Author Topic: sol fails at retirement  (Read 10846 times)

spartana

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 255
  • Retired at 42
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #150 on: February 09, 2019, 08:55:40 AM »
My investment accounts fluctuate thousands (and sometimes tens of thousands) of dollars every day, so the financial incentive behind devoting my day to someone else's work isn't even a rounding error in my nest egg totals.
This is a great description for how inconsequential money has become for me, and people in general I imagine, in retirement. You don't think retiring was like flipping a switch. I used to do this for money and now they're offering me so much more for such a small amount of work! Surely that's worth just a little bit of my time. But it was like flipping a switch. You won the game and dollars have become irrelevant. They might as well be paying you in seashells, as far as the motivation goes. I actually took a full-time job again and realized two weeks in it was a huge mistake. I couldn't be that person anymore. It was a weird experience, but eye opening.
This ^. For me, once I had "enough", I have lost all desire and motivation for money or to spend any of my (very precioussss) time to earn more money. It is not even a tiny blip on my radar and it's not something I seek in any form. I want to spend my limited time doing things I enjoy or that help others without any regard to earning money. If I wouldn't do it for free, I wouldn't do it for money. You could offer me a million bucks to spend a month in an office and I'd turn it down. You could offer me nothing to spend a year in Antarctica shoveling penguin poop and I'd be on the first plane out.  The only thing I want is more time...lots and lots of time to do the things I want to do.

ETA of course if you offered me a million to spend a year in Antarctica I'd take it. However, so far since I've been ER there hasn't been anything (yet) that pays that I am willing to trade even a second of my time doing for money.

I'd like to quote something that @Jon_Snow wrote in his journal that sums it up better than I can:

"I'd like to think that all of us here are going to do what brings us the most happiness at whatever point in our lives we are at. Hell, if I thought I might be happier helming a construction crew for six months, banking 80k or so, and then slipping back into my current FIRE mode....I WOULD. But honestly, I can't imagine a job scenario, regardless of money, that would bring the the joy....yes, JOY....that my current existence does. "
I completely agree. Zero desire to earn money, but paradoxically, increased desire to give to causes we care about. DH and I flip houses slowly for fun, but we do it mostly to keep ourselves busy. Due to his mom and her pal Al Z. Heimer living with us, we can't go anywhere or do many of the things we want to do. We love the challenge of taking an ugly house and using our bodies and minds to solve scores of riddles to create a safe, warm haven for a new family. The money we make gets socked away for future travel and allows us to be more generous than we could before. We also have the luxury of taking our time and doing it right, which someone who does this for a living doesn't experience without angst. But a genuine j-o-b for moi? #getthefuckouttahere!
I've also found that my desire for more time now goes beyond "not working a job for money" with me. I turn down lots of offers to do things that I'm not really that interested in that others are paying for because they cut into my "time". For instance someone offered me a cruise trip for free recently and I turned it down (I'm not interested in cruising). If I won one in a contest or something, I'd donate to someone. Same with many other venues that would suck up my time. I also don't sell anything I want to get rid of but donate things instead (including some expensive thing like cars and sports equipment). I don't care about the money at all but I do care about the time I'd have to spend on selling those things. Plus I feel it may help others in a small way. 

While I don't have a lot of money by the standards of most of the people on these boards, I have enough and rather optimize time (and relationships, family, friends etc) then spend that time trying to earn something I don't need more of - money.

whywork

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 116
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #151 on: February 09, 2019, 03:46:51 PM »
Reasons that make us work

When young, we think we work because we need money to survive
In middle age, the work stress makes us feel we want to save enough and FIRE
Post FIRE, the reasons are sense of purpose and don't want to lose chance of making more money (even when we know we may not be able to spend it)

If we knew this early (that we will anyway be working for ever), then we could do better by avoiding higher paying stressful jobs in middle age and enjoy the moment more
« Last Edit: February 09, 2019, 03:48:59 PM by whywork »

BicycleB

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 529
  • Location: Live Music Capital of the World
  • Older than the internet, but not wiser... yet
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #152 on: February 09, 2019, 03:56:38 PM »
I've also found that my desire for more time now goes beyond "not working a job for money" with me. I turn down lots of offers to do things that I'm not really that interested in that others are paying for because they cut into my "time". For instance someone offered me a cruise trip for free recently and I turned it down (I'm not interested in cruising). If I won one in a contest or something, I'd donate to someone. Same with many other venues that would suck up my time. I also don't sell anything I want to get rid of but donate things instead (including some expensive thing like cars and sports equipment). I don't care about the money at all but I do care about the time I'd have to spend on selling those things. Plus I feel it may help others in a small way. 

While I don't have a lot of money by the standards of most of the people on these boards, I have enough and rather optimize time (and relationships, family, friends etc) then spend that time trying to earn something I don't need more of - money.

All of the above quotes are gold, but especially this

pecunia

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 749
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #153 on: February 09, 2019, 04:50:58 PM »
Reasons that make us work

When young, we think we work because we need money to survive
In middle age, the work stress makes us feel we want to save enough and FIRE
Post FIRE, the reasons are sense of purpose and don't want to lose chance of making more money (even when we know we may not be able to spend it)

If we knew this early (that we will anyway be working for ever), then we could do better by avoiding higher paying stressful jobs in middle age and enjoy the moment more

I've known people who work only for health insurance.  I worked with a fellow who had retired once and his wife developed Cancer.

happy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4441
  • Location: NSW Australia
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #154 on: February 11, 2019, 09:18:19 PM »
[


I've also found that my desire for more time now goes beyond "not working a job for money" with me. I turn down lots of offers to do things that I'm not really that interested in that others are paying for because they cut into my "time". For instance someone offered me a cruise trip for free recently and I turned it down (I'm not interested in cruising). If I won one in a contest or something, I'd donate to someone. Same with many other venues that would suck up my time. I also don't sell anything I want to get rid of but donate things instead (including some expensive thing like cars and sports equipment). I don't care about the money at all but I do care about the time I'd have to spend on selling those things. Plus I feel it may help others in a small way. 

While I don't have a lot of money by the standards of most of the people on these boards, I have enough and rather optimize time (and relationships, family, friends etc) then spend that time trying to earn something I don't need more of - money.
[/quote]

Onya Spartana

spartana

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 255
  • Retired at 42
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #155 on: February 12, 2019, 09:44:00 AM »
^thanks (and to @BicycleB) Although I think I may be a tiny bit lazy too ;-).

 I DO understand all the reasons why people who are FI continue working, and I also understand how easy it is to take a job like @sol did when you feel you are helping someone and have unique skills they need and they are waving large sums of money in your face. But for me the money just has zero motivation (unless I was giving it to charity) now. Even doing it because I feel I'm being helpful has lost its motivation (except to people and things I care about). Unless its where I want to be and what I want to be doing and would do for free I'm not really interested in using my time for that reason.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 09:46:50 AM by spartana »

sol

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7849
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Pacific Northwest
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #156 on: February 12, 2019, 10:20:50 AM »
I also understand how easy it is to take a job like @sol did when you feel you are helping someone and have unique skills they need and they are waving large sums of money in your face.

Yea, that hasn't worked out so well.  Remember when I was saying I expecting to work roughly 20 hours per week for three weeks?  I think I've worked a total of 14 hours instead of the 60 I was expecting. 

It snowed!  The kids were home all day, and there was sledding to do and hot chocolate to make.  I had to shovel the driveway.  Netflix called to me.  I had to get a haircut.  My volunteer gigs needed my attention.  I went skiing.  I just couldn't be bothered to sit down and dig into spreadsheets.  Sooooo boring.

In theory my three weeks are now up, but I will need to spend a few more hours to complete the handoff and wrap up my temporary working arrangement.  I'm sure they will be disappointed I didn't get more done and I do feel a little bad about that, but on the other hand I did more than zero which is what was going to happen without me so they still came out ahead on the deal.  Even if they're well and truly dissatisfied, we'll just wrap things up and all move on with our lives.  It's not like I want to keep working for them.

Linda_Norway

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4142
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #157 on: February 12, 2019, 10:37:10 AM »
It snowed!  The kids were home all day, and there was sledding to do and hot chocolate to make.  I had to shovel the driveway.  Netflix called to me.  I had to get a haircut.  My volunteer gigs needed my attention.  I went skiing.  I just couldn't be bothered to sit down and dig into spreadsheets.  Sooooo boring.

At least now you understand again why you had retired. Working while there are good skiing conditions just sucks. We had a week with very nice weather on both Friday and Monday and lots of rain on Saturday and Sunday. At last on Friday DH and I quit are jobs really early and went skiing. But Monday was spent inside. ;-(

nereo

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 9403
  • Location: la belle province
    • Here's how you can support science today:
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #158 on: February 12, 2019, 11:46:14 AM »
I look forward to the next time (estimated to be in 6-12 months) when you again "fail" at retirement.

In all seriousness though, this thread has been a pretty awesome reminder of the value of time over money once you have 'enough'.

spartana

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 255
  • Retired at 42
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #159 on: February 12, 2019, 12:15:58 PM »
I look forward to the next time (estimated to be in 6-12 months) when you again "fail" at retirement.

In all seriousness though, this thread has been a pretty awesome reminder of the value of time over money once you have 'enough'.
I'll keep my IRP badge, Jack boots and whip at the ready in case he tried working again.  Or I'll just send a photo of me skiing midday on a Monday with an apres-ski TGIM Mimosas in hand ;-).

I do think it's good to TRY things like going back to a paying job once FIREd to see how it feels.  You learn a lot about yourself and what makes you happy/unhappy then. It takes some of the guess work out of the equation early on. Working a job, even one you really enjoy, can often mean you end up giving more of yourself then you planned to or wanted too just out of a sense of duty, loyalty, pride in doing a good job, etc. I occasionally have dreams that I'm working again and the sense of dread I feel is pretty deep. Not about the actual job itself, which I enjoyed, but everything else including just the mundane routines of, well...routines. I had a common I have one last night. Basicly a "Joe vs. The Volcano" Tom Hanks going to work and home and work and home everyday thing. Was happy to wake up...late on a Tuesday ;-).

nereo

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 9403
  • Location: la belle province
    • Here's how you can support science today:
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #160 on: February 12, 2019, 12:26:22 PM »
I'll keep my IRP badge, Jack boots and whip at the ready...
oh my...
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 04:10:01 PM by nereo »

spartana

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 255
  • Retired at 42
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #161 on: February 12, 2019, 03:53:52 PM »

I'll keep my IRP badge, Jack boots and whip at the ready...
oh my...
[/quote]

 lol! Maybe I will bring IRP dog "Officer Friendly"  along for back up in case the whip doesn't work ;-).

pecunia

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 749
Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #162 on: February 13, 2019, 12:49:15 PM »

-SNIP-

In theory my three weeks are now up, but I will need to spend a few more hours to complete the handoff and wrap up my temporary working arrangement.  I'm sure they will be disappointed I didn't get more done and I do feel a little bad about that, but on the other hand I did more than zero which is what was going to happen without me so they still came out ahead on the deal.  Even if they're well and truly dissatisfied, we'll just wrap things up and all move on with our lives.  It's not like I want to keep working for them.

This reminds me of something I learned as a kid.  My mom asked my dad to paint something.  He didn't want to.  So he painted it and did an awful job.  It was like kindergarten coloring outside the lines.  When he was done he showed it to my mom with a big smile on his face and a gleam in his eye showing how proud he was of the work that was done.  She looked it over and smiled back politely.  I don't recall her ever asking for another painting job.

I guess I learned a few things from my dad.