Author Topic: Bathroom mold  (Read 1727 times)

Leisured

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Bathroom mold
« on: May 23, 2019, 01:35:06 AM »
I use hand sanitizer, which I think is alcohol in a gel. Squeeze a blob on a patch of mold, and spread with a finger. The gel stays in place. After a few days the mold has faded away. Repeat as required.

Lulee

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2019, 04:15:13 PM »
Very interesting!  I wonder how well it gets beneath the surface to kill off the mold there (my research says mold is a bit like icebergs and mushrooms, the visible part is the smaller part of the plant/object than what's below the surface).  But the gel holding it the alcohol there certainly gives it every chance to kill the invisible portion.  Do you think it's actually the alcohol killing the mold or does the gel actually suffocate the mold?

Leisured

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2019, 07:22:48 AM »
Good point Lulee. The gel will certainly keep air from the mold, but alcohol is lethal for all life forms, including us. Try drinking a  bottle of whiskey in ten minutes.

Dabnasty

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2019, 08:07:38 AM »
I tried the sanitizer where the bathtub meets a tile wall. I think the mold lightened up a bit but after reapplying 3 times over 2 days but then I gave up.

After that I tried strips of old t-shirts dipped in bleach and then pressed into the corners. Most of the mold was gone after a few hours.

Also, I only tried hand sanitizer because we had half a big bottle we salvaged from someone and we never use it. I would assume it's much more expensive than bleach? Might still use the sanitizer for small mold spots in places where I don't want bleach to stain something.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2019, 10:19:43 AM »
Good point Lulee. The gel will certainly keep air from the mold, but alcohol is lethal for all life forms, including us. Try drinking a  bottle of whiskey in ten minutes.

If the choice is live with mold, or give the mold my gin  . . .  hello my fuzzy little bathroom friends.

StarBright

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2019, 10:30:29 AM »
I tried the sanitizer where the bathtub meets a tile wall. I think the mold lightened up a bit but after reapplying 3 times over 2 days but then I gave up.

After that I tried strips of old t-shirts dipped in bleach and then pressed into the corners. Most of the mold was gone after a few hours.

Also, I only tried hand sanitizer because we had half a big bottle we salvaged from someone and we never use it. I would assume it's much more expensive than bleach? Might still use the sanitizer for small mold spots in places where I don't want bleach to stain something.

I tried it too! We have one spot about an inch long that gets mold no matter what! - this trick did not work for me. I went back to my trusty Mold Armor spray.

habaneroNorway

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2019, 07:04:19 AM »
Mold in the bathroom (or anywhere else) is normally a sign of a more fundamental problem.

Leisured

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2019, 07:22:18 AM »
You need to consider the corrosive effects of treatments like bleach. Get rid of the mold, but face the consequences of corroded tiles in the future. Try something more benign.

PC2K

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2019, 08:40:13 AM »
Solve the actual issue; moisture.

Make sure you ventilate correctly. Ventilate well and everything dries quickly and you won't get mold.

meghan88

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2019, 01:58:28 PM »
Good point Lulee. The gel will certainly keep air from the mold, but alcohol is lethal for all life forms, including us. Try drinking a  bottle of whiskey in ten minutes.

If the choice is live with mold, or give the mold my gin  . . .  hello my fuzzy little bathroom friends.

Best laugh I've had all week.  Thanks :-)

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2019, 06:27:46 PM »
Chlorine bleach is cheap as anything and the main ingredient in mold-rid products. Water down about half, put in spray bottle, spray on mold. Will bleach some things so test it first. White vinegar will also attack mold, if you're worried about bleach, but bleach should be totally appropriate as a germ killer in bathrooms. No more scrubbing grout, just spray on and leave.

FYI, bleach shouldn't impact ceramics like tiles. It won't react with the tile or the glaze. Perhaps if the tile was handpainted or printed it might......

Radagast

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Re: Bathroom mold
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2019, 10:39:51 PM »
Chlorine bleach is cheap as anything and the main ingredient in mold-rid products. Water down about half, put in spray bottle, spray on mold. Will bleach some things so test it first. White vinegar will also attack mold, if you're worried about bleach, but bleach should be totally appropriate as a germ killer in bathrooms. No more scrubbing grout, just spray on and leave.

FYI, bleach shouldn't impact ceramics like tiles. It won't react with the tile or the glaze. Perhaps if the tile was handpainted or printed it might......
Yup, bleach is one of my go-to's. Dirt cheap and extremely effective. Provides water treatment in emergencies. It will not damage glass, porcelain, ceramic, enamel, or most plastics. Look out for metals though!