Author Topic: DIY bathroom addition...  (Read 1345 times)

ncornilsen

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DIY bathroom addition...
« on: July 05, 2013, 11:09:57 PM »
I rent out two rooms in my 3br, 1 ba house... and three people sharing a bathroom is a bit much, plus the 3 br 1 ba layout isn't completely resale friendly.  As a hands on engineer who likes to build things, I wanted to design and build a simple bathroom addition on the master bedroom.

I decided this was the year to do it because the roof on the house was due for replacement anyway.

So, here are some pictures!
March 2013:
HVAC system replaced so I could get the packag heater/AC system out of the footprint of the planned addition. I did all the work, including some ducting modifications and running the gasline.  (First two pics)

I was concurrently doing the design and layout of the addition in CAD. This allowed me to know exactly how many boards I'd need. (It did not, however, help me account for the fact that fully 15% of the boards I purchased were unusable due to low quality wood these days, and that the lumberyard I get great deals through doesn't allow cherry picking) (3rd pic)

And, finally in May 2013, I broke ground. I rented the escavator and dug it out. I was within 2 inches of final grade when I was done.

ncornilsen

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Re: DIY bathroom addition...
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2013, 11:15:15 PM »
Once the foundation  pit was dug, it was time to form and pour the footer: (Pics 1, 2, 3)



ncornilsen

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Re: DIY bathroom addition...
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2013, 11:25:01 PM »
With the footer poured, it was time to construct the stem wall forms. About as much time went into these damned thing as went into framing the actual house, so I recommend anyone else find a better way to form their stem wall.  The rest of the house has a rat slab poured over the vapor barrier. It makes working in the crawlspace so nice, I decided to do that in the addition as well.

In the fourth pic... the concrete truck shows up, with 3 yards of 3000 PSI, 5% air concrete! This, and the pumping service, are the only two things I hired out so far. Money well spent, in my opinion.


ncornilsen

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Re: DIY bathroom addition...
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2013, 11:31:18 PM »
The pumper ran the hose and filled the forms. I used a vibe to settle the concrete in the form behind him. It took 25 minutes to pour the walls and the floor... then an hour of finishing work. (1 & 2)

A lesson learned:  Concrete shrinks with it cures. Just a little bit.  This ment the forms on the outside of the pour came right off the cement. It unfortunately ment the forms on the inside of the stem wall were hopelessly locked into place, and had to be destroyed upon removal.  So much for my idea to resell them!

ncornilsen

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Re: DIY bathroom addition...
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2013, 11:35:51 PM »
With the stem walls done, it was time to frame and install the floor joists and underlayment. I apparently didn't get any pics while placing the joists, so you'll just have to trust that they're there!

With the floor installed, it was time to remove the siding and begin framing!



ncornilsen

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Re: DIY bathroom addition...
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2013, 11:40:22 PM »
Pics one and two are of the walls going up, 3 shows the rafters installed, and 4 shows the roof plane where I tied the old in with the new. I'm very happy with how the roof plans matched... it took alot of careful measuring and adjusting rafter lengths 1/8" at a time to make this come out nicely.

And, that's where I'm at now.  Well, I started tearing the roofing off the rest of the house, but I'll post pics of that later!


Rural

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Re: DIY bathroom addition...
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2013, 07:56:36 AM »
Very nicely done so far! Do keep us posted.

I wish in retrospect that we'd gone ahead and bought a new copy of CAD for our house design. My husband did it all in Corel, which works, but is slow.

Did you build your roof trusses?

Don't kick yourself over the concrete forms. The pros spray something in theirs before they pour or they'd never get theirs off either. I didn't know about it until they started spraying. It's not at all intuitive. Your forms look great in the pics, by the way.

kendallf

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Re: DIY bathroom addition...
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2013, 09:49:59 PM »
Looking good!  How much $ are you in it for at this point?

ncornilsen

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Re: DIY bathroom addition...
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2013, 07:47:21 AM »
I sprayed the forms with diesel before pouring, so it wasn't adheared, it was just mechanically back-locked into the concrete! The concrete guy thought they were a bit over-built, but having a blow out would have been a disaster!
I hand-built all the rafters, pre-built trusses would have been nice but there was no way to make them match the existing roof without lowering the plate height so far that the ceiling would only be 88".

Right now, I'm in it $8500, but that's including $3400 in materials (and potentially $800 in labor) for re-roofing the rest of the house, which needed to be done anyway.  I hope to have it done at about $12000 total. 

ncornilsen

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Re: DIY bathroom addition...
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2013, 04:23:47 PM »
Well, nice surprise... my contractor buddy was able to shave $1000 off the price of roofing materials by letting me use his account. (And paying cash)! It's who you know in this world... I ended up paying a crew to install the shingles. since I did the tear off and will handle the cleanup, they were able to do it very inexpensively and quickly.

Anyway, Here's some pic's of the tear off, and one of the new roof, where the addition transitions to the existing structure.

Pro-tip:  If you do a roof tear-off, here's how to make it easier.
-Spend the money on a dump bin. Handling this stuff twice to save $250 isn't worth it.  Beleive me, we did this on this project and it sucks.
-If you insist on using your pickup/trailer to haul the stuff,  put the tarpaper down in the truck first. When you have 4" or less of debris in the truck, it all will just slide out of the back of the truck, saving some time.
-Get a cheap harbor freight square nose shovel. grind two v notches, 1/4" deep, spaced at 5.5". This lets you pull two rows of nails (and therefore flights of shingles) at the same time. The shingles also come up more or less whole, with the nails still in the shingle, for easier handling.