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General Discussion => Throw Down the Gauntlet => Topic started by: Luz on January 01, 2020, 08:44:04 PM

Title: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 01, 2020, 08:44:04 PM
I read that language fluency involves a working vocabulary of at least 10,000 of the most commonly used words.

I currently have around 2,500 frequently-used words in Spanish, which puts me at conversational level.
Having command of 3,000 frequently-used words will put me in advanced-level territory. Over the next 6 years, I'd like to break the 10,000 word mark.

I've had every intention of consistently building my vocabulary for a few years now. But I haven't made much progress. I think what I need is a little accountability so that I sit down and do the work.

My 2020 goal and strategy are listed in the comments. I'd love to do this with others working toward the same goal.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 01, 2020, 09:00:05 PM
My goal for 2020:
Learn 15 words/week for a total of 750 over the course of the year.

A little background:
My husband is a native Spanish-speaker. And we speak Spanish as a family when we're all together (we have a toddler). I also read to the toddler in Spanish to help build her vocabulary and increase her exposure to the language.

Strategy:
I have 1.5 hrs/week to study. I plan to look up unfamiliar words from my daughter's children's books. I will write them on a sticky note to place in the book (though she likes to remove them) and also keep a weekly list here, for accountability in moving forward.  In addition to accountability, it will be nice to have a record of the words I learn for reviewing purposes.
I find that picture books have been a helpful resource, since I'm a visual learner. Once I learn the word, it sticks in my head since there's an image to go along with it. We also read the same books over and over throughout the week, so that should help me commit it to memory.
I'm also beginning to translate English books to Spanish, since she's getting older and the Spanish collection at our library is limited. It's the same concept, although a lot more work. 

Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Steeze on January 01, 2020, 09:12:30 PM
I am learning Chinese - not counting words, but completing a self study course. My goal is to complete 1 set of lessons per day.

DW is Chinese, and her parents do not speak English. I’m also traveling to China in a couple weeks! for the first time.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 01, 2020, 09:59:40 PM
Here's my first 15 of the year:

I think I'll also use this list to clarify words or groupings of words that are muddled in my mind, even if they are somewhat familiar (like the difference between drop and fall, for example).

1. female: hembra (animal) feminino
2. to pray: rezar (prayer: oración)
3. claw: garra
4. cloth (fabric): tela (rag: pedazo de tela o trapo)
5. to wear: llevar/traer puesto
6. to put on (clothing): ponerse
7. to take off (clothing): quitarse
8: to pump: bombear (pump: bomba)
9. coconut: coco
10. daisy: margarita
11. to dive: zambullirse
12. to wag (a tail): menearse
13. engine: motor (machine: máquina)
14. envelope: sobre
15. to fall: caerse (to drop: dejar caer)
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 01, 2020, 10:07:41 PM
I am learning Chinese - not counting words, but completing a self study course. My goal is to complete 1 set of lessons per day.

DW is Chinese, and her parents do not speak English. I’m also traveling to China in a couple weeks! for the first time.

1 set of lessons per day is awesome! Setting aside that kind of time would be so helpful.  Are you doing it for the whole year? If so, what level of Chinese are you currently at, and where would you like to be (just out of curiosity)?
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ysette9 on January 02, 2020, 03:35:23 AM
Here's my first 15 of the year:

I think I'll also use this list to clarify words or groupings of words that are muddled in my mind, even if they are somewhat familiar (like the difference between drop and fall, for example).

1. female: hembra
2. to pray: rezar (prayer: oración)
3. claw: garra
4. cloth (fabric): tela (rag: pedazo de tela o trapo)
5. to wear: llevar/traer puesto
6. to put on (clothing): ponerse
7. to take off (clothing): quitarse
8: to pump: bombear (pump: bomba)
9. coconut: coco
10. daisy: margarita
11. to dive: zambullirse
12. to wag (a tail): menearse
13. engine: motor (machine: máquina)
14. envelope: sobre
15. to fall: caerse (to drop: dejar caer)
It may not work for you at all, but I keep this tiny notebook in my work backpack where I jot down interesting vocabulary I want to retain. At this point it is not the standard stuff that I can look up easily but mostly the things Google Translate has trouble with for whatever reason. I can flip back through for a reminder lesson but often the process of writing it down is what I need to remember.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Steeze on January 02, 2020, 05:44:29 AM
I am learning Chinese - not counting words, but completing a self study course. My goal is to complete 1 set of lessons per day.

DW is Chinese, and her parents do not speak English. I’m also traveling to China in a couple weeks! for the first time.

1 set of lessons per day is awesome! Setting aside that kind of time would be so helpful.  Are you doing it for the whole year? If so, what level of Chinese are you currently at, and where would you like to be (just out of curiosity)?

If I had to guess somewhere in the 300-600 word range (HSK 2-3)? I completed a course up to HSK 4, which is 1200 words, but restarted a new course from the beginning. I think I was (read: am still) missing some of the finer points of a tone based language.

I have up to HSK 2 (300 words) down pretty well - read, text message and talk, but cannot write any of it. The HSK 3 material I have no trouble with using when prompted in the app, but have trouble using it in sentences and have no idea what the correct tones are most of the time.

By the end of the year I would like to have HSK 3 words down, improve my use of tones on HSK 1-2, and complete the HSK 4 material again.

I think doing 1 HSK level per year is a good target for me.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ysette9 on January 02, 2020, 12:25:35 PM
Ahh, the tones are so hard! My husband speaks mandarin with our kids and it is totally unfair how easily they pick up on it, where I am left wondering whether they are talking about horse or mother.... ;-)
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Michael in ABQ on January 02, 2020, 12:34:27 PM
I'm currently in a foreign country with two different languages but I've probably only picked up about 5-10 words between the two. I'm spoiled because most of the people I interact with speak English or there's an interpreter available.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: sui generis on January 04, 2020, 11:47:13 AM
Where can one get a measure of how many words they know in another language?  Is there some app or website that can estimate based on a quick test? 

I've been learning Spanish for most of my life and never have managed to attain fluency.  I always need more vocabulary, but the grammar is what really stops me from speaking with others (learning the subjunctive - ugh.  And as I've gotten better with that, it's made me forget basic verb forms like the present and preterite of irregular verbs!)

I listen to about 6-7 Spanish podcasts currently (most are weekly), so I get lots of comprehension but very little practice using the words, since I almost never speak it.  I feel like I need to speak to actually master new vocabulary and one of my goals is to find some groups or lessons where I have to speak this year, so joining in on this thread is applicable.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ysette9 on January 04, 2020, 07:43:25 PM
Where can one get a measure of how many words they know in another language?  Is there some app or website that can estimate based on a quick test? 

I've been learning Spanish for most of my life and never have managed to attain fluency.  I always need more vocabulary, but the grammar is what really stops me from speaking with others (learning the subjunctive - ugh.  And as I've gotten better with that, it's made me forget basic verb forms like the present and preterite of irregular verbs!)

I listen to about 6-7 Spanish podcasts currently (most are weekly), so I get lots of comprehension but very little practice using the words, since I almost never speak it.  I feel like I need to speak to actually master new vocabulary and one of my goals is to find some groups or lessons where I have to speak this year, so joining in on this thread is applicable.
For me podcasts are good as well as reading books. But the gold standard is just making yourself speak it. Haltingly, poorly, embarrassingly, whatever... just do it.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: nessness on January 04, 2020, 08:32:17 PM
I'm in. I started learning French about 5 months ago and would love to get to a very basic conversational level this year.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ysette9 on January 04, 2020, 08:39:04 PM
I'm in. I started learning French about 5 months ago and would love to get to a very basic conversational level this year.
Le français c’est ma langue aussi
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ItsALongStory on January 04, 2020, 09:40:20 PM
I am planning on setting up an internal job transfer to Portugal this upcoming summer so I have started Duolingo Portuguese. It appears to be more of the Brazilian dialect but it's the easiest path to learn it without having an opportunity to speak it on a regular basis. My native language is Dutch and I also speak (mostly) fluent French so that last one most definitely help with my Portuguese (and Spanish too although not focusing on that).

Several of my colleagues are Brazilian so technically I could speak it, but I am concerned that trying to force business meetings in Portuguese unnecessarily won't be very productive :)

I am about to complete the first 'stage' (not sure what they call it) on Duolingo having started right at or just before the new year.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 09, 2020, 01:30:22 PM
I'm going to try for 20 words this week. If I do 1,000/words per year, I'll be more likely to reach my goal of 10,000 words in 6 years. I also realize that language learning for me will be a lifetime pursuit. Supposedly, someone who is fluent has command of 10,000 to 30,000 words, including knowing all the verb conjugations and other variations of any given root word. So 10,000 is just scratching the surface- though it's a great foundation.

My receptive skills in Spanish are much more developed than my expressive ones. Is that common even in adults speaking their native language? I know it's true for young children: my toddler is at the point where she understands nearly all of what we say, but only says 20 words or so herself. When I look over a list of frequently-used Spanish vocabulary, I recognize the majority of the words. But so few come to mind when I'm trying to express myself.

I seem to remember Spanish words so much better when I translate them from English to Spanish rather than vice versa. I guess that means that I'm still thinking and translating from my native language, but that's ok for now. I lived in Mexico in my 20's and remember getting to the point where I started thinking in Spanish. Maybe immersion is the only way to enter that state. Hopefully I'll be able to live there again in the future. I'm guessing that being able to translate both ways is the goal. What do all of you do with learning vocab?

Today I'm translating straight from the dictionary. Usually I check with my husband to see what form is most commonly used in Mexico. But I'll do that this weekend and make needed corrections.

16. to hold: agarrar (to carry: llevar, cargar)
17. playful: juegetón
18. fin: aleta (flippers too)
19. to sting: picar
20 to twist: girar (to turn:girar/voltear)
21. elbow: codo
22. electrical outlet: toma de corriente
23. to pop: reventar
24. to bloom: florecer
25. to shed: mudar
26. fan (handheld): abanico
27. to wash away: llevarse
28. snowball: bola de nieve (snowflake: copo de nieve)
29. bush/shrub: arbusto (hedge: seto)
30. poisonous: venenoso
31. thankful/grateful: agradecido (blessing: bendición)
32. warm: caliente/cálido/caluroso- same as hot, maybe depends on context? (cool: fresco, lukewarm: tibio)
33. stream/brook: arroyo
34. eyelashes: pestaña (eyebrow: ceja, eyelid: párpado)
35. drawer: cajón (basket: cesta/canasta, shelf: estante, container: recipiente, cabinet: armario)
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 09, 2020, 02:00:26 PM
Where can one get a measure of how many words they know in another language?  Is there some app or website that can estimate based on a quick test? 

I've been learning Spanish for most of my life and never have managed to attain fluency.  I always need more vocabulary, but the grammar is what really stops me from speaking with others (learning the subjunctive - ugh.  And as I've gotten better with that, it's made me forget basic verb forms like the present and preterite of irregular verbs!)

I listen to about 6-7 Spanish podcasts currently (most are weekly), so I get lots of comprehension but very little practice using the words, since I almost never speak it.  I feel like I need to speak to actually master new vocabulary and one of my goals is to find some groups or lessons where I have to speak this year, so joining in on this thread is applicable.

I did the Memrise program, "First 5,000 words in Spanish". I stopped halfway because I wasn't retaining the vocabulary very well. So I estimate that I'm at 2,500 words from what I remember from that program, what I pick up from my Spanish-speaking spouse, and from having lived in Mexico for a time . It's definitely not an exact calculation. But it's really hard for me to see forward movement with studying a language, so it's a way to help track the progress I'm making.

As for the word-count relationship to language-level, I read a few (unscientific) articles and liked how they categorized the different stages of language learning (though they categorize differently):
https://www.fluentu.com/blog/how-many-words-do-i-need-to-know/
https://universeofmemory.com/how-many-words-you-should-know/
https://markmanson.net/foreign-language

I agree that language exposure is where it's at! My husband wouldn't be able to explain the subjunctive to you (and I wouldn't be able to do so in English either), but he could easily spot when it's used incorrectly, simply because it will sound weird to him as a native speaker. I've heard that some people ignore grammar altogether when studying a language and just go with learning words and imitating the things they hear so they get an ear for what sounds right and what sounds wrong. Everyone has a way that works for them, but grammar is definitely the biggest barrier for me, so I'm focusing on having the words I need to express myself before worrying about their proper arrangement.

Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 09, 2020, 02:10:08 PM
I am planning on setting up an internal job transfer to Portugal this upcoming summer so I have started Duolingo Portuguese. It appears to be more of the Brazilian dialect but it's the easiest path to learn it without having an opportunity to speak it on a regular basis. My native language is Dutch and I also speak (mostly) fluent French so that last one most definitely help with my Portuguese (and Spanish too although not focusing on that).

Several of my colleagues are Brazilian so technically I could speak it, but I am concerned that trying to force business meetings in Portuguese unnecessarily won't be very productive :)

I am about to complete the first 'stage' (not sure what they call it) on Duolingo having started right at or just before the new year.

How long will you be in Portugal for? I'm curious how much faster those of you who are multilingual pick up on additional languages in comparison to us monolingual folks. Did you study most of the languages you know as a kid? If so, how does studying Portuguese as an adult compare?
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ItsALongStory on January 09, 2020, 02:51:46 PM
@Luz it's certainly a benefit to have proficiency in other languages since I see similarities with other languages. A good trick is to watch peoples mouth when they are teaching you words. It's a bit odd at first but really helps me with pronunciation.

I learned french in school from age 10 and added English from 12. I learned most of my English from TV and french got tons better when I was in a multi lingual work environment with some folks who only spoke french.

Portuguese is certainly difficult but not nearly as bad as I thought. I just have to learn the verbs which Duolingo doesn't seem particularly suited for.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 19, 2020, 09:33:25 AM
36. joint: articulación
37. germ: microbio
38. layer: capa
39. role: función
40. tulip: tulipán
41. tiny: diminuto
42. vine: liana
43. tastebuds: papila gustativa
44. soft: suave (smooth: blando)
45. rough: áspero
46. bitter: amargo
47. set: vajilla
48. nostril: fosa nasal
49. to lift: levantar
50. to wrap (encircle): rodear, (cover): envolver
51. to taste (try): probar (flavor): saber
52. to bend: torcer
53. to dig: cavar
54. hump: joroba
55. to store: guardar

Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 22, 2020, 08:08:26 PM
This is my 4th week of vocabulary. I post the week's list on the fridge. Every morning before the toddler and I read her children's books, I review the list of English words and state their equivalent in Spanish. When we read, much of the words are reinforced.

I've retained all the words so far, much to my surprise. I think it's the repetition and images and probably most importantly, that I'm starting with the English word (and therefore am not relying on just receptive skills to get by). I've heard the Spanish word for envelope (sobre) at least 50 times and it never stuck. But now that I'm translating children's books from English to Spanish, and am forced to exercise my expressive skills, sobre is imprinted in my mind. It's not going anywhere.
I wish I had known this 7 years ago. I feel like learning how to learn a language is as important as going about learning one.

55. magnet: imán
56. buoy: boya
57. to keep: quedarse (also- mantener, conservar, guardar)
58. silk: seda (felt: fieltro)
59. row: hilera
60. to match: combinar con
61. to suck: sorber, chupar
62. bathrobe: bata
63. to dress up: ataviarse
64. helmet: casco
65. apron: delantal
66. to direct: dirigir
67. crew: equipo
68. to provide: preveer, propocionar
69. to rub: frotar(se)
70. teamwork: cooperación, trabajo en equipo
71. flashlight: linterna
72. sandbox: cajón de arena
73. shovel: pala
74. screw: tornillo, screwdriver: desarmador
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Ockhamist on January 23, 2020, 08:35:53 AM
A good resource is conversationexchange.com.   Connecting with someone with whom you can have a language exchange is really, really helpful.   You can do email exchanges or video calls, or face to face if you live in the same city.

You do have to kiss a few frogs to find a compatible partner, and there are some scammers who are interested in things from you other than help with English, but I've found those to be pretty easy to filter out.  I have connected with a total of four reliable partners over the years.   For three of them we discontinued due to time commitments or other issues (finding suitable call times across time zones can be a challenge) but I've actually been working with one guy I met on there for nearly five years now.   He's helped me enormously with my French, I've been able to help him a lot with English, and we've actually become quite good friends in the process. 
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: SunnyDays on January 23, 2020, 11:10:23 AM
Interesting approach.  I have studied French, Spanish and German, and while building vocabulary does help, I find that it's putting the words into sentences that's hard.  And even if I can manage to do that, I often find out that it's not the common way to say something.  So many idioms!  I can see why people that speak more than one language are often not really fluent in any of them.


Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: sui generis on January 23, 2020, 02:29:33 PM
A good resource is conversationexchange.com.   Connecting with someone with whom you can have a language exchange is really, really helpful.   You can do email exchanges or video calls, or face to face if you live in the same city.

You do have to kiss a few frogs to find a compatible partner, and there are some scammers who are interested in things from you other than help with English, but I've found those to be pretty easy to filter out.  I have connected with a total of four reliable partners over the years.   For three of them we discontinued due to time commitments or other issues (finding suitable call times across time zones can be a challenge) but I've actually been working with one guy I met on there for nearly five years now.   He's helped me enormously with my French, I've been able to help him a lot with English, and we've actually become quite good friends in the process.

I've been meaning to check this out and also, italki (and see how much they each cost - I think at least one does charge).  There are two podcasts I've listened to with latina/gringo couples that met over searching for a conversation partner on italki.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: YYK on January 23, 2020, 09:30:39 PM
I'm not necessarily working on a specific goal this year, but I thought I would post in this thread to recommend Anki to everyone who's studying a language. It's a program that generates flash cards based on the information you input, such as a word/definition pair, then challenges you on the flashcards at intervals based on how well you remember the cards. The more times you get a card correct, the longer the time interval becomes before you see it again. This is supposed to allow you to retain more with the minimum amount of review time. You can use it to memorize pretty much anything, not just languages.

Website: https://apps.ankiweb.net/index.html

I've been studying Japanese for about two and a half years, and have been using Anki for about two. I started by reading a couple of grammar books over the course of six months or so, and then started reading and listening to material in Japanese, putting into Anki any words I didn't know. I had to look up almost every word in the beginning, a very tedious and tiring process, but my reading speed increased pretty quickly, and now I can comfortably read without looking up very many words. I currently have about 7300 words in my Anki deck.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on January 31, 2020, 07:57:29 PM
I'm adding Anki, conversationexchange.com, and italki to my language-learning resource list, thanks!

@SunnyDays right there with you on idioms! I find that even for the more literal uses of Spanish, it would be so much easier if there weren't multiple ways of saying the same thing. My husband (who is studying English) was puzzling over the phrase "in tandem with" the other day. It's just a fancy way of saying "together with" or "simultaneously" (depending on the context) or any other multitude of options.

The 10,000 words are just the jumping off point I'm trying to build up to. I think it will take living in Mexico and totally immersing myself in Spanish (using little to no English) for 2 years to really achieve the level of fluency I'd like (which is still far from the level of native speakers). But even then... my mom is from Germany and grew up bilingual German/English, though German was truly her native language since it was the community language. She's lived in the US for 40 years (the entirety of her adult life) and now sometimes has trouble finding the German word she wants to use. It's such a dynamic process.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: sui generis on January 31, 2020, 10:01:08 PM
I'm adding Anki, conversationexchange.com, and italki to my language-learning resource list, thanks!

@SunnyDays right there with you on idioms! I find that even for the more literal uses of Spanish, it would be so much easier if there weren't multiple ways of saying the same thing. My husband (who is studying English) was puzzling over the phrase "in tandem with" the other day. It's just a fancy way of saying "together with" or "simultaneously" (depending on the context) or any other multitude of options.

The 10,000 words are just the jumping off point I'm trying to build up to. I think it will take living in Mexico and totally immersing myself in Spanish (using little to no English) for 2 years to really achieve the level of fluency I'd like (which is still far from the level of native speakers). But even then... my mom is from Germany and grew up bilingual German/English, though German was truly her native language since it was the community language. She's lived in the US for 40 years (the entirety of her adult life) and now sometimes has trouble finding the German word she wants to use. It's such a dynamic process.

Very true. It's a little disheartening.  My BIL speaks like 6 languages, though, and I don't know how he maintains them.  Granted, he's a French teacher and I'm sure that helps him maintain Spanish and Italian but its been two or three decades since he lived in China (for not even that long!) and he can still speak Mandarin! And well enough that the waitress at our Chinese restaurant a couple years ago was absolutely delighted with surprise when the chubby bald Jewish guy started speaking to her. I know some people are just better at it but really?? So unfair!
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on February 05, 2020, 06:36:35 AM
I switched up my study night since I rely on my husband to check that I'm choosing the correct translation and he has class some evenings. And also because I want to translate the children's books the day the toddler and I go to the library for a new batch, in order that I can reinforce the vocab in context for the full week.
Getting close to 100 and it's been fairly painless! Though my Spanish translations of the children's books are pretty rudimentary. Better than nothing, though!

75. to get stuck: atorarse
76. to get ready: prepararse
77. push: empujar (pull: jalar)
78. to march: desfilar
79. to sneak: colarse
80. to lie down: acostarse (to get up: levantarse)
81. shiny: brillante
82. to follow: seguir
83. to shake: agitar (shake your head: negar, shake hands: apretar)
84. to kick: dar patadas (animals: cocear)
85. to blink: pestañar
86. to lock: cerrarse (noun: candado)
87. fluffy: esponjoso
88. gentle: ligero o suave
89. to get hurt: herir, lastimar, hacer daño (injury: herida)
90. hook: gancho
91. sandpaper: papel de lija
92. to catch: atrapar
93. maze: laberinto
94. to rush: tener prisa
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on February 07, 2020, 08:52:01 PM
Now that my list of words is getting longer, I'll have to set aside a bit more time every day to review it. I was looking it over for a few minutes before the toddler and I read each afternoon. But I think I'll move my review time to her after-nap snack, prior to reading time. That way she's occupied and I won't blow it off like I've done the past few days because she's not having it.
This week one of our books was about the farm.

95. preschool (noun): el jardín de infancia
96. glue: el pegamento (verb: pegar)
97. to ride: montar (bicicleta, caballo..) ir en (tren, autobus)
98. wool: la lana
99. to gather: recoger
100. mayor: el alcalde
101. to wave: saludar con la mano
102. sunrise: la salida del sol, amanecer (sunset: el puesto de sol, atardecer)
103. to produce (plants): dar (to make/create: producir) (to manufacture: fabricar)
104. to wander (walk without intention): deambular (to walk with leisure: pasear)
105. to milk (ie cows): ordeñar
106. dairy (farm): lechera (food group: lácteos)
107. poultry: aves de corral
108. to lay eggs: poner huevos
109. to harvest: cosechar (noun: la cosecha o la siega para cereales)
110. wheat: trigo (flour: harina- I always confuse this with sand: arena and oatmeal: avena)
111. orchard: el huerto
112. crop: el cultivo (produce: la cosecha as above)
113. gate: la puerta (fence: la cerca)
114. to lead: guiar
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on February 16, 2020, 08:33:58 PM
I feel unmotivated to do my vocab tonight, but I know it'll feel good once I'm done. I also had a busy last week and only reviewed my words 4 out of the 7 days. But I'm just going to keep moving forward and review as much as possible. Try to keep it a habit while allowing for life to happen meanwhile.

*I've not been consistent about putting el/la. But I'll try to start now.

115. guinea pig: el conejillo de Indias
116. portrait: el retrato
117. to rise (the sun): salir
118. to set (the sun): meterse
119. to roam: vagar
120. to scatter: esparcir
121. (animal) pen: corral
122. to roll: rodar
123. pasture: el potrero
124. to herd: conducir en manada (la manada)
125. stable: la caballeriza (el establo- ganado)
126. to trot: trotar
127. to gallop: galopar
128. to stand: estar de pie/estar parado; ("  " up: levantarse, pararse, ponerse de pie)
129. toddler: el pequeno (I'm using a windows program on my MacPro today and can't figure out the symbol)
130. to get dark: oscurecer
131. to roost: dormirse (la percha)
132. coop: el gallinero
133. to flutter: revolotear (n: el aleteo)
134. quiet: tranquilo, silencioso
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on February 28, 2020, 01:19:28 PM
I'm leaving on a trip tomorrow and have had a busy week. My laptop also crashed and my husband needs his for homework during the evenings when I usually post my vocab (I don't like typing on my phone). This week, I wrote out my list on paper. I'll try to post the list once I'm settled (maybe Monday). I'll visit the library in my new location and get new words translated that day as well, if possible. Then do another list next weekend so I stay where I should be.

I'm so excited about the forward movement I'm seeing. Even my husband has noticed that I'm saying new words. We switched to English after moving back to the US 5 years ago, for his sake. My Spanish has been at a stand still ever since. Even when we started speaking it as a family with my daughter. That is, until now. I've finally found something that works! I'm even considering switching completely to Spanish with our daughter. Our conversations aren't complex at this point. And if I use Spanish with her now, continue to build my vocab, and we spend a year or two living in Mexico in the near future, I might be able to keep up with her as she gets older. I didn't speak to her in Spanish full-time when she was born because I felt like I was spinning my wheels and getting nowhere.

If I do switch to Spanish, (I'll do a test run on my trip since we'll be in an English-speaking environment without my husband) I'll likely need to keep an additional list of unfamiliar words that come up during our interactions (as @ysette9 suggested). Today I was taking off her hat and couldn't remember the word for "untie". I'm able to say "vamos a quitar tu gorro" ("let's take off your hat") and can get by in most situations by using the more general translation, but I'd like to be able to express myself more specifically. During my vacation, I'll try to come up with a system for improving those daily interactions.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: KathrinS on February 28, 2020, 01:52:28 PM
Great thread! I started learning Spanish last week - it's Day 11 today. Something I've been meaning to do for years but never got around to.
So far, Duolingo says I've learned 425 words.

Some of the newest ones or the ones I've had trouble with are:
la direccion - the address (with an accent on the o, but can't find it on my computer)
el camarero/ la camarera - waiter, waitress
la cartera - purse or wallet
lunes, martes, miércoles, jueves, viernes, sabado (accent on a), domingo - days of the week

qué - what
este/esta - this

Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on February 28, 2020, 02:18:06 PM
Memrise has lessons for the 4000/5000 most common words ordered by word frequency in several languages.  It's really helping me with Thai, but I'm just a beginner. 

What can you use to help you figure out which words still need to learn with more advanced vocabulary?  I'm at a more advanced level in Spanish, so I already know pretty much all of the 5000 most frequent words. 
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: raincoast on February 28, 2020, 02:47:23 PM
Memrise has lessons for the 4000/5000 most common words ordered by word frequency in several languages.  It's really helping me with Thai, but I'm just a beginner. 

What can you use to help you figure out which words still need to learn with more advanced vocabulary?  I'm at a more advanced level in Spanish, so I already know pretty much all of the 5000 most frequent words.

I suggest reading in Spanish and looking up words you don’t recognize. If a word is common enough to appear in a newspaper or magazine article, it’s probably one you should know. Same if you want to build vocabulary on a certain subject, such as your profession - read about that subject in Spanish.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on March 03, 2020, 02:57:05 PM
135. east: este (west: oeste) I always get these two mixed up
136. quite: bastante
137. sniffles: el resfriado (to sniffle: respirar con la nariz congestionada)
138. stuffed animal: el peluche o el oso/pinguino/canguro de peluche
139. to prop up (against): apoyar contra
140. gosling: el ansarino
141. back/backward: atrás/hacia atrás
142. uphill: (adv: cuesta ariba; adj: en subida (downhill: -adv/adj- cuesta abajo)
143. mess: el desorden/el disastre
144. to pout: hacer pucheros
145. to refuse: rechazar (to refuse to: negarse a)
146. to throw: tirar, aventar
147. to hog: monopolizar
148. ride: el paseo, la vuelta, el viaje, el aventón
149. over: encima (both above and on top)
150. tight: apretado, ajustado (loose: suelto)
151. instead of: en vez/lugar de
152. trash (can): el bote de basura
153. to stuff: rellenar (like chile relleno, that'll be easy to remember)
154. to spit: escupir
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on March 03, 2020, 03:11:47 PM
Here are the words from last week that I wrote on paper:

155. to chase: perseguir
156. to hop/jump/leap: brincar, saltar (to bounce: botar)
157. excited: emocionado/entusiasmado
158. to entertain: entretener/divertir
159. to button/fasten: abrochar (to zip: subir/bajarcerrar el cierre)
160. must/should/have to: deber, tener que
161. to go away: irse/macharse (away/gone: ausente)
162. to look: mirar (to see: ver, to seem: parecer, to look for: buscar)
163. to snort: bufar
164. scary: espantoso
165. to tap: tocar ligeramente
166. to turn around: dar vuelta
167. to tuck in: arropar/tapar con la cobilla
168. to fluff up: mullir (fluff: la pelusa, down: el plumón)
169. to stroke: acariciar
170. to sprint: arranquar
171. to strut: pavonearse
172. to stomp: pisotear
173. to train: entrenar
174. to sigh: suspirar
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on March 03, 2020, 03:36:39 PM
Gracias por darnos estas palabras.  A veces es difícil de identificar todas las palabras que se necesitan aprender para lograr fluidez.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on March 03, 2020, 04:07:46 PM
10 weeks so far, 200 words!

175. To line up: ponerse en fila, hacer cola
176. To roar: rugir
177. Fossil: el fósil
178. Banker: el/la banquero/ra
179. Oops: ¡uy!
180. To knock: golpear
181. Jet plane: el avión a reacción
182. Down: hacia abajo
183. To weave: serpentear, zigzaguear
184. Along: a lo largo de
185. Harbor: el refugio, el puerto
186. Bump: el bulto, la proturberancia
187. To spot: ubicar
188. Steep: escarpado, inclinado
189. Narrow: estrecho
190. Wide: ancho
191. Gradual: gradual (flat: plano)
192. To scrape: rozar (to scratch: rascar, rasguñar)
193. Bucket: la cubeta (pail: el cubo)
194. To flash: destellar, relampaguear
195. Siren: la sirena (I guess it’s the same for mermaid)
196. Pot: la olla (cocina) el bote (contenedor) la maceta (plantas)
197. Accessory el accessorio
198. To leave: dejar
199. Dresser: la cómoda
200. Heater: el calefactor

Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on March 04, 2020, 09:21:59 AM
¿Es posible que puedas escribir las palabras de una manera que nos permite ver las palabras inglesas sin ver las palabras españolas?  ¿Tal vez poner algunos espacios entre ellas para que podamos cubrir las palabras de un idioma?  Gracias
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: penguintroopers on March 07, 2020, 03:48:59 AM
My husband and I have been talking about a trip to Japan in March of 2021, so I started learning Japanese. We've traveled out of the country before, but it always seemed 'easy' because most Europeans tended to know at least enough English to help when we couldn't express ourselves with our guidebooks well. The number of Japanese that also have English as a second language is much less than Europeans.

It is a little discouraging that I have to spend a really large amount of time on just the alphabet and pronunciation. I have graduated to some colors and numbers though.

Goals:
1. continue Duolingo streaks by completing at least 1 sub-lesson a day (I've been slacking on this)
2. Achieve level 5 in Hiragana lessons 1-4 by the end of March
3. Start journal of letters learned to practice writing
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: YYK on March 14, 2020, 01:03:41 PM
My husband and I have been talking about a trip to Japan in March of 2021, so I started learning Japanese.

How is it going so far?

For practicing kana, here are a couple of trace sheets that I used.
http://www.guidetojapanese.org/pdf/hiragana_trace_sheet.pdf
http://www.guidetojapanese.org/pdf/katakana_trace_sheet.pdf

After doing those a couple times you'll be able to have the sounds down as well as write them from memory.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on March 15, 2020, 12:58:44 PM
201. huge:                                inmenso, enorme
       big:                                   grande
        giant:                               gigante
202. across:                              a través, del otro lado
203. loud:                                 alto, fuerte, en voz alta
        noisy:                               ruidoso
204. height:                              la altura, la estatura (person) al cima (peak)
205. to poke:                            golpear (con la punta de algo) asomar (to poke out)
206. lullaby:                             el arrullo
207. to race:                             ir corriendo, correr (una carrera)
208. spot:                                 el punto, la mancha (stain)
209. to spray:                           rociar
210. to squirm:                         retorcerse
211. to leave behind:                 abandonar, dejar
212. to tape:                            sujetar, arreglar con cinta adhesiva (tape)
213. to fry:                               freír
214. jungle:                              la selva, la jungla
215. to press:                           apretar
216. to bob:                             subir y bajar
217. to call:                             llamar, convocar (for someone's attention)
218. to stop by:                       visitar
219. ribbon:                             la cinta
220. marigold:                         la caléndula, el cempasúchil (Nahuatl, more used for Day of the Dead?)
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on March 15, 2020, 01:10:55 PM
¿Es posible que puedas escribir las palabras de una manera que nos permite ver las palabras inglesas sin ver las palabras españolas?  ¿Tal vez poner algunos espacios entre ellas para que podamos cubrir las palabras de un idioma?  Gracias

¡Claro que si!

A caveat: the words I'm studying aren't necessarily the most frequently used. They are just words I have questions about when I'm translating my toddler's books from English to Spanish. I'm going this route instead of frequently used word lists because the images, repetition, and active use of the language help me commit them to memory. There may be spelling errors! I also am hit or miss with checking the correct form for Central Mexico with my husband.
Here's a word list I like: https://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/spanish-frequency-5000-1-5781583/packs/8804899
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on April 03, 2020, 09:21:30 PM
I erased my last 20 words because they were from children's books I read only once to my daughter before returning from our trip. For the life of me, I can't commit them to memory. It confirms that I need at least a week of reading the same book on a daily basis before they go to my long term memory.

I don't have access to library books right now, but we do have both a visual children's dictionary and encyclopedia in English that should give me a lot of vocab to work with. I'd like to be at 300 words this week (15 weeks into the year x 20 words per week). I translated 50 words yesterday and will try to do 30 on Friday to get caught up. Some were super obvious. I just couldn't recall or was unsure of the correct word.

Here are the 50:
221. performer:                                el/la artista                   
222. acrobat:                                   el/la acróbata
223. to act:                                      actuar
224. play (theater):                          la obra de teatro
       show:                                       el espectáculo           
225. television show:                        el programa
226. to add:                                     sumar, añadir (to add a comment)
227. sum:                                        la suma
228. to become:                              volverse
229. to take off (airplane):                despegar
230. to land (airplane):                     aterrizar
231. reptile:                                    el reptil
232. scaly:                                       escamoso
233. van:                                        la van
234. chain:                                       la cadena
235. into:                                        en, a, dentro de, contra (against something)
236. upset:                                      disgustado
237. apple tree:                               el arbol de manzana
238. tank:                                        el tanque
239. sidewalk:                                 la banqueta
240. to attack:                                 atacar, enfrentarse con (to tackle, ie: a project)
241. bony:                                      huesudo
242. armor:                                    la armadura
243. sign:                                       el señal, el letrero (when it's a sign with words)
244. way:                                       el camino, la via, la ruta
245. to create:                                crear, hacer (always confuse this with raising kids: criar)
246. clay:                                       la arcilla
247. astronaut:                               el/la astronauta
248. outer space:                            el espacio
249. spacecraft/spaceship:               la nave espacial
250. rocket:                                    el cohete
251. audience:                                el público, los espectadores, la audiencia
252. text:                                       el texto
253. avalanche:                             la avalancha
254. behind:                                   atrás/detrás de
255. bottom:                                  el trasero, las nalgas
256. rubber:                                   el hule
257. to blow up (balloon):               inflar             
258. curved:                                  curvado
259. rind:                                      la cascara, la piel
260. bunch:                                   un puño, un montón, el ramo (flowers) el racimo (bananas)
261. bandage:                               la venda
262. strip (of material):                  la tira
263. riverbank:                              la orilla
264. bench:                                   la banca
265. blind:                                    ciego
266. seal:                                     el sello
267. case:                                    la funda
268. electricity:                            la electricidad (I always thought it was just la luz)
269. pebble:                                la piedrita (it seems like la piedra is used for stone, rock, pebble...)
270. piece (fragment):                   el pedazo, la pieza (component)             
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on April 09, 2020, 06:50:57 PM
¿Es posible que puedas escribir las palabras de una manera que nos permite ver las palabras inglesas sin ver las palabras españolas?  ¿Tal vez poner algunos espacios entre ellas para que podamos cubrir las palabras de un idioma?  Gracias

¡Claro que si!

A caveat: the words I'm studying aren't necessarily the most frequently used. They are just words I have questions about when I'm translating my toddler's books from English to Spanish. I'm going this route instead of frequently used word lists because the images, repetition, and active use of the language help me commit them to memory. There may be spelling errors! I also am hit or miss with checking the correct form for Central Mexico with my husband.
Here's a word list I like: https://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/spanish-frequency-5000-1-5781583/packs/8804899

¡Gracias!

Ya sé las palabras básicas también, así que como tú yo estoy aprendiendo las palabras que encuentro.  Me inspiraste a escribir una lista de palabras.   Algunas de ellas:

chaleco salvavidas                                             life jacket
el salvavida                                                        lifeguard
desempeñar un papel                                        play a role
escollera/espigón                                               jetty
listo                                                                    clever
sabiduría                                                            wisdom
un remanso de paz                                            a peaceful haven
el altavoz                                                           speaker (electronic)
tacaño                                                                stingy
rellano                                                                landing in the middle of stairs (didn't know this in English either)
el pallar                                                              lima bean (Peru?)
erizo de mar                                                       sea urchin
acatar                                                                comply with, abide by, obey, respect
cubiertos                                                            silverware, utensils
petardo                                                              firecracker (Spain?)
comillas                                                              quotation marks
hierba luisa                                                        lemongrass
la incertidumbre                                                 uncertainty
el volante                                                           steering wheel
« »                                                                      angular quotation marks are apparently preferred to "comillas inglesas" in Spanish
embrocar                                                            to empty, to pour, to turn upside down (container)
grumos                                                               lumps (in food that's supposed to by smooth)
anduve                                                               I walked - past of «andar» is like «tener»
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 10, 2020, 04:41:36 PM
271. to go to sleep:                    ir a dormirse
272. to turn into:                       convertirse
273. back (direction):                 la parte de atrás
274. hollow:                              hueco
275. bulb (tulip):                        el bulbo floral
276. stem:                                el tallo
277. strap:                                la correa
278. pit (peach):                        el hoyo de la fruta
279. to pedal:                            pedalear
        pedal:                               el pedal
280. to steer:                            conducir, manejar
281. handlebars:                       los manubrios                     
282. binoculars:                        los binoculares
283. cover (book):                     la cubierta             
284. guide dog:                         perro guía
285. to bleed:                           sangrar
286. boat:                                 el bote
       ship:                                 el barco
287. cargo:                              el cargamento
288. boomerang:                      el bumerán
289. straight:                           recto (lines), derecho (direction) el pelo liso (hair)
290. bottom:                            la parte de abajo, el fondo
291. to crack:                           rajar
292. brick:                               el ladrillo
293. block:                               el bloque
294. soil/earth/dirt:                  la tierra
       mud:                                el lodo   
       ground:                            el suelo
295. bristle:                            la cerda
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 10, 2020, 05:02:29 PM
296. handle:                               la agarradera
297. to hold (contain):                contener
298. bud:                                   el capullo
299. roof:                                   el techo/tejado
       ceiling:                                el techo
300. to hum:                              zumbar
301. concrete:                            el concreto
302. light bulb:                          el foco
303. to break into:                      forzar
304. to set on fire:                     incendiar
305. butcher:                             el/la carnicero/a
306. to fasten:                           sujetar, atar (attach) abrochar (fasten
307. log:                                   el tronco         
308. prickly:                              espinoso
309. chart:                                la tabla, el gráfico
310. to camp:                           acampar
311. campsite/campground:       el campamento
312. equipment:                       el equipo
313. outdoors:                          al aire libre
314. wax:                                  la cera
315. canoe:                              la canoa
316. paddle:                            el remo
317. cap:                                 la gorra de béisbol
318. petal:                               el pétalo
319. carnation:                         el clavel
320. string:                              el cordel
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Mariposa on May 10, 2020, 05:31:31 PM
Hi! I'm trying to improve my Spanish now that I'm taking a break from work during the pandemic. I'm conversant in my specialized setting but not great outside of it. My goal is to be able to have a general conversation, read the newspaper, and be able to follow TV shows / podcasts. Duolingo says I blew through 2200 words in the first week, but a good number of them I'm sure I wouldn't be able to use actively. It's also sometimes a little too easy, being a native English speaker, to guess what the Spanish is while reading, so I started to close my eyes to focus on the listening. It's working really well for me to pick up words this way in context. I'm not formally trying to re-study the grammar, but I do scan conjugation tables sometimes so the exact shade of the sentence is clear. Do I really need to learn the imperfect subjunctive and imperfect2 subjuctive?

The accent in Duolingo seems to be Northern Mexican, but I hear a lot of Dominican and Puerto Rican where I live, and I first learned Spanish in Argentina, which has its own linguistic quirks.

After Spanish, I want to improve my Mandarin. I wish Duolingo had Cantonese.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 11, 2020, 08:47:41 PM
I have far fewer expressive words than I thought. Most of the vocab I've looked up the last week or so has been really obvious. But I can't seem to find the right word when translating from English to Spanish. Or I'm unsure. I guess they'll become expressive now.

321. to burn:                                                 quemar
322. middle:                                                  el medio
        center:                                                  el centro
        half:                                                      la mitad
323. breakfast cereal:                                     el cereal (same as grain)
324. to cheer:                                                aclamar
325. coat (animal's fur):                                 el pelaje
       to coat:                                                 cubrir, bañar
326. cheetah:                                                el guepardo
327. chess:                                                    el ajedrez
328. game board:                                         el tablero de juego
329. dice:                                                     los dados
330. deck of cards:                                         una baraja
331. smokestack:                                          la chimenea (same as chimney)
332. choir:                                                    el coro
333. to pick:                                                seleccionar (to choose: elegir)
334. chopsticks:                                           los palillos
335. to pick up:                                           recoger (like to gather)
336. hymn:                                                  el himno
337. muddy:                                                lodoso
338. cliff:                                                     el acantilado
339. item (object):                                       el artículo
340. spiderweb/cobweb:                               la telaraña
341. cockpit:                                                la cabina
342. flesh:                                                    la carne (animals/people) la pulpa (fruit)
343. chilly:                                                  frío
344. light (color):                                         claro
345. continent:                                            el continente
       -Africa:                                                África
       -Asia:                                                  Asia
       -Antarctica:                                          Antártida
       -Australia:                                            Australia
       -Europe:                                              Europa
       -North America:                                   Norteamérica
       -South America:                                   América del Sur
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 12, 2020, 08:11:30 PM
346. antler:                                                       la asta
        tusk:                                                        el colmillo
       horn:                                                         el cuerno
347. to bring up:                                               mencionar
       to bring up (data on computer):                  sacar
348. conductor (orchestra):                               el director
349. to weave:                                                  tejer
350. to surround:                                              rodear (same as to wrap around/encircle)
351. cattle:                                                       el ganado
        bull:                                                          el toro
        calf:                                                         el/la ternero/a
352. claw (crustáceo):                                       la pinza
353. crayon:                                                     el crayón
        marker:                                                    el marcador
        paint:                                                       la pintura
        paintbrush:                                               el pincel
        chalk:                                                       el gis
354. cricket (sport):                                          el críquet
355. jaw:                                                         la mandíbula
356. crutch:                                                     la muleta
357. crowd:                                                     la multitud
358. headdress:                                                el tocado
359. gem:                                                        la piedra, la gema
        jewel:                                                      la joya
360 to run down (flow):                                    correr, ir
361. cushion:                                                   el cojín
362. to slice:                                                   cortar (same as to cut)
363. daffodil:                                                   el narciso
364. dam:                                                       la represa
365. to hold back:                                            detener
366. dandelion:                                               el diente de léon
367. wild flower:                                             la flor silvestre
368. deaf:                                                       sordo
369. sign language:                                         el lenguaje por señas
370. doe:                                                       la cierva
       fawn:                                                       el cervato
       stag:                                                       el ciervo
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on May 13, 2020, 04:12:04 PM
Hi! I'm trying to improve my Spanish now that I'm taking a break from work during the pandemic. I'm conversant in my specialized setting but not great outside of it. My goal is to be able to have a general conversation, read the newspaper, and be able to follow TV shows / podcasts. Duolingo says I blew through 2200 words in the first week, but a good number of them I'm sure I wouldn't be able to use actively. It's also sometimes a little too easy, being a native English speaker, to guess what the Spanish is while reading, so I started to close my eyes to focus on the listening. It's working really well for me to pick up words this way in context. I'm not formally trying to re-study the grammar, but I do scan conjugation tables sometimes so the exact shade of the sentence is clear. Do I really need to learn the imperfect subjunctive and imperfect2 subjuctive?

The accent in Duolingo seems to be Northern Mexican, but I hear a lot of Dominican and Puerto Rican where I live, and I first learned Spanish in Argentina, which has its own linguistic quirks.

After Spanish, I want to improve my Mandarin. I wish Duolingo had Cantonese.

They actually do use the imperfect subjunctive in Spanish, which is weird having come at Spanish from French and Italian where it is just something in old books.  It's not something you really need to learn for basic or intermediate Spanish, IMHO, but you need to learn it when you get to the point of wanting to make your Spanish sound less rough. 

I like the fact that Duolingo uses Mexican-ish Spanish.  Dominican, Puerto Rican, and Argentine Spanish are probably the hardest dialects to hear.  I'm getting to the point where I can understand Mexican Spanish reasonably well, but Caribbean and Southern Cone dialects, especially Dominican, might as well be Swahili for me.  When I do happen to understand Caribbean Spanish, it blows my mind how many letters they leave out.  It's basically French.  DH even had a coworker who had to be a translator when her Peruvian family and her Puertorican in-laws visited together.  Those dialects are not for beginners. 

Learning Mandarin is probably helpful if you eventually want to learn Cantonese.  Sort of like learning Spanish would really give you a leg up on Italian. 
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 13, 2020, 05:48:27 PM
Memrise has lessons for the 4000/5000 most common words ordered by word frequency in several languages.  It's really helping me with Thai, but I'm just a beginner. 

What can you use to help you figure out which words still need to learn with more advanced vocabulary?  I'm at a more advanced level in Spanish, so I already know pretty much all of the 5000 most frequent words.

I suggest reading in Spanish and looking up words you don’t recognize. If a word is common enough to appear in a newspaper or magazine article, it’s probably one you should know. Same if you want to build vocabulary on a certain subject, such as your profession - read about that subject in Spanish.

I'm not sure of the quality, but there are also dictionaries of the most frequently used words in different languages. This book is the last of a series of 4 that goes up to 10,000 words. (https://www.amazon.com/Spanish-Frequency-Dictionary-Vocabulary-Spanish-English/dp/9492637243).

Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 13, 2020, 05:56:50 PM
Hi! I'm trying to improve my Spanish now that I'm taking a break from work during the pandemic. I'm conversant in my specialized setting but not great outside of it. My goal is to be able to have a general conversation, read the newspaper, and be able to follow TV shows / podcasts. Duolingo says I blew through 2200 words in the first week, but a good number of them I'm sure I wouldn't be able to use actively. It's also sometimes a little too easy, being a native English speaker, to guess what the Spanish is while reading, so I started to close my eyes to focus on the listening. It's working really well for me to pick up words this way in context. I'm not formally trying to re-study the grammar, but I do scan conjugation tables sometimes so the exact shade of the sentence is clear. Do I really need to learn the imperfect subjunctive and imperfect2 subjuctive?

The accent in Duolingo seems to be Northern Mexican, but I hear a lot of Dominican and Puerto Rican where I live, and I first learned Spanish in Argentina, which has its own linguistic quirks.

After Spanish, I want to improve my Mandarin. I wish Duolingo had Cantonese.

I'm a visual learner, so listening is challenging. I'll have to try your trick of closing my eyes.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: eyesonthehorizon on May 14, 2020, 09:18:23 PM
While the gold standard (as mentioned) really is speaking practice, if you want to immerse yourself by reading the news or other materials in your target language you can always install the Google Translate extension in Chrome for desktop. The extension lets you set preferences to give a tooltip that translates any word you select, so once you reach intermediacy you can pick up words on the fly.

For Duolingo users who want to know how many words they've learned or their relative strength, check out duome.eu/[yourusernamehere] for your stats.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 16, 2020, 05:40:26 PM
My husband was home for 2 months due to the pandemic. Our language arrangement is One Person One Language, but when we're all together we speak Spanish. Usually my daughter gets around 25 hours/week of Spanish exposure. But the last 2 months it's been 70 hours/week. She now only speaks in Spanish, except for maybe 4 words of English. It's been awesome to watch her language skills take off!

My husband returned to work this week and I've spoken only in Spanish to my daughter the last 3 days. I figure that I might as well continue on with what we've been doing, at least for the next few months. Extra motivation for me to expand my vocabulary.

I found that if I review my words at least 3 days a week, I'm able to remember them. The list is also getting long, so I review half one day and the other half the next. Nearly all the words are coming from a kid's visual dictionary (in English). It's important that I start story time looking over that resource and reinforcing the new words before moving on to the books in Spanish that don't require brain power. If I save the dictionary review for the end of story time, it's less likely to happen.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ethereality on May 18, 2020, 09:28:55 AM
I've been spending quarantine time learning Mandarin. Aiming for 5000 phrases mastered (reading/speaking). I'm already mostly fluent verbally, though certain subjects, I would not be able to carry a coherent conversation. But I'm nearly completely illiterate.

According to Pleco, I've mastered 1200/5000 so far. Supposedly I should be able to fairly easily read a newspaper at that point.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 19, 2020, 09:04:55 PM
371. detective:                                        el detective
372. to hunt:                                          cazar
373. to solve:                                          solucionar
374. diagram:                                         el diagrama
375. to sparkle:                                       centellear
376. valuable:                                         valioso
377. diary:                                              el diario (same as newspaper)
378. to arrange:                                      arreglar
379. disguise:                                         el disfraz (same as costume)
380. diver:                                             el/la buzo (scuba) el/la saltador(a) (sport)
381. to get well:                                     recuperarse
382. friendly:                                          simpático, amistoso, amigable
383. to bray:                                          rebuznar
384. slope:                                             la inclinación
385. drill:                                               la barrena
386. to spill:                                           derramar
387. drumstick:                                      el palillo (drum) muslo de pollo (food)
388. webbed:                                         palmeado
389.  badger:                                        el tejón
390. load:                                              la carga
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 25, 2020, 07:48:34 PM
391. top:                                         el trompo
392.  to pack (full):                          llenar
393. sandy:                                     arenoso
394. to dump:                                  descargar
395. prey:                                       la presa?
396. easel:                                      el caballete
397. stand:                                     la base (base) el puesto (stall)
398. unborn:                                   aún no nacido
399. to hatch:                                  incubar, empollar
400. floppy:                                     blando, flexible
401. weight:                                     el peso
402. scale:                                      la balanza
403. halfway:                                  intermedio
404. escalator:                                la escalera mecánica
405. fit (exercise):                           en forma, sano
406. to blow up:                              explotar
407. arcade:                                    la arcada
408. merry-go-round:                      el carrusel
409. ferris wheel:                             la rueda de la fortuna
410. breeze:                                    la brisa
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ysette9 on May 25, 2020, 08:23:17 PM
Memrise has lessons for the 4000/5000 most common words ordered by word frequency in several languages.  It's really helping me with Thai, but I'm just a beginner. 

What can you use to help you figure out which words still need to learn with more advanced vocabulary?  I'm at a more advanced level in Spanish, so I already know pretty much all of the 5000 most frequent words.

I suggest reading in Spanish and looking up words you don’t recognize. If a word is common enough to appear in a newspaper or magazine article, it’s probably one you should know. Same if you want to build vocabulary on a certain subject, such as your profession - read about that subject in Spanish.
This is good. You can pick up a lot more than just vocabulary from reading also. For simple stuff it is good to memorize vocabulary (table, chair, green, woman). But at some point you start to get into the nuances that don’t translate easily. « Retrouvailles » , for example is a word that doesn’t have an equivalent in English. In French you are “under” the rain or the shower whereas in English you are “in”. That kind of stuff you learn from immersing yourself to get context.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Mariposa on May 26, 2020, 01:25:04 AM
I like the fact that Duolingo uses Mexican-ish Spanish.  Dominican, Puerto Rican, and Argentine Spanish are probably the hardest dialects to hear.  I'm getting to the point where I can understand Mexican Spanish reasonably well, but Caribbean and Southern Cone dialects, especially Dominican, might as well be Swahili for me.  When I do happen to understand Caribbean Spanish, it blows my mind how many letters they leave out.  It's basically French.  DH even had a coworker who had to be a translator when her Peruvian family and her Puertorican in-laws visited together.  Those dialects are not for beginners. 

Learning Mandarin is probably helpful if you eventually want to learn Cantonese.  Sort of like learning Spanish would really give you a leg up on Italian.

Agree that Duolingo Spanish is clear and pretty easy to understand, pero la mayoría de los hispanohablantes en mi cuidad son boricuas y dominicanos, so I need to understand Carribean accents. Improving my speaking and aural comprehension would be really useful for work, and I'd like to improve my reading as well, for fun.

I spent years studying French and Mandarin, but my French is now completely replaced with Spanish, since I almost never use French. Whenever I try to speak French, Spanish comes out, and I often can't tell what language I'm speaking; it's a strange feeling.

I'm conversational in Mandarin, and I speak to my parents in Shanghai dialect. I use Mandarin at work too, and Cantonese would be helpful, but I don't understand a word of it. I'm still quite illiterate, after years of trying to learn written Chinese. Back in the day, we didn't have smartphones, and we'd have to count the number of strokes in the main radical and look in that section of the dictionary: so frustrating back then, and so easy now to point with a smartphone or trace the character on an ipad.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Mariposa on May 26, 2020, 01:44:41 AM
For Duolingo users who want to know how many words they've learned or their relative strength, check out duome.eu/[yourusernamehere] for your stats.

This is helpful; thanks!

My husband returned to work this week and I've spoken only in Spanish to my daughter the last 3 days. I figure that I might as well continue on with what we've been doing, at least for the next few months. Extra motivation for me to expand my vocabulary.

Since you speak Spanish with your family, does this mean you're fluent in speaking already? I don't think I've ever achieved fluency in a language other than English. My definition of fluency would be the ability to have an extended conversation with a native speaker without feeling tired afterwards;)

Memrise has lessons for the 4000/5000 most common words ordered by word frequency in several languages.  It's really helping me with Thai, but I'm just a beginner. 

What can you use to help you figure out which words still need to learn with more advanced vocabulary?  I'm at a more advanced level in Spanish, so I already know pretty much all of the 5000 most frequent words.

I suggest reading in Spanish and looking up words you don’t recognize. If a word is common enough to appear in a newspaper or magazine article, it’s probably one you should know. Same if you want to build vocabulary on a certain subject, such as your profession - read about that subject in Spanish.
This is good. You can pick up a lot more than just vocabulary from reading also. For simple stuff it is good to memorize vocabulary (table, chair, green, woman). But at some point you start to get into the nuances that don’t translate easily. « Retrouvailles » , for example is a word that doesn’t have an equivalent in English. In French you are “under” the rain or the shower whereas in English you are “in”. That kind of stuff you learn from immersing yourself to get context.

Even beginning-level stuff has quirks and nuances that can only be learned from a bit of immersion in the language. For instance: "conocer a alguien," literally "to know at someone," whereas in English we just say "to know someone." Also, I don't know if I'll ever use ya vs todavía correctly: https://www.realfastspanish.com/podcast/tips-031-ya-vs-todavia
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ysette9 on May 26, 2020, 12:06:50 PM
For Duolingo users who want to know how many words they've learned or their relative strength, check out duome.eu/[yourusernamehere] for your stats.

This is helpful; thanks!

My husband returned to work this week and I've spoken only in Spanish to my daughter the last 3 days. I figure that I might as well continue on with what we've been doing, at least for the next few months. Extra motivation for me to expand my vocabulary.

Since you speak Spanish with your family, does this mean you're fluent in speaking already? I don't think I've ever achieved fluency in a language other than English. My definition of fluency would be the ability to have an extended conversation with a native speaker without feeling tired afterwards;)

Memrise has lessons for the 4000/5000 most common words ordered by word frequency in several languages.  It's really helping me with Thai, but I'm just a beginner. 

What can you use to help you figure out which words still need to learn with more advanced vocabulary?  I'm at a more advanced level in Spanish, so I already know pretty much all of the 5000 most frequent words.

I suggest reading in Spanish and looking up words you don’t recognize. If a word is common enough to appear in a newspaper or magazine article, it’s probably one you should know. Same if you want to build vocabulary on a certain subject, such as your profession - read about that subject in Spanish.
This is good. You can pick up a lot more than just vocabulary from reading also. For simple stuff it is good to memorize vocabulary (table, chair, green, woman). But at some point you start to get into the nuances that don’t translate easily. « Retrouvailles » , for example is a word that doesn’t have an equivalent in English. In French you are “under” the rain or the shower whereas in English you are “in”. That kind of stuff you learn from immersing yourself to get context.

Even beginning-level stuff has quirks and nuances that can only be learned from a bit of immersion in the language. For instance: "conocer a alguien," literally "to know at someone," whereas in English we just say "to know someone." Also, I don't know if I'll ever use ya vs todavía correctly: https://www.realfastspanish.com/podcast/tips-031-ya-vs-todavia
The “to know” one is interesting in French also. “Savoir” is to know in the sense of facts. “Connaitre” is know in the sense of familiarity, so you “connaître” someone and you “savoir” where you left your book.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on May 27, 2020, 11:06:52 PM
Agree that Duolingo Spanish is clear and pretty easy to understand, pero la mayoría de los hispanohablantes en mi cuidad son boricuas y dominicanos, so I need to understand Carribean accents. Improving my speaking and aural comprehension would be really useful for work, and I'd like to improve my reading as well, for fun.

Si quieres escuchar mejor español boricua or dominicana, busca videos en Youtube.  Busca a alguien que sea puertorriqueño o domincano y que hace videos sobre asuntos que te gustan.  Si te gustan las motos, busca videos por puertorriqueños sobre las motos.  Si te gusta cocinar, busca videos por dominicanos sobre la comida.  Al principio no entenderás casi nada, pero sigue viendolos aunque no entiendas.  Poco a poco entenderás más. 

Quote
I spent years studying French and Mandarin, but my French is now completely replaced with Spanish, since I almost never use French. Whenever I try to speak French, Spanish comes out, and I often can't tell what language I'm speaking; it's a strange feeling.

I'm doing French from Spanish in Duolingo, and counterintuitively it actually helps to separate them.  At first it is hard to wrap your brain around, but eventually it forces you to compartmentalize them.  Also, when you do closely related languages, Duolingo really stresses the little differences.  Je vais à manger -> Voy a comer.  That helps even more to keep from confusing them. 

Quote
I'm conversational in Mandarin, and I speak to my parents in Shanghai dialect. I use Mandarin at work too, and Cantonese would be helpful, but I don't understand a word of it. I'm still quite illiterate, after years of trying to learn written Chinese. Back in the day, we didn't have smartphones, and we'd have to count the number of strokes in the main radical and look in that section of the dictionary: so frustrating back then, and so easy now to point with a smartphone or trace the character on an ipad.

写中文写得很难。

Even beginning-level stuff has quirks and nuances that can only be learned from a bit of immersion in the language. For instance: "conocer a alguien," literally "to know at someone," whereas in English we just say "to know someone." Also, I don't know if I'll ever use ya vs todavía correctly: https://www.realfastspanish.com/podcast/tips-031-ya-vs-todavia
The “to know” one is interesting in French also. “Savoir” is to know in the sense of facts. “Connaitre” is know in the sense of familiarity, so you “connaître” someone and you “savoir” where you left your book.

Fun fact, "savoir" and "saber" are the same word. "Conocer" and "connaître" are also the same word.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ysette9 on May 28, 2020, 08:43:44 AM
« Je vais manger » :)

The infinitive « manger » already has « to » baked into it.

À is « to » in the sense of direction, like going to the store.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on May 28, 2020, 10:10:12 AM
« Je vais manger » :)

The infinitive « manger » already has « to » baked into it.

À is « to » in the sense of direction, like going to the store.

Yes, exactly in French, but in Spanish they do put it in.   (I put a strike through the à, but I don't think it was obvious). Il va dormir = Él va A dormir.  That can make for confusion since French and Spanish both have similar grammar but with little differences like that.  When you do Duolingo directly from one Romance Language to another, it seems to harp on those differences.  That helps keep from getting confused between them if you're trying to learn two Romance Languages at the same time. 
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 28, 2020, 10:15:49 AM
For Duolingo users who want to know how many words they've learned or their relative strength, check out duome.eu/[yourusernamehere] for your stats.

This is helpful; thanks!

My husband returned to work this week and I've spoken only in Spanish to my daughter the last 3 days. I figure that I might as well continue on with what we've been doing, at least for the next few months. Extra motivation for me to expand my vocabulary.

Since you speak Spanish with your family, does this mean you're fluent in speaking already? I don't think I've ever achieved fluency in a language other than English. My definition of fluency would be the ability to have an extended conversation with a native speaker without feeling tired afterwards;)

Memrise has lessons for the 4000/5000 most common words ordered by word frequency in several languages.  It's really helping me with Thai, but I'm just a beginner. 

What can you use to help you figure out which words still need to learn with more advanced vocabulary?  I'm at a more advanced level in Spanish, so I already know pretty much all of the 5000 most frequent words.

I suggest reading in Spanish and looking up words you don’t recognize. If a word is common enough to appear in a newspaper or magazine article, it’s probably one you should know. Same if you want to build vocabulary on a certain subject, such as your profession - read about that subject in Spanish.
This is good. You can pick up a lot more than just vocabulary from reading also. For simple stuff it is good to memorize vocabulary (table, chair, green, woman). But at some point you start to get into the nuances that don’t translate easily. « Retrouvailles » , for example is a word that doesn’t have an equivalent in English. In French you are “under” the rain or the shower whereas in English you are “in”. That kind of stuff you learn from immersing yourself to get context.

Even beginning-level stuff has quirks and nuances that can only be learned from a bit of immersion in the language. For instance: "conocer a alguien," literally "to know at someone," whereas in English we just say "to know someone." Also, I don't know if I'll ever use ya vs todavía correctly: https://www.realfastspanish.com/podcast/tips-031-ya-vs-todavia

I'm not fluent at all!
My definition of fluency would be the same (the ability to have an extended conversation with a native speaker) but without getting frustrated!! I can get by but can't express myself well.

Right now my husband speaks only Spanish to our daughter and I speak English, unless we're all together, in which case I switch to Spanish with her (family language approach). Since we were all together for two months, I only spoke Spanish to her and it wasn't that bad (it helps that our conversations are basic- she's 2- and also that I can copy many of the phrases my husband uses with her). She also went from using half English/half Spanish words to nearly 100% Spanish. She's at the age where she's starting to speak in phrases/sentences, so I thought I might continue with Spanish and see what happens. If I can't find the word I need, I just use a whole bunch of words to describe it.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on May 28, 2020, 10:25:35 AM
Memrise has lessons for the 4000/5000 most common words ordered by word frequency in several languages.  It's really helping me with Thai, but I'm just a beginner. 

What can you use to help you figure out which words still need to learn with more advanced vocabulary?  I'm at a more advanced level in Spanish, so I already know pretty much all of the 5000 most frequent words.

I suggest reading in Spanish and looking up words you don’t recognize. If a word is common enough to appear in a newspaper or magazine article, it’s probably one you should know. Same if you want to build vocabulary on a certain subject, such as your profession - read about that subject in Spanish.
This is good. You can pick up a lot more than just vocabulary from reading also. For simple stuff it is good to memorize vocabulary (table, chair, green, woman). But at some point you start to get into the nuances that don’t translate easily. « Retrouvailles » , for example is a word that doesn’t have an equivalent in English. In French you are “under” the rain or the shower whereas in English you are “in”. That kind of stuff you learn from immersing yourself to get context.

I'm going to add in a little reading and listening to the radio to my studies. My husband and I made tentative plans to spend a year in Mexico in 5 years (when he's done with his training and our kids are a little older). I was hoping to spend 2 years there, but 1 year is more realistic job and school-wise. Aside from building vocab, I was thinking to just rely on 2 years of immersion to become fluent. But if I have only one year of immersion, I'd like to make the best use of my time before we go. I'm bumping up my vocab to 30 per week (in order to hit 7500 in 5 years for a total of 10,000) and will also start listening to the radio while I cook. I'll read a few pages in Spanish when I review my words in the afternoon (it's become too distracting to review them during story time while my toddler is vying for my attention).
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ysette9 on May 28, 2020, 03:22:55 PM
« Je vais manger » :)

The infinitive « manger » already has « to » baked into it.

À is « to » in the sense of direction, like going to the store.

Yes, exactly in French, but in Spanish they do put it in.   (I put a strike through the à, but I don't think it was obvious). Il va dormir = Él va A dormir.  That can make for confusion since French and Spanish both have similar grammar but with little differences like that.  When you do Duolingo directly from one Romance Language to another, it seems to harp on those differences.  That helps keep from getting confused between them if you're trying to learn two Romance Languages at the same time.
Ah, I’m sorry. Maybe it is just Tapatalk but I got an accent grave instead of a strike through. Hence the confusion.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on May 28, 2020, 05:48:57 PM
« Je vais manger » :)

The infinitive « manger » already has « to » baked into it.

À is « to » in the sense of direction, like going to the store.

Yes, exactly in French, but in Spanish they do put it in.   (I put a strike through the à, but I don't think it was obvious). Il va dormir = Él va A dormir.  That can make for confusion since French and Spanish both have similar grammar but with little differences like that.  When you do Duolingo directly from one Romance Language to another, it seems to harp on those differences.  That helps keep from getting confused between them if you're trying to learn two Romance Languages at the same time.
Ah, I’m sorry. Maybe it is just Tapatalk but I got an accent grave instead of a strike through. Hence the confusion.

It's an A accent grave with a strike-through.  I guess I can't assume it's going to display the same for everybody, but at least that was the intent. 
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: LinneaH on May 30, 2020, 02:47:55 PM
I'd like to join, I really want to learn Italian, this is my first choice of where to live when I "am old", also where I want to travel to with and without the kids.
Later on Portuguese as well - Portugal is my second, slightly less expensive, option for retiring.

I speak English fluently enough, basic German, and also some Spanish, but have forgotten most as I don't use it. Swedish is my mother tongue, so I can also understand some Norwegian and Danish.

I am using DuoLingo for the Italian, currently on a 46 days strike. I do try to listen to some you tube as well, but not much yet. I want to increase this, and maybe also some newspaper reading.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: sui generis on May 30, 2020, 04:28:45 PM


Even beginning-level stuff has quirks and nuances that can only be learned from a bit of immersion in the language. For instance: "conocer a alguien," literally "to know at someone," whereas in English we just say "to know someone." Also, I don't know if I'll ever use ya vs todavía correctly: https://www.realfastspanish.com/podcast/tips-031-ya-vs-todavia

To be fair, in Spanish you do nearly every verb "at" someone, due to the personal "a", even if the word "to" wouldn't be included in an English translation of the sentence. Although it's a lot more nuanced than that, of course...here's a nice little summary: https://www.spanishdict.com/answers/116131/personal-a

I've been doing online Spanish lessons with a Colombian teacher and a friend of mine.  She's much less fluent than me, but it's good because it's forced me to get deeply familiar with some concepts I knew at a more superficial level, add more vocabulary (on point to this post), and just the practice of being forced to speak extemporaneously, which is hard but good practice.  I'm getting better at correcting myself as I go (with matching masculine/feminine articles to nouns - esp. the hard ones like el mapa or la foto - or verb tense when I realize I've gone with a plural instead of a singular, etc.), but it's still such a start-stop-slow way to speak that I have a hard time forcing myself to do it in day-to-day life unless I'm forced to.  This is my forever road block in getting fluent. 
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: yyc-phil on May 30, 2020, 04:30:31 PM
I'm going to follow because I am frustrated with my progress in learning languages that should come to me easily, especially Spanish since I spend a lot of time in Mexico and Central America and I plan to spend more time there starting next fall. I was born in Africa, grand-parents from both sides spoke their own dialects, a form of Catalan on mom's side, and a dialect of Neapolitan on dad's side, but neither could speak "real" Catalan or Italian. I can understand both dialects which are surprisingly very similar, but these dialects are practically useless because nobody speaks them here, and I have no intention or desire to go there. The common language for this happy tribe was French which they speak perfectly but with a weird accent. I also speak French (both France and Québec versions) although after spending 40 years in English Canada, I regularly have to pause a few seconds to find the correct word or expression in proper French. I am working hard these days to perfect my Spanish, but the similarities and false or deceptive cognates with French, Catalan, and Italian throw me off...Your method is what I need...but being lazy by nature, I will have to include this in my daily routine...
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 04, 2020, 10:03:07 AM
411. to spin:                                               dar vueltas
412. film (reel):                                          la fotográfica, el filma
413. fingerprint:                                          la huella digital
414. flame:                                                 la llama
415. first aid:                                              los primeros auxilios
416. pattern:                                              diseño, estampado (print)
417: flow (of water):                                   el flujo
418: key (musical):                                     la tecla
419: fog:                                                    la niebla
420: footprint:                                            la huella
421. remains (body):                                   los restos
422. gymnast:                                            el/la gymnasta
423: jet (stream):                                       el chorro
424: bushy:                                               espeso
425: serving dish:                                      la fuente, el platillo (food dish)
426: to wear (glasses):                               usar lentes
427: globe:                                                el terráqueo
428: paste:                                                la pasta
429: post (pole):                                        el poste
430: to score (sports):                                marcar
431: billy goat:                                          el chivo
        nanny goat:                                       la cabra
        kid goat:                                            chivito/a
432: goggles:                                            las gafas
433: goldfish:                                            pez dorado
434: golf:                                                  el golf
435: golf club:                                           el palo de golf
436: to hand:                                            pasar, dar
437: grasshopper:                                      el saltamontes
438. to strum:                                           rasguear
439: to pluck:                                            puntear (guitar)
                                                                arrancar (to pull out)
                                                                desplumar/depilar (de-feather, de-hair)
440. musical strings:                                  las cuerdas
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on June 04, 2020, 11:04:13 AM
If you don't mind, I'll make my next vocabulary contribution:

el ajedrez                                     chess
muela                                          molar (tooth)
reduje                                          I reduced (irregular past)
resbalar                                       slip, slide
atascado                                      stuck
una apuesta                                 a bet
tengo miedo -de- hacer algo (verbo)    be afraid of doing something (verb)
tengo miedo -a- algo (sustantivo)        be afraid of something (noun)
qué oso!                                      how embarrasing
contratar                                     hire
sacacorchos                                 corkscrew
salvamanteles                              placemat
mantel                                        tablecloth
pasar a ver a alguien                    drop by to see somebody
carpa                                          tent
palanca                                       stick shift
peca                                           freckle
paulatinamente                           gradually
escarabajo                                  beetle
año bisiesto                                leap year
los matices                                 nuances
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 06, 2020, 05:58:48 PM
441. to leak:                                        dejar escapar, perder
442. hangar:                                        el hangar
443. hawk/falcon:                                 el halcón
444. headlight:                                     el faro
        taillight:                                      la calavera
445. hearing aid:                                 el audífono
446. heel:                                           el talón
447. propeller:                                     la hélice
448. shelter:                                       el refugio
449. to hover:                                     sostenerse en el aire
450. to hibernate:                               invernar
451. hot air balloon:                            globo de aire caliente
452. to stick out:                                sobresalir (project) asomar (from behind something)
453. to wallow:                                  revolcarse
454. opening:                                    la apertura
455. hoof:                                          el casco
       paw:                                          la pata
456. crease:                                       el pliegue
457. to warn:                                     alertar
458. mane:                                        el pelo (la crin?)
459. mare:                                        la yegua
       stallion:                                      el semental
       foal:                                          el/la potro/a
460. hutch:                                       la conejera (rabbit), la alacena (cupboard)
461. animal call:                                el grito
462. iceberg:                                     el iceberg
463. icicle:                                        el carámbano
464. to drip:                                      gotear
465. igloo:                                        el iglú
466. ridge:                                       la cresta
467. injection/shot:                           la inyección
468. to prick:                                    pinchar
469. to invent:                                  inventar
470. wrinkle:                                     la arruga
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on June 08, 2020, 10:22:47 AM
I realized I am posting backwards (Spanish - English) from how your posting.  I'll flip them for this installment
 
jam                                                    mermelada                       
tap, faucet                                          grifo           
defend onseself                                   autodefenderse                   
opposite                                             opuesto                         
whole kernel corn                                maíz desgranado                 
jack (tool to lift things)                        gato                           
expectations                                       expectativas                     
ground beef                                        carne molida                     
in the middle of nowhere                     en medio de la nada             
makes no sense                                  no tiene sentido                 
splash                                                chapotear                       
flashlight                                            linterna                         
twenty-four hours a day                       las veinticuatro horas al día   
grater                                                 rallador                         
nutmeg                                               la nuez moscada                 
slimy                                                  baboso                           
delays                                                demoras                         
a model (miniature representation)       una maqueta   
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 08, 2020, 01:27:09 PM
@dougules feel free to post in whatever way that works for you! Everyone's approach is a bit different. I post my vocab list to this thread for the accountability. I would blow off my studies if not for the fact that you all know that by mid-year, I should be at 500 words. It really helps me get my butt in gear!
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on June 09, 2020, 10:19:55 AM
Just a little question, should "heel" (#446) be «tacón»?
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 13, 2020, 11:54:11 AM
Just a little question, should "heel" (#446) be «tacón»?

In Central Mexico, heel as in the body part is el talón. If it's part of a shoe, for example, it's el tacón.
I have 5 or so mistakes in my lists that I need to correct! Hopefully Monday.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on June 13, 2020, 02:05:42 PM
Just a little question, should "heel" (#446) be «tacón»?

In Central Mexico, heel as in the body part is el talón. If it's part of a shoe, for example, it's el tacón.
I have 5 or so mistakes in my lists that I need to correct! Hopefully Monday.

I learned something.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 13, 2020, 02:16:25 PM
Just a little question, should "heel" (#446) be «tacón»?

In Central Mexico, heel as in the body part is el talón. If it's part of a shoe, for example, it's el tacón.
I have 5 or so mistakes in my lists that I need to correct! Hopefully Monday.

I learned something.

Me too! I also didn't clarify on my list which "heel" I was referring to.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 16, 2020, 08:29:02 PM
471. ivy:                              la hiedra
472. jacket:                         la chaqueta
473. to spread (smear):        untar
474. jar:                             el tarro
475. needle:                        la aguja
476. emerald:                     la esmeralda
        ruby:                          el rubí
477. to fit together:             corresponder a
478. judo:                           el judo
479. pitcher/jug:                 la jarra
480. spout:                         el pico
481. to pour:                       verter, echar, servir (bebidas)
482. to juggle:                    hacer juegos malabares con
483. steamy:                      lleno de vapor
484. pouch:                        la bolsa, la pequeña
485. to chop:                      picar
        to grind:                    moler
       to slice:                      rebanar
        to cut:                       cortar
486. kennel:                      la caseta para perros
487. to rule:                      reinar
       to govern:                  gobernar
488. to kneel:                    arrodillarse
489. blade (knife):             la hoja
490. knight:                      el caballero
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 16, 2020, 08:47:30 PM
491. loop:                                   la lazada
492. knuckle:                              el nudillo
493. knot:                                  el nudo
494. rope:                                  la cuerda
495. eucalyptus:                         el eucalipto
496. frame (structure):               el cuadro
497. stair/rung:                         el escalón
498. to climb:                            trepar, escalar, subir
499. lioness:                              la leona
500. to litter:                             tirar basura en, ensuciarse
501. lawn:                                 el césped
502. lawnmower:                       la cortadora
503. unkept:                             enmarañado
504. to lean/to tilt:                    inclinarse
505. leafy:                                frondoso
506. to borrow:                         tomar prestado
507. lifeboat:                            el bote salvavidos
508. lightning:                          el relámpago, el rayo
509. thunderstorm:                   la tormenta (eléctrica/con truenos y relámpagos)
510. shaggy (hairy):                  peludo
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 16, 2020, 09:23:35 PM
Every other night, my husband and I switch off reading articles to each other in English and Spanish. I've seen a few of the words from my list, which is fun, and also have picked up a few new ones. "Jornada" is the word that keeps popping up this week.

I still haven't made listening (to the radio/podcasts/youtube) a habit. When does everyone else fit their listening in? I thought it would work while cooking, but I'm too distracted trying to keep the food from burning while wrangling my toddler. Also, what do you all listen to?

I'm having a baby in a few weeks and decided to scale down my weekly word count to 20. I'll try to take 2 weeks off and then get back at it (this could be wishful thinking). Hopefully the baby is super relaxed and makes my job easy. We're also pushing back our Mexico gap year plans to 6 or 7 years from now, so I think I'll still reach my goal with 20 words and it will be more realistic.

I'm interested to hear what's worked for you so far and what barriers have come up. My main issue is just making myself do my word list (I never feel like it). I'm happy with the fact that I'm retaining all my words (retention was my biggest problem in the past).



Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on June 18, 2020, 11:19:56 AM
I found out how to make tables with the code here, so I'm going to try it out with this installment:


lever, stick shift (car)          palanca
crew (ship/aircraft)          tripulación
hierarchy          jerarquía
the bridge (of a ship)          la puente (de un buque)
steep          escarpado
involved          involucrado
famine          hambruna
balloon          globo
dining room          comedor
to harm (formal)          perjudicar

Edit: Had one of the pairs switched.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Ockhamist on June 23, 2020, 12:38:18 PM
Can't recommend specific programs for you since I'm focused on a different language, but I have found habits that work. Best thing is to force  follow a habit of a certain schedule.

I download a 10 minute news podcast and listen to it every morning (six days a week).  Usually on my commute to work, but not always.  Sometimes while getting ready in the bathroom.  Or whatever.   But I always listen, it's just a habit.

I also keep track in my weekly bullet journal of a commitment to watch at least three hours of TV programs or movies.   I usually try to record programs that I'd enjoy watching in English as well, so it becomes kind of a combination of learning with brain candy.  Typically I break that up into 30 minutes per day, but if I'm just not feeling it one day I allow myself to skip that day, but still make up the time.   I do have a regular exercise schedule and so I piggyback on that.    I try to watch while exercising (multi-tasking bigtime here) but sometimes will just kick back on the couch and relax.

I can tell you that with practice it actually becomes easier.   When I first started I would have to really concentrate ... could not listen while driving for example.   As you ear improves, you understand more and need to focus a bit less, which frees you up to listen at times and places where you are not 100% concentrating, more similar to the level of concentration required to listen to something in English.




Every other night, my husband and I switch off reading articles to each other in English and Spanish. I've seen a few of the words from my list, which is fun, and also have picked up a few new ones. "Jornada" is the word that keeps popping up this week.

I still haven't made listening (to the radio/podcasts/youtube) a habit. When does everyone else fit their listening in? I thought it would work while cooking, but I'm too distracted trying to keep the food from burning while wrangling my toddler. Also, what do you all listen to?

I'm having a baby in a few weeks and decided to scale down my weekly word count to 20. I'll try to take 2 weeks off and then get back at it (this could be wishful thinking). Hopefully the baby is super relaxed and makes my job easy. We're also pushing back our Mexico gap year plans to 6 or 7 years from now, so I think I'll still reach my goal with 20 words and it will be more realistic.

I'm interested to hear what's worked for you so far and what barriers have come up. My main issue is just making myself do my word list (I never feel like it). I'm happy with the fact that I'm retaining all my words (retention was my biggest problem in the past).
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 29, 2020, 05:58:08 PM
Can't recommend specific programs for you since I'm focused on a different language, but I have found habits that work. Best thing is to force  follow a habit of a certain schedule.

I download a 10 minute news podcast and listen to it every morning (six days a week).  Usually on my commute to work, but not always.  Sometimes while getting ready in the bathroom.  Or whatever.   But I always listen, it's just a habit.

I also keep track in my weekly bullet journal of a commitment to watch at least three hours of TV programs or movies.   I usually try to record programs that I'd enjoy watching in English as well, so it becomes kind of a combination of learning with brain candy.  Typically I break that up into 30 minutes per day, but if I'm just not feeling it one day I allow myself to skip that day, but still make up the time.   I do have a regular exercise schedule and so I piggyback on that.    I try to watch while exercising (multi-tasking bigtime here) but sometimes will just kick back on the couch and relax.

I can tell you that with practice it actually becomes easier.   When I first started I would have to really concentrate ... could not listen while driving for example.   As you ear improves, you understand more and need to focus a bit less, which frees you up to listen at times and places where you are not 100% concentrating, more similar to the level of concentration required to listen to something in English.




Every other night, my husband and I switch off reading articles to each other in English and Spanish. I've seen a few of the words from my list, which is fun, and also have picked up a few new ones. "Jornada" is the word that keeps popping up this week.

I still haven't made listening (to the radio/podcasts/youtube) a habit. When does everyone else fit their listening in? I thought it would work while cooking, but I'm too distracted trying to keep the food from burning while wrangling my toddler. Also, what do you all listen to?

I'm having a baby in a few weeks and decided to scale down my weekly word count to 20. I'll try to take 2 weeks off and then get back at it (this could be wishful thinking). Hopefully the baby is super relaxed and makes my job easy. We're also pushing back our Mexico gap year plans to 6 or 7 years from now, so I think I'll still reach my goal with 20 words and it will be more realistic.

I'm interested to hear what's worked for you so far and what barriers have come up. My main issue is just making myself do my word list (I never feel like it). I'm happy with the fact that I'm retaining all my words (retention was my biggest problem in the past).

This is so helpful and such a great approach! Good point about the issue of concentration. I don't think I'm at the point where I can multitask yet. Maybe I'll have to set aside time at first where I can really focus and then eventually combine it with another task as my understanding improves. I'll have to do some research on podcasts.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on June 29, 2020, 09:06:52 PM
I found out how to make tables with the code here, so I'm going to try it out with this installment:


lever, stick shift (car)          palanca
crew (ship/aircraft)          tripulación
hierarchy          jerarquía
the bridge (of a ship)          la puente (de un buque)
steep          escarpado
involved          involucrado
famine          hambruna
balloon          globo
dining room          comedor
to harm (formal)          perjudicar

Edit: Had one of the pairs switched.

That looks sharp! How do you create a table?
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on June 30, 2020, 09:54:45 AM
That looks sharp! How do you create a table?

You can use tags in brackets [], table for the whole table, tr for a row, and td for a cell.  Then end each one with /td, /tr, and /table.  I also put in a cell with spaces to space it out.  There's probably a better way to do that, but I don't know it yet.  I'm putting in quotes so it doesn't actually interpret it as a table:

["table"]
["tr"]["td"]row 1 cell 1["/td"]["td"]      ["/td"]["td"]row 1 cell 2["/td"]["/tr"]
["tr"]["td"]row 2 cell 1["/td"]["td"]      ["/td"]["td"]row 2 cell 2["/td"]["/tr"]
["/table"]

Take the quotes out and it gives you

row 1 cell 1      row 1 cell 2
row 2 cell 1      row 2 cell 2
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on June 30, 2020, 10:23:14 AM
Parce que je sais qu'il y a des gens ici qui sont intérressés au français, je vais donner des mots en français aussi. 

to sift, to seive          tamiser
steering wheel          le volant
interested in          interessé à
can I? (interrogative form)          puis-je?
at the same time          en même temps
keep one's word          tenir sa parole
sth browns (cooking)          qqch revient
to brown sth (cooking)          faire revenir qqch
leap year          année bissexte
a grater          la râpe
fur          la fourrure
scared          effrayé
a meow          un miaulement
ensure that          faire en sorte que
press the button          appuyer sur le bouton
slobbery          baveux
rush hour          heure de pointe

correction: coquille
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: DadJokes on June 30, 2020, 10:54:49 AM
I was born & raised in West Texas & took four years of Spanish. I wouldn't say that I was ever fluent, but I could certainly pick up enough in a conversation to get by. I haven't used the language in over a decade now, and I can barely recall more than basic words at this point.

I would, however, like to learn Portuguese and actually retain the language. It's going to be a while, but I would like to take a trip to Portugal, and it looks like a very good place for expats.

For those who are fluent in languages they don't frequently use, what are your tips for not losing the language over time if you don't have anyone to speak with?
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on June 30, 2020, 03:44:21 PM
I was born & raised in West Texas & took four years of Spanish. I wouldn't say that I was ever fluent, but I could certainly pick up enough in a conversation to get by. I haven't used the language in over a decade now, and I can barely recall more than basic words at this point.

I would, however, like to learn Portuguese and actually retain the language. It's going to be a while, but I would like to take a trip to Portugal, and it looks like a very good place for expats.

For those who are fluent in languages they don't frequently use, what are your tips for not losing the language over time if you don't have anyone to speak with?

I don't know that you'll actually lose it.  I think it just gets really rusty.  My sister lived in Portugal for a year and a half speaking only Portuguese.  My parents went there to help her move back home, and despite being a native speaker she could barely speak English when they got there.  Naturally it came back, but it took a few days of talking to them before she fully got back to normal fluency. 

I've noticed just doing Duolingo every day has helped keep things fresh.  I stumble on words a lot less when I try to talk to my sister and brother-in-law in Quebec now.  I think movies, videos, and music would probably be helpful, too. 

If you know a decent amount of Spanish, I would suggest doing Portuguese in Duolingo as if you were a native Spanish speaker.  You get a 2-for-1 deal, and counterintuitively I think it helps to keep from getting confused on the small differences between the two.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: DadJokes on July 01, 2020, 09:41:00 AM
I was born & raised in West Texas & took four years of Spanish. I wouldn't say that I was ever fluent, but I could certainly pick up enough in a conversation to get by. I haven't used the language in over a decade now, and I can barely recall more than basic words at this point.

I would, however, like to learn Portuguese and actually retain the language. It's going to be a while, but I would like to take a trip to Portugal, and it looks like a very good place for expats.

For those who are fluent in languages they don't frequently use, what are your tips for not losing the language over time if you don't have anyone to speak with?

I don't know that you'll actually lose it.  I think it just gets really rusty.  My sister lived in Portugal for a year and a half speaking only Portuguese.  My parents went there to help her move back home, and despite being a native speaker she could barely speak English when they got there.  Naturally it came back, but it took a few days of talking to them before she fully got back to normal fluency. 

I've noticed just doing Duolingo every day has helped keep things fresh.  I stumble on words a lot less when I try to talk to my sister and brother-in-law in Quebec now.  I think movies, videos, and music would probably be helpful, too. 

If you know a decent amount of Spanish, I would suggest doing Portuguese in Duolingo as if you were a native Spanish speaker.  You get a 2-for-1 deal, and counterintuitively I think it helps to keep from getting confused on the small differences between the two.

It looks like Duolingo only offers Brazilian Portuguese, rather than European Portuguese. The dialects are pretty different, though I could probably get by. I started Memrise, though it doesn't have the option for me to try learning as a native Spanish speaker.

It took less than a day to realize that Portuguese is going to be a much more difficult language than Spanish. In Spanish, there is lot less phonology. Words sound exactly like they look in Spanish, for the most part. That doesn't seem to be the case in Portuguese.

Add to that the fact that Spanish is a more universal language (half of my kid's toys/books have Spanish settings/translations), and I think I'll be better served just re-learning Spanish for now.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on July 01, 2020, 11:11:19 AM
It looks like Duolingo only offers Brazilian Portuguese, rather than European Portuguese. The dialects are pretty different, though I could probably get by. I started Memrise, though it doesn't have the option for me to try learning as a native Spanish speaker.

It took less than a day to realize that Portuguese is going to be a much more difficult language than Spanish. In Spanish, there is lot less phonology. Words sound exactly like they look in Spanish, for the most part. That doesn't seem to be the case in Portuguese.

Add to that the fact that Spanish is a more universal language (half of my kid's toys/books have Spanish settings/translations), and I think I'll be better served just re-learning Spanish for now.

Does Memrise have European Portuguese?  I'd be surprised if there's a lot of material out there for European Portuguese given that only 10 million people live in Portugal in comparison to 200 million in Brazil.  I don't know that learning Brazilian Portuguese would be a huge issue if there is a lot more material for it, though.  The pronunciations are fairly different, but in the end I don't think the jump from Brazilian to European Portuguese would be much harder than American to British English.

Yes, pronouncing Portuguese is more difficult than Spanish, but unlike English it's fairly regular.  You just have to make it clear to your brain that it's not Spanish. 

Spanish is more useful in general.  Plus the languages are still similar enough that learning more Spanish now will make it easier to learn Portuguese later. 
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: DadJokes on July 01, 2020, 11:32:51 AM

Does Memrise have European Portuguese?  I'd be surprised if there's a lot of material out there for European Portuguese given that only 10 million people live in Portugal in comparison to 200 million in Brazil.  I don't know that learning Brazilian Portuguese would be a huge issue if there is a lot more material for it, though.  The pronunciations are fairly different, but in the end I don't think the jump from Brazilian to European Portuguese would be much harder than American to British English.

Of the three apps I downloaded (Duolingo & Busuu as well), it was the only one that had European Portuguese, though I'm sure that it's pretty limited. Additionally, of those three, it's the only one that claims to have Mexican Spanish. However, I think those two are closer than the variations of Portuguese.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: ysette9 on July 02, 2020, 01:32:46 PM
Parce que je sais qu'il y a des gens ici qui sont intérressés au français, je vais donner des mots en français aussi. 

to sift, to seive          tamiser
steering wheel          le volant
interested in          interessé à
can I? (interrogative form)          puis-je?
at the same time          en même temps
keep one's word          tenir sa parole
sth browns (cooking)          qqch reveint
to brown sth (cooking)          faire revenir qqch
leap year          année bissexte
a grater          la râpe
fur          la fourrure
scared          effrayé
a meow          un miaulement
ensure that          faire en sorte que
press the button          appuyer sur le bouton
slobbery          baveux
rush hour          heure de pointe
Ah chouette, un autre francophone!

Je ne connais pas le mot « reveint ». En fait, mon portable essaie de le corriger « revient ». Je connais plutôt le mot « dorer » (« make golden »).

Merci pour « année bissexte ». Voilà quelques chose de nouveau pour moi.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on July 02, 2020, 02:55:28 PM
Ah chouette, un autre francophone!

Je ne connais pas le mot « reveint ». En fait, mon portable essaie de le corriger « revient ». Je connais plutôt le mot « dorer » (« make golden »).

Merci pour « année bissexte ». Voilà quelques chose de nouveau pour moi.

Merci.  «Reveint» était une coquille(?).  Ça devait être «revient»

J'ai vu "faire revenir" dans une recette.  Je ne sais pas si c'est très commun.
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on July 07, 2020, 08:12:24 PM
I'm posting quite a bit of vocab because I decided to give myself at least a month off after having my baby. Thanks for the info on creating tables, @dougules! When I return, I'll put my lists into the proper format. For now, lopsided will have to do!

511. fastening:                                     el cierre
512. to glow:                                       resplandecer
513. bead:                                           la cuenta
514. luggage:                                      el equipaje
515. magician:                                     el mago
516. steel:                                          el acero
517. amazing:                                     asombroso
518. magnifying glass:                         la lupa
519. mammal:                                     el mamífero
520. mask:                                         la máscara
       face mask:                                   el cubrebocas
521. somersault:                                 la votereta
522. match:                                        la cerilla
523. to find out:                                  averiguar
524. mechanic:                                   el/la mecánico/a
525. medal:                                        la medalla
526. to melt:                                      derretir, disolver
527. copper:                                       el cobre
528. iron:                                           el hierro
529. to feed:                                       dar de comer
530. mine:                                          la mina
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on July 07, 2020, 08:24:24 PM
531. coal:                                               el carbón
532. microscope:                                    el microscopio
533. refection:                                        el reflejo
534. to stir:                                            revolver
535. to pretend:                                     fingir (NOT pretender)
536. fairy tale:                                        el cuenta de hadas
537. make believe:                                 la fantasía
538. measure:                                        la medida
539. satellite:                                         el satélite
540. mosque:                                         la mesquita
541. synagogue:                                     la sinagoga
542. rocky:                                            rocoso
543. device:                                           el aparato
544. pointer (tool):                                 el puntero
545. fungus:                                           el hongo
546. musical note:                                  la nota
547. to hammer:                                     martillar, clavar
548. spike:                                             el clavo grande
549. navy:                                             la armada
550. sailor:                                             el marinero
        sailboat:                                         el velero
        sail:                                               la vela
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on July 07, 2020, 08:43:28 PM
551. warship:                                          el barco de guerra
552. to sew:                                            coser
553. fishing net:                                      la red de pesca
554. newt:                                              el tritón
555. bolt:                                               el tornillo
       nut:                                                la tuerca
556. nutcracker:                                     el cascanueces
557. salt water:                                      agua salada (also, de agua salada if it's an adjective)
558. symbol:                                          el símbolo
559. pole:                                               el palo, el poste
560. blade (mechanics):                          la pala (oar), la paleta (propeller)
561. to row:                                           remar
562. Pacific ocean:                                 el océano Pacífico
       Atlantic ocean:                                el océano Atlántico
563. greasy:                                          grasiento
       oily:                                               grasoso
564. to water (eyes):                              lagrimear
       to water (mouth):                           hacersele agua la boca (se me hace agua la boca)
565. opera:                                           la ópera
566. to examine (medically):                   revisar, checar
567. optometrist:                                   el/la optometrista
568. area (region):                                 la área, la zona, la region
569. organ (musical instrument):             el órgano
570. keyboard:                                       el teclado
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on July 07, 2020, 08:59:11 PM
571. pipe:                                             el tubo
572. doghouse:                                     la casita de perro
573. oyster:                                          el ostión
574. grand (lavish):                               grandioso
575. palm tree:                                     la palma
576. parachute:                                     el paracaídas
577. pedestrian:                                    el/la peatón/a
578. trail:                                             el sendero
579. pod:                                              la vaina
580. to peel:                                         pelar
581. pelican:                                         el pelicano
582. graphite:                                       el grafito
583. tame:                                           domesticado, manso
584. photographer:                               el/la fotógrafo/a
585. pie:                                              el pastel or pay?
586. pastry shell:                                  la pasta, la masa
587. boar:                                            el varraco, el cerdo macho
        sow:                                            la cerda
       piglet:                                           el cochinillo
588. pigeon:                                         el pichón
589. to stack:                                       amontonar
590. pin:                                              el alfiler
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on July 07, 2020, 09:10:36 PM
591. reward:                                           la recompensa
592. to force:                                          forzar
593. puncture:                                        la ponchadura
594. ancient:                                          antiguo
595. python:                                           la pitón
596. quarry:                                           la cantera
597. quilt:                                              la colcha
598. quiz:                                              la prueba
        test:                                              el examen
599. race car:                                        el auto de carreras
600. mass:                                             la masa
601. chemical:                                        el químico
        chemistry:                                      la química
        chemist:                                         el químico
602. plum:                                             la ciruela
603. plumber:                                        el/la plomero/a
604. point:                                             el punto
605. to polish:                                        lustrar
606. pony:                                              poni
607. poppy:                                            la amapola
608. quill:                                               la púa
609. postcard:                                        la tarjeta postal
610. to mail:                                           enviar por correo
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: Luz on July 07, 2020, 09:24:39 PM
611. track (sports):                          la pista
612. radio waves:                            las ondas de radio
613. raft:                                         la balsa
614. railroad:                                   el ferrocarril
615. railway:                                    la vía
616. railroad station:                        la estación de tren
617. arc:                                         el arco
        ring:                                       el aro
618. to stretch out (extend):            estirar
619. to catch (a flight/train):            tomar
620. recorder (instrument):              la flauta dulce
621. to reuse:                                 reutilizar
622. storage:                                  el almacenamiento
623. backbone:                               la columna
624. cold-blooded:                          de sangre fría
        warm-blooded:                       de sangre caliente
625. road:                                      la carretera
        highway:                                la autopista
        street:                                    la calle
626. to shoot:                                 disparar
627. thorn:                                    la espina
628. rug:                                       el tapete
629. ruler:                                     la regla
630. runway:                                 la pista de aterrizaje
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on July 15, 2020, 11:04:06 AM
Sometimes when you put out all this new vocabulary it makes me feel a little discouraged when I see how little of it I know.  I feel like I'll never master Spanish.  I need to not let the perfect be the enemy of the good.  Being able to hold a conversation is still huge even if it's a little rough.  Polishing it and adding more vocabulary just makes things better.  It's ok if my Spanish is never native-speaker level.   
Title: Re: Expand Your Vocabulary in Another Language 2020
Post by: dougules on August 02, 2020, 09:37:48 PM
I think I'm going to go back to the Spanish words first. I think you're learning Spanish words as the concepts come up.  I'm going the other way and learning Spanish words as I hear them, so it makes sense for you to put English first but for me to put Spanish first.

hora pico      rush hour
apodo      nickname
vendima      vintage (wine)
experimentar      to experience
entrañable      endearing
aderezo      dressing (food)
egipcio      Egyptian
sobrellevar algo      endure sth
el añil, el índigo      indigo
ludoteca      playroom, game library
darse un chapuzón      take a dip (swim)
ventrílocuo      ventriloquist
tétrico      dismal
torpe      clumsy
trajo      he brought (irregular past)
algodón de azúcar      cotton candy