Author Topic: Urban vs. Suburban  (Read 1197 times)

heybro

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Urban vs. Suburban
« on: April 13, 2018, 01:33:28 AM »
Hey hey...

My car-lack life has always been enabled by living in the city.  During the recession, vacancy rates were high and the city was still quiet.

Now that the recession is over and that living in a city is extremely popular, I'm not as keen on it anymore!  It could be just that I'm getting older as well.  There are so many more people here.  And things go so much later here than before.

There are some suburbs that I could still access public transportation with and I could still choose to live close to certain central business areas in a suburb. 

Will things be more quiet out there.  I've lived in a small town before but never a suburb.  What is it like usually?


Malkynn

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Re: Urban vs. Suburban
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2018, 06:40:59 AM »
Hey hey...

My car-lack life has always been enabled by living in the city.  During the recession, vacancy rates were high and the city was still quiet.

Now that the recession is over and that living in a city is extremely popular, I'm not as keen on it anymore!  It could be just that I'm getting older as well.  There are so many more people here.  And things go so much later here than before.

There are some suburbs that I could still access public transportation with and I could still choose to live close to certain central business areas in a suburb. 

Will things be more quiet out there.  I've lived in a small town before but never a suburb.  What is it like usually?

Iíve personally never met a suburb I could live in.

Iíve lived in very small towns and very big cities, and I love both because itís easy to live ďcentral,Ē but suburbs always feel so residential to me. The ones Iíve seen are really geared towards driving everywhere and shopping at box stores or eating at chain restaurants.

That might just be the burbs around where I live, but not having kids, not liking driving, and not liking major chain retailers, I see no appeal in the burbs.

Fomerly known as something

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Re: Urban vs. Suburban
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2018, 07:15:18 AM »
I like to call my preferred housing style "semi-urban."  I like having some space/a small yard but don't want much.  (My ideal house would be an east coast row house but I don't live on the east coast.). My last two residences have been in the "Suburbs" of larger cities but I was very careful in picking.  So I think it can be done but you really have to look hard at the commuinty. 

One was in an old, inner ring suburb of a large midwestern city.  The suburb was developed prior to WW2/into the 50s.  Therefore, the streets were still a grid system and there was a walkable business district from the house.  (Although the closest grocery store closed while I lived there making the walk/bike for food at a 4 mile round trip). 

My current is in a new subdivision that is a mile away from what was originally a small farming town.  It is a 10 mile drive into a mid-sized Midwestern city.  I have everything I need within walking distance but it is limited.  When I was looking in my new area, I was really looking at a very small number of neighborhoods and was for example watching listings in my current neighborhood like a hawk in order to find a smaller house on a smaller lot within a limited distance of that small town I was talking about.  (there were 2-3 other areas around the larger city that were I was also looking.)

MayDay

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Re: Urban vs. Suburban
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2018, 08:46:16 PM »
Not retired yet, but we also live in a first ring suburb, grid streets, built 1950-60's. Walk or bike to grocery, target, bike shop, library, etc etc, plus on several bus lines. But have a third of an acre. I think it is the best of both worlds.
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