Author Topic: we still live 15 minute drive from the town where i work and we play  (Read 788 times)

letsdoit

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living in the town where I work would be $1900/mo for rent.  my family and I go there every day. 

we pay 1415/mo for a place we own, earning 10k/yr in equity

if I lived closer to my work, I'd get rid of one car , thatis a 3k/yr savings

the amount gained by not moving is still $13k/yr

that makes our time in car going to the town worth $43/hour. 

I think it's smart to stay. ideas?

Linda_Norway

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@moderator, I think this should be moved to a more relevant part of the forum.

GuitarStv

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living in the town where I work would be $1900/mo for rent.  my family and I go there every day. 

we pay 1415/mo for a place we own, earning 10k/yr in equity

if I lived closer to my work, I'd get rid of one car , thatis a 3k/yr savings

the amount gained by not moving is still $13k/yr

that makes our time in car going to the town worth $43/hour. 

I think it's smart to stay. ideas?

What is the actual distance between your home and where you work?  Can you replace on of those cars with a bike right now, without moving?

letsdoit

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oh, this is going to unleash some stuff, but bring it on:
it is 3 miles.
I gave away my bike stuff/sold it 3 yrs ago bc I got burned out on riding .  I was an active long-course triathlete and I was sick to the gills with it.  I have tried bike commuting and it's not for me.  I have zero bikes now (I used to have 3-4 in my living room)

letsdoit

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and I have a baby.  so I only have 45 minutes that I carve out (345AM) for an intense workout, and that is all the time I have. 

GuitarStv

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I'm going to (gently) push bike commuting for you.

It's more time efficient as you're getting exercise in place of time spent relaxing in the car.  You're only going 3 miles, so that's what  . . . a quite leisurely 20 - 25 minute ride in each direction?  It's a short enough distance that you can go slowly and avoid ending up all sweaty.  You get all the benefit of going down to a single car, but none of the monetary down side of moving.

I know, you said that you've tried it and don't like it.  What specifically was the issue, or was causing you problems?  Sweat, rain, route, confidence in traffic . . . ?

Having a baby is tough.  It does get better though, and a little bit of your free time will slowly trickle back into your life every year.  At least keep the idea of replacing your car with a bike in mind for when it does.

letsdoit

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hi,
thank you for being gentle:) it's a valid suggestion
I like working out and stretching afterward.  I have had a chronic groin prob for 20 years, and I feel crappy if I cant stretch after working out .   I live in a big city and riding bike (no bike lanes) is more like trying to stay alive while on a bike.  not worth it for me.   


GuitarStv

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Do you have much experience cycling in traffic?  I'm asking because it can be pretty daunting the first few times.  There's a lot of stuff going on, vehicles aren't too patient (especially around rush hour), and it's easy to feel overwhelmed.

I have been riding 12 miles each way to work for several years now.  There are about 100 ft of bike lane on that trip, and about half the distance is in very busy city traffic.  Taking the lane when necessary, signalling your intent, and figuring out how bikes fit into the flow of traffic radically reduces the risks that you're focusing on.  There are risks to cycling, but I honestly believe that they're overblown.  If you have particular concerns about part of your route, send me a google maps link and I'll see if I can help you plan out a better way to get where you need to go, or if I can offer suggestions regarding particular turns or sections that feel dangerous.

As far as stretching . . . just stretch after your ride for a couple minutes.  You can toss a leg up onto the bike rack, a nearby bench, or whatever you've gotta do.  At least initially (while you're getting a feel for vehicular cycling) you shouldn't be going much harder than you would while out walking, so I'm assuming that the need to stretch should be reduced somewhat.

letsdoit

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I rode appx 100 miles a week for 3-4 years. 

Liberty Stache

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If you moved closer to work and gained that 6 hours / week back (assuming $13K savings @ 50 weeks/yr @ $43/hr), could you earn > $50/hr by either taking on overtime, side projects, etc.? At what $/hr do you value your spare time now that you have a baby and are extremely busy?

I would say that while 'earning' $43/hr is good, I would also say that depending on where you are from a NW standpoint, an income standpoint, and a 'busyness' standpoint, it might not be worth it.

For example, if someone earner $150K/yr+, has a sizable NW (think >$750K or $1MM), a working spouse who is also high income all with small children its probably not worth having the commute. The time is much more valuable. Even if the person was 'earning' $100-200/hr by commuting (e.g. greater than their normal $/hr income), from a life sanity / time with family / downtime perspective, it just wouldn't be worth it.
"Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright" ~Benjamin Franklin, The Way to Wealth

letsdoit

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yes, good point.
I always reckoned it was worth $25/hr.
free time for me is picking up the apartment, swinging kettlebells or taking a walk.  I guess it's true that I could have quality family time with some of this time I'm spending on commute