Author Topic: When you retired early, how did you resign?  (Read 8442 times)

Villanelle

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #50 on: February 07, 2018, 01:51:08 AM »
I once gave 2.5 months notice and it was perfectly fine. 

I did this because I knew I was moving overseas and frankly, I knew it would be impossible for that not to slip out.  I also knew there was essentially no chance they would ask me to leave early as they were hard up for trained people at the time.  There was no extra work, no extra pressure, no negative treatment.  The only thing that really changed was I didn't attend a few trainings (yes!!) and I wasn't assigned new professors to work with. (Job specific thing, but basically I probably would have been given a bit more workload had I been staying.)

I felt really good about how I left and I know it was appreciated.  I think you have to judge the organization, but if they are as "nice" as you say they are, perhaps giving them a long notice period will help, especially since it sounds like you may want to go back in some capacity at some point.  It will be fairly obvious that you didn't just come to this decision two weeks before you quit, so I can see why they might resent the short notice, especially for a higher level position which tends to take longer to fill.

Also, in general for difficult conversations, I come up with 3-4 lines, and repeat them as necessary.  It doesn't matter if it is awkward.

"[Thanks and small talk]. I really need a change, so June 1 will be my last day."
Begging and pleading
"My heart is no longer in this work, even though I love this organization, so it really needs to be this way."
Hand wringing and desperate offers
"I want to pursue my passions while I still have my health and plenty of time.  I'm sorry, but I'll be leaving after May."
Throwing money at you and crying
"I'm sorry, but I really need a change, so this is my decision."
"that's very generous, but my heart isn't here so I'm going to be leaving."
"Thank you for the kind words, but it's time for me to pursue my passions."

Take your three lines, and cling to them, and deploy them as often as needed.  Don't get drawn in to details.  If the take the passion thing and ask what your passions are because they will find a way to better integrate them into a revised role, you just repeat a different line.  "Thank you, but my heart is no longer here and Paris awaits."  The more details you give, the more you give them to try to argue against or negotiate over. 

Agent Rosenflower

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #51 on: February 07, 2018, 01:10:32 PM »
Well, I finally gave verbal notice a couple weeks ago, after trying and getting talked out of it in fall. I went in with more of a game plan this time and my boss heard me out more than he did last time.

Anyway, I proposed a final date sometime in April, but was asked to stay until the end of June. I'm still looking into some benefits implications, but I think I'll probably agree to stick it out. It will give me enough time to hire for an open position in my department, and possibly max out both my retirement accounts.

I commented on another thread about notice periods, but basically in my field and at my level of seniority, 1 month notice is really the absolute minimum, and 2-4 is more the norm. If I gave two weeks' notice I'd burn all my bridges and people would assume I'd been fired. If I leave at the end of June, that's 5 months, which is more than generous on my part. It'd probably be better for me personally to get out the door sooner, but I don't expect any weird repercussions, at least from my boss. Once the word is out to everyone else, there will be some drama and I'll essentially become a lame duck, so that communication has to be a lot tighter.

Trudie

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #52 on: February 08, 2018, 01:06:08 PM »
I just quit three weeks ago, and I gave them 4 weeks' notice.  It is a small company, and I am the controller.  My job is key to the organization, but I was burned out after 10 1/2 years and making a commute (on bad winter roads) and just decided I needed to move on.

I was in a planning meeting with my boss (already had letter prepared) and basically said, "It's hard for me to plan a future that I don't see myself a part of.  I'm giving 4 weeks' notice."  I explained that my (9 1/2 years older) husband was on an early retirement track, that I'd enjoyed my ten years with the company, but that I needed to get off the road and I needed -- with my husband --  to make some decisions together about the next chapter of our lives which would involve different work and a possible relocation.

Once they hear you're leaving, they tend to tune the explanations out.  My boss acted in frustration and said some things he later regretted, I think, but then was gracious in announcing my resignation the next day and has been decent to me since. 

I think that in the end you just have to decide to do it, then do it.  Four weeks has felt long, but it's given me the opportunity to close out some 2017 projects (audits) that I care about and with people I want to leave on good terms with and to do a reasonable job of preparing for the next person.  I was really stressed out about how to have the conversation with my boss, but in the end had to realize that organizations need to learn to move on and transition when people leave.  It's a hard lesson, but something he needed to learn.

And don't for a minute think that because you aren't going onto the next "big job" or you don't have something "lined up" that you're being irresponsible or doing them a disservice by not hanging around.  In the end, your reasons are your reasons.  What they think of them is irrelevant.  Repeat this to yourself.  Also repeat the above lesson about they need to learn how to function when people leave, because people will leave.

As others have said, make a plan and book tickets or something so you can't fall back in.  In my case, my job is very deadline driven and technical.  There would never be a great time because there's always a deadline around the corner.  It comes down to prioritizing -- for once -- your needs over those of your employer.

moneytaichi

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #53 on: February 08, 2018, 08:21:32 PM »
Similar title, similar situation for me.  I didn't say I was retiring.  I said I needed a change and that continuing wasn't good for me and by extension then, wasn't good for the company.  I couldn't give the company my best because I wasn't at my best.  I said I didn't have another job lined up and hadn't been looking for another job and offered to discuss what time frame they'd like to see for a transition (given my position, etc).  I did put some parameters around it, saying that I wouldn't stay longer than six months.  They asked for 2 months and I agreed to it.

At the time, I thought it would probably be a break and I'd end up looking for something different in 3 - 6 months or so.  It has been several years and I haven't looked for another job :).  Instead, I'm "self-employed" as an artist :)))))

RExplorer, thank you for your reply. I am in a similar boat. I am an artist too! My job pays well so it's hard to walk away. But whenever I say that I am only taking one year of sabbatical, it seems to lighten me up quit a bit. Sabbatical is a good transitional job title :) I just searched LinkedIn and saw many people on sabbatical. Maybe it's the hint from the universe.

smoghat

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #54 on: February 12, 2018, 07:40:35 AM »
The administration eliminated the entire research sector of our school so I was forced into it, but I got a nice severance bit of pay just as I also got a windfall from selling a rental property that I'd been managing for 17 years. I read up here, did the math, fired the financial advisor who was "looking after" my mother's accounts after she passed away and FIRE'd. 

Everyone felt bad for me. I felt bad for them. ;)

Linda_Norway

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #55 on: February 12, 2018, 08:10:05 AM »
The administration eliminated the entire research sector of our school so I was forced into it, but I got a nice severance bit of pay just as I also got a windfall from selling a rental property that I'd been managing for 17 years. I read up here, did the math, fired the financial advisor who was "looking after" my mother's accounts after she passed away and FIRE'd. 

Everyone felt bad for me. I felt bad for them. ;)

Nice when a severance package can work as a windfall.