Author Topic: Sound Sensitivity Disorder  (Read 5227 times)

ysette9

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #50 on: December 20, 2018, 09:52:45 AM »
Hmm. I was thinking of getting noise-cancelling headphones for air travel, but not for the sound of the plane itself, which doesn't really bother me. It's the loud talkers and the screaming babies that get to me. Do NC headphones not take care of those?

They definitely help and make it quieter than not wearing anything.  But if it's talking and screaming you are trying to drown out, ear plugs or earmuffs would give you more bang for your buck.

These were my go to, basic uline provided by my work.  I'd wear ear buds under them to listen to music.  This setup was better at drowning out all noise than noise cancelling headphones are.  But you look goofy as fuck on a plane or walking around an airport with them on.



Thanks! I wear earplugs at night to sleep, but it hadn't occurred to me to wear them on a plane. I'll give it a try! Might save me a lot of money!
I always carry earplugs in my purse/pocket and especially when I am on planes. Those damn in-flight announcements have gotten so loud that they are physically painful to me. I always ask them to turn the volume down and usually I am told there is no volume control. Arrrrgggg

MasterStache

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #51 on: December 20, 2018, 11:34:34 AM »
I can somewhat relate OP. My hearing deteriorated while in the military. I was diagnosed with tinnitus. The ringing really isn't that bad but I also developed a bit of a sensitivity to loud noises. Most particularly raised voices, yelling, loud singing etc. It's weird because it's a hit or miss for me. Some loud noises really don't bother me.

GreenSheep

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #52 on: December 20, 2018, 12:48:18 PM »
I always carry earplugs in my purse/pocket and especially when I am on planes. Those damn in-flight announcements have gotten so loud that they are physically painful to me. I always ask them to turn the volume down and usually I am told there is no volume control. Arrrrgggg

I'm going to have to move my earplugs from my toiletry bag to my pocket!

I thought of this thread today while wearing my husband's ear protectors (or whatever those things are called -- for working with loud machinery, yard tools, etc.) while using my blender and food processor. He gave me his old ones a couple of years ago, and now I don't know how I ever managed to stand all the racket in the kitchen without them! I also vacuum with them on, with earbuds underneath for listening to a podcast. The noise of the vacuum never really bothered me much, but now it's a much less boring task! :-)

ysette9

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #53 on: December 20, 2018, 02:28:04 PM »
We buy earplugs in buckets of 100 from Target or online. I used to wear them every night until I started getting a series of ear infections. I’m pretty sure the earplugs had nothing to do with the infections, but I stopped just in case.

They lose their effectiveness I find over time, and they are toast if they go through the laundry cycle (I did a lot of that when my baby was young).

Linea_Norway

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #54 on: December 23, 2018, 11:55:43 AM »
I just spent two days in FIL's house where also BIL with wife, a three years old and a baby were. What a stressful experience. Children are very noisy, especially when one of them is coughing a lot. The house has bad acoustics and sounds are very loud. When it is quiet FIL turns on the TV quite loud. This morning DH and I were reluctant to leave the bedroom, which was the most quiet room in the house.
It is nice to see relatives, but I was (acoustically) glad BIL and family left early because of the sick child.

BriarRose111

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #55 on: December 26, 2018, 06:08:13 PM »
I have found sound sensitivity to be an issue for me too, the past few years.  I moved to a home out in the country a year ago, and I LOVE it.  It is so nice to come home after a stressful day working in our "open office" environment, to my house and yard that is so peaceful and quiet.   I do have the nearby highway sounds, but otherwise it is just nature sounds for the most part.

At work, I cope by keeping headphones nearby, and using them to listen to "Classical for Focus" or similar on Amazon Prime music.  Sometimes I just put them on so people won't try to pull me into their conversations.  Alot of people do really struggle with our open office!

Before moving to this house, I had a neighbor who used to drive me batty - he was always making noise.  Either talking / laughing loudly in his yard, using power tools/equipment at all times of day, yelling at his dog, etc.   He also smoked and used an outdoor fireplace, and was always outside. I got a fence but could still hear and smell him.  It was so very frustrating, when I just wanted to relax and unwind.  Now my nearest neighbors are some space away in all directions, and they are all quiet anyway.  I am so much happier living here.

I never noticed sound bothering me when I was younger.  Maybe I was one of the people MAKING noise then.  Maybe my intolerance to noise is payback for all that loud music I used to blare in my car and apartment - Haha!

Linea_Norway

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #56 on: December 31, 2018, 07:25:25 AM »
Some days ago I was onan airplane with lots of noise. My in ear headphones don't block sound very well unless I press them constantly into my ears. Later I used my sleeping earplugs, formed after my ears. They worked better.

Now we are at our cabin for the 5th day. Despite all cabin neighbours being there, it is nice and silent both day and night. We have been on several ski trips where you sometimes meet another person, but often not. With little to no noise from roads.

Tyler

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #57 on: December 31, 2018, 11:22:43 AM »
I can somewhat relate OP. My hearing deteriorated while in the military. I was diagnosed with tinnitus. The ringing really isn't that bad but I also developed a bit of a sensitivity to loud noises. Most particularly raised voices, yelling, loud singing etc. It's weird because it's a hit or miss for me. Some loud noises really don't bother me.

I can definitely relate. I've become accustomed to tinnitus, but some noises just drive me crazy.  For example, building a silent PC became an interesting side hobby.  FWIW, I personally found that magnesium supplements reduce the volume of the ringing.  Obviously YMMV, but you might give it a shot.

I used to travel a lot for work, and there's no way I could have survived so many flights without my in-ear headphones.  Just think of them as earplugs that also play music at a reasonable level.

LilyFleur

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #58 on: January 04, 2019, 11:16:24 AM »
My Bose noise-cancelling over-ear headphones make long air flights much less tiring for me. I need to remember to use them when the gardeners are using blowers.

There is traffic noise if my windows are open. I am thinking of fountains on my patios to mask the sound of the traffic.

Holyoak

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #59 on: January 06, 2019, 07:11:58 PM »
Although I do have very good hearing, and *may* be a bit sensitive to noise, for me the problem of noise is not so much source/type, rather in what it represents - a further coarsening of our society, lack of any basic courtesy and respect for others, no enforcement to attenuate, and complete selfish entitlement by a bunch of hypocrites.  It is true my current location is not the best for living the life of lowish noise; just the same it has become apparent in a very marked way, to just how little many folks respect others right to not have to be involved with your piss-poor manners, or forced into having your *lifestyle* invade in my home.  I guess as with light pollution, noise pollution is only going to increase, and it seems little care as if some fait au compli, or "quit yer bitchin, deal with it".

Over the years the increase in Harley type motorcycles, very loud automobiles (even factory stock), and especially truuuucks is crazy, along with a bunch of folks who will not repair a cracked flexpipe, muffler, ect.  same for neighbors/strangers who allow their dogs to bark on sight of me, all the time, etc without so much as a "hush".  When asked politely to please stop it, you will gets responses from "that's what dogs do", to F you, to not saying a word.  Same pretty much for children running amok screaming in quiet public places, eateries, stores, you name it.  Apartment/condo living...  Good lord, it's the mecca for inconsiderate noise dwellers, and I'd love to find a complex that somehow only allows quiet folks in, and boots any quickly who are not.  I know this can be relative, just the same you know what I mean.

I used to think living in the country would be better, but that has changed so much too...  Now it's so much dirtbike/quad noise, playing with binary explosives that used to almost break my windows from many hundreds of yards away, shooting at inappropriate times, etc.  It can be noisier in the 'country' than folks realize, especially so because noise can carry so well at certain times, and locations.  I simply miss hearing wind rush through branches, Owls hooting, the silence of a big snow without it seems it being interrupted, washed out by the almost constant drone, din, and spasms of obnoxious noise.   Not trying to post a rant, or somehow I expect silence - It would just be nice to be able to enjoy my home, and not live with such a lack of peace. 

Anyone have any suggestion where a quiet fella might move, to truly enjoy some peace and quiet, with good folks as neighbors?  Thanks.

DreamFIRE

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #60 on: January 07, 2019, 04:03:37 PM »
Although I do have very good hearing, and *may* be a bit sensitive to noise, for me the problem of noise is not so much source/type, rather in what it represents - a further coarsening of our society, lack of any basic courtesy and respect for others, no enforcement to attenuate, and complete selfish entitlement by a bunch of hypocrites.  It is true my current location is not the best for living the life of lowish noise; just the same it has become apparent in a very marked way, to just how little many folks respect others right to not have to be involved with your piss-poor manners, or forced into having your *lifestyle* invade in my home.  I guess as with light pollution, noise pollution is only going to increase, and it seems little care as if some fait au compli, or "quit yer bitchin, deal with it".

Over the years the increase in Harley type motorcycles, very loud automobiles (even factory stock), and especially truuuucks is crazy, along with a bunch of folks who will not repair a cracked flexpipe, muffler, ect.  same for neighbors/strangers who allow their dogs to bark on sight of me, all the time, etc without so much as a "hush".  When asked politely to please stop it, you will gets responses from "that's what dogs do", to F you, to not saying a word.  Same pretty much for children running amok screaming in quiet public places, eateries, stores, you name it.  Apartment/condo living...  Good lord, it's the mecca for inconsiderate noise dwellers, and I'd love to find a complex that somehow only allows quiet folks in, and boots any quickly who are not.  I know this can be relative, just the same you know what I mean.

I think I'm kind of the same way.  I'm not bothered much by natural noises like wind, rain, ocean, birds, etc. I keep my windows closed, and I'm more bothered / distracted by the sound of trains (the low frequency rumble much more so than the whistle), barking dogs, thumping bass in passing cars, yelling/screeching kids, a basketball bouncing off the neighbor's driveway, an excessively loud condenser unit, gasoline engine mowers, etc.  I'm a half mile from the closest train, and it's still way too close.

There don't seem to be a lot of good country places, but moving isn't a practical option for me until I retire, anyway.

Dr. Pepper

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #61 on: January 07, 2019, 09:07:58 PM »
When I was deployed recently as a medical support asset, I lived in a tent about 50 feet from a mortar pit for a month, that could go off any time day or night (usually 5-6 times a 24hr period), with sudden extreme noise.  I bit the inside of my mouth about 20 times, being woken up from the boom. You would sometimes hear them shout (Hang it!) , which was about 1 second before it would go off, but that was the only warning most of the time. I wouldn't say I'm sensitive to loud sounds now, but I'm still kind of on edge.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #62 on: January 09, 2019, 07:48:30 AM »
Although I do have very good hearing, and *may* be a bit sensitive to noise, for me the problem of noise is not so much source/type, rather in what it represents - a further coarsening of our society, lack of any basic courtesy and respect for others, no enforcement to attenuate, and complete selfish entitlement by a bunch of hypocrites.  It is true my current location is not the best for living the life of lowish noise; just the same it has become apparent in a very marked way, to just how little many folks respect others right to not have to be involved with your piss-poor manners, or forced into having your *lifestyle* invade in my home.  I guess as with light pollution, noise pollution is only going to increase, and it seems little care as if some fait au compli, or "quit yer bitchin, deal with it".

Over the years the increase in Harley type motorcycles, very loud automobiles (even factory stock), and especially truuuucks is crazy, along with a bunch of folks who will not repair a cracked flexpipe, muffler, ect.  same for neighbors/strangers who allow their dogs to bark on sight of me, all the time, etc without so much as a "hush".  When asked politely to please stop it, you will gets responses from "that's what dogs do", to F you, to not saying a word.  Same pretty much for children running amok screaming in quiet public places, eateries, stores, you name it.  Apartment/condo living...  Good lord, it's the mecca for inconsiderate noise dwellers, and I'd love to find a complex that somehow only allows quiet folks in, and boots any quickly who are not.  I know this can be relative, just the same you know what I mean.

I used to think living in the country would be better, but that has changed so much too...  Now it's so much dirtbike/quad noise, playing with binary explosives that used to almost break my windows from many hundreds of yards away, shooting at inappropriate times, etc.  It can be noisier in the 'country' than folks realize, especially so because noise can carry so well at certain times, and locations.  I simply miss hearing wind rush through branches, Owls hooting, the silence of a big snow without it seems it being interrupted, washed out by the almost constant drone, din, and spasms of obnoxious noise.   Not trying to post a rant, or somehow I expect silence - It would just be nice to be able to enjoy my home, and not live with such a lack of peace. 

Anyone have any suggestion where a quiet fella might move, to truly enjoy some peace and quiet, with good folks as neighbors?  Thanks.

This is me. It is hard to find quiet places, even out in the country. In my local area, most houses hear the constant noise of the roads. In my neighbourhood you don't, but there are the dogs, children, snow blowers, lawn mowers, etc. Even in the local forest you hear the noises of "civilization". Sometimes, in the mountains, pretty far away from any road, you can experience silence. It has become a seldom thing, like dark places, as you mentioned. I am also afraid there isn't much you can do about it. You can't go to the police and complain your neighbour does a perfectly normal thing like having a small dog in his garden most of the day. Neighbour probably can't help it is a constantly barking dog rase...

Korrywow

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #63 on: January 20, 2019, 02:51:53 AM »
Although I do have very good hearing, and *may* be a bit sensitive to noise, for me the problem of noise is not so much source/type, rather in what it represents - a further coarsening of our society, lack of any basic courtesy and respect for others, no enforcement to attenuate, and complete selfish entitlement by a bunch of hypocrites.  It is true my current location is not the best for living the life of lowish noise; just the same it has become apparent in a very marked way, to just how little many folks respect others right to not have to be involved with your piss-poor manners, or forced into having your *lifestyle* invade in my home.  I guess as with light pollution, noise pollution is only going to increase, and it seems little care as if some fait au compli, or "quit yer bitchin, deal with it".

Over the years the increase in Harley type motorcycles, very loud automobiles (even factory stock), and especially truuuucks is crazy, along with a bunch of folks who will not repair a cracked flexpipe, muffler, ect.  same for neighbors/strangers who allow their dogs to bark on sight of me, all the time, etc without so much as a "hush".  When asked politely to please stop it, you will gets responses from "that's what dogs do", to F you, to not saying a word.  Same pretty much for children running amok screaming in quiet public places, eateries, stores, you name it.  Apartment/condo living...  Good lord, it's the mecca for inconsiderate noise dwellers, and I'd love to find a complex that somehow only allows quiet folks in, and boots any quickly who are not.  I know this can be relative, just the same you know what I mean.

I used to think living in the country would be better, but that has changed so much too...  Now it's so much dirtbike/quad noise, playing with binary explosives that used to almost break my windows from many hundreds of yards away, shooting at inappropriate times, etc.  It can be noisier in the 'country' than folks realize, especially so because noise can carry so well at certain times, and locations.  I simply miss hearing wind rush through branches, Owls hooting, the silence of a big snow without it seems it being interrupted, washed out by the almost constant drone, din, and spasms of obnoxious noise.   Not trying to post a rant, or somehow I expect silence - It would just be nice to be able to enjoy my home, and not live with such a lack of peace. 

Anyone have any suggestion where a quiet fella might move, to truly enjoy some peace and quiet, with good folks as neighbors?  Thanks.


Try northern NV. Lots of quiet, empty space out here.

Missy B

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #64 on: January 20, 2019, 11:11:12 PM »
I've read that sound sensitivity can be a symptom of magnesium deficiency. I certainly don't think the sole cause of the sensitivity so many of you are experiencing, but Mg deficiency is extremely common and really can't be tested for properly... and supplementing might help reduce the intensity of the sensitivity.  If you want to try it, Mg bisglynate is the most absorbable form, citrate is 2nd best, and carbonate is a complete waste of time. 

Mg deficiency has some other fun symptoms like muscle cramping or all kinds (including menstrual),extreme fatigue, and irritability. Some meds remove Mg from the body (a lot of heart meds) so if you've started getting a lot of cramping that only started after new meds that could be why.

Missy B

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #65 on: January 20, 2019, 11:18:46 PM »
Although I do have very good hearing, and *may* be a bit sensitive to noise, for me the problem of noise is not so much source/type, rather in what it represents - a further coarsening of our society, lack of any basic courtesy and respect for others, no enforcement to attenuate

This.  The noise is one thing, but it's the contempt for others that puts me around the bend.

smoghat

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #66 on: January 31, 2019, 07:12:59 AM »
Iíll try the magnesium. I have some. Who knows, maybe it will work!

smoghat

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #67 on: February 01, 2019, 06:55:47 AM »
I've read that sound sensitivity can be a symptom of magnesium deficiency. I certainly don't think the sole cause of the sensitivity so many of you are experiencing, but Mg deficiency is extremely common and really can't be tested for properly... and supplementing might help reduce the intensity of the sensitivity.  If you want to try it, Mg bisglynate is the most absorbable form, citrate is 2nd best, and carbonate is a complete waste of time. 


How about Mg taurate?

Only bad thing about Mg is I have IBS, so they donít mix well.

Cellista

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #68 on: February 01, 2019, 03:20:52 PM »
Although I do have very good hearing, and *may* be a bit sensitive to noise, for me the problem of noise is not so much source/type, rather in what it represents - a further coarsening of our society, lack of any basic courtesy and respect for others, no enforcement to attenuate

This.  The noise is one thing, but it's the contempt for others that puts me around the bend.

I work in downtown D.C. near the tourist attractions  We have a lot of street musicians.  Most are not very good, but tourists think it's great "atmosphere" so they contribute money and the musicians persist.  Many use electronic amplifiers and you can hear them blocks away. 

I firmly believe one person's music is another person's noise. I have earbuds, if I wanted to listen to music I would use them.

I'm a musician myself and have fantasized about going up to one of these annoying people to give them an uncharitable critique of their technical skills and understanding of music.

smoghat

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #69 on: February 14, 2019, 05:02:54 AM »
Jesus, I hate street musicians. The Andean pipers make me think of HP Lovecraft.

Versatile

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #70 on: March 12, 2019, 07:03:09 PM »
Jesus, I hate street musicians. The Andean pipers make me think of HP Lovecraft.

Have you considered building a soundproof room for relaxation? Or sleeping for that matter? There are lots of methods to accomplish this without breaking the bank.

I can relate somewhat to your predicament as noises are very distracting to me. If I am in a room with two televisions on two different stations it drives me nuts. Same with radios or stores that play music with static. Bonkers.

Loud people on their phones or in a restaurant having a good time also drive me crazy. I can't tune them out.

moneytaichi

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #71 on: March 14, 2019, 09:59:59 PM »
I just got a book called "The Empath's Survival Guide" https://www.amazon.com/Empaths-Survival-Guide-Strategies-Sensitive/dp/1622036573. It talks about introvert empath is especially sensitive with sound (and light, smell). It gave me many aha moments on why I dislike strongly with artificial light, loud noise, and house cleaning product smell. When people use hand-dryers in bathroom, I want to run away. After reading the book, I respect my boundary better, e.g. if I sit next to a person who I don't feel the right energy, I will move. This book offers some concrete suggestions on how to setting protective boundary to empath, both physically and energetically.   

Missy B

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #72 on: March 16, 2019, 04:04:12 PM »
I've read that sound sensitivity can be a symptom of magnesium deficiency. I certainly don't think the sole cause of the sensitivity so many of you are experiencing, but Mg deficiency is extremely common and really can't be tested for properly... and supplementing might help reduce the intensity of the sensitivity.  If you want to try it, Mg bisglynate is the most absorbable form, citrate is 2nd best, and carbonate is a complete waste of time. 


How about Mg taurate?

Only bad thing about Mg is I have IBS, so they donít mix well.

I don't know anything about taurate. But I suggest you split the Mg into multiple smaller doses spread through the day and you'll tolerate it better.

cloudsail

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #73 on: March 16, 2019, 04:31:45 PM »
If the misophonia is debilitating maybe look into Tomatis or other forms of sound therapy. We did Tomatis for my son with autism, but I understand it's supposed to help also with sound sensitivity and misophonia. It was near miraculous for the autism. It's just a little on the expensive side, and also not that easy to find clinics in the U.S. But there are also home-based programs where you can rent the equipment.

The clinic that we go to has some good information on their site: http://www.sacarin.com/
I notice that they specifically mention misophonia in their adult section: http://www.sacarin.com/code/adult.php