Author Topic: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover  (Read 1980 times)

NeonPegasus

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Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« on: May 02, 2017, 10:43:37 AM »
My tenants just moved out and left the bathroom a mess. The vanities have some drawers missing and some just messed up. The vanity + top have to go. I'm now trying to decide what to do about the replacement.

This unit is in a working class neighborhood so I don't want to sink a ton of money into the bathroom. At the same time, I don't want to replace the vanity at every turnover so I'm leery of the cheapest options at the big box stores. I'm also disgusted by having to clean out bathroom drawers and think that bathroom cabinets tend to hide leaks.

What do you think about an open vanity like this:


Or maybe something with one shelf that could hold baskets:


I would probably get some made out of stainless (Mr. NP and I own a stainless metal fab shop), so it should be damn near indestructible. I'm just wondering if that would end up being really undesirable to tenants or bad for some unforeseen reason. I would have no problem providing new baskets at every turnover.

Cwadda

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2017, 02:43:29 PM »
Definitely not the open one. Functionality supersedes look any day. There is minimal storage in that first one.

My mom has had great success with IKEA vanities in her rental apartments. They're cheapish, are great for storage, and look good.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 03:13:01 PM by Cwadda »

CptJack83

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2017, 03:12:14 PM »
I know this subjective, but when I've had to update any of my rentals, I've always made them a little nicer than one would think is "rental quality".  Even if a nicer updated won't always get me more rent, it will get me a better tenant, or at least I'll have more applicants so I have a bigger/better pool to pick my tenant from.  Good quality tenants are the difference between Landlording being a breeze and a nightmare. So put in a nice vanity.

MayDay

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2017, 06:09:26 PM »
As a current tenant that would be a huge negative unless there is some other storage space in the bathroom.
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valsecito

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2017, 09:20:08 PM »
Definitely not the open one. Functionality supersedes look any day. There is minimal storage in that first one.

My mom has had great success with IKEA vanities in her rental apartments. They're cheapish, are great for storage, and look good.
+1 on the IKEA. I've installed them in my own bathroom. Cheap and rather good quality.

It's also possible to go even cheaper with very little fiddling by using IKEA furniture not desigened for bathrooms. Some of that has ridiculously good value for money. A friend has done that and - with just a little planning- spent ridiculously little on his bathroom.

Also 1000% agree with others regarding getting in good tenants. A well equiped bathroom is one of the cheapest ways to have your rental stand out. So don't scrimp on that!

NeonPegasus

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2017, 10:33:10 AM »
Thanks all for your replies.

I decided against IKEA because none of their stuff is standard sized so I'd be limited to using them any time I needed to replace something.

I spoke with Mr. NP last night and we were convinced that we were going to build a new vanity out of stainless but now, after reading the responses, I'm second guessing it.

I do know that I will not be buying another wood vanity.

My options now are to (a) rehab the existing vanity or (b) build a new stainless one.

If we build an open stainless steel vanity for the bathrooms, we will include a stainless steel shelf so there are more storage options. This will be a nice looking vanity, BTW.  It will look similar to the one below except the stainless will be satin polish instead of mirror, the shelf will be stainless, not glass, and the vanity top will be a standard "engineered marble" like below.



Since the vanity top will be 49" wide with only one sink, there should be a good amount of space to set things. Additionally, I'll replace the existing mirror with a medicine cabinet for more storage. I may convince MNP to weld some hairdryer hooks on the side closest to the outlet. Right now, the estimated cost for a vanity is $200 in materials + another $215 for labor. So, it'd be $415 each. The new top would be $159. A medicine cabinet would cost $150.

If we rehab the existing vanity, I will get new drawers and drawer front and get a new top. The drawers + front would cost around $75-100. I'd have to spend time repainting as well. The new top would be $209 since it's 61" instead of 48". I would leave the existing mirror and just repaint the frame.

I think the stainless vanity would look cool and modern. It would be nearly indestructible and allow for easy cleaning underneath. It would be 48" instead of 60" so any subsequent tops would be cheaper and the vanity would not be up against the wall. If I remove the existing vanities, the floor guy will be able to ensure his new flooring extends underneath it.

If I rehab the existing vanity, it will be cheaper. Subsequent replacement tops would be more expensive and the top would be against the wall so there's the potential for wall damage. Also, it could get destroyed by the next tenant and I'd be back at square one.

Maybe some pics would help. I'll post some from my phone in the next post.


NeonPegasus

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Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2017, 10:34:32 AM »

This is one of the current vanities.

The other drawer does not work well and neither do the drawers in the other bathroom.

This is what the bathroom in the other unit that is a mirror image looks like. I paid $150 to have the top refinished. I don't know why I couldn't find the right sized vanity top for a good price. I will definitely not refinish another vanity top at that cost.






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NeonPegasus

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2017, 10:40:23 AM »
Some back story would be appropriate as well.

I agree about making the unit nice to attract good tenants but I also have to be reasonable about what I'm going to achieve. Rental units are going for around $895/mo in the area and nicely updated ones fetch maybe $50-100/mo more but that's it.

And then there's the issue of cash. I've already put about $30k into my two duplexes this year, replacing siding and adding gutters to one, painting the exterior and replacing the windows in all. Then I spent $4.5k due to a tree root growing into a pipe and $5k rehabbing another unit for turnover.

To get this particular unit ready for rental, I have to repaint the entire interior (ceiling, trim, doors, everything), paying extra due to the previous tenant's grandkids coloring on the walls. I have to replace all flooring, deal with some plumbing issues and repair/refinish a tub with a crack in it. Both bathroom lights will have to be replaced. I don't think I'll get out of this for much less than $6k. I'm going to have to do a lot of work to clean their filth out of the fridge and stove and all of the kitchen cabinets and then repaint them. I feel strongly about finding ways to minimize cleaning and rehabbing costs going forward, even if it costs me a bit more right now.

And before anyone asks - no, I didn't choose the tenant that just moved out. She was just moving in when I purchased the duplex. My property manager and I will definitely be intense with screening the next ones.

Cwadda

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2017, 01:28:03 PM »
That mirror image one you have there looks fine and has good functionality.

I'm against open vanities. Why? Because the purpose of a vanity is to store all your crap. You don't want all of your shampoo bottles, lotions, medicines and towels visible.

Open vanities look cool in the pictures but offer very little functionality.

NeonPegasus

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2017, 01:14:07 PM »
So, I think I qualify as an askhole on this topic. I did appreciate the input but I went with the open vanity anyway. Here they are. Each has bars on the front and sides that can hold hand towels and a toilet paper holder on one side. They also have shelves upon which the tenants can place organizers to hold stuff. The countertops are big enough for toothbrush holders and the like. Also, they can put hooks on the bars to hang stuff if they want. I hope these will end up lasting.


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Papa bear

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2017, 01:23:35 PM »
Looks like an operating room - not my taste.

Those old vanities were probably 20+ years old.  I would have replaced with a real vanity again - that's what I've done with all my rentals, and expected 10 years on it.

Hopefully this works out for you.


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former player

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #11 on: June 21, 2017, 02:03:47 PM »
Anyone who cared could easily pretty up those vanities with a couple of wicker baskets or even some curtaining.   Even without, it's clean, modern and functional. I'd have agreed that the previous vanity wasn't worth saving.
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SuperSecretName

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #12 on: June 21, 2017, 02:44:01 PM »
no offense, but that looks hideous.  add some doors and close the sides.

As a landlord and a renter, it should be move-in ready.  That isn't if the tenant needs to fix up the bathroom to make it functional.

pbkmaine

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #13 on: June 21, 2017, 02:54:41 PM »
I am not crazy about it, but it would be easy enough find some wicker baskets to warm it up a little.

YttriumNitrate

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #14 on: June 22, 2017, 07:20:23 AM »
Interesting. That bathroom certainly has a unique look to it. When you show the unit, how are the potential tenants reacting to the bathroom?

Cwadda

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2017, 08:07:54 AM »
+1 for it needing closed storage. The worst thing is walking into a bathroom and looking at numerous shampoo bottles, beauticare products, etc all over the place.

Dee18

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2017, 09:22:23 AM »
I like your creation, but would add curtains.  Get rings used to hang shower curtains that you can hook on.  Use inexpensive curtains or even shortened shower curtains.  They could look fabulous.

calimom

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2017, 09:42:07 AM »
Not really my idea of a great look either. I don't like seeing the exposed plumbing and it looks like a cleaning challenge. But different strokes and all that.

Cwadda

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #18 on: June 22, 2017, 10:31:21 AM »
I like your creation, but would add curtains.  Get rings used to hang shower curtains that you can hook on.  Use inexpensive curtains or even shortened shower curtains.  They could look fabulous.

Great idea!

MrsDinero

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2017, 11:07:21 AM »
Throwing in my thoughts about open cabinets.  I think it can look nice but in my opinion it limits the type of people you are renting to.  As a parent I would take one look at these and recognize I could not put child safety locks on them.  Sure you can store the cleaning solutions in a locked closet, but you can't lock up the toilet paper and keep a kid from unrolling the entire thing or tossing all the towels about.   Maybe you want to discourage people with kids, but that is limiting a group of people who could pay the rent.

NeonPegasus

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2017, 09:28:06 PM »
The unit has been rented and the tenants like the vanities. The tenants on the other side are apparently jealous of the vanities.

The couple who moved in have no kids or pets. Yay!

I agree about adding baskets or even curtains. That could easily be done to allow the tenant to make their own design mark and it won't damage them. But even without baskets, it is still fully useable and rental ready.

Cleaning is super easy. The shelf is high enough off the floor that you can sweep or vacuum under and stainless can be cleaned with vinegar and water as needed.

Maybe my units are at a low enough price point that the addition of stainless is seen as a luxury, even in spite of a sacrifice in some functionality.



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NoNonsenseLandlord

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2017, 11:46:11 AM »
The unit has been rented and the tenants like the vanities. The tenants on the other side are apparently jealous of the vanities.

Great job.  I just did a bathroom remodel with the tenants in place.  I waited until they went on vacation, and did an extensive job.  It cost about $300 for me to do myself.  I replaced some of the subfloor, reinforced the subfloor, put in a new toilet and tile floor.

While they were out, I also replaced the furnace.

Here are some pictures. 
http://www.nononsenselandlord.com/2017/07/bathroom-remodel/

NeonPegasus

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2017, 12:04:13 PM »
The unit has been rented and the tenants like the vanities. The tenants on the other side are apparently jealous of the vanities.

Great job.  I just did a bathroom remodel with the tenants in place.  I waited until they went on vacation, and did an extensive job.  It cost about $300 for me to do myself.  I replaced some of the subfloor, reinforced the subfloor, put in a new toilet and tile floor.

While they were out, I also replaced the furnace.

Here are some pictures. 
http://www.nononsenselandlord.com/2017/07/bathroom-remodel/

I checked out your pictures and I'm very impressed. Unfortunately, our turnover cost nowhere near that little. All in all, the rehab cost around $13k (so much for the $6k estimated below). The flooring was the most expensive due to the cost of the Allure Ultra plus all of the work the floor needed (tons of leveling compound, many sheets of disintegrated flooring shoveled out and replaced). That was $6.5k. After that, repainting the entire unit cost about $2.3k. Replacing the entire tub and all of the flooring + joists was $1.4k.

I am really, really, REALLY hoping the Allure Ultra ends up being a good long term investment. The house is on a crawl space and has settled a lot so the floors are wavy. Short of spending $$$ to jack up the floors, sheet vinyl and carpet were my only other reasonable choices for that floor. The Ultra had just enough give to work with the less than level floors.

I ended up like the Allure Ultra so much that I'm thinking of using it at my father-in-law's house. His original kitchen and bathroom floors were vinyl that likely contains asbestos. He has put more vinyl over that in the kitchen and carpet over it in the bathrooms. I think Allure would allow me to update those rooms while leaving the bottom layer of vinyl intact. They were very easy to clean based on my experience at the rental.

NoNonsenseLandlord

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2017, 07:20:34 PM »
I checked out your pictures and I'm very impressed. Unfortunately, our turnover cost nowhere near that little. All in all, the rehab cost around $13k (so much for the $6k estimated below). The flooring was the most expensive due to the cost of the Allure Ultra plus all of the work the floor needed (tons of leveling compound, many sheets of disintegrated flooring shoveled out and replaced). That was $6.5k. After that, repainting the entire unit cost about $2.3k. Replacing the entire tub and all of the flooring + joists was $1.4k.

I am really, really, REALLY hoping the Allure Ultra ends up being a good long term investment. The house is on a crawl space and has settled a lot so the floors are wavy. Short of spending $$$ to jack up the floors, sheet vinyl and carpet were my only other reasonable choices for that floor. The Ultra had just enough give to work with the less than level floors.

I ended up like the Allure Ultra so much that I'm thinking of using it at my father-in-law's house. His original kitchen and bathroom floors were vinyl that likely contains asbestos. He has put more vinyl over that in the kitchen and carpet over it in the bathrooms. I think Allure would allow me to update those rooms while leaving the bottom layer of vinyl intact. They were very easy to clean based on my experience at the rental.

I had a lot of donated labor from myself.  Even if I would have replaced the tub, it would not be nearly $13K, although this was only a bathroom.  A new tub maybe $1,500.  Painting the tub would have added ~$500 or so.  A new vanity is ~$300.

Did you do the work yourself?  Ceramic tile is better than any vinyl.

I have taken out walls and added washers and dryers, replac carpet and flooring, kitchen cabinets, etc. and have never spent more than ~$6K on a complete rehab.  My typical renter turn is less than $100, unless I have to replace a bunch of stuff.

Be sure to look at RTA cabinets for good rental cabinets.  And I use laminate counter tops, not granite. 

jooniFLORisploo

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #24 on: August 03, 2017, 07:25:11 PM »
I really like what you went with.

I'm a minimalist, love clean lines, love having my stuff out where I can see it, and love using baskets. So, your choice would have been a win for me :)

NeonPegasus

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2017, 11:37:20 AM »
I checked out your pictures and I'm very impressed. Unfortunately, our turnover cost nowhere near that little. All in all, the rehab cost around $13k (so much for the $6k estimated below). The flooring was the most expensive due to the cost of the Allure Ultra plus all of the work the floor needed (tons of leveling compound, many sheets of disintegrated flooring shoveled out and replaced). That was $6.5k. After that, repainting the entire unit cost about $2.3k. Replacing the entire tub and all of the flooring + joists was $1.4k.

I am really, really, REALLY hoping the Allure Ultra ends up being a good long term investment. The house is on a crawl space and has settled a lot so the floors are wavy. Short of spending $$$ to jack up the floors, sheet vinyl and carpet were my only other reasonable choices for that floor. The Ultra had just enough give to work with the less than level floors.

I ended up like the Allure Ultra so much that I'm thinking of using it at my father-in-law's house. His original kitchen and bathroom floors were vinyl that likely contains asbestos. He has put more vinyl over that in the kitchen and carpet over it in the bathrooms. I think Allure would allow me to update those rooms while leaving the bottom layer of vinyl intact. They were very easy to clean based on my experience at the rental.

I had a lot of donated labor from myself.  Even if I would have replaced the tub, it would not be nearly $13K, although this was only a bathroom.  A new tub maybe $1,500.  Painting the tub would have added ~$500 or so.  A new vanity is ~$300.

Did you do the work yourself?  Ceramic tile is better than any vinyl.

I have taken out walls and added washers and dryers, replac carpet and flooring, kitchen cabinets, etc. and have never spent more than ~$6K on a complete rehab.  My typical renter turn is less than $100, unless I have to replace a bunch of stuff.

Be sure to look at RTA cabinets for good rental cabinets.  And I use laminate counter tops, not granite.

The rental had really been trashed. There was a crack in the original tub (I'd had it repaired professionally once already) and water had been seeping into the floors for awhile. Both layers of wood in the floor were completely rotten. The old bathtub was the kind that is built into the house so we ended up getting a water restoration company to handle the demo and replacement of tub and floors. I didn't think ceramic tile was a good choice for the unit (neither did the flooring contractor) due to the uneven floors.

We have a business other than the rentals and this is our busy season (we currently have a 3 mo lead time). Hubby is very handy but in the end, it was better to pay someone else to do the most labor intensive parts (bathtub replacement, advanced plumbing repairs, full interior repaint over crayon and pen, and complete flooring replacement) and make more money through our own work than to do it ourselves. Even so, he and our employee put quite a lot of labor into it as well. If you're interested, I could put together a dropbox folder of all the before and afters.

I spent hours cleaning. Even our kids helped clean! Really, so very much needed to be fixed and replaced. We've now turned over both sides of that duplex this year so I'm hopeful that subsequent turnovers will be much faster and cheaper.

And when DH decides he's done with our business, we'll be doing much more of the work ourselves.

madgeylou

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Re: Rehabbing bathroom at turnover
« Reply #26 on: August 04, 2017, 11:49:03 AM »
I really like what you went with.

I'm a minimalist, love clean lines, love having my stuff out where I can see it, and love using baskets. So, your choice would have been a win for me :)

Same here (though I don't think I'm a minimalist)! I honestly hate closed-off under-sink cabinets because they always get gross, in the bathroom especially. I would look at this vanity as a plus, too.