Author Topic: Dumpster Diving for Groceries  (Read 43357 times)

nancy33

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 58
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #100 on: December 26, 2016, 07:32:25 PM »
This is a bit addicting! Same dumpster again today, took the kids for a long walk and brought a grocery bag this time. A bunch of expired corn tortillas, 70 per package. Got one package from the top for the chickens. Also some loose bread rolls for the chickens from the top. Really, you barely need to reach in. it is right there!

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2641
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #101 on: December 29, 2016, 10:47:37 AM »
lostinwoods,

Can you encourage the management at your local store to reach out to your local food banks and/or an organization like Second Harvest to see if there is a way to donate that excess food rather than dumping it?  Lots of foodbanks and the organizations that support them have grocery salvage operations.  At the one I volunteer at, probably 80-90% of the food comes from grocery salvage.

I've worked for 2 companies, roughly 11 stores... I'll share my experience

The first company was an 18 store family-owned supermarket and deathly afraid of lawsuits.  They claimed someone could get sick off the donated food and sue the company for a ton of money.  Nothing was donated.

The company I work for currently (a massive organic/"green" market you may have heard of) does have food banks and companies that we donate to.  I would still say that only about 5% of the salvageable food actually makes its way out the door. 

The problem is it's a store by store effort and companies don't have specific policies in place.  Our company throws out enough that we could feed entire countries, but donating it is costly and is a hassle for employees that are already struggling to get the bare minimum done.  The reason we donate is really only for the tax write-off, which requires an employee costing out the loss and recording it, which takes time (money).  Then it takes up valuable space in backrooms, coolers and freezers that is usually much needed to store product.  All of that combined with the high-turnover rate and "don't give an f" attitude of many retail employees leads to a system that doesn't actually work.  Those in need only end up getting scraps of what is actually tossed everyday.

Maybe it's because of Christmas (or the eggnog), but this thread had inspired me to reach out to local food banks and work with them to create a better system.  If it was pitched right, with emphasis on the tax write-off and public relations/media coverage for the store, combined with a useable execution strategy that the stores could work with, I think a huge dent could be made in the waste.

I still want to emphasize how risky dumpster diving is at stores.  I went back through my recall-notice emails last night and estimated that we throw out potentially HIGHLY contaminated food, that looks perfectly fine to eat, roughly 25 times a year(almost every other week).  Other recalls like infestation and rancidity take place close to weekly, not to mention the fact that dumpsters are literally a dumping ground for box cutter blades, broken glass, and every other waste meant to be tossed far away from humans.  I am not a germaphobe or anything like that, but risking health and safety to save a few bucks seems more like gambling than frugality.










This was always my concern.  I do drive around the store once in awhile to see if other non perishable items might be around but as much as I would like to dumpster dive if i am not kidding myself it would be more for the sport of it! My wife would kill me though as shes picky and I wouldn't feel right lying to her especially if something did happen and her or one of the kids got sick. Having said that, I use to ship a lot of food and yea...for the reasons you mentioned I would not recommend it people.
" In life you don't get what you deserve you get what you negotiate"

SaveSpendGiveALittle

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #102 on: December 30, 2016, 07:21:04 PM »
Definitely is addictive... I've been looking on a regular basis and finding items to consume myself or donate. Today I brought home a bag of organic apples, 3 bags of brussell sprouts, 4 containers of yogurt, 3 boxes of raspberries and some bananas.

I agree with some of dangers, that being said, I basically just take these right off the top and in the box that the employee put them in to avoid some of the risks.

mousebandit

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 267
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #103 on: December 30, 2016, 10:57:17 PM »
It's 10pm here and I am seriously thinking we need to drive to town for a little looksee!!  OMGoodness, I am digging this!  (Pun intended!)

FunkyChopstick

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 42
  • Location: Philadelphia, PA
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #104 on: January 09, 2017, 03:13:59 PM »
I would do this in a heartbeat! Kudos to you guys for helping so  many others out. Especially in the winter I would be all over it. Maybe its time to break the seal and dive in (ba-duh-ba!)!

frugalsurfer

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 40
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #105 on: January 10, 2017, 09:51:59 PM »
Great stuff. I'd really like to find a good DD spot for reliable supplies. My partner works at a small vegetarian cafe and they they throw out so much good food each day because the salads and other plant based foods don't look as presentable once they're a day old. She takes home as much as she wants so we always have fresh salads and other healthy treats for free. It's not DD, but it's a start.

sw1tch

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 269
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Middle of no and where
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #106 on: January 12, 2017, 01:23:42 PM »
My wife and I are thinking about trying this in our area.  Posting to hear others' experience and maybe share mine in the future.
<|>

I, sw1tch, will become a millionaire!
FIRE'd on 9/8/2017

SaveSpendGiveALittle

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #107 on: January 16, 2017, 09:47:32 AM »
I just rescued 6 large bags full of holiday candy/food. None of it is expired or close to expiring, just because it has a holiday label, apparently it was time to trash it all. I will probably keep a few things such as the canned pumpkin but most of it will be donated. Everything was right on top of the dumpster and double bagged so really no worries about something being compromised.

KT Beans

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #108 on: January 16, 2017, 01:24:43 PM »
I've always wanted to try this, but in my town the two grocers have compactors.

However, once a lady posted on FB that she had wild meat in her freezer that was over a year old and wanted it gone.  She suggested it would be good to use as dog food, but I asked if it was freezer burnt.  She said she didn't think so, so I asked to take it.  I let her think I had a dog (without saying otherwise) and ate the meat all myself.  I had to cut off very small patches of freezer burn on only a couple of pieces.  I learned that freezer burnt meat is fine to eat from a food safety perspective, it only affects texture.  That was such an awesome score.

Alternatively I've considered asking my grocer for food waste for my pigs, even though I don't have pigs (or live on a farm).  We have curb side compost pick up so anything I throw out would be used to make money for the town anyhow (and I doubt the grocer composts their waste).  Haven't done it yet...

Kaybee

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 128
  • Location: Alberta
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #109 on: January 16, 2017, 05:41:36 PM »
I wouldn't necessarily be against this (there's even a freegan restaurant that I want to visit in Paris, I only heard about it AFTER I returned from my last trip) but the stores in my old area had compactors/locked dumpsters.  I know at least one of the nearby stores in my new area has a compactor but I haven't checked out the others...I should look into this. :)
I'm late to the game but I'm trying to be quick to pick up how to play!!

Goldielocks

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4805
  • Location: BC
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #110 on: January 16, 2017, 06:46:05 PM »
When I worked for a retail chain, one store did have a set up for a large customer, who would pay 10% of the value for any short dated items about to be tossed.  He had a regular pickup date / time, so the employees could put it aside for him neatly the day before, and the proceeds went to the store's chosen charity (so employees were happy about it).

I think that he was from a Hutterite colony or something like that, and had a side business where he fed a lot of people as part of their work day.  Only good quality, but close dated or items being switched off shelves to make room for new products were given, and cleanly packaged.  Often, these were the items that could not get sold from the discount rack and were sold to him as a "last chance" money opportunity.

Anyway -- some of you larger volume dumpster divers may want to negotiate with a store if you have animals or a large need for regular supplies of food.

The chain I worked at, for most stores, had a recall / sort process, where instead of dumping items, they were sent to a central processing facility if non-perishable, and cleaned up, counted, and then the manufacturer was charged (for damage due to bad packaging), or sent to the discount location, or held for food bank pick up.   Several large trucks a week went to the food bank.  Note, this was partially paid by the drugstore (makeup / hair product) merchandise that the vendors paid the recall center to count and credit the stores for, as they did not trust store employees to do it correctly.

SaveSpendGiveALittle

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #111 on: January 22, 2017, 10:56:20 AM »
Stopped by a few dumpsters this morning and rescued about 10 boxes of cereal, 5 bags of popcorn, 1 bag beef jerky, 1 bag of starbucks coffee, 5 bottles of vitamin water, 1 energy drink, and I'd guess about 40 bags of various candy/snacks.  There was a few different packs of beer ( I would guess its illegal to dump alcohol and I don't drink, so I left them ) in one dumpster. Also while getting gas, I went to throw away a bag with a few items that I couldn't rescue and found a box with 10 packages of cookies.

Dicey

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6276
  • Age: 59
  • Location: NorCal
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #112 on: January 25, 2017, 09:55:22 AM »
In the second that I freeze, I hear clearly, repeated, "Come on in, boy."  I am frozen as a figure emerges from the shadows and approaches me.  Indigent, and likely homeless. Middle-aged, scruffy beard, bandana around head, clothes that looked as though he lived outdoors in them, casted from a low-budget horror movie.

"They got shoes.  I hid when you pulled up cause I thought you were the po-lice.  Come on in."

My buddy and I dove back into his car, afraid to turn our backs as we ran.

Great story, haha.  Loving your writing style.  DH was inside the dumpster one night when a couple goth teens rolled up and started using the darkened dumpster location as their makeout spot.  I wish I had saved our text conversation documenting his steady stream of internal dialogue until the moment he decided to say, "Hey guys, I don't want to scare you, but there's a dude in this dumpster about to come out."  They turned tail and fled, to live out their lives in traumatized fear of dumpsters.
Haha, I like your story better. In the first one, it seemed like the guy was kinda helpful, despite being down on his luck.
I did it! I have a journal!
A Lot Like This
And hell yes, I am still moving confidently in the direction of my dreams...

Just Joe

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 996
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #113 on: January 27, 2017, 09:23:22 AM »
Saw an episode of "Dirty Jobs" where food from Las Vegas casinos was salvaged and fed to pigs. Seems to me that there is a business opportunity for "old" food to be salvaged and fed to people and if not people then farm animals.

SO sad that our society wastes so much. I think our economy is dependent on waste. Think of all the broken things that get tossed that is one repair from being very usable again. SO many of my cars have been examples of this. When I young and single I drove for free by flipping cars that needed some TLC. Walk through a junkyard and you'll see as many neglected cars as you will wrecked or worn out cars. They were neglected so long and in so many ways...

Back when I was flipping cars, a friend and I would frequently dumpster dive behind some retail establishments. We'd get paperback books, magazines, a weed whacker, a push lawnmower, etc.

SirSavesaLot

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 21
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #114 on: January 30, 2017, 09:21:34 PM »
I love it when a thread starts with "Ok, so it sounds super gross."

iowajes

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5222
  • Location: United States
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #115 on: January 31, 2017, 06:47:49 AM »
I just rescued 6 large bags full of holiday candy/food. None of it is expired or close to expiring, just because it has a holiday label, apparently it was time to trash it all. I will probably keep a few things such as the canned pumpkin but most of it will be donated. Everything was right on top of the dumpster and double bagged so really no worries about something being compromised.

I don't think I would donate food I took out of a dumpster. It is one thing to decide you are up for the risk (even if it is near minimal); but to expose others, without disclosing that- seems a bit crazy.

SaveSpendGiveALittle

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #116 on: February 01, 2017, 07:43:24 PM »
I am not sure I understand what is crazy or risky about this ? The food was in its original sealed container, then sealed inside 2 garbage bags. Nothing that was donated was opened or exposed to anything in the dumpster.

Goldielocks

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4805
  • Location: BC
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #117 on: February 01, 2017, 09:55:34 PM »
I am not sure I understand what is crazy or risky about this ? The food was in its original sealed container, then sealed inside 2 garbage bags. Nothing that was donated was opened or exposed to anything in the dumpster.
There is sometimes a reason  that otherwise good food is put in a dumpster -- like a recall for manufacturing problem.

You would not know about that, and would not be able to tell before you donated it.


SaveSpendGiveALittle

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #118 on: February 02, 2017, 06:15:12 PM »
I am not sure I understand what is crazy or risky about this ? The food was in its original sealed container, then sealed inside 2 garbage bags. Nothing that was donated was opened or exposed to anything in the dumpster.
There is sometimes a reason  that otherwise good food is put in a dumpster -- like a recall for manufacturing problem.

You would not know about that, and would not be able to tell before you donated it.

The vast majority of the time there is not.

It was various christmas candy that was being discarded because it was the end of January. Stores across the country throw this away every year. If there was a large quantity of one specific item, I agree, it could be recall related but I don't see the M&Ms, Reese PB cups, Kit Kats, Snickers and other candy listed on any recall list.

Companies recall food all the time after thousands have purchased/consumed the product... you are at "risk" every time you eat something from the store. I don't see an increase in the risk if common sense is used when determining what to donate against what shouldn't be consumed.

Last time I read the facts, it was something like half of the food in America goes to waste ( and this number is not due to recalls ) while 1 in 7 Americans are food insecure. I don't see anything crazy about helping to reduce this.


iowajes

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5222
  • Location: United States
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #119 on: February 02, 2017, 06:28:37 PM »
Do you think the food pantry would take it if you told them you pulled it out of the dumpster? If it's no big deal, disclose it.

SaveSpendGiveALittle

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #120 on: February 02, 2017, 06:48:59 PM »
There is no one at the drop off location...  Here is what's posted at a food bank website as to what they will accept and why donations are important.

WHY DONATE

It’s financially smart.

Check with your financial advisor to learn more about the tax benefits associated with donating food.

You’re legally protected.
 The FEDERAL BILL EMERSON GOOD SAMARITAN FOOD DONATION ACT protects those who make good faith donations from liability.

It’s crucial to our community.
 Every day, we become more aware of the staggering need for emergency food in our community. In 2015, we distributed over 26 million pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables to families in need.

WHAT WE ACCEPT

We accept nonperishable foods, fresh produce, and prepared but unserved foods that meet these requirements.*
• All foods must be closed, sealed, and labeled. If unlabeled, complete ingredient information must be provided.
• Fresh produce must be boxed or bagged—not loose.
• Temperature-sensitive foods must be frozen or held at or below 40 degrees.
*We follow strict warehouse standards and safe food handling practices.
We do not accept milk-based soups, fresh shellfish, home-prepared foods, or foods that have been placed in a buffet serving area.

Goldielocks

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4805
  • Location: BC
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #121 on: February 03, 2017, 10:29:03 AM »
I am not sure I understand what is crazy or risky about this ? The food was in its original sealed container, then sealed inside 2 garbage bags. Nothing that was donated was opened or exposed to anything in the dumpster.
There is sometimes a reason  that otherwise good food is put in a dumpster -- like a recall for manufacturing problem.

You would not know about that, and would not be able to tell before you donated it.

The vast majority of the time there is not.

It was various christmas candy that was being discarded because it was the end of January. Stores across the country throw this away every year. If there was a large quantity of one specific item, I agree, it could be recall related but I don't see the M&Ms, Reese PB cups, Kit Kats, Snickers and other candy listed on any recall list.

Companies recall food all the time after thousands have purchased/consumed the product... you are at "risk" every time you eat something from the store. I don't see an increase in the risk if common sense is used when determining what to donate against what shouldn't be consumed.

Last time I read the facts, it was something like half of the food in America goes to waste ( and this number is not due to recalls ) while 1 in 7 Americans are food insecure. I don't see anything crazy about helping to reduce this.

The solution to this is incredibly easy to implement.  The issue is one of two things:

1)  Lack of timely and convenient transportation to the Food Bank
2)  Lack of storage at Food bank (related to perceived value of the food to the food banks.  They want peanut butter, but not pickles, etc)

What you do, is:
- go to the store manager (where you see a lot of stuff tossed) and tell him that you see a lot of good, short dated food getting tossed, and would like to bring some of it to the food bank each week.
-Ask them to put aside 2 boxes that you will pickup every Friday at 8am. with your name / foodbank name on it.  (or ask for thier time).
-Take it to the food bank.

Bonus -- ask the food bank what type of items they want the most of. 
Super Bonus -- ask the food bank if they need a free pickup driver on Fridays at 8am, and you can do the circult for them, and they arrange the food boxes with the stores.

runewell

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 420
  • Age: 46
  • actuary
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #122 on: February 03, 2017, 01:06:18 PM »
There is a documentary out there about this topic.  If it's still available on Netflix, look around and watch it.  I think it takes place in Canada.
Please leave Dicey out of this! Have you not been paying any attention? Trolls are not welcome here!

Dropbear

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 51
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #123 on: February 28, 2017, 05:53:02 AM »
Inspired by this thread, I thought I'd have to see for myself just how much supermarket food goes to waste.  First try: found 2 dozen eggs and 2 hands of bananas, so I made an omelette and a smoothie, and the rest went in the fridge.  Bear: 1, Bin: 0 :)

kkbmustang

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1285
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #124 on: March 03, 2017, 09:23:46 PM »
I just watched "Just Eat It" on Amazon.  (Note: it's not free.  Reminder: I can watch it for a couple more weeks. Should watch it again.)

Pretty interesting.

FYI, this documentary is free for Amazon Prime members as of tonight.

PJ

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1452
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Toronto, Canada
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #125 on: March 03, 2017, 09:43:45 PM »
I just watched "Just Eat It" on Amazon.  (Note: it's not free.  Reminder: I can watch it for a couple more weeks. Should watch it again.)

Pretty interesting.

FYI, this documentary is free for Amazon Prime members as of tonight.

Hi kkbmustang!  Nice to see your name pop up on the recent/unread posts!  Hope you're doing ok these days!
'To be human you must bear witness to justice. Justice is what love looks like in public." 
Dr. Cornel West

okobrien

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 107
    • Up From Wage Slavery
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #126 on: March 03, 2017, 10:26:59 PM »
This thread has reminded me of the annual canned food drives at the HS where I used to teach.  The vast majority of the students were poor, but many still made the sacrific, and brought in a few canned food items for the drive.  When everything was collected from the classrooms, they would sort through and throw away the expired cans because the thought was you couldn't donate expired food. So this sucked, especially because it seemed that a huge percentage of the food was expired. The remaining food was then donated to the community, which, of course, was the same people who donated in the first place- but they only got like 60% of their food back. 
To summarize: Poor people donate food. Hours of labor is spent collected and sorting said food. Half is thrown away, the other half is returned to poor people.
On a positive note, my stockpile of tasty, expired, canned food was always well stocked.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk


Aggie1999

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 272
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #127 on: March 19, 2017, 09:26:02 PM »
Hit local small grocery store dumpster yesterday. Got 30+ loaves of bread that will go to feed catfish. Got one bag of tortillas that expire next month. Already ate a few of those. Got 3 boxes of Ritz type crackers past the expiration date. Don't taste that good (not stale, just cheap knock-off crackers) so those will go to the fishes also.

Dicey

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6276
  • Age: 59
  • Location: NorCal
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #128 on: March 20, 2017, 12:26:11 AM »
This thread has reminded me of the annual canned food drives at the HS where I used to teach.  The vast majority of the students were poor, but many still made the sacrific, and brought in a few canned food items for the drive.  When everything was collected from the classrooms, they would sort through and throw away the expired cans because the thought was you couldn't donate expired food. So this sucked, especially because it seemed that a huge percentage of the food was expired. The remaining food was then donated to the community, which, of course, was the same people who donated in the first place- but they only got like 60% of their food back. 
To summarize: Poor people donate food. Hours of labor is spent collected and sorting said food. Half is thrown away, the other half is returned to poor people.
On a positive note, my stockpile of tasty, expired, canned food was always well stocked.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
I run a community-wide food drive in the Fall as part of a larger community volunteer event and at Christmas I organize a neighborhood food drive. My local food bank accepts packaged and canned goods up to one year past their expiration date. Check before you toss, always.
I did it! I have a journal!
A Lot Like This
And hell yes, I am still moving confidently in the direction of my dreams...

runewell

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 420
  • Age: 46
  • actuary
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #129 on: March 20, 2017, 12:38:48 PM »
Hit local small grocery store dumpster yesterday. Got 30+ loaves of bread that will go to feed catfish. Got one bag of tortillas that expire next month. Already ate a few of those. Got 3 boxes of Ritz type crackers past the expiration date. Don't taste that good (not stale, just cheap knock-off crackers) so those will go to the fishes also.

Because the catfish are starving?
Please leave Dicey out of this! Have you not been paying any attention? Trolls are not welcome here!

LiquidLen

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 24
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #130 on: March 20, 2017, 12:51:48 PM »
You got me inspired. I have enough food in the house now, but wanted a few more vegetables, i'm gonna go *try* it after work. I really like the idea of not wasting good stuff, let's see if it works.

Aggie1999

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 272
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #131 on: March 20, 2017, 01:32:56 PM »
Hit local small grocery store dumpster yesterday. Got 30+ loaves of bread that will go to feed catfish. Got one bag of tortillas that expire next month. Already ate a few of those. Got 3 boxes of Ritz type crackers past the expiration date. Don't taste that good (not stale, just cheap knock-off crackers) so those will go to the fishes also.

Because the catfish are starving?

Parent's tank stocked with catfish. Nice to have free bread to feed them instead of the expensive fish food.

Awka

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 20
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #132 on: March 23, 2017, 06:36:29 AM »
I just watched "Just Eat It" on Amazon.  (Note: it's not free.  Reminder: I can watch it for a couple more weeks. Should watch it again.)

Pretty interesting.

FYI, this documentary is free for Amazon Prime members as of tonight.

Yay! Still free. Thanks for sharing!

TWoK

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 14
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #133 on: March 23, 2017, 09:06:55 PM »
Quote
We've already had the discussion with our kids that it's probably not a good idea to tell people at school that we eat dumpster food.  Haha.

There was a time there whenever we drove past a dumpster my son would start asking us for bananas. :D

I have really mixed feelings about this. My mom was and probably still is a dumpster diver/trash hoarder. I guess the difference is she generally claimed to be "rescuing" shit like typewriters (in the mid-90's) from the dump, yet here we are 20 years later and they are still filling up her house. I do have to say that while we all know the standard American diet and standard American lifestyle are full of waste and excess this is something you want to explain to your kids within reason. Giving your kids a pavlovian response to dumpster diving just seems to be asking for issues down the road - who knows... I'm not trying to be judgement and just trying to look for ways to lower my grocery bill myself.

I've considered diving to get food for my chickens but never for my family. Maybe time to rethink things?
« Last Edit: March 23, 2017, 09:09:04 PM by TWoK »

Awka

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 20
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #134 on: March 25, 2017, 05:37:17 AM »
Finally watched "Just Eat It." The hauls of organic or natural foods alone are crazy. Example:  The rescue boxes of Green + Blacks organic chocolate bars. Something like a year prior to Best By date, and not recalled.  Food recalls can be checked online easily. Shows them doing so.

It's definitely worth watching.  If I lived someplace with those products just trashed, I'd do it. (I'm in a very small town, one store. I think they're in Vancouver?)

HAPPYINAZ

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 281
Re: Dumpster Diving for Groceries
« Reply #135 on: March 26, 2017, 09:59:57 AM »
I watched "just eat it" last night, thanks for the suggestion.  Good documentary.  We used to harvest a lot of food from convenience stores and leave it where homeless people were staying.  They greatly appreciated it.