Author Topic: Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery  (Read 12275 times)

Goldielocks

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Flattening oats with a mallet for oatmeal is badass.

ONE Meal.....

:-)

    I grew about 3 cups of oat groats, total.  More for the learning experience when I realized that the "cat grass" seed was actually oats, I kept it going.

Verdure

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People have mentioned making their own pesto, but I thought I'd add you can make a tasty pesto out of spinach leaves instead of basil, and the flavor of walnut actually goes quite well with spinach in place of the pine nuts. I add a bit of nutmeg to it, as well. Obviously it doesn't taste the same as basil pesto, but I quite like it, and it is super cheap to make.  It's great to make when basil is not in season but (spinach is), and you have no more basil pesto in the freezer.

Goldielocks

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People have mentioned making their own pesto, but I thought I'd add you can make a tasty pesto out of spinach leaves instead of basil, and the flavor of walnut actually goes quite well with spinach in place of the pine nuts. I add a bit of nutmeg to it, as well. Obviously it doesn't taste the same as basil pesto, but I quite like it, and it is super cheap to make.  It's great to make when basil is not in season but (spinach is), and you have no more basil pesto in the freezer.

For that matter, I read where someone used their carrot tops to make pesto, too.  (was it here?)...  they said it was quite good

SpeedReader

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People have mentioned making their own pesto, but I thought I'd add you can make a tasty pesto out of spinach leaves instead of basil, and the flavor of walnut actually goes quite well with spinach in place of the pine nuts. I add a bit of nutmeg to it, as well. Obviously it doesn't taste the same as basil pesto, but I quite like it, and it is super cheap to make.  It's great to make when basil is not in season but (spinach is), and you have no more basil pesto in the freezer.

For that matter, I read where someone used their carrot tops to make pesto, too.  (was it here?)...  they said it was quite good

Besides basil I've made pesto out of sorrel, and out of garlic scapes (the flower stalk on hardneck garlic).  All good stuff.

sparkytheop

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My son made his own kimchi this week, and I finally made a batch of refried beans that I like (from dried beans).  It makes quite a bit, and it's supposed to freeze well, so that will be nice.

Oh, he also made liver pate yesterday.  Cost was minimal since the liver comes with the beef (neither of us like liver on its own, but he's discovered he likes pate).
« Last Edit: March 30, 2017, 08:58:36 PM by sparkytheop »

Silkspin

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I can't stand store salad dressings, and make them all on my own.

Leftover bread/ buns get cut up, brushed with olive oil and made into croutons in the toaster oven. I also spin leftover bread in my vitamix to make bread crumbs.

Guacamole - and often I just cut open an avocado and squeeze out onto my food - any food!

Pie crusts - ok I'll admit I don't always do it, but try as much as I can.

Gnocchi - my grandmother used to make these. When you're making mashed potatoes for dinner, make a double batch. Next day add some flour and an egg to leftover mashed potatoes to form a dough, roll into long tubes and cut into bite sizes. Into boiling water until they float. So yummy!

Smoothies: The vitamix was the best investment. I hated the leftover pulp from my juicer - I was never motivated enough to make use of it and hated the wastage and cleanup.

Chicken nuggets - the store stuff is junk and tastes horrible imho. I buy chicken thighs from Costco. Make them into my own pink slime in the vitamix. Mix with egg/bread crumbs/ spices. Form into nuggets. A light flour, egg wash and coated with bread crumbs and fried in a bit of oil. Family LOVES them. It does take some time, so I commit to the process and do a huge batch and then freeze for easy meals.


starjay

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The two homemade things that come to mind for this thread are homemade salad dressings (ranch, blue cheese, and vinaigrette) and homemade kimchi.

I can't tell you how happy the homemade kimchi makes me. I don't do spicy foods well, so I asked my boyfriend to make starjay-friendly kimchi at home. I love it SO MUCH. It's on constant rotation. Tasty, and it doesn't melt my face off! hooray! :)

We also have sourdough starter that lives in the fridge and periodically gets used to make delicious bread.

MrSal

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Hey guys,

What food do you normally prepare at home, instead of buying the expensive and/or unhealthy version at the supermarket ?

Personally, I experienced so far with :
- Hummus: the classic case of an expansive grocery item that takes 3 minutes to prepare at home.
- Pesto: Great if you have your own garden for the basil
- Chicken wings/ribs: I just throw them in a ziplock bag with a dry rub for 24 hours instead of buying the disgusting and terribly unhealthy version
- Salsa: much more healthy than the supermarket version

I'm now preparing my kombucha, hopefully it will turn OK


The normal is to prepare everything at home pretty much ... other than bread, milk, yoghurt and cheese everything here is made here.

geekinprogress

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People have mentioned making their own pesto, but I thought I'd add you can make a tasty pesto out of spinach leaves instead of basil, and the flavor of walnut actually goes quite well with spinach in place of the pine nuts. I add a bit of nutmeg to it, as well. Obviously it doesn't taste the same as basil pesto, but I quite like it, and it is super cheap to make.  It's great to make when basil is not in season but (spinach is), and you have no more basil pesto in the freezer.

For that matter, I read where someone used their carrot tops to make pesto, too.  (was it here?)...  they said it was quite good

Besides basil I've made pesto out of sorrel, and out of garlic scapes (the flower stalk on hardneck garlic).  All good stuff.

Garlic Mustard is an abundant, invasive species, that can be picked in any number of yards or public areas (if you can find somewhere you don't think gets pesticide sprays), and while I think it doesn't make a super flavorful pesto on its own, it does give a nice garlicky and mustardy touch, and is great for bulking up a super strong tasting or oily pesto that could use a little bulking material. 

Johnez

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Any of you guys making pizza or spaghetti sauce have a sauce recipe to share? Right now my sauce is usually canned/jarred kicked up a notch with dried Italian herbs and garlic. Would be great to make a fresh sauce.

For my contribution to the thread: Madeleines. The ultimate and perfect any time snack. Cheap, easy, and yummy. A batch of two dozen lasts a while and is ready for guests or coffee/tea in the morning. The cost savings is massive compared to the little containers sold at the grocery.

ReadingLearner

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I make tons of easy vegetarian recipes. I like Budget Bytes. I also put the dishes I cook on my website:

http://vegisinme.blogspot.ca/?m=1

I also shop at Real Canadian Superstore and make use of an ap called Flipp. It lets you price match. If you take the time, you can reduce your grocery bill significantly.

HipGnosis

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Spreadable butter
I buy 'regular' butter, let a stick soften, mash it a bit and mix in some oil.
I use to use vegetable oil, now I use butter flavored oil (for popcorn).

Goldielocks

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Any of you guys making pizza or spaghetti sauce have a sauce recipe to share? Right now my sauce is usually canned/jarred kicked up a notch with dried Italian herbs and garlic. Would be great to make a fresh sauce.

For my contribution to the thread: Madeleines. The ultimate and perfect any time snack. Cheap, easy, and yummy. A batch of two dozen lasts a while and is ready for guests or coffee/tea in the morning. The cost savings is massive compared to the little containers sold at the grocery.

I started this because it is MUCH cheaper than the "good" jarred sauce, then turned out to taste better, and be easy, too.  Buy your cans on the super sales that happen 2x per year.   This recipe costs about $2.30 for a large portion for a family of 4.... $3.00 if you include a lot of pasta.

One can of diced tomatoes
One Can of crushed tomatoes (optional if you are serving more than 2, I find i need more tomatoe power of crushed)
Splash of olive (or canola) oil
2 Tsp of sugar
Garlic clove, minced (optional)
Salt / pepper to taste (watch out if cans already have salt added)

Heat to a boil, simmer for 20 minutes, or as long as you have, if you have more time.   Will not be as saucy if short on time, or no crushed tomatoes, but still great.

Add your herbs that you like.  I sometimes top off with fresh basil or parsley.   Also adding in chopped fresh veggies (carrots, celery, onions and, spinach are my go to's), and/ or a sprinkle of parm cheese is nice.


Johnez

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^Awesome! Thank you, yeah spaghetti sauce is the killer in terms of cost, I can get all the other ingredients cheap and even have most daily in the kitchen anyway. I've tried canned and jarred-nothing has knocked my socks off yet, definitely looking forward to giving this a whirl.

recklesslysober

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I made some salted 'caramel' sauce with dates, water, vanilla, and salt. Not quite the same taste and texture as traditional caramel obviously but delicious and no refined sugar!

Laserjet3051

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Yuca con ajo


1st time ive ever made this but it tasted even better than what ive been served in any of Miami's finest Cuban restaurants

-boil yuca in small volume of water with copious lime juice and some salt for 30 min
- smash whole garlic clove in salt with mortar and pestle
-saute minced onion and salt/garlic in olive oil
-add copious lemon juice to saute and  large cubes of boiled yuca, saute for 5 more minutes, coating/turning yuca in pan

So simple, so delicious

pbkmaine

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Chippewa

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Mustachian food that you prepare at home instead of buying at the grocery
« Reply #117 on: April 04, 2017, 03:53:00 PM »
Yuca con ajo


1st time ive ever made this but it tasted even better than what ive been served in any of Miami's finest Cuban restaurants

-boil yuca in small volume of water with copious lime juice and some salt for 30 min
- smash whole garlic clove in salt with mortar and pestle
-saute minced onion and salt/garlic in olive oil
-add copious lemon juice to saute and  large cubes of boiled yuca, saute for 5 more minutes, coating/turning yuca in pan

So simple, so delicious

I love Yuca con ajo. Thank you the recipe how to. My ex FIL used to make it all the time. So yummy.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2017, 03:56:09 PM by Chippewa »
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