Author Topic: Hurricane Preparedness  (Read 817 times)

elvisz

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Hurricane Preparedness
« on: September 05, 2017, 06:17:40 PM »
Florida resident here - monitoring the approach of Hurricane Irma. I will gladly evacuate if and when the time comes but wanted to share some Mustachian ways of doing so. I.e. not rushing to the store at the last minute and buying overpriced and wasteful bottled water. And please, if you have anything to add, feel free to do so. This list is geared towards a "bug-out" as opposed to trying to wait it out in your house.

1) Stock up on mason jars (cheap, reusable, and have many uses) and fill one or two dozen with perfectly-good tap water. I bought a dozen for less than $10 and am thus ensured to always have several days of water on hand. Also useful for storing soups, smoothies, and other such foods. I also have a Big Berkey which is a water purifier allowing me to filter rain, and even pond, water. It's a little pricy but I have a feeling it may come in handy over the next couple weeks.
2) Have a cooler and be prepared to toss in some pre-selected frozen and refrigerated foods for when it comes time to hit the road.
3) Have a sleeping bag, tent, and several days of clothing ready to go. Be prepared to spend some nights on the road if hotels are booked up.
4) If you have a spare battery(s) or an auxiliary battery for your cell phone, ensure it is charged up and ready to go. Electricity could be scarce and your cell phone may be a lifeline.
5) Have pet supplies/food ready to go.
6) Keep your car fueled up. I usually drive to nearly empty, but not with a hurricane inbound. In this case I don't go below half in preparation for gas pumps to dry up or, at a minimum, long lines. With a full tank, I have a range of at least 350 miles. Additionally, make sure any maintenance issues are taken care of. For example, you wouldn't want to drive through pouring rain with bad tires or faulty windshield wipers.
7) Get important documents in order. Bring things of vital importance: social security card, credit cards, birth certificates, passport, etc. And with everything else you can't bring, ensure it is waterproofed and stashed away in a file cabinet, or somewhere safe.
8) Non-perishable bulk foods. I have buckets of rice, beans, and flour that will provide weeks of nourishment for myself and others in need.
9) Tools. Portable stove, water purifier, knife, tarps, first aid kit, matches/lighter, etc.
10) CASH. When all of the above fails you, currency is king. Credit cards may not work so be prepared to buy transportation, lodging, food, medicine, etc with good, old-fashioned cash. Take more than you think you will need.

Above all, anticipate and have a plan! If you can stay with a friend or relative out of the disaster zone and get there well ahead of the storm, that is the best route of all. Think about your medical needs, your children, your pets, and the needs of any friends and family that rely on you.
"Follow your bliss" - Joseph Campbell

braje

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Re: Hurricane Preparedness
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2017, 06:28:46 PM »
I haven't lived in FLA in decades, but it drives me crazy when they show on the news people trying to buy their supplies and fill their cars at the 11th hour. 

Noodle

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Re: Hurricane Preparedness
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2017, 09:29:07 PM »
I live in a hunker-down zone so I am not usually evacuating, but you do need supplies to be able to stay in place. I bought a big cooler that fits nicely under the clothes in my walk-in closet. In it I keep collapsible water carriers designed for camping, spare batteries for the portable fan and camping lantern, disposable cups, plates and utensils, hand sanitizer, shelf stable food (mostly so I don't get tempted to eat the granola bars). I had originally thought I would be putting the freezer food on ice, and then realized that was dumb, because the reason is to keep it fresh until you can cook it on your grill...which I'm not allowed to have at my complex. Also, the point of hurricane prep is to NOT have to stand in line with the panicked crowds, and going out to buy 50 pounds of ice at the last minute defeats the purpose. But it turns out the big cooler was a great water storage device when I discovered the tub drain didn't seal properly... I do keep one case of bottled water on hand, but it's to throw in the freezer and make impromptu ice to put in the little cooler with things like the lunch meat and cheese which I can eat without cooking.

I always have sunblock, mosquito repellent, and a first aid kit on hand and a couple different large-size chargers for the iThings.

A big lesson learned from Harvey was the importance of buying a bit ahead on things like toilet paper, shampoo, etc. I wasn't able to get to the grocery store for about 10 days, which wasn't a big deal for me, but a lot of people got pretty desperate. (Referring to the people who are not planners, not the folks who can't afford to keep extra items around.)

Also, a comfy folding camping chair makes tornado warnings in the closet much more pleasant. None of my regular chairs fit in there.

former player

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Re: Hurricane Preparedness
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2017, 06:21:40 AM »
It's obviously a good thing to be prepared to either bug out or shelter in place as appropriate, but watching the news from Florida I'm now seeing that there are potential storm surges of 12 feet.  That would mean anyone sheltering in place in even the soundest 2 storey structure is likely to end up drowned if that storm surge reaches them.  Anyone who doesn't realise their danger from storm surge could find all their other preparedness useless.
Be frugal and industrious, and you will be free (Ben Franklin)

soccerluvof4

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Re: Hurricane Preparedness
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2017, 08:44:20 AM »
I have a lot of family down there and its been tough as things keep changing.  I agree with ^. As much as I would build up a plan /supplies if I lived their overtime and would want to stay because of my fascination with weather you just need to get out. The risk reward is just not worth it and the predictions if correct are devastating.
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Birdie55

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Re: Hurricane Preparedness
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2017, 01:54:32 PM »
Just a couple of thoughts. 

While glass is wonderful, think about the breakage factor.  Maybe fill some plastic containers. 

And a way to cook the beans and rice would be helpful too.  Otherwise you are covered, and please stay safe. 

bobechs

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Re: Hurricane Preparedness
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2017, 02:06:06 PM »
Just a couple of thoughts. 

While glass is wonderful, think about the breakage factor.  Maybe fill some plastic containers. 

And a way to cook the beans and rice would be helpful too.  Otherwise you are covered, and please stay safe.

you can cook in a mason jar.  That is what happens during a lot of home canning.  Boiling water jacket cooks the food in the jar.

You can cook beans or rice in an open jar the same way.  A bit slow but effective.

ender

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Re: Hurricane Preparedness
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2017, 06:07:00 PM »
It's obviously a good thing to be prepared to either bug out or shelter in place as appropriate, but watching the news from Florida I'm now seeing that there are potential storm surges of 12 feet.  That would mean anyone sheltering in place in even the soundest 2 storey structure is likely to end up drowned if that storm surge reaches them.  Anyone who doesn't realise their danger from storm surge could find all their other preparedness useless.

This is why everywhere in FL has evacuation zones, which trigger mandatory evacuations when storm surge is an issue.

elvisz

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Re: Hurricane Preparedness
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2017, 02:53:00 PM »
Good thoughts, thank you. Irma seems to have mostly passed and my little NW corner of the state wasn't effected at all. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for Miami, Tampa, etc. If anyone knows any good ways to get involved in helping with clean-up, I am eager to hear your ideas. I am military and looking into volunteering with Team Rubicon, as a start.
"Follow your bliss" - Joseph Campbell