Author Topic: Housing Fear Index  (Read 953 times)

Jon Bon

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Housing Fear Index
« on: April 25, 2019, 11:14:20 AM »
So I have owned a home for 10 years now, I've been around the block and replaced nearly every component possible on a house. Given enough time I would be confident enough to build one completely on my own.

Now I feel many home buyers (especially first timers) entire house buying process is just driven by fear which is a a horrible way to pick a house imo. So I have complied my completely unscientific list of things you should and should not be worried about when buying a house.


A Big Deal:
Foundation movement
Roof Issues
Water pouring into basement
Structural issues
Abandoned Oil Tanks
Termites (active)

Fix When You Have Time/Chance
Knob and tube wiring
Asbestos
Old HVAC
Wet basement aka - gutters and grading
Ungrounded electric
Mold

Good to Ignore:
Radon
Lead Paint
Damp basement
Foundation crack
Termites (inactive)


Now everyone situation is different, what does your list look like? I realize some of this stuff would be NBD in a older house but cause for alarm in a new build. I am curious to hear what is a big deal in other parts of the country. That reminds me Termites!
« Last Edit: April 30, 2019, 07:36:23 AM by Jon Bon »

Papa bear

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2019, 12:01:21 PM »
Walk away from:

Flips that have shitty work done.  What else is messed up behind that drywall?
Problems that have been cosmetically hidden.
I would say something along the lines of buried leaking oil tanks.
Meth / grow houses



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affordablehousing

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2019, 05:59:35 PM »
from my learning, the most important thing is a pitched roof and 24" overhangs. You can be a really shitty homeowner and if you have overhangs, you'll be ok. I would add horrible neighbors to the big deal list, that can really aggravate a situation. To the NBD pile I'd add galvanized water piping.

FIREstache

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2019, 06:08:17 PM »
from my learning, the most important thing is a pitched roof and 24" overhangs.

Overhangs have been a nightmare for me, too.  But what's wrong with pitch?  Most homes roofs in the U.S. have pitch.

SwordGuy

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2019, 08:27:19 PM »
from my learning, the most important thing is a pitched roof and 24" overhangs.

Overhangs have been a nightmare for me, too.  But what's wrong with pitch?  Most homes roofs in the U.S. have pitch.

Pitch as in a non-flat roof, not pitch as in tar.   

FIREstache

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2019, 09:02:34 PM »
from my learning, the most important thing is a pitched roof and 24" overhangs.

Overhangs have been a nightmare for me, too.  But what's wrong with pitch?  Most homes roofs in the U.S. have pitch.

Pitch as in a non-flat roof, not pitch as in tar.

Yeah, that's what I mean.  Most roofs aren't flat.  Pitch is a good thing.

soccerluvof4

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2019, 06:26:57 AM »
How close to larger Rental units, Cemetery and traffic noise.
Windows
Properly Insulated and good Mechanicals

Fishindude

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2019, 06:58:03 AM »
I would consider; termites, knob and tube wiring and un-grounded electric things that need pretty immediate attention.

Jon Bon

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2019, 08:24:02 AM »
I would consider; termites, knob and tube wiring and un-grounded electric things that need pretty immediate attention.

Sure Active versus inactive I noted above I will buy that.

But knob and tube that has been fine for 100 years or ungrounded 2 wire that has been fine for 50 years? IMO sure get to it when you need to open the wall, but not worth killing a deal over.

Don't get me wrong I am uncomfortable with those as well, but there are many houses that still have that stuff and work just fine.

Rocket

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2019, 11:24:55 AM »
Just bought a house and these were some of my big deal items.  Location.  Grade of yard (wont buy a house where rain runs toward house).  Electric heat and well water.  Mold would be big for me.  Too much DIY improvements.  More square footage advertised versus whats on town records.   

The location is so many things.  Not on a busy street.  Not near highway, rail road tracks, chicken rendering plant, etc.  Also if house is next to an empty field, who owns it and what could possible be put there in the future.  Tax rate in town.  Quality of schools.  Crime rate.  Flooding or fire zone.  Oh so many things.

dougules

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2019, 03:39:49 PM »
Flooding is a big one, especially here where every once in a while we see 2 inches of rain in an hour.   You should look at the lay of the land around the house and ask yourself "how's the water going to flow if there's a really intense downpour?"  "Who's going to be in danger if the nearest ditch/creek/river has to accommodate 10 times its normal flow?"  Back when people had sense, Southern farmhouses were built on hills when possible.  As the climate changes it will probably get worse given that warm air can hold a lot more moisture.

Another minor one is proximity to the tracks.  Trains are loud, even at 1/4 mile away. 

FIREstache

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2019, 06:44:24 PM »
Another minor one is proximity to the tracks.  Trains are loud, even at 1/4 mile away.

I live a 1/2 mile away, and it's my number one complaint where I live.  I used to live a mile from the tracks, and I could still hear it, but I wasn't distracted by it as much as I am now.  If I end up moving, 1 mile would be the absolute minimum distance that I would require, but I'm really hoping I can get at least 2 miles from the tracks.  Of course, I wouldn't want to be near an airport, either.  A friend of mine lives near one, and I remember we had to stop talking for a while as a jet took off because it was so loud.  I didn't ask him how much that happens.

Someone else complained about too much DIY work.  That can be a good thing - people showing pride in their home, taking care of it.  As long as the quality of the workmanship is good, and it can be better than what some professionals do.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2019, 08:32:25 PM by FIREstache »

SunnyDays

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2019, 08:43:09 PM »
Where I live, knob and tube wiring disqualifies one from getting house insurance, so for me, that would require an immediate fix.

Fishindude

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Re: Housing Fear Index
« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2019, 06:44:59 AM »
But knob and tube that has been fine for 100 years or ungrounded 2 wire that has been fine for 50 years? IMO sure get to it when you need to open the wall, but not worth killing a deal over.

Don't get me wrong I am uncomfortable with those as well, but there are many houses that still have that stuff and work just fine.

No, most of the houses that had active knob & tube wiring in the last several decades have already burnt down.
That stuff went out of use in the 40's so it's at least 70 years old, the insulation on wire will be very brittle or possibly gone, etc.    Dangerous stuff to have in a home.