Author Topic: When you retired early, how did you resign?  (Read 8672 times)

gypsy79

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When you retired early, how did you resign?
« on: December 20, 2017, 02:02:43 PM »
This probably sounds dumb since I can google and find any number of articles on how to properly resign from various situations, but I have a bit of Stockholm Syndrome with my job and need help.

Situation: I plan to "retire early" sometime in 2018. I likely won't remain that way forever; knowing myself, I'm envisioning a full break for 6 months and then probably introducing some part-time self-employed moneymaking back into the picture. Regardless of all that, I have a well-paid VP-type job that I'll be resigning from in 2018 and I just don't know how to do it. The company has given me tremendous growth opportunities over a long work history there, and I love the type of work I do and my boss. They also love me. However, the organization also has issues that are harming my mental health and, frankly, I am both mentally burned out and have physical health problems from sitting and standing at desks for 21 years.

Complicating my resignation is that I have tried to resign more than once over the years and was pulled back in. It's almost embarrassing at this point, and advice to just be strong and stand my ground probably won't work because the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. I need a real "reason" I can give that sounds legitimate to others. Not health because they are so great that they will just offer to give me lots of time off. Not a break because they are so great that they will offer to rework my job to allow for a break. Not retirement since they will just beg me to stay and do anything they can to make it palatable. Etc. You get it.

I need out permanently and simply do not know how to resign from a great place.

Questions: Has anyone else been in a similar situation? And whether you have or not, if you retired early, what did you say when you resigned?

ysette9

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2017, 02:07:01 PM »
It sounds like you need to grow a spine. In place of that, how about something that forces you to leave the area, preferably the country, on a firm date and for a long period of time? Round the world cruise, hike the Camino de Santiago, some volunteer project to restore a crumbling chateau, something. Schedule it, but tickets, put your house up for rent, move your stuff into storage, and then hand in your resignation. Put up as many blocks as possible to falling back into your old life. If your stuff is in storage and your house is rented to someone else, losing $10k deposit on a trip of a lifetime while finding a hotel to live out of just to keep going to work should out a damper on any charitable feelings you have towards your workplace.

Hikester

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2017, 02:23:14 PM »
How about just telling them you need a change in your life. The fact that you can actually step away from your job is a personal accomplishment you should not be ashamed of. Maybe you can “try it out” and in the end don’t come back if you are having better results. To have the means to step away when your health is suffering and not do it because of embarrassment or because it’s a bit awkward, or you feel guilty, will pale in comparison to really harming your health and knowing you could have done something about it but were too afraid of what others think.  Most people don’t have that choice. Nobody in their death bed ever wished they had worked longer. If this is what you really want, do it and don’t worry what others think. It’s your life.

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2017, 02:25:59 PM »
It sounds like you need to grow a spine.

Yes, most assuredly. I used to have one before I started this job--not sure what happened.

In place of that, how about something that forces you to leave the area, preferably the country, on a firm date and for a long period of time? Round the world cruise, hike the Camino de Santiago, some volunteer project to restore a crumbling chateau, something. Schedule it, but tickets, put your house up for rent, move your stuff into storage, and then hand in your resignation. Put up as many blocks as possible to falling back into your old life. If your stuff is in storage and your house is rented to someone else, losing $10k deposit on a trip of a lifetime while finding a hotel to live out of just to keep going to work should out a damper on any charitable feelings you have towards your workplace.

You know, this really could work. I like the idea of a volunteer project, preferably to pet homeless kittens daily. :-) They would probably offer to have a job waiting when I return, but after a year of clarity and separation, it would be much easier to say "thanks, but no thanks" even if I were unable to do it in the moment. (Which I would still try to do--they are just so damn nice it's hard!)

ysette9

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2017, 02:30:08 PM »
I understand the personal connection. I have fretted about that as well when making job moves or considering my career development. My husband is a good remedy to that because he reminds me that this is cold business and the only person looking out for me is me. I am sure you are important and make good contributions but i am also just as sure that if you were hospitalized tomorrow they would find a way of carrying on without you.

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2017, 02:31:53 PM »
How about just telling them you need a change in your life.

I like this wording. And just keep repeating it. (Might help for me to think of it as an invitation. I have no problem saying "thanks but I can't" and just continuing to repeat variations of that for a party or dinner invitation. So why not do the same with a resignation. Perhaps reframing it in that way in my mind would lead to better success.)

The fact that you can actually step away from your job is a personal accomplishment you should not be ashamed of. Maybe you can “try it out” and in the end don’t come back if you are having better results. To have the means to step away when your health is suffering and not do it because of embarrassment or because it’s a bit awkward, or you feel guilty, will pale in comparison to really harming your health and knowing you could have done something about it but were too afraid of what others think.  Most people don’t have that choice. Nobody in their death bed ever wished they had worked longer. If this is what you really want, do it and don’t worry what others think. It’s your life.

Thanks for saying this. You are right.

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2017, 02:35:37 PM »
. . . if you were hospitalized tomorrow they would find a way of carrying on without you.

They absolutely would. I think a lot of it (for them) is just that hiring is so hard...they would rather retain the people they have. But yes, they would get over it in a day and figure out their path forward.

ketchup

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2017, 03:42:10 PM »
. . . if you were hospitalized tomorrow they would find a way of carrying on without you.

They absolutely would. I think a lot of it (for them) is just that hiring is so hard...they would rather retain the people they have. But yes, they would get over it in a day and figure out their path forward.
Yes, and that's their problem, not yours.

Financial.Velociraptor

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2017, 04:27:54 PM »
I left a fairly decent gig.  They tried mightily to get me to stay.  They couldn't understand why someone with potential would walk away at 40.  I told them, "I've discovered that accounting isn't who I am.  It is just something I do for money."  "I like the people I work with and company but I have no passion for this work."  And then I stuck to it.  I still see several folks from the office once a quarter when I schedule "Lunch Bunch".  Even people with director+ titles can get away for four lunches a year during the off months in mid quarter.  Three people have left after me, two to do other things, and one to be a stay at home Mom.  After 5 years of SAHM, she is looking to return to her old employer.  Not because she has passion for the work but because she has passion for the people and "misses adult conversation."

Here's my take: you do what makes you happy for however long it makes you happy.  If you change your mind in the future that is your prerogative.  Leave it a door open with your old employer but be firm that you are taking a least a year away.  You don't need any more explanation that it is what you feel will bring you the most happiness at this time.  If they like you as much as you say, they owe you a year to pursue happiness.  Otherwise, what the hell kind of friends are they really?

kaizen soze

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2017, 04:41:43 PM »
When I put in my notice, there were two people high up in the organization that tried pretty hard to get me to stay, or at least take a sabbatical. I finally just said "I don't need the money." And that was that. I wasn't planning on revealing that, but it seemed like the right thing to say in the moment.

GillyMack

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2017, 08:40:03 PM »
It’s a variation on a suggestion above, but a few years ago, I took an evening class in French.  In my class was an interesting couple who had applied for visas to live in France for a year. They were preparing to sell or rent out their house here in the U.S. [I don’t remember the exact details.)  This was before I had discovered MMM, so I was fascinated at their creative out-of-the-box plans.  I asked them Why? Their answer was the wife had already retired and when the husband retired as planned soon, they wanted to be immediately far enough away so that he couldn’t be sucked back by being asked to consult to fix problems.

So there you have it. Other  folks trying to solve the same problem.  Maybe you need to go pet homeless kittens in Paris.

MM_MG

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2017, 11:18:32 PM »
If the issues that are harming your mental health, and the physical problems of sitting all day, are resolved would you stay? 

If so, tell them about the issues and tell them you are taking leave until they are resolved.

If not, tell them about the issues and enjoy your new found freedom. 

FrugalZony

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2017, 11:20:41 PM »
I asked for a Sabbatical because I wanted to focus on some personal projects.
It was declined, because I wanted a year and best they offered would have been 3 months FMLA.
I then resigned.

I was at that company for most of my career, 18 years, reasonable pay, similary schmancy title as yours.

I gave long notice, so my colleagues would have to bear the burden of me leaving.

jim555

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2017, 06:55:43 AM »
Escorted out by security.  It was a best case situation, laid off without cause.  UI and severance jackpot.

Daisy

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2017, 12:33:33 PM »
I was planning to FIRE anyways, and my new manager's bulliness made the decision much easier. I'd rather not get into that here.

So I did end up quitting. I told people that I was taking a sabbatical, probably for about a year. I was also having a visible skin issue which I attributed to the stress, so I also mentioned getting my health under control as a reason. Some colleagues at work know I was planning on ER so even though I keep using the term "sabbatical" they called me "early retired".

Many were still aghast that I could take off a year and openly wished they could do the same.

RExplorer

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2017, 01:58:05 PM »
Similar title, similar situation for me.  I didn't say I was retiring.  I said I needed a change and that continuing wasn't good for me and by extension then, wasn't good for the company.  I couldn't give the company my best because I wasn't at my best.  I said I didn't have another job lined up and hadn't been looking for another job and offered to discuss what time frame they'd like to see for a transition (given my position, etc).  I did put some parameters around it, saying that I wouldn't stay longer than six months.  They asked for 2 months and I agreed to it.

At the time, I thought it would probably be a break and I'd end up looking for something different in 3 - 6 months or so.  It has been several years and I haven't looked for another job :).  Instead, I'm "self-employed" as an artist :)))))

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2017, 02:33:43 PM »
Thank you all so much for your replies! I am going to read through everything in detail tonight, maybe with a nice glass of wine in hand, and formulate my plan. Then tomorrow I will make sure my plan still makes sense without wine.

Daisy

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2017, 02:39:49 PM »
Thank you all so much for your replies! I am going to read through everything in detail tonight, maybe with a nice glass of wine in hand, and formulate my plan. Then tomorrow I will make sure my plan still makes sense without wine.

Or just drink wine before going into the office and quitting. That way, your state of mind will be the same during the planning and execution phases. Plus, we can always use more Epic FU Money stories for that thread, and partaking in the wine makes me think the story will be more FU-worthy.

ScottsdaleSaver

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2017, 02:44:42 PM »
If you lay out the reasons you want/have to leave and you get guilted into coming back (no matter how generous the terms), this company doesn't have your best interest in mind, they have their best interest in mind.

BPA

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2017, 02:50:55 PM »
Best of luck.

Because no one where I worked ever quit once they were past two years in unless they were of typical retirement age, I dealt with a lot of people trying to convince me I shouldn't quit.  It was honestly the hardest thing about my last week at work. 

My boss asked me once, but I stood strong with him.  But then it was colleagues and students and parents and the union and it was pretty overwhelming.

I'm glad I stuck to my guns and I completely understand how worried you are that they will try to suck you back in.

I did think about the people I'd told here and the support from here helped a lot.  Think of us as your cheerleading squad.  And if necessary and if possible, post here asking us to lend you strength.  I'm sure we can help ease the transition.

ETA: I emailed HR first and asked them not to tell my boss until I had.  That did make it easier somehow.  I felt like since I'd already told the upper echelon I was going, I'd be more likely to stick to my guns.

It was either in my journal or the Class of 2015 thread where I wrote about being sure I would chicken out.  Emailing the letter to HR first helped.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2017, 02:53:23 PM by BPA »

ysette9

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2017, 03:04:50 PM »
I second the vote for more wine

albireo13

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #21 on: December 21, 2017, 06:07:50 PM »
++ for the wine

zinnie

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2017, 06:40:50 PM »
Good advice already.

I quit, and then decided to stay, and then quit, and decided to stay, and then finally quit for good. I could have easily kept going back forever, because it was just too comfortable. And it is hard to explain a firm leaving date when they know you don't have another job. In my situation, my boss and coworkers were like family. But I was ready for something new.

Some ideas--and you might need to tell these to yourself as much as to them:

"I've been so fortunate to work here, but its time to move on."
"I'm ready for something new. This has been a great opportunity, but I'm ready for a change."
"There are other things I want to explore in life. This has been a great company and I have truly loved it here, but I've been here X years and there are many other things I want to do in my short time on this earth."

Just confidently explain your decision and leave it at that. Walk into your boss' office with a resignation letter and a firm but kind explanation. Don't entertain any discussions of you staying. If they protest: "be that as it may, it is time for me to leave," "I really appreciate how much you value me, and I understand why you want me to stay, but it is time for me to move on," "thank you for being so flexible and giving me so many opportunities, but it is time for me to move on to something new." Practice repeating it to yourself as needed!

Once you rip the band-aid off, I bet you'll feel better. It is nice to get in the headspace of "post-work."

Miss Piggy

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #23 on: December 22, 2017, 08:00:49 AM »
How about this: "This is such a great company, I feel very good about vacating my spot so someone new can join the organization and have the wonderful experience I've had here..."

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #24 on: December 22, 2017, 08:50:25 AM »
Thank you all so much for your replies! I am going to read through everything in detail tonight, maybe with a nice glass of wine in hand, and formulate my plan. Then tomorrow I will make sure my plan still makes sense without wine.

Or just drink wine before going into the office and quitting. That way, your state of mind will be the same during the planning and execution phases. Plus, we can always use more Epic FU Money stories for that thread, and partaking in the wine makes me think the story will be more FU-worthy.

Hahaha! We do need more good stories for that thread. That's actually why I need to resign calmly and quietly soon--so I don't end up with an epic FU story on my hands later. But that would certainly make it more interesting.

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #25 on: December 22, 2017, 08:53:14 AM »
It’s a variation on a suggestion above, but a few years ago, I took an evening class in French.  In my class was an interesting couple who had applied for visas to live in France for a year. They were preparing to sell or rent out their house here in the U.S. [I don’t remember the exact details.)  This was before I had discovered MMM, so I was fascinated at their creative out-of-the-box plans.  I asked them Why? Their answer was the wife had already retired and when the husband retired as planned soon, they wanted to be immediately far enough away so that he couldn’t be sucked back by being asked to consult to fix problems.

So there you have it. Other  folks trying to solve the same problem.  Maybe you need to go pet homeless kittens in Paris.

It is becoming clear to me that I need to have a daily volunteer role petting homeless kittens either in Paris or Maui.

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #26 on: December 22, 2017, 09:03:17 AM »
If the issues that are harming your mental health, and the physical problems of sitting all day, are resolved would you stay? 

If so, tell them about the issues and tell them you are taking leave until they are resolved.

If not, tell them about the issues and enjoy your new found freedom.

Good question and points. Without providing too much detail, I don't think they can resolve the issues that are harming my mental health--the issues have been around for years and have recently been exacerbated. Regarding the physical issues, I think that is just the reality of the desk job combined with some congenital issues of my own. I do have a Varidesk and fatigue mat, which has really helped a lot, and I do physical therapy and exercise daily to try to reverse the damage, but the truth is that when I go away on vacation, the physical pain just melts away and I'm ready to have that all the time.

This thread has really helped me think it through; it is clearly time to go and 2018 is going to be My Year. The money should be completely lined up to give notice in a few months.

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #27 on: December 22, 2017, 09:12:08 AM »
Similar title, similar situation for me.  I didn't say I was retiring.  I said I needed a change and that continuing wasn't good for me and by extension then, wasn't good for the company.  I couldn't give the company my best because I wasn't at my best. 

That is a really good way to put it. Might be a good backup line if they keep hassling me during my notice period. (They think of it as trying to help both the company and employee, but I think of it as hassling.) Another good backup line may also be what someone else suggested...just flat out saying I don't need the money.

For someone who has a really hard time coming up with the right thing to say in the moment, having all of these lines prepared and figuratively "in my back pocket" will be extremely helpful. Thank you all.

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #28 on: December 22, 2017, 09:25:48 AM »

Once you rip the band-aid off, I bet you'll feel better. It is nice to get in the headspace of "post-work."

Yes, I am certain that two minutes after I walk out on the last day, I'll have no regrets at all.

It is funny how people can be so certain about something but still be so ridiculous about getting there. Objectively I know I won't ever worry about this place again and they won't worry about me. Objectively I know I'm being ridiculous. I'll look back on this thread in a year and think, "good lord". Lol.

Daisy

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #29 on: December 22, 2017, 10:14:07 AM »

Once you rip the band-aid off, I bet you'll feel better. It is nice to get in the headspace of "post-work."

Yes, I am certain that two minutes after I walk out on the last day, I'll have no regrets at all.

It is funny how people can be so certain about something but still be so ridiculous about getting there. Objectively I know I won't ever worry about this place again and they won't worry about me. Objectively I know I'm being ridiculous. I'll look back on this thread in a year and think, "good lord". Lol.

Your apprehension is normal and healthy.

In my case, I was at the company for 20+ years and had a lot of friendships and good memories of good projects at work. But the truth was that the best managers had already left or been laid off, and the future projects just didn't sound interesting to me. I knew I would be miserable at the actual job stuff. Everything else was great about the job (well except for the commute).

I am newly FIREd and it did freak me out at first. But I knew my current manager was an ass and the project work was boring, and that wasn't going to change.

I left on good terms, even after having to go to HR to complain about the bulliness. It is amazing that they told me I was available for rehire even after all of my complaining. I think HR knew the manager had messed up and I had always had good reviews.

I am loving FIRE so far, as I knew I would.

soccerluvof4

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #30 on: December 26, 2017, 03:52:27 AM »
Flip this around. I was an employer for over 25 years with 8 or 9 office people and 25+ all over the country. I had developed relationships with them all and I know alot of them really needed there job. I did try to sell the business to a few of them but that turned into a fiasco. So after a month or two I just said thats it I am closing the doors April 3rd.  I was very unhappy, unhealthy etc.. and hated the job the last ten years and spent most of my time figuring out how not to be there and or it cost me a lot to keep someone to handle things. By delaying I actually lost out on a great buyout offer about 3 years prior because I didn't want my employees to get burned. Long and short of it you have got to think of you well being first and I would just simply say I know in the past I have tried to move on but I need you to respect my decision as I am absolute in leaving. I enjoyed my time here but for many many reasons and plenty of time to think this all out I appreciate you just leaving it at that and excepting my resignation. It simply time for me to move on and I need you to just understand that as I am not moving on to stay in the industry or be in any industry at this point. Thanks for respecting my final decision this time.

Enigma

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #31 on: December 26, 2017, 04:15:58 AM »
I had the same issue.  I tried to resign after being with the company who gave me a guilt trip.  First they asked me to stay a little longer.  Instead of my two week notice they asked for a one month notice.  Then I had issues with them scheduling meeting with the intent on getting me to stay.  I ended up staying.

The solution for me was finding another job.  One that I wasn't as emotionally attached to.  One that was also not that emotionally attached to me.  Once I gave them two weeks notice and had something lined up they were not able to do much but wish me luck.

I probably could have grown a 'Spine' but there is nothing better than the feeling of being needed.

Roadrunner53

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When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #32 on: December 26, 2017, 05:12:13 AM »
Have you thought about what you will do when you walk out the door for the last time? Are you going to sit in your house and watch tv and just be a couch potato for a week or two? Then what? Why don't you make a solid plan like joining Habitat for Humanity or book a trip to the pyramids in Mexico. Go to art school. I know a guy who was a scientist and when he retired he bought all kinds of wood working equipment and makes bowls and other stuff and sells them. You could buy or rent an RV and travel the USA to all the national parks. If you have a solid plan, you won't have to feel like you have to make up an excuse. If you have a hobby you could get more involved with that. You can then tell your employer you have the need to volunteer and fix homes for the poor. Or you are going to visit the Pyramids in Mexico and plan to write a book about it after you have done extensive research. Same with the RV/national parks, go to them and write a book. Or if you have a hobby and want to make items to sell. Or buy a food truck and go to all the State fairs and sell food all around the country! Go to Aruba and buy a big boat and start a business like a booze cruise or a Jimmy Buffett lazy lunch cruise.

You must have some burning desire. Find it, plan it, do it. Tell your boss before you are too old to enjoy this new venture, you must leave to do it now and you plan to make it work and you have no plans to return to the job...thank you very much! Get your plans in order on when you plan your new adventure and then give your notice. Tell the boss you start your new venture on such and such a date and that is it! Good Luck!

Dragonswan

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #33 on: December 27, 2017, 02:06:19 PM »
Do you have an heir apparent for your position? If not, start grooming someone; someone with a "lean and hungry look".  If so, then think of it as leaving the job to give your heir the chance to inherit while things are good.  You won't be leaving them in the lurch, you'll be passing the baton to the next generation who can bring new energy to the role. And you can tell your organization just that.

jim555

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #34 on: December 27, 2017, 07:56:23 PM »
I had the same issue.  I tried to resign after being with the company who gave me a guilt trip.  First they asked me to stay a little longer.  Instead of my two week notice they asked for a one month notice.  Then I had issues with them scheduling meeting with the intent on getting me to stay.  I ended up staying.

The solution for me was finding another job.  One that I wasn't as emotionally attached to.  One that was also not that emotionally attached to me.  Once I gave them two weeks notice and had something lined up they were not able to do much but wish me luck.

I probably could have grown a 'Spine' but there is nothing better than the feeling of being needed.
They ask you for more time, funny.  How did you fall for that one?  After they said we need more notice, I would have said, now you have zero notice and walked out on them.

MrThatsDifferent

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #35 on: December 28, 2017, 06:59:55 AM »
That’s a nice position to be in.  You obviously could lie, but that doesn’t seem right. Look, you’re a VP, you’ve had to make lots of tough decisions and communicate tough messages. This is no different. Stand your ground. Tell everyone you’re done and you’re on to the next chapter. The only reason they pull you back is because you’ve wanted to be pulled back. Maybe you were nervous about the numbers or you thought you’d be bored? IDK, but it starts and ends with you. As a VP, you’ve said no plenty of times, this isn’t different. My plan is to pick a date, buy my plane tickets and then negotiate the transition with my end date in mind. I’ll tell them my retirement party is the weekend before I fly out and they are all invited. Commit to your retirement and they will have no choice but to believe you. Give them an opening and they will take it.

radram

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #36 on: December 28, 2017, 07:16:05 AM »
You obviously love what you do, and fully admit you will probably go back to work soon after FIRE.

Why not just switch to part time, or project based work for a set time period at your current employer right now? If you hate it, then leave for good.

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #37 on: December 28, 2017, 02:25:00 PM »
That’s a nice position to be in.  You obviously could lie, but that doesn’t seem right. Look, you’re a VP, you’ve had to make lots of tough decisions and communicate tough messages. This is no different. Stand your ground. Tell everyone you’re done and you’re on to the next chapter. The only reason they pull you back is because you’ve wanted to be pulled back. Maybe you were nervous about the numbers or you thought you’d be bored? IDK, but it starts and ends with you. As a VP, you’ve said no plenty of times, this isn’t different. My plan is to pick a date, buy my plane tickets and then negotiate the transition with my end date in mind. I’ll tell them my retirement party is the weekend before I fly out and they are all invited. Commit to your retirement and they will have no choice but to believe you. Give them an opening and they will take it.

You are absolutely right about this.

gypsy79

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #38 on: December 28, 2017, 02:27:45 PM »
You obviously love what you do, and fully admit you will probably go back to work soon after FIRE.

Why not just switch to part time, or project based work for a set time period at your current employer right now? If you hate it, then leave for good.

I need a clean break and a rest for a while, but yes, I hope to leave on good terms so there is the option to do part time or contract work with them later if plans for my own gig don't work out. I've seen others do that there--they are really pretty amenable and flexible.

radram

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #39 on: December 29, 2017, 09:00:33 AM »
You obviously love what you do, and fully admit you will probably go back to work soon after FIRE.

Why not just switch to part time, or project based work for a set time period at your current employer right now? If you hate it, then leave for good.

I need a clean break and a rest for a while, but yes, I hope to leave on good terms so there is the option to do part time or contract work with them later if plans for my own gig don't work out. I've seen others do that there--they are really pretty amenable and flexible.

Sounds like you now have the exact way to tell them. Just use your own words :)

Congratulations on your accomplishments. Keep us posted.

Agent Rosenflower

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #40 on: December 30, 2017, 09:37:32 AM »
Ugh, I need this. I tried to quit in fall but my boss talked me out of it. He didn’t guilt me (totally not his style) he just offered me more flexibility in an already pretty flexible job, and I somehow found myself agreeing to stay a bit longer. I tell myself it’s just to pad our savings another $50k or so. I think next time I go into his office it has to be with a hard copy resignation letter in hand.

markbike528CBX

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #41 on: January 19, 2018, 06:02:31 PM »
The letter, delivered about 6 months before my FIRE Date (I wanted to start FIRE in summer).

Hopefully I've redacted most identifying words.   OK, it's a little wordy, but I've been working on it for at least 5 years.

Two things that are  not quite  correct:   The 401K will not be transferred to an IRA as 401K is slightly better protected from creditors (think lawsuit).
                The end date is May 31st, as I have vacation to use or lose.  So the 15th or so is the last working day, and the 31st is the touch the desk, skeddattle day (otherwise the vacation is unpaid if you don't have a "last day in the office").


To: Manager    Date:12/13/2017
cc:SemiBigCorp IT “manager”

From:
markbike528CBX                       Your ref:
Phone: XXX-867-5309
                                             Our ref: XXX-YYY-17-002

Subject:
Request for Leave of Absence and or Resignation /Retirement notice.

I am hereby giving notice of my intent to take a Leave of Absence for the summer of 2018 (May 15th to September 15th) or resign my position/ retire starting about May 15th 2018.

There are several options to consider, all dependent on your needs. 

The options are listed in order of my preference.  While I would like to be associated with the local office of SemiBigCorp I understand that because of headcount issues, this may not be possible.
   
   1) Leave of Absence/Sabattical for the summer (May15- Sept 15th 2018) with a return to #2 or 3    below.  This is the only option for which I would feel contractually tied to SemiBigCorp.

2) A switch to part time work to include very occasional field jobs and specific responsibility (gamma spectroscopy, SEM, etc) and training/mentoring.

3) Part time with consulting as above but no field jobs.

4) Traditional two week notice.

5) Immediate departure upon receipt of this letter.

However, after December 29, 2019 (DW and my 9th anniversary), field work would no longer be accepted.

Reasons for departure-General:

As I’m sure you and other of my colleagues have suspected, DW and I no longer need the financial support of SemiBigCorp.

The increasing level of “standardization” of work practices (project plans and other work that provides no extra customer value), extra QA, “Iknows” , CAPALs and other unspecified stuff have made my position a job to be endured, and not fun enough to bother with.

Field work is getting old and I’m also getting too old for field work.

I’m also getting tired of being in the office on beautiful days, or even not so beautiful days, when I could remain in a nice warm bed. 

I promised myself that the summer of 2017 was my last summer working.  I don’t make promises to myself lightly. If one can’t keep promises to oneself, who can one make promises to in good faith?  One of the reasons for specifying no more summers, was the typical shuffling of vacations due to job needs.  Even though this was minimal for me, I saw how it affected others.

Being restricted ,or even feeling restricted, on accumulation and use of compensation time (CTO) is now unacceptable.  Casual (unpaid) OT is less than lame.  I don’t care if it is “industry practice” or some other HR buzzword, it still is less than lame.

The layoff in October 2014 was a big reason to think about moving on.  We lost many good people, just to satisfy some alleged “person” at the main office of SemiBigCorp.  Seeing other people gone at a moment’s notice was a wake-up call for me.

While it wasn’t that much of a financial threat to me, the layoff definitely decreased my sense of loyalty to SemiBigCorp.  The recent pension freeze and bankruptcy certainly didn’t help the sense of loyalty.

When “B” and “E” were left go in 2015, all sense of being able to care about SemiBigCorp  left also.

While I have always welcomed the fact that we are separated by several thousand miles from SemiBigCorp headquarters, this separation does have its downsides. I have had a general feeling of being superfluous to SemiBigCorp upper management.

If this letter is a sudden thing, than it is probably because we got another DOE contract.


The following was paraphrased and plagiarized from:
https://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/07/25/sherwood-anderson-resignation-letter/

Dear local office manager:

You have a man in your employ that I have thought for a long time should be fired. I refer to markbike528CBX. He is a fellow of a good deal of ability, but for a long time I have been convinced that his heart is not in his work.

There is no question but that this man markbike528CBX has in some ways been an ornament to our organization. His hair, for one thing.

But markbike528CBX is not really productive. As I have said, his heart is not in his work. I think he should be fired and if you will not do the job I should like permission to fire him myself. I therefore suggest that Mr. markbike528CBX be asked to sever his connections with the company on [the earliest convenient date]. He is a nice fellow. We will let him down easy but let’s can him.

   Respectfully submitted,

    markbike528CBX





Reasons for Departure- Health:

From the most reputable news source: The Onion:
Health Experts Recommend Standing Up At Desk, Leaving Office, Never Coming Back

Health Experts Recommend Standing Up At Desk, Leaving Office, Never Coming Back

ROCHESTER, MN—In an effort to help working individuals improve their fitness and well-being, experts at the Mayo Clinic issued a new set of health guidelines Thursday recommending that Americans stand up at their desk, leave their office, and never return. “Many Americans spend a minimum of eight hours per day sitting in an office, but we observed significant physical and mental health benefits in subjects after just one instance of standing up, walking out the door, and never coming back to their place of work again,” said researcher Claudine Sparks, who explained that those who implemented the practice in their lives reported an improvement in mood and reduced stress that lasted for the remainder of the day, and which appeared to persist even into subsequent weeks. “We encourage Americans to experiment with stretching their legs by strolling across their office and leaving all their responsibilities behind forever just one time to see how much better they feel. People tend to become more productive, motivated, and happy almost immediately. We found that you can also really get the blood flowing by pairing this activity with hurling your staff ID across the parking lot.” Sparks added that Americans could maximize positive effects by using their lunch break to walk until nothing looks familiar anymore and your old life is a distant memory.


Appendix B:  Reasons for departure-SemiBigCorp IT list:

SemiBigCorp has made ordinary work into a royal pain in the ass.
   
Boot times up to 15 minutes. 
   I once talked to a IT rep who had the same boot time,
   and who failed to see that this was a desperate problem that needed fixing,
   not an annoyance to be papered over.

Time to come back from a locked computer ~3 minutes.  Gotten better lately, but 1minute is still too long.

Lack of being an admin for my own computer. 
   I have to go and beg to put needed tools on my laptop.
    Printer drivers, really?  At BigFieldJob 2017, I called in to IT to get a printer driver, and it had to    be “escalated” to a Level 2, who responded late the next day.

   This includes tools I would have liked to use (MathCad, Statistica/Minitab).
   
   We are typically at least 2 revisions back on Internet Explorer. 
   By the time the SemiBigCorp version is available, many sites say it’s already too old.
   Ditto on Java.

   15 minute screen saver maximum time (time locked also).  Noticed 4/12/17 fixed before 7/17.
   Has no one at SemiBigCorp IT heard of hour-long meetings?  See above on locked computer.

No webmail—are you kidding?  How can G-mail, yahoo etc. manage this?   I understand that using a Microsoft product (Outlook) is fraught with holes/bugs etc.   The webmail was down from November 2014 to April 2015 or later (I gave up looking) and the page that came up was:

 “In order to serve you better, this website is down for maintenance. Please check back later or contact the SemiBigCorp Service Desk at 1-XXX-867-5309. Thank you for your patience.”.

This is laughable, to the point of insolence.  Fixed, after 6 months ~7/2015.

When in the field (off  VPN), Internet Explorer popups appear (IE NOT open at the time) saying that I have been blocked from Facebook and several other sites.   Note that IE is NOT open.  Some of the popups fill the screen, blocking work.  I’ve called IT about it, but to no avail.

Outlook flushing of old emails, specifically sent items.
Being able to prove/resend emails is critical to avoid being “thrown under the bus”.
Just because some directors can’t figure out how to manage their email, does not mean that the rest of us should be punished.

   It is important to be able to document the sending of emails.   Some projects last years, and being able to prove that some deliverable or information was sent can enable a project manager to have a much better bargaining position in negotiations, possibly leading to hundreds of thousands of dollars extra income for SemiBigCorp.

RSA token while in the office  What bullshit. My code was/is written on the side.  Problem eliminated in 2016, -- you can tell I’ve been working on this letter for a while, can’t you?  Still a pain in the field.

Beyond Trust Software virus?  0.29 seconds slowdown on Explorer.  Yeesh.

Personal webmail blocked.  12/17 on Chrome.   There are times when the VPN and/or Outlook is not available and critical emails still need to be sent.  Redundancy is OK , required for power plants, what about power plant workers.  Some plants don’t allow VPN on their networks.

APPENDIX C  Reasons NOT to leave:

Unless I retire after my 55th birthday, partial withdrawals from the 401K are not allowed even though allowed by law, without penalty after January 1 2019.
   Solvable, move 401K to an IRA and take Substantially Equal Payments (SEPP, 72(t) rule).

Unless I retire after my 55th birthday, I am not “retired” and cannot get retiree rate medical insurance per SemiBigCorp Electric Company Retirement Event Guide Revised January 2014
 (copy at C:\Users\markbike528CBX\Documents\Mark Root- formerly D\SemiBigCorp Corporate puffery\ C4_EventsGuide_Retirement.pdf ).   
However at one point it says you can and other places not for 70 points retirement.  This is probably a moot point given the bankruptcy and the small likelihood of this being offered in the future.
   Solvable, don’t care.

I kinda like the job, and people.
   Not solved yet.

SachaFiscal

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #42 on: January 21, 2018, 07:25:54 AM »
I set up a meeting in my office with my program manager and supervisor and told them both at the same time. For each project I was working on I had someone in mind who could take over my responsibilities. So when they asked me to stay longer for the transition I just told them I didn’t feel it was necessary because I had already either transferred the knowledge to another coworker or thoroughly documented the subject. After that some higher ups tried to get me to stay to finish up some efforts but each time I confidently stated those efforts would be fine in the hands of my coworkers who had been working on them for a while now and were proficient. I didn’t burn any bridges and told everyone that I was taking a career break to learn some new skills and have some different experiences. So I left the door open to come back if I wanted to. I think it’s important not to air all your grievances. There was one guy I ended up telling some of my grievances to but only because he pushed me to reveal them. But in the end I smoothed things over saying overall my experience at the company was good and I was grateful for the time I spent there.

Basenji

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #43 on: January 24, 2018, 08:09:37 AM »
I resigned December 2017. I gave 3 months notice. Everyone kept asking me, "Where are you going? What will you be doing?" And I kept saying, "No plans right now." But I did not say "retirement." I felt it was not anyone's business what I would be doing and I loved flummoxing people by being vague. I did not say, "I have enough money" or anything specific. In the end they convinced me to go "adjunct," which meant I could work when I wanted to on projects that I wanted to, at my own pace. I'll also train my replacement when they finally hire one--still no replacement hired even though I gave notice back in September! So far I've done a few small projects for them. I love it. Most of my time is mine, but I pick up a bit of cash when I feel like it. Just do it. Do not overexplain. Ask for what you want and do it.

2lhasas

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #44 on: January 26, 2018, 11:37:45 AM »
I will turn 50 next week, and I gave a 3 month notice at the beginning of the year.  Like you, I have a high level position doing a job I like, but certain staffing decisions in the last year have made the time commitment and stress untenable.  I was very apprehensive leading up to my resignation, particularly because I have a great group of people who work for me and I didn't want them to get screwed.  That said, after firmly telling them I will be retiring effective March 30, it's like a weight is off my shoulders. Before I gave notice, I had already considered whether I would give them more time if they hadn't found someone, but after giving notice, I am totally committed to being out the door not a second after 5pm on the 30th. I have some travel planned in April, and have signed up for a photography class. And yes, I plan to commit more time volunteering with a local pet rescue - petting dogs as I am allergic to cats. 

My advice would be to draft your resignation letter now - perhaps thanking them for the opportunities, guidance, mentoring or whatever over the years, but very clearly stating a date after which you will no longer be working there.  I drafted mine 2 months in advance, and took pleasure in reviewing it on difficult days.  I personally would not be coy about your plans to retire.  Clearly you worked hard to get here, and part of my discussions with co-workers has centered around the idea that I have been deliberately working toward early retirement for many years.  I think that helps establish that this isn't just some whim where you've decided you are stressed out and need a break. 

Good luck. I hope you will have the same sense of relief once you let the cat out of the bag.  I even downloaded a timer app, so I can just glance at my phone and it will tell me how much more time I have.  63 days, 3 hours and 22 minuets if you must know.  :-)

Richard3

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #45 on: February 06, 2018, 04:47:48 AM »
My company actually has a Retirement policy (a couple extra days off in your last year, paid for meetings with a financial advisor, etc) so I'm probably going to have to tell the truth.

My current draft.

Dear Boss,

This letter is my three month notice of my intention to retire. My final day will be on or around June 30th (we can discuss this and other practical aspects at our next meeting).

Regards

Richard

There's little benefit in adding any extra facts or opinions in your resignation mail. It's a transaction. Save the "this place is great and I love you all" for the farewell email and save the "you're a duckhead and I am glad I'll never see you again" for your imagination. It's never as satisfying as you imagine it will be.

Roadrunner53

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #46 on: February 06, 2018, 05:51:50 AM »
My advice is to give the least amount of notice as you can. Once you give your notice, your whole mental outlook for the job takes a nose dive. Some people might feel that they owe the company a long notice but if you dropped dead today, someone will have to do the job. It happens all the time where someone becomes sick and can't come back to work. Someone has to pick up the pieces. I don't condone just walking out the door, but a 2 or 3 week notice seems fine to me. Don't forget to take all those days that you won't be paid for like personal days. My Hub gave too much notice and totally regretted it. His only salvation was taking personal days that he wouldn't get a pay out for.

ysette9

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #47 on: February 06, 2018, 07:21:52 AM »
Richard3: do you have to be a certain age or have a certain number of years with the company to officially retire? I can’t “retire” from my company until I hit some age. I’m not sure if it is 50 or 55, but either way I will be FIREing and not retiring because o won’t be eligible for any of the stuff they give traditional retirees.

markbike528CBX

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #48 on: February 06, 2018, 09:08:58 AM »
My advice is to give the least amount of notice as you can. Once you give your notice, your whole mental outlook for the job takes a nose dive. Some people might feel that they owe the company a long notice but if you dropped dead today, someone will have to do the job. It happens all the time where someone becomes sick and can't come back to work. Someone has to pick up the pieces. I don't condone just walking out the door, but a 2 or 3 week notice seems fine to me. Don't forget to take all those days that you won't be paid for like personal days. My Hub gave too much notice and totally regretted it. His only salvation was taking personal days that he wouldn't get a pay out for.

I gave 6 months and am regretting it.  I'm about to talk with the boss about the extra projects, and I might end up with an FU money story.

Livingthedream55

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Re: When you retired early, how did you resign?
« Reply #49 on: February 06, 2018, 10:47:55 AM »
My advice is to give the least amount of notice as you can. Once you give your notice, your whole mental outlook for the job takes a nose dive. Some people might feel that they owe the company a long notice but if you dropped dead today, someone will have to do the job. It happens all the time where someone becomes sick and can't come back to work. Someone has to pick up the pieces. I don't condone just walking out the door, but a 2 or 3 week notice seems fine to me. Don't forget to take all those days that you won't be paid for like personal days. My Hub gave too much notice and totally regretted it. His only salvation was taking personal days that he wouldn't get a pay out for.

I gave 6 months and am regretting it.  I'm about to talk with the boss about the extra projects, and I might end up with an FU money story.

+ 2 The two times I gave generous notice to leave (3 months and six months) were really horrible.

In the six month case my manager got really demanding and unpleasant and had extremely unrealistic demands for what needed to be finished before I left (but I was young and foolish and worked round the clock and got it all done).

In the three month leave my manager ignored (dragged his feet on hiring a replacement -- the reason I gave such generous notice was to give ample time to bring someone on board so I could train him or her) and then went into manic hyperdrive my last three weeks (I mean still extracting work when I had literally hours to go on my last day.)

Once I gave "only" two weeks notice (due to a highly toxic boss who I knew would make me days miserable once I let him know) and yes, it was painful but I was so glad that limited my exposure to the grief!