Author Topic: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery  (Read 14376 times)

sparkytheop

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #50 on: January 28, 2017, 09:48:44 PM »
Only mustashian in that I needed to use the cream before it went bad...  I made butter today.  It's really good, too!  Now I just need to find out a way to use all the buttermilk (or freeze it until I think of a way to use it).  Not a huge fan, so no buttermilk pancakes, etc.  I have a recipe that uses it, but I can't remember which recipe...

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #51 on: January 29, 2017, 11:59:32 AM »
Apart from all the preserves:
three types of jam
four types of pickles
canned fruit, tomato sauce and salsa
and a ton of condiments

I made maple syrup.  I didn't bother last year because I made 8 liters the year before. We are now low so I am thinking about this late winter/early spring tapping the four maple trees on my property and having another boil down.  I use a propane burner because I don't have access to enough wood and it may be a problem because I live in an urban area.  I save boiling time be freezing the sap and then tossing the ice lumps out.  Feels pretty badass to pull a jar of the golden liquid out of the freezer for my salad dressings, or cheery sauce.
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dreams_and_discoveries

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #52 on: January 29, 2017, 02:35:23 PM »
Wow, impressed with all the home cooking here, I aspire to get to the level of you guys.


I only do homemade pizzas, curry from scratch, bread, salad dressing, scones, cakes etc.

Have never managed to get hummous as amazing as they make it in the shops...

With This Herring

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #53 on: January 30, 2017, 11:27:37 AM »
I made maple syrup.  I didn't bother last year because I made 8 liters the year before. We are now low so I am thinking about this late winter/early spring tapping the four maple trees on my property and having another boil down.  I use a propane burner because I don't have access to enough wood and it may be a problem because I live in an urban area.  I save boiling time be freezing the sap and then tossing the ice lumps out.  Feels pretty badass to pull a jar of the golden liquid out of the freezer for my salad dressings, or cheery sauce.

8 liters of syrup from four trees!  I know it takes a lot of sap to make a little syrup, so I thought it took many more trees to get that much syrup.  Or do you tap neighbors' trees as well?  This is very neat, and your sap-freezing idea is really good.
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HipGnosis

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #54 on: January 30, 2017, 12:51:07 PM »
Soya milk
Vegetarian meatballs and patties
Apple sauce
Cakes and muffins
Bread
I seldom have applesauce because it's to sweet (when store bought).  Your post reminded me that a friend said it's really easy.
So I made a very small batch this weekend.  I 'sauced' half an apple!  I was adapting a recipie and was guessing at how much sweetener to put in.  It turned out great!  It'll be even better when I make a big enough batch to be able to put in clove - I couldn't figure out how to measure a miniscule amount for the 1/2 an apple.

sparkytheop

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #55 on: January 30, 2017, 09:05:08 PM »
Soya milk
Vegetarian meatballs and patties
Apple sauce
Cakes and muffins
Bread
I seldom have applesauce because it's to sweet (when store bought).  Your post reminded me that a friend said it's really easy.
So I made a very small batch this weekend.  I 'sauced' half an apple!  I was adapting a recipie and was guessing at how much sweetener to put in.  It turned out great!  It'll be even better when I make a big enough batch to be able to put in clove - I couldn't figure out how to measure a miniscule amount for the 1/2 an apple.

When I need a very tiny amount of a spice, I will sometimes dip the tip of a spoon/fork handle into the jar.  It picks up a few specks and doesn't waste any.

Dicey

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #56 on: February 03, 2017, 11:19:32 PM »
And we have pizza and a photo! Thank you WithThisHerring for your one-on-one coaching! (Sorry, the lighting wasn't great, but the pizza definitely was.)

Last time the dough was a little big for the stone. I found this small one in the back of a cupboard, so I made two. Still no marinara, so I used pesto again.

This recipe is definitely going into the rotation.

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sparkytheop

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #57 on: February 04, 2017, 03:38:43 AM »
Did we mention desserts?

My son asked me what I wanted for my birthday recently.  I gave him the option to take me out to eat (he pays), or make a dessert.  He did both (we don't eat out often).

He made creme brulee. It was so good, and we already had everything on hand.  (ETA-- well, except for orange liqueur, so he substituted brandy).

I think he mostly used this recipe or one similar.  I know he used a vanilla bean instead of vanilla extract...

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/creme-brulee-recipe.html

« Last Edit: February 04, 2017, 03:43:06 AM by sparkytheop »

frugalwitch

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #58 on: February 04, 2017, 06:25:58 AM »
I can a lot of things but mostly tomato sauce, spaghetti sauce, soups.
I also garden a lot so from spring till december we usually try to only eat our own veggies.
I also do my own kombucha.

I homecook a lot of meals and here's what I'm trying to cook more in 2017 (SO bought me a kitchen aid mixer):

- Cookies
- Bread
- Hummus
- Yogurt (or milk kefir)
- Lactofermented veggies

Dicey

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #59 on: February 04, 2017, 02:12:45 PM »
Awww, puppy + produce for the win!
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boarder42

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #60 on: February 04, 2017, 02:32:34 PM »
Just made

Garbanzo bean chips
Olive tapenade
Salsa
Blue cheese dressing w/ homemade Greek yogurt
Yogurt is in the instant pot

Then some normal foods
Chili from dry black beans
Oven roasted cauliflower faux mashed potatoes
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dorothyc

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #61 on: February 04, 2017, 02:59:52 PM »
Bone broths from roasted, saved bones from making roast chicken, etc
Granola
Yogurt
Marzipan (we eat it like a candy snack)
Pizza
Bread
quick breads
corn tortillas
Lemon curd
Preserved lemon, Moroccan style
Garam masala
Soups
Salad dressings
Vanilla extract from vanilla beans and spiced rum

-- some non edible things I make
toothpowder
body wash
deodorant
beeswax skin salve
dry shampoo

Shropskr

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #62 on: February 04, 2017, 03:13:15 PM »
Just learned to make tarter sauce, and Cole slaw.

Mock clif bars
Muffins
Mock peach cobbler
Yogurt
Gf banana bread
Waffles
Pancakes
Meat balls
Egg drop soup
French onion soup

tj

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #63 on: February 12, 2017, 01:33:05 PM »
I'm surprised no one has mentioned Crock Pots/slow cookers yet, but mine are a central part of my kitchen! I cook a lot; in an average month, I will eat out only 2 or 3 times. All other meals are prepped at home.

My favorite/most successful slow cooker dishes:

1. Pot roast. For about $12 (buy pork on sale), I can make 12-15 portions. Meat, veg, gravy, all in one.

3. Roast chicken. I find that sea salt and pepper are enough to make this dish fantastic. One whole chicken: $6.  No broth, no veg.

Here's the key to major savings: Freeze extra portions in ready-to-go plastic containers. I have a full size freezer in the garage. I use it for bulk storage (when I hit a sale), and pre-portioned frozen meals, ready to go for work days.

Do you have recipes for those two!?
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Helvegen

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #64 on: February 13, 2017, 04:02:29 PM »
The big things are yogurt, Greek yogurt, tzatziki, butter, farmer's cheese, ricotta. I am a big fan of dried chickpeas. You can add them to basically any stew or curry as a meat sub. I love falafel burgers and using chickpeas in wraps. I make my own flatbreads and occasionally loaf bread. I have a bunch of berries I have to get rid of, so I am going to make and freeze a sugar free mixed berry syrup with them to have with waffles and pancakes the week after next. I make my own Truvia and reduced sugar baking blends.


Frugal Lizard

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #65 on: February 13, 2017, 05:27:30 PM »
I made maple syrup.  I didn't bother last year because I made 8 liters the year before. We are now low so I am thinking about this late winter/early spring tapping the four maple trees on my property and having another boil down.  I use a propane burner because I don't have access to enough wood and it may be a problem because I live in an urban area.  I save boiling time be freezing the sap and then tossing the ice lumps out.  Feels pretty badass to pull a jar of the golden liquid out of the freezer for my salad dressings, or cherry sauce.

8 liters of syrup from four trees!  I know it takes a lot of sap to make a little syrup, so I thought it took many more trees to get that much syrup.  Or do you tap neighbors' trees as well?  This is very neat, and your sap-freezing idea is really good.
The ratio is 40:1.  My four big trees produce bucketfuls of sap. Eventually I get sick of boiling.  It takes all day but it gets me outside.
I could tap my neighbour's big trees and make even more but then it would be more watching it boil.   
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With This Herring

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #66 on: February 13, 2017, 05:32:37 PM »
I made maple syrup.  I didn't bother last year because I made 8 liters the year before. We are now low so I am thinking about this late winter/early spring tapping the four maple trees on my property and having another boil down.  I use a propane burner because I don't have access to enough wood and it may be a problem because I live in an urban area.  I save boiling time be freezing the sap and then tossing the ice lumps out.  Feels pretty badass to pull a jar of the golden liquid out of the freezer for my salad dressings, or cherry sauce.

8 liters of syrup from four trees!  I know it takes a lot of sap to make a little syrup, so I thought it took many more trees to get that much syrup.  Or do you tap neighbors' trees as well?  This is very neat, and your sap-freezing idea is really good.
The ratio is 40:1.  My four big trees produce bucketfuls of sap. Eventually I get sick of boiling.  It takes all day but it gets me outside.
I could tap my neighbour's big trees and make even more but then it would be more watching it boil.   
Thank you!
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stoaX

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #67 on: February 13, 2017, 05:40:47 PM »
Sprouts!  I'm particularly partial to lentil sprouts...

sparkytheop

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #68 on: February 15, 2017, 02:40:27 AM »
We normally make our own dips, but went to make onion dip yesterday, and didn't have any onion soup mix left.  So, today I looked up a recipe and made this instead: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/onion-dip-from-scratch-recipe

It is so much better than making it from the soup mix, and we already had everything on hand.  My son and I have decided we'll make it with this recipe from now on.

Gunny

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #69 on: February 15, 2017, 04:24:46 AM »
My wife makes almost all of our bread, waffles and pancakes.  No pre-packaged mixes.  She makes yogurt, breakfast sausage, mayo and salad dressing.  She prepares almost all meals from scratch.  Only time we eat pre-packaged is whole ham she slices for sandwiches, cheese, and the occasional frozen pizza. Aldi's pizza is pretty good for less than five bucks.  We do eat frozen and canned veggies.

asauer

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #70 on: February 15, 2017, 05:18:38 AM »
Yogurt
Ketchup
Mayo
Salsa
Hot sauce (we grow peppers)
Sauerkraut
hummus
herb mixes/ rubs (we grow a shit ton of herbs)

matthixson

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #71 on: February 18, 2017, 05:49:11 PM »
I use to faff around with nut bags and cheesecloth, then I discovered this: http://www.thepretendbaker.com/easiest-cashew-milk-ever/

Instant nut milk, whenever I want it, no straining. Pretty life changing if you are dairy-free.
[/quote]

Wow. Thanks for that! I just made this with almond butter and it's delicious.

Pizzabrewer

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #72 on: February 18, 2017, 05:54:17 PM »
Yum.

Tom Bri

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Re: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #73 on: February 26, 2017, 11:14:24 AM »
Yogurt, at the cost of one gallon of milk and one little cup of yogurt. Both bought on sale. We go through about a gallon a week. And you don't have to buy the little cup every time either. You can use your old yogurt to make new yogurt a few times, but it eventually needs to be replaced with new.

travelbug

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Hummus - it is fun to make variations like sweet potato or red pepper
Salsa
Guacamole
Hot sauce
Bread (biscuits, pizza crust)
Corn tortillas
Vegan cheese (a couple varieties)
Vegan sour cream

Various bean soups/chilis/curries made from dried beans
Marinara sauce
Nut milks/rice milk
Veggie stock
French fries
Vegan ice cream

Hi I would love it if you would share these recipes please, DS, DH and I are dairy free (and gluten free) and the occasional desire for that melted cheese taste costs a bomb for packaged vegan "cheese".

Thanks x


For us, I make:

waffles
crepes
soup
pizza
passata
and this paleo mayonnaise recipe is really quick easy and yummy...

http://thehealthyfoodie.com/fail-proof-home-made-paleo-mayo-whole30-compliant/ I have also added a teaspoon of mustard for extra flavour.

10dollarsatatime

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Jerky!  But only when pork loin goes on sale for 99c/lb.  ... I purchased 30 pounds the other day that's all destined to become a tasty dried protein snack...
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swick

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Jerky!  But only when pork loin goes on sale for 99c/lb.  ... I purchased 30 pounds the other day that's all destined to become a tasty dried protein snack...

Have a recipe you could share? I've always felt a little squidgy about making pork jerky.

HipGnosis

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Jerky!  But only when pork loin goes on sale for 99c/lb.  ... I purchased 30 pounds the other day that's all destined to become a tasty dried protein snack...
Have a recipe you could share? I've always felt a little squidgy about making pork jerky.
Me too, please.

HipGnosis

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I was going to make liquid laundry detergent.  It's like $0.04 per load (I'm not sure when the ingredients were priced on the website).
But when I went to get an empty detergent bottle, I found I have 3 full bottles.  I've been buying 2 bottles when I found a particularly good sale.

10dollarsatatime

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Jerky!  But only when pork loin goes on sale for 99c/lb.  ... I purchased 30 pounds the other day that's all destined to become a tasty dried protein snack...

Have a recipe you could share? I've always felt a little squidgy about making pork jerky.

I think use whatever marinade you want... I've been using this one (doctored up a little with ginger).
http://www.yankeekitchenninja.com/2013/11/cidered-jerky-beef-or-venison-and-tips.html

But with pork, this is the important part:
http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/dry/jerky.html

Quote
If pork or wild game is used to make jerky, the meat should be treated to kill the trichinella parasite before it is sliced and marinated. This parasite causes the disease trichinosis. To treat the meat, freeze a portion that is 6 inches or less thick at 0F or below for at least 30 days. Freezing will not eliminate bacteria from the meat.
...
 The risk of foodborne illness from home-dried jerky can be decreased by allowing the internal temperature of the meat to reach 160F, but in such a way as to prevent case hardening. Two methods can be used: heating meat strips in marinade before drying or heating the dried jerky strips in an oven after the drying process is completed.
...
If the strips were not heated in marinade prior to drying, they can be heated in an oven after drying as an added safety measure. Place strips on a baking sheet, close together, but not touching or overlapping. For strips originally cut 1/4 inch thick or less, heat 10 minutes in an oven preheated to 275F. (Thicker strips may require longer heating to reach 160F.)
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swick

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Thank you! Still makes me feel a little squidgy....Heating up in the marinade is not something I would have considered. Good to learn about the process.

10dollarsatatime

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Thank you! Still makes me feel a little squidgy....Heating up in the marinade is not something I would have considered. Good to learn about the process.

I've chosen to do the post-dehydrating heat up in the oven.  They do say the marinade bath changes the texture a bit, and I don't want that.

I'll also be storing it in vacuum sealed jars in the freezer. 
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kitsuneleah

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Kimchi.  Crazy cheap to make at home, but now the Whole Foods crowd has caught onto it and is willing to pay $12/quart.


It's so true! Even at a Korean grocery, kimchi is super expensive! It takes a few hours, but making it at home isn't too hard, and you can customize it for whatever vegetables you have/like better. I use Maangchi's recipe here (though a half-batch is good enough for me!): https://www.maangchi.com/recipe/easy-kimchi

If you're in the US, it's even cheaper if you use Western cabbage instead of Napa cabbage or similar-- it comes out the same.

MMMaybe

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I'm making mustard! Smells good so far. After soaking the seeds for another day, I will blend it up and taste it...

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we make almost all our food at home. Restaurant or Fast Food expenses rarely reaches $20/month

MishMash

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Popcorn! I can't believe all the bags of popped popcorn that I see in Costco carts. And don't even get me started on microwave popcorn.

High quality popcorn, air popper, easy-peasy.  If we really want to get fancy, we grate a little parmesan and shake on some Green Tabasco or Cholula. Brewer's Yeast is good, too.

YES! I found a new favorite way of doing popcorn. I know most people just don't have these things on hand, but I tend to get lots of fancy pants food gifts involving truffle.

Fresh popped popcorn with a melted ghee (or butter) that has had some truffle honey melted into it. Then sprinkled with truffle salt and fresh cracked black pepper. It is AMAZING a little sweet a little salty, a little bite from the pepper and comes out very much like Kettle Corn. sooo good!

You don't even need an air popper.  Want microwave popcorn without the chemicals?   Throw a handful of regular popcorn in a paper lunch sack, tape closed and zap

Ebrat

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Popcorn! I can't believe all the bags of popped popcorn that I see in Costco carts. And don't even get me started on microwave popcorn.

High quality popcorn, air popper, easy-peasy.  If we really want to get fancy, we grate a little parmesan and shake on some Green Tabasco or Cholula. Brewer's Yeast is good, too.

YES! I found a new favorite way of doing popcorn. I know most people just don't have these things on hand, but I tend to get lots of fancy pants food gifts involving truffle.

Fresh popped popcorn with a melted ghee (or butter) that has had some truffle honey melted into it. Then sprinkled with truffle salt and fresh cracked black pepper. It is AMAZING a little sweet a little salty, a little bite from the pepper and comes out very much like Kettle Corn. sooo good!

You don't even need an air popper.  Want microwave popcorn without the chemicals?   Throw a handful of regular popcorn in a paper lunch sack, tape closed and zap

This is my favorite snack! I don't bother taping the bag closed, though. I just fold the top over a couple times.

sparkytheop

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I guess we'll add sushi to my list...

We have one store (Safeway) that sells sushi, but there is nowhere else to get it in my town.  We do have a small Asian market though, so today we stopped to get some ingredients (nori seaweed, sticky rice, and pickled ginger).  We'll use vegetables and meat from home (no sushi-grade fish, so we'll experiment with other meats).  I'm not a seafood person, but I've had roasted duck sushi before and it was really good, so looking forward to what my son makes.

For the price of a couple pieces at the store, we'll be making 6 different rolls.

Nangirl17

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I was going to make liquid laundry detergent.  It's like $0.04 per load (I'm not sure when the ingredients were priced on the website).
But when I went to get an empty detergent bottle, I found I have 3 full bottles.  I've been buying 2 bottles when I found a particularly good sale.

I used to make my own detergent, but found that it really didn't work as well as real detergent. Then I discovered Checkout 51 and between that and coupons I can get it for .05 a load.

Nangirl17

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I plan to make salsa this summer, the batch from 5 years ago is done, but I lost my recipe! I see that a lot of you guys make it - care to pass along your recipe?

sparkytheop

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I plan to make salsa this summer, the batch from 5 years ago is done, but I lost my recipe! I see that a lot of you guys make it - care to pass along your recipe?

I use the one in this link: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_salsa/chile_salsa_II.html

I use lime juice or lemon juice instead of vinegar.

hoping2retire35

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Oh man I want to make maple syrup! Funny winters the last couple of years ago wasn't real sure when to try it.

What's the best, most efficient way to boil the sap? I thought if you had a wood burning stove in your house you could just put on top.

kiwiozearlyretirement

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I'm surprised no one has mentioned Crock Pots/slow cookers yet, but mine are a central part of my kitchen! I cook a lot; in an average month, I will eat out only 2 or 3 times. All other meals are prepped at home.

My favorite/most successful slow cooker dishes:

1. Pot roast. For about $12 (buy pork on sale), I can make 12-15 portions. Meat, veg, gravy, all in one.

2. Bean soup. Vegetarian or w/meat. 15 servings for $5-$8. The longer it cooks, the more the flavors enhance. Freezes well.

3. Roast chicken. I find that sea salt and pepper are enough to make this dish fantastic. One whole chicken: $6.  No broth, no veg.

Here's the key to major savings: Freeze extra portions in ready-to-go plastic containers. I have a full size freezer in the garage. I use it for bulk storage (when I hit a sale), and pre-portioned frozen meals, ready to go for work days.
We love our slow cooker also. Just in regard to the beans. The beans need to be cooked at a high temp for 45 mins (100 deg c) or they contain poisonous alkaloids. Our local health department published a warning about beans and slow cookers.

Nangirl17

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I plan to make salsa this summer, the batch from 5 years ago is done, but I lost my recipe! I see that a lot of you guys make it - care to pass along your recipe?

I use the one in this link: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_salsa/chile_salsa_II.html

I use lime juice or lemon juice instead of vinegar.

Thanks!

sparkytheop

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I plan to make salsa this summer, the batch from 5 years ago is done, but I lost my recipe! I see that a lot of you guys make it - care to pass along your recipe?

I use the one in this link: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_salsa/chile_salsa_II.html

I use lime juice or lemon juice instead of vinegar.

Thanks!

Looking at it again (the online version), it says you shouldn't change anything else. However, when I took a class with the local Extension Office, we were told you could add germs and spices, as long as they were dried. We add dried garlic, oregano, smoked paprika, etc, to play with the flavor. Fresh herbs could change the pH, but dried are fine.

Dicey

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We love our slow cooker also. Just in regard to the beans. The beans need to be cooked at a high temp for 45 mins (100 deg c) or they contain poisonous alkaloids. Our local health department published a warning about beans and slow cookers.
Hmmm, pretty sure that's just for kidney beans, not all beans.
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Goldielocks

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I have been making dried shredded chicken for our backpacking meals (add in dried noodles, or instant rice, and seasonings / or dehydrated home made roasted red pepper sauce) for awesome meal on the trail that did NOT cost $10 for 2 people.  My Turkey jerky  had mixed results, the ground / reformed jerky was better than the whole strips, easier to eat).

I have also made my own cornflakes / bran flakes (not recommended!), and flax granola (recommended) breakfast cereal.  I did grow some oats one year, (just enough to try), flattened them with the mallet, and made oatmeal..

Usual suspects for preserves - jam, fruit syrup for pancakes, apricot / orange marmalade, plum jam, etc.  Sundried tomatoes in oil. I have canned peaches / pears. I will try a relish recipe this year, too.

Yoghurt, Ricotta, Bread (various types), pierogies, buttermilk, cottage cheese, butter.
Chocolate / vanilla pudding.

Started to freeze summer on-sale produce for the winter -- yellow beans, rutabaga, beets, carrots, cabbage (ick), onions, apple slices and apple sauce -- enough for 26 meals or so, total (not each).  I just received a hobby-sized cider press and grinder -- next summer needs to watch out because I aim to try it out.


pbkmaine

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Flattening oats with a mallet for oatmeal is badass.

Monkey Uncle

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Flattening oats with a mallet for oatmeal is badass.

That's pretty hard-core.  Pre-flattened oats are already crazy cheap.
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pbkmaine

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Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #99 on: March 19, 2017, 04:51:37 AM »