nightshades have lectin in them. That's the big thing Gundry says we need to remove. Apparently GMO is making that worse, but also some cultures didn't have many of the lectin containing fruits and vegetables until Columbus opened up trading. All of a sudden things that weren't native were being consumed. Our bodies did not have time for our DNA to change to deal with them. Fun fact: Columbus brought tomatoes to Italy and Italians actually refused to eat them for 2 years. They also got smart in consumption by creating the roma strain. It contained way fewer seeds which cause the most problems and they remove the skins which also cause problems.

@Malaysia41  Thank you!! I'm just super glad to have found something that helps me.

@sisto  That's interesting, I never knew that about nightshades. I will definitely check out the Plant Paradox book.

@wenchsenior Yes, several years back I was diagnosed that by a dermatologist and became a patient of their PCOS clinic. The naturopath and others have suggested this as well, but it's hard to say for sure. I never went on spironolactone, and when I did want to try it, a PCP at the time strongly recommended I didn't. With hormone-focused tests, my naturopath determined that both DHEA, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, and estrogen levels were all really low for some reason. I need to get retested to determine if this situation has now been improved in a month or two, but so far I'm really happy. Skin is looking fantastic, and the hormonal acne I tend to get along the chin and jawline are really minimal.

The Pill tends to mask the symptoms of PCOS, so it's not surprising that it resurged when you went off it.  I wasn't on the Pill for big chunks of time, so it was more obvious that things weren't right (though apparently not obvious enough that I wasn't diagnosed by any ob/gyn I saw for ~15 years :sigh:)  By that time I was severely symptomatic with everything except weight gain.  I ended up just adopting a diabetic style/low-glycemic-index diet (no meds) and the symptoms nearly all resolved.  Ovaries went back to normal, regular ovulation and periods (after a decade of 3 or 4 periods/year), fewer cosmetic symptoms.  If you have any symptoms of insulin-resistance (I was severely reactively hypoglycemic), you might try that and see how your body does. Honestly, I love sugar, but it just wreaks havoc on the body, esp if you have these types of endocrine disorders.