Author Topic: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers  (Read 24981 times)

Abel

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #50 on: March 06, 2016, 10:00:24 PM »
Great thread!

Bicycles represent my most Mustachian and least-Mustachian passion. On the one hand, I've religiously bike commuted and saved thousands in gas and maintenance as a result. Yet I also enjoy making my road bike vaguely resemble the racing wonders of the Tour de France, even if my engine isn't anywhere near justifying it. Oh well, you gotta live a little right?

Tires: Gatorskins have never let me down when it comes to road commuting / training tires. I rode Schwalbe tires on a Pan-American ride, Alaska to Argentina, and I don't think they can be beat in the realm of surviving-the-zombie-apocalypse-or-fat-tired-adventure-of-your-life. Great MTB and touring tires.

Fenders: Had good luck with the Planet Bike Cascadia fenders on a Surly Troll. No complaints, easy installation, no rattling or issues.

Panniers: Got some old Arkel Samurais. Heavy, but built to last forever and totally waterproof. Have seen these for ridiculously cheap prices on eBay. Insane. Would buy them again in a heartbeat. Otherwise, I think Arkel / Ortlieb is all the gold standard. Panniers for me are only really a touring thing...commuting or errands never requires more than a backpack for me. If I was loading up groceries I would rather have a trailer. If I had a regular commute carrying clothes and computer etc. I can imagine that panniers and racks would be more practical.

Racks: If you care about weight, get Tubus. If you don't care about weight, Surly Nice Racks can't be beat. We beat the hell out of them, carried everything on them often in excess of the max weight capacity, on nasty backroads from Alaska to Argentina and they are still going strong.

Headlight: I have always wanted to try dynamo but never gotten the chance. I've never used better than Light & Motion when it comes to rechargeable. Only other brands tried would be Blackburn, Niterider, etc. L&M is a great company and their stuff is fantastic. Well designed, easy to use, and great visibility from the side which makes them a great buy from a safety standpoint.

Taillight: Used both of the Light & Motion taillights, both fantastic. Their upgraded one has an aero mount that fits on the back of my road bike. Very bright, sleek, easy to use.

I have a single speed rigid Surly Troll that I am considering converting into a part-time Dynamo hub commuter. For now it's basically an urban bike to run around for short rides or errands, lock up at the bar or the beach, or borrow to a buddy to play around on some single track. Fat tires, simple drivetrain and disc brakes, etc. A dynamo hub setup with some lights would add some versatility...

My dream is to have a fleet of bikes in the garage, ideally acquired used and well kept. Currently own the single speed Troll for errands / around town / lock up at the bar / abuse. I've also got a fancier mountain bike that's my do-it-all adventure, tour, ride for fun bike. Finally I have my road race bike that I commute with because I love riding it, and a 12 mile one way bicycle commute is more fun on a fast bike.

Surly makes great stuff. I really like belt drive and single speed drivetrains. Simplicity wins and climbing steep hills without extra gears builds character. If you ever get the chance, use an Alfine or Rohloff and you'll never want to use anything but an internally geared hub for commuting / touring / mountain bike for the rest of your life. I've got a belt-drive Rohloff MTB / bikepacking / touring bike and it's gnarly.

Eric222

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #51 on: March 08, 2016, 09:13:20 AM »
...
Bicycles represent my most Mustachian and least-Mustachian passion. On the one hand, I've religiously bike commuted and saved thousands in gas and maintenance as a result. Yet I also enjoy making my road bike vaguely resemble the racing wonders of the Tour de France, even if my engine isn't anywhere near justifying it. Oh well, you gotta live a little right?
...
So much this. :)  I've gotten more compliments on my bike (I lost count) than my cars (zero).  I too feel like my bike is a high end racing car - and we just keep working on the engine?  At any rate, if a more expensive bike (which is still less than a cheap car) makes you not drive - it's a win.  NOTE:  These are all of my self-justifications. :)
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Faraday

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #52 on: March 08, 2016, 12:08:30 PM »
...
Bicycles represent my most Mustachian and least-Mustachian passion. On the one hand, I've religiously bike commuted and saved thousands in gas and maintenance as a result. Yet I also enjoy making my road bike vaguely resemble the racing wonders of the Tour de France, even if my engine isn't anywhere near justifying it. Oh well, you gotta live a little right?
...
So much this. :)  I've gotten more compliments on my bike (I lost count) than my cars (zero).  I too feel like my bike is a high end racing car - and we just keep working on the engine?  At any rate, if a more expensive bike (which is still less than a cheap car) makes you not drive - it's a win.  NOTE:  These are all of my self-justifications. :)

Welcome Abel. Werd, Eric222!

Gotta add one thing, though - the exercise. The fitness you get from biking has tremendous value, so you've got to see bike investments as returning immense health benefits (and avoiding healthcare costs down the road). I am deathly afraid of diabetes (runs on both sides of my family, so I'm a ticking time bomb) and the bike is crucial to my plans to beat the "Big D"!

Abel - I have both Nexus and Alfine sealed hubs and I love love love 'em. Once you get used to the gearing and how to play 'em, they are great!

Question: Does anyone own and use a bike bag like this one: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018LOY6RY/
At $10, I can afford it. It looks like it would put phone and keys and wallet right where I need 'em. Also, batteries for a battery-powered headlight. Anyone else use one of these and care to comment on how they like it?
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 12:15:58 PM by Faraday »
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Faraday

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What's In Your Seat Pack?
« Reply #53 on: March 08, 2016, 03:52:26 PM »
Almost everyone has a "seat pack": the little canvas bag that clips onto the seat rails and seat post, sits below your butt under the seat. What does everyone put in your seat pack?

Now that weather has gotten dramatically warmer in the southeast, I want to ride - a LOT - and I need to come up with a new "minimum equipment list" for my seat packs. What I'm looking at having in there right now is:

Skabs (or similar tube patch kit)
2 or 3 CO2 cartridges
CO2 tire inflator (one cartridge loosely packed inside)
3 Plastic tire pry bars
Spare tube
A couple dollar bills
A schrader adapter for presta valves

Anything else that should be in the pack? Looking for advice from real world experience....
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Eric222

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Re: What's In Your Seat Pack?
« Reply #54 on: March 08, 2016, 04:12:28 PM »
Almost everyone has a "seat pack": the little canvas bag that clips onto the seat rails and seat post, sits below your butt under the seat. What does everyone put in your seat pack?

Now that weather has gotten dramatically warmer in the southeast, I want to ride - a LOT - and I need to come up with a new "minimum equipment list" for my seat packs. What I'm looking at having in there right now is:

Skabs (or similar tube patch kit)
2 or 3 CO2 cartridges
CO2 tire inflator (one cartridge loosely packed inside)
3 Plastic tire pry bars
Spare tube
A couple dollar bills
A schrader adapter for presta valves

Anything else that should be in the pack? Looking for advice from real world experience....
I actually don't have an entire CO2 inflator, just a little screw on cap that does the same thing - slightly less space.
Plus 2x CO2 cartridges, tire pry bars, tube, cell phone, an id (driver's license), credit card, and a tiny multi-tool. 

So...my pack is what you listed + a cell phone and id.
“Except when awesome is just awesome, because sometimes it is.” - Scrubby

Journal: Racing towards zero

Where I started...

Long term goals:  Stay fit, NW0 by 39, and FI by 50.  Required SR:  66%.  SR goal for monthly income: 60%.

Faraday

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #55 on: March 08, 2016, 05:19:39 PM »
Hey Eric - what multi-tool? The last one I bought is this fat little marshmallow-sized blob that has the most bizarre, un-useful sizes of tools. Wrong allen wrench sizes, a little box-end wrench, stuff you don't need on a bike.

I'd love to find out from you or the readers of the thread, if there's a multi-tool out there that is totally, 100% useful and merits the weight and space of being carried....
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Eric222

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #56 on: March 08, 2016, 06:25:41 PM »
I've had it forever - mostly just allen wrenches and screwdrivers. 

It's an "Ascent Bare Bones Mini Tool."  I've had it forever, and works well. :)

I think this is it:
http://www.amazon.com/Spin-Doctor-Bare-Bones-Multi-Tool/dp/B017MP3K4I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1457486697&sr=8-1&keywords=bare+bones+multitool+bike
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GuitarStv

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Re: What's In Your Seat Pack?
« Reply #57 on: March 09, 2016, 07:01:58 AM »
Almost everyone has a "seat pack": the little canvas bag that clips onto the seat rails and seat post, sits below your butt under the seat. What does everyone put in your seat pack?

I can just manage to cram a tube, multi-tool, and two tire levers into my under-saddle bag.  There is no spare room at all in there after it's packed.

The multi-tool that I use is this one:
http://www.filzer.com/products.php?id=77

I've had it for three or four years and have used most of the allen keys, the screw drivers, the chain tool, and the spoke wrench on the road.  The only useless part is the torx driver (I don't have any torx stuff on my bike).  My one complaint about the tool is that it will rust if you get it wet, so I wrap it in a thin plastic bag before stowing it.  Other than that, it's a very handy thing to have.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #58 on: March 09, 2016, 07:53:09 AM »
If you can find one, Blackburn used to make a unit called the AirFix that was a CO2 inflater with a multitool built in; it was a little bulky, but a real lifesaver.

GuitarStv

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #59 on: March 09, 2016, 10:05:21 AM »
Ugh.  CO2 inflators are so wasteful.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #60 on: March 09, 2016, 11:13:19 AM »
My bike setup is so far off the others listed on this thread I thought I'd add it.

My main bike is a Gazelle Basic 3 Speed. It's probably a 2010 or so (I bought it used).
Comes standard with:
  • Rear rack
  • Fenders
  • 3 speed hub (Nexus) with coaster brake
  • Sturmey Archer dynamo hub with drum brake
  • dynamo front and battery rear lights

Things I've added/changed for commuting:
  • B & M lights - both dynamo, Lumotec and Brake Tec, I think?
  • Yepp Maxi child seat (for 3 year old)
  • Basil front rack
  • giant wicker milk crate shaped basket from Target strapped to said rack (for bag, groceries)
  • Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tires (Schwalbe Winter Dec-Feb)

So basically the way its set up, I never have to think about it. I don't worry about bringing tools/tire change with me because, frankly, I don't want to change a tire on the side of the road and the rear wheel would be very difficult anyway. I wear normal clothes because I don't move quickly and the chain guard/step through means I can. It's basically like a car, but more fun!

Disclaimer: my commute is 4.5 miles one way, max, including daycare drop off. This setup is less than ideal for hills and every time I'm about halfway up out of the valley I fantasize about a lighter bike. That only lasts 30 seconds or so, though!

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #61 on: March 09, 2016, 11:16:06 AM »
I'd love to find out from you or the readers of the thread, if there's a multi-tool out there that is totally, 100% useful and merits the weight and space of being carried....

I have to say that I am not keen on multi-tools as you are often likely to end up with something that
a) has tools that you / your bike do not want or need
b) is not able to access all the places that you might need to because of its size
c) may not provide as much leverage / torque as you actually need
d) may not be made as strongly as you might need

So I, personally use http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Bits-Wrench-Pouch-Nylon/dp/B001CDKT7I/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1457545998&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=Victorinox+Bitwrench
but with the hex-drive bits substituted with those that I actually want / need for my bike.

That bitwrench plus a couple of tyre levers, a compact pump and a spare inner-tube and  puncture repair kit / patches are what I minimally carry with me on my bike.

For the more adventurous expeditions I add a couple of chain quick-links and a short length of chain and http://www.amazon.com/Cyclo-Rivoli-Bicycle-Breaker-Universal/dp/B001CK0OS0
and an 8mm + 10mm crescent wrench and a 14mm + 15mm crescent wrench which happen to be relevant to my bike.



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Re: What's In Your Seat Pack?
« Reply #62 on: March 10, 2016, 08:32:12 AM »
Almost everyone has a "seat pack": the little canvas bag that clips onto the seat rails and seat post, sits below your butt under the seat. What does everyone put in your seat pack?

Now that weather has gotten dramatically warmer in the southeast, I want to ride - a LOT - and I need to come up with a new "minimum equipment list" for my seat packs. What I'm looking at having in there right now is:

Skabs (or similar tube patch kit)
2 or 3 CO2 cartridges
CO2 tire inflator (one cartridge loosely packed inside)
3 Plastic tire pry bars
Spare tube
A couple dollar bills
A schrader adapter for presta valves

Anything else that should be in the pack? Looking for advice from real world experience....

I always carry dollar bills, not just as money, but also for their capacity to repair a blown out tire. All the patch kits and extra tubes in the world arent going to fix a tear in the tire, but strategically placing a dollar bill beneath the tire rip can prevent the tube  from bubbling through the tire upon reinflation. Ive actualyl succesfully done this on more than one occasion. I also carry my health insurance card when i ride as emergency rooms seem to prioritize such information even in trauma cases here.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #63 on: March 10, 2016, 08:39:50 AM »
A dollar bill can work OK as a boot in a tire with a hole, but I've found that duct tape is harder wearing and the stickiness makes putting the thing in place and remounting the tire to the wheel a hell of a lot easier.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #64 on: March 10, 2016, 09:59:29 AM »
I have not read the whole thread, so my apologies if this has already been mentioned.

Any suggestions for a good compact pump?  I do not want to use the CO2 thingies.

Thanks.
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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #65 on: March 10, 2016, 10:32:08 AM »
I have not read the whole thread, so my apologies if this has already been mentioned.

Any suggestions for a good compact pump?  I do not want to use the CO2 thingies.

Thanks.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/can-anyone-recommend-a-good-portable-bicycle-pump/

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #66 on: March 10, 2016, 10:38:31 AM »
I have not read the whole thread, so my apologies if this has already been mentioned.

Any suggestions for a good compact pump?  I do not want to use the CO2 thingies.

Thanks.

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/can-anyone-recommend-a-good-portable-bicycle-pump/

Thanks!
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Laserjet3051

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #67 on: March 11, 2016, 08:19:39 AM »
A dollar bill can work OK as a boot in a tire with a hole, but I've found that duct tape is harder wearing and the stickiness makes putting the thing in place and remounting the tire to the wheel a hell of a lot easier.

Absolutely agree with you. I'm somewhat of a minimalist so the uber-light weight of 2 $1 bills kills two birds with one stone; bus fare in case of a breakdown (that is unfixable on the spot) or a tire blowout.  The dollar bill is just a short term tire fix that will allow me to get back home (or to the bike shop) where I can better repair/replace the tire.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #68 on: March 11, 2016, 08:33:57 AM »
Lights: Cygolite hotshot in back and another Cygolite in front. Great lights.

Panniers: Ortlieb back roller classic. Quality is amazing. Been using these for a few years and they still look new. Simple and totally waterproof.

Tires and tubes: Whatever they have at the local bike shop when I need them.

Fenders: Bike planet.


2 cents: Don't cheap out on lights or panniers. Good ones will last a long time and are worth it. I've tried all kinds of tires and tubes and I just can't tell the difference (they do make a difference if you bike race). Probably doesn't matter much for commuting unless you live somewhere where flats are common (thorns, lots of glass, etc.).
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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #69 on: March 11, 2016, 09:09:54 AM »
2 cents: Don't cheap out on lights or panniers. Good ones will last a long time and are worth it. I've tried all kinds of tires and tubes and I just can't tell the difference (they do make a difference if you bike race). Probably doesn't matter much for commuting unless you live somewhere where flats are common (thorns, lots of glass, etc.).

I've found the tires make a huge difference on my commuter; I've gone from eight or ten flats a year down to one since I switched away from "whatever's cheapest on Nashbar" as my preferred brand. And that one was from running over a fishhook; I don't think anything would have stopped that. For context, I'm commuting on city streets with lots of potholes and debris.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #70 on: March 11, 2016, 01:45:30 PM »
2 cents: Don't cheap out on lights or panniers. Good ones will last a long time and are worth it. I've tried all kinds of tires and tubes and I just can't tell the difference (they do make a difference if you bike race). Probably doesn't matter much for commuting unless you live somewhere where flats are common (thorns, lots of glass, etc.).

I've found the tires make a huge difference on my commuter; I've gone from eight or ten flats a year down to one since I switched away from "whatever's cheapest on Nashbar" as my preferred brand. And that one was from running over a fishhook; I don't think anything would have stopped that. For context, I'm commuting on city streets with lots of potholes and debris.

With potholes, air pressure is even more important than the tire. I was getting pinch flats all the time after I moved because I couldn't find my pump with an attached pressure gauge, and I got 3 flats in 2 weeks because it turns out I was wildly under inflating my tires with the mini pump that I could find.

I do swear by good Gatorskins for shrugging off the pointy stuff, though :)
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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #71 on: March 11, 2016, 05:58:39 PM »
The problem with flatproof tires is that they all kinda feel like crap and are heavy.  I mean, I still use them for commuting . . . but they are not so fun on a long road ride.

headwinds

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #72 on: March 28, 2016, 06:41:49 AM »


Black Betty

Abel

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #73 on: March 28, 2016, 06:53:35 AM »


Black Betty

GREAT bike! Makes me excited to transform my Troll into commuter-mode.

headwinds

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #74 on: March 28, 2016, 08:24:02 AM »
Thanks man, yeah this one is an Ogre though you can't easily tell because I removed all the decals. Did you recognize the frame shape? Custom built in my garage over the last few weeks. Not very mustachian I am afraid, even with Cali gas prices it's going to take me many years of bike commuting to break even on this investment.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #75 on: March 28, 2016, 08:42:22 AM »
Thanks man, yeah this one is an Ogre though you can't easily tell because I removed all the decals. Did you recognize the frame shape?

Rear dropout and the fork with a bazillion mounting points.  Surly seems to have more flexibility than others.

How is changing the rear tire with the horizontal dropouts and the fenders?  That issue is why I'm sticking with the disc trucker even though my tire size can only go up to 2.1" wide.

headwinds

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #76 on: March 28, 2016, 10:14:29 AM »
Getting it set up in the first place was a PITA, but now that it's set up it's all good. I had to modify some of the mounting hardware for the fenders, cut spacers with a hacksaw instead so that everything would fit. Took me several hours to install.

Actually scratch that, I just realized I haven't tried to remove the rear wheel since I had finished the fenders. I'm thinking that it will be all good, but I'm not sure yet
« Last Edit: March 28, 2016, 10:16:42 AM by headwinds »

Abel

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #77 on: March 29, 2016, 06:05:27 AM »
Getting it set up in the first place was a PITA, but now that it's set up it's all good. I had to modify some of the mounting hardware for the fenders, cut spacers with a hacksaw instead so that everything would fit. Took me several hours to install.

Actually scratch that, I just realized I haven't tried to remove the rear wheel since I had finished the fenders. I'm thinking that it will be all good, but I'm not sure yet

Surprised you had difficulties with the fender install - I've had racks/fenders/discs on my Troll and it all played real nice together. Might be the 29er thing on the Ogre, or my specific rack/fender/brake combo. *shrug*

If you're not in a super hilly area, I'll put in my recommendation for single speed! Horizontal dropouts are much easier to work with when you don't have a derailleur to worry about, cleaner/low maintenance too, but it's not a deal breaker, you've obviously got a sweet setup.

Is that a quick release on the rear or axle nuts? Sometimes QRs can't get tight enough tension to bite and keep the wheel from sliding in horizontal drops.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #78 on: March 29, 2016, 12:52:57 PM »
We have brompton folding bikes. With our life, it's important to keep things minimal and these fit the bill.
We have some specialized usb charge lights for headlight and taillights, fenders came standard

1st pic- They take up a seat worth of space

2 pic - kickstand mode Put in Bay Island, Ohio

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #79 on: March 29, 2016, 01:00:13 PM »
We have brompton folding bikes. With our life, it's important to keep things minimal and these fit the bill.

Nice. I test-rode one of those once, and they're great bikes. Unfortunately, they're also so incredibly expensive that they're only practical if they're your only bike. Since I only wanted a folder for occasional use and ride a regular bike most of the time, I could only justify a sub-$100 used Dahon Classic III.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #80 on: March 29, 2016, 01:22:28 PM »
Brompton is my dream third bike. I have the custom Ahearne and an xtracycle for cargo, and then the brompton for flying, I'd be set. As is, I borrow a brompton when I need one for travel. Can't really justify the expense when I already have most of my assets in two-wheeled vehicles.

(Also I have another bike as well -my 1960's stingray for fun rides- so oops, I already have a third bike. Oh yea, also my cannondale frame that I can't bear to get rid of because it was my first nice bike...)
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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #81 on: March 31, 2016, 05:55:32 PM »


Surprised you had difficulties with the fender install - I've had racks/fenders/discs on my Troll and it all played real nice together. Might be the 29er thing on the Ogre, or my specific rack/fender/brake combo. *shrug*

If you're not in a super hilly area, I'll put in my recommendation for single speed! Horizontal dropouts are much easier to work with when you don't have a derailleur to worry about, cleaner/low maintenance too, but it's not a deal breaker, you've obviously got a sweet setup.

Is that a quick release on the rear or axle nuts? Sometimes QRs can't get tight enough tension to bite and keep the wheel from sliding in horizontal drops.

I think it is a 9er thing, they try to use as short of chainstays as possible, which makes clearance an issue on the front derailleur even without fenders. Plus I've got the 2.3" Big Apple slicks on there. Good thing surly sells "monkey nuts", basically spacers for the horizontal dropout to move the rear axle back and still have everything nice and parallel. These plus the hacksaw and it all works out.

Single speed would be nice, but my rides are all around 2% down going into work/town and 2% up on the way home - enough that I'm top gear all the way in, and around the middle on the way back, lower with trailer/groceries/etc. Plus this bike's other applications will be road riding and road/offroad touring with grades up to 12% in my area, single speed is out.

Those folding bikes are crazy! Never even considered something like that, super easy for travel!

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #82 on: April 13, 2016, 04:38:07 PM »

Bicycles represent my most Mustachian and least-Mustachian passion.

THIS!! Even though I did my shopping on CL, a Surly KM 29er was not cheap. (Not at all necessary, since I already had my daily driver trek road bike.) I'm getting my money out of it though with some half centuries now and a Trip across the Colorado Trail later in the summer.

I'm currently on the hunt for frame bag, handlebar bag and seat bag for luggage. (I want to avoid avoid panniers if possible)

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #83 on: April 14, 2016, 06:18:24 AM »
I'm currently on the hunt for frame bag, handlebar bag and seat bag for luggage. (I want to avoid avoid panniers if possible)

This statement seems really weird to me.  "I want to carry stuff on my bike frame, but am opposed to the most common way of carrying stuff on my bike frame".


GuitarStv

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #85 on: April 14, 2016, 12:28:53 PM »
Ride further.  I find that comfort doesn't really become important until you're riding distances of ten miles or more.  When you start doing a few longer rides you'll quickly figure out what needs to be changed.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #86 on: April 14, 2016, 01:52:50 PM »
I'm currently on the hunt for frame bag, handlebar bag and seat bag for luggage. (I want to avoid avoid panniers if possible)

This statement seems really weird to me.  "I want to carry stuff on my bike frame, but am opposed to the most common way of carrying stuff on my bike frame".

Sometimes you have to blaze your own trail.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #87 on: April 14, 2016, 02:57:06 PM »
I enjoyed reading this thread, even though it makes me realize how low-rent my tastes are.

I've got a Gary Fisher Mako.  I like aluminum MTBs with no suspension for commuting / touring.  I love the idea of a hybrid, but I feel like I'm too rough on my bikes.  I ride 10 miles a day, and I've toured pretty extensively (US and China) on similar bikes.

In terms of lights, I had a fancy Cat Eye rechargable headlight but it was (IMHO) garbage.  Now I have some 5 dollar cheapo thing.  I never ride in the dark, though.  Don't trust the drivers here in Tampa.  I've also got the frame covered with little reflective stickers, and I wear an orange reflective vest.  When I start doing night riding again, though, I'll check out the lights recommended here.

In terms of storage, I've got a milk crate on my back shelf, into which I stick my backpack.

My saddle back (which is actually a toiletry bag in my backpack :) ) - multitool, 2 prybars, tube, patch kit, pump, little adjustable wrench / bolts (for the shelf)

My favorite thing, though, is my mirror.  I've tried all kinds, and I love this one (it's not cheap, though): http://www.amazon.com/Safe-Zone-Bicycle-Helmet-Mirror/dp/B003LVHZ4O

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #88 on: April 14, 2016, 08:07:01 PM »
I'm currently on the hunt for frame bag, handlebar bag and seat bag for luggage. (I want to avoid avoid panniers if possible)

This statement seems really weird to me.  "I want to carry stuff on my bike frame, but am opposed to the most common way of carrying stuff on my bike frame".

Sometimes you have to blaze your own trail.

GStv - it sounds to me like attackgnome is a bikepacker. They prefer triangle, handlebar and seat packs because it's easier to carry the bike with those kinds of packs attached.
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attackgnome

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #89 on: April 15, 2016, 10:04:41 AM »
I'm currently on the hunt for frame bag, handlebar bag and seat bag for luggage. (I want to avoid avoid panniers if possible)

This statement seems really weird to me.  "I want to carry stuff on my bike frame, but am opposed to the most common way of carrying stuff on my bike frame".

Sometimes you have to blaze your own trail.

GStv - it sounds to me like attackgnome is a bikepacker. They prefer triangle, handlebar and seat packs because it's easier to carry the bike with those kinds of packs attached.

Guilty as charged. Looking at Revelate viscacha seat bag, and sweetroll handlebar bagwith Porcelain Rocket, frame bag.  I use a regular pannier and rack system on my commuter though.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2016, 01:19:38 PM by attackgnome »

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #90 on: April 16, 2016, 07:06:44 AM »
Huh.  I've always carried my bike by shouldering it through the frame (a-la-cyclocross).  I'd figure that a frame bag would be really annoying when trying to do that.  How does a bikepacker carry the bike?

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #91 on: April 16, 2016, 08:16:55 PM »
carrying by bb >> carrying by top tube
literally anything is better than panniers. they make every bike handle like garbage and you can't reach your snacks

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #92 on: April 22, 2016, 03:01:27 AM »
Bike: I've got a Kona Dew City, probably built around 2012. I bought it used from Gumtree last year.

Lights: I've got a set of Serfas front and rear lights, along with a Portland Design Works Radbot 500. I've also got a Guee Sol 200 Plus that I need to get fixed, but sometimes I hook it up too. Hey, it's almost winter, I actually need the light :)

Tires: The front tyre is whatever it came with (Kenda something or other). The rear tyre is a Schwalbe Marathon.

Wheels: The front wheel is standard, and IIRC the rear wheel is an Alexrims wheel, not sure of the model.

Fenders: None.

Racks:  The bike came with a Topeak rack that's a little beat up but works fine.

Panniers: Ortlieb Commuter Bag. It's a fantastic bag, perfect for my uses :)

It's been a good bike so far, although part of me wishes I'd bought a bike with disc brakes and something to cover the chain a bit.

Maybe next bike. Although where I am I don't really have the space for more bikes. :)
« Last Edit: May 29, 2016, 06:24:40 AM by alsoknownasDean »

hollis

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #93 on: April 25, 2016, 04:13:50 PM »
*I work at a bike shop as a bike mechanic.   This is my daily rider. It's not fancy but it works for me.  I like the skinny tires because they help get up the steep hills around here.

Bike: 1994 Wheeler 3000 ($40 yardsale find).  Hybrid that I converted to a roadbike

Lights: bontrager 120 / flare 3

Tires: Currently using what came on the blue wheels when I got them last year.  I have some bontrage R4 320 on order (wayyy pricey but I get very good prices on this stuff).

Wheels: Velocity rims / sora hubs

Fenders: None.

Racks:  currently none.  I need to throw my cheap rack back on.

Panniers: trunk bag only or a backpack



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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #94 on: April 25, 2016, 05:17:43 PM »
Off topic question:  is that bridge the one from the island over to Bridgeport?

Wait, no, it can't be.  I'm stumped.  Which bridge is that?
« Last Edit: April 25, 2016, 05:21:59 PM by NinetyFour »
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hollis

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #95 on: April 25, 2016, 05:31:58 PM »
That's the bridge to Stuebenville, OH.  The "market st bridge".  Built in 1905.  That was a photo from today's ride actually!  My longest of the year (52 miles).

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #96 on: April 25, 2016, 06:09:24 PM »
Thanks--very cool.  That's a nice ride!
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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #97 on: May 19, 2016, 06:31:26 PM »
I love this thread - everyone posting here kicks ass.

Here's a quote I found in a review today of an electric bike produced by Italian motorcycle company Benelli. I'm not expressing angst against lycra (I wear it often myself), but
I am entertained by the writer's words, as it gets to a point that I do agree with:

So I've come away thinking this bike, and eBikes in general, are a pretty great way to get around. And if some spandex cowboy mouths off saying that you get no exercise on an eBike, you might choose to point out that with the power off, it's a 20-kg bicycle, which is gonna get you much fitter than tooling around on a ten grand, carbon fiber butt wedge that weighs less than a ham sandwich. If fitness was really the number one priority, Captain Shaveylegs over there would be riding a 30-kg fixie with a backpack full of sand.

Source: http://www.gizmag.com/benelli-achle-ebike-review/43160/

Disclaimer: I own ebikes, road bike, hybrid bikes, etc. I love bikes, electric or not. I have some that I would not dream of electrifying and some that I wouldn't want otherwise.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2016, 06:34:29 PM by Faraday »
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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #98 on: May 20, 2016, 06:01:09 AM »
I love this thread - everyone posting here kicks ass.

Here's a quote I found in a review today of an electric bike produced by Italian motorcycle company Benelli. I'm not expressing angst against lycra (I wear it often myself), but
I am entertained by the writer's words, as it gets to a point that I do agree with:

So I've come away thinking this bike, and eBikes in general, are a pretty great way to get around. And if some spandex cowboy mouths off saying that you get no exercise on an eBike, you might choose to point out that with the power off, it's a 20-kg bicycle, which is gonna get you much fitter than tooling around on a ten grand, carbon fiber butt wedge that weighs less than a ham sandwich. If fitness was really the number one priority, Captain Shaveylegs over there would be riding a 30-kg fixie with a backpack full of sand.

Source: http://www.gizmag.com/benelli-achle-ebike-review/43160/

Disclaimer: I own ebikes, road bike, hybrid bikes, etc. I love bikes, electric or not. I have some that I would not dream of electrifying and some that I wouldn't want otherwise.

While I get that it was meant as a joke, my experience is that the author of your quote is wrong.

Weight on a bicycle with gearing doesn't make you fitter or stronger.  It makes you slower.  I get the same workout on a light weight 22 lb bike that I do on a 60 lb fully laden touring bike . . . I just accelerate from a stop with less speed and go up hills much more slowly.  There's little difference at all on flat ground once you're up to speed.

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Re: Discuss Your Bike, Bike Lights, Tires, Fenders, Racks and Panniers
« Reply #99 on: May 20, 2016, 12:47:00 PM »
carrying by bb >> carrying by top tube
literally anything is better than panniers. they make every bike handle like garbage and you can't reach your snacks

Do you have an image of someone carrying a bike by the bottom bracket (I assume that's what you mean by bb)? I'm having a tough time imagining that.

Also, I'm surprised you find panniers to be the worst method.  I currently have a cantilevered seatpost rack that has a matching bag it interacts with to quick secure & quick release it.  It's convenient, but it makes the bike very tippy when getting set up to do things like open doors, pump tires, lock bike, etc.  The dismount can be difficult/embarrassing if you fail to achieve leg clearance.  Forces you to have Jean Claude Van Damme level flexibility.

I've got a regular old steel road bike now, but I found a Yuba Mundo cargo bike on CL that I'm scooping up and hooking a Falco motor to.  I have been lusting after quality ebikes for a while now, but the sticker shock held me back.  I should be able to get this built for just over a thousand, which isn't bad considering electric Mundos go for 3,500 new.