Author Topic: sol fails at retirement  (Read 10849 times)

sol

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sol fails at retirement
« on: January 22, 2019, 09:15:35 PM »
Forgive me, fellow forum members, for I have disappointed you almost as much as I have disappointed myself.  I have failed at retirement.  I am going back to work, 151 days after retiring.

I did not want another job.  I do not need the money.  I love retirement and the freedom it brings.  Nevertheless, I am about to sign another I-9 and will be receiving a regular paycheck.  I'm not happy about it.

But everyone has a price, right?  A former coworker sent me a lead, a local company looking for someone with my unusual skill set, and out of professional courtesy I went in to talk to them.  I told them up front that I was retired, and not looking for another job.  I told them I couldn't possibly work anything resembling full time, and they said okay.  I told them I wanted to work from home at least four days per week, and they said okay.  I told them I couldn't commit to more than a few weeks of employment, and they said okay.  So I told them I wanted a 35% raise over the previous wage I had already walked away from, and they grumbled about it but they said okay to that too.

So later this week I'm going back to work, part time, for a three week commitment with the option to extend.  I anticipate working approximately 60 hours and clearing a few thousand dollars total, a negligible amount of money for a recent retiree who is near his expected lifetime peak net worth.  It will make no material difference in my family finances.  I'm still undecided on how I feel about this situation.

MrUpwardlyMobile

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2019, 09:18:29 PM »
Call the retirement police ASAP and report yourself. 

No seriously though. Sounds a bit more like youíre getting paid for a short term hobby.

kei te pai

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2019, 09:28:44 PM »
Cant you think of anything else you want to do?

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2019, 10:16:51 PM »
Say twelve Hail Marys and commit to sinning no more after this gig is up.

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2019, 10:31:51 PM »
Sounds like great news, early retirement doesn't mean you'll stop working...

Quote
I find that when people earn their freedom from money constraints, they usually donít stop working. Instead they start doing their best work. Looking at many of societyís highest achievers right now, the world leaders and founders of the most productive companies, I see mostly people who have already made it. And yet are still working because it means something to them.

So Sol, go out there and enjoy your best 60 hours of meaningful work of your life!  I'll even let you continue to call yourself retired if you want to, since it's apparently Mustachian to, unless you actually *gasp* use the money someday.  Maybe 30 years from now I'll have to stop calling you retired...

okits

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2019, 11:03:41 PM »
Congratulations on your new job!  ;)

Are you able to rationalize your failed retirement by donating your wages to a worthy cause?  That might help with any complicated feelings.

Iím downshifted and working less for financial necessity than for the good it can do and for personal satisfaction.  Itís not a utopia but a positive workplace culture and decent coworkers are nice to have (when one is not broke one can insist on that).  And having a 20 hour work week kicks some serious ass.  👍

Looking forward to hearing how it goes!

SpreadsheetMan

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2019, 12:25:23 AM »
Well, it really is your call. The beauty of being FI is if you want to do a bit of work you can, but completely on your own terms.

When I leave my current job I'll call myself retired, but I won't be averse to picking up a bit of work from time to time as long as it doesn't involve too much commitment (or any BS at all).

steveo

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2019, 12:58:46 AM »
Sol - you are a legend. See how it goes. It will be funny if you find that you like the money coming in.

happy

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2019, 01:19:33 AM »
Ask @Exflyboy to talk you down....no wait, that might not work.

Linda_Norway

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2019, 01:25:05 AM »

But everyone has a price, right?  A former coworker sent me a lead, a local company looking for someone with my unusual skill set, and out of professional courtesy I went in to talk to them.  I told them up front that I was retired, and not looking for another job.  I told them I couldn't possibly work anything resembling full time, and they said okay.  I told them I wanted to work from home at least four days per week, and they said okay.  I told them I couldn't commit to more than a few weeks of employment, and they said okay.  So I told them I wanted a 35% raise over the previous wage I had already walked away from, and they grumbled about it but they said okay to that too.


Yes, everyone has a price. But also a bunch of conditions to make the job more easy to tolerate. It sounds like you got all your conditions fulfilled. Good for you.

I can understand that someone wants to fatten his retirement stash. I that the real reason behind doing this? Or has it something to do with needing a sense of purpose and using your professional skills.

Linda_Norway

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2019, 01:41:47 AM »
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/this-might-be-the-first-book-published-describing-how-to-fire/msg2269754/#new

Look at the article in the first post, at point 4:

4. Busy beats idle. No hammock strung between the palm trees for our man Belmont. ďBy all means, if you retire, find some useful and soul satisfying activity to absorb your hours,Ē he wrote.

That might mean spending time with hobbies, he added, or finding the right kind of paying job. ďWork while in retirement is healthful just as is exercise and recreation. But the work must be wholesome, interesting,Ē he explained. If you donít enjoy it, youíve just traded one rat race for another.

Frankies Girl

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2019, 02:01:52 AM »
Why tho? Do you really need the validation from a work/job situation so much? Unless... this is also a humblebrag thing as well? I'm not saying this to be critical, but it is very very attractive to show off a bit about how amazing and awesome you are, especially when you have others that are so desperate for you and your talents that they'll pay practically any price to get a tiny piece of you. It also can be very, very dangerous (not specifically to you Sol since I'm pretty sure you're a introspective enough person to realize all the ramifications)

If you feel this is worth the loss of free time and the hassle of reallocating brain space to working on the job and tasks they give you because of the ridiculous amount of money/perks AND you also enjoyed the work itself, that's great. But I also am not sure about even why you entertained the notion/interviewed in the first place. Considering the emphasis on money, it worries me that you may be hung up on valuing your free time vs work time in a dollar amount score-keeping way where you might have felt at loose ends with not being productive enough or something that drew you into this new job?

I literally can't even name a realistic number that would make me want to go back to actual work, but I might be flattered into doing something not even considering money/pay. I have done my former skillset stuff for free actually when asked for a charity and a few other causes I support. But then I do remember the first year after I FIREd, it was a bit bumpy for me to refocus my path/future without actual work being the main day to day and redefining my own self/worth as well.

It is very seductive to be pursued for your talents.

deborah

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2019, 02:52:32 AM »
Calling @Exflyboy to respond.

pbkmaine

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2019, 04:02:00 AM »
SHAME on you!

trollwithamustache

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2019, 07:34:03 AM »
I didn't have any sympathy until you got the to the i-9.  You should be a 1099 consultant, not an employee!

MrOnyx

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2019, 07:58:31 AM »
We're defining 'failure' pretty broadly if you're only going back on your own terms, and because you want to rather than because your portfolio has failed and you need the money. A little extra cash increases your chance of success/not needing to go back in 20 years. I know that mentality leads to OMYS, but it's still true in moderation.

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2019, 08:01:52 AM »
Congratulations Sol!   Iím happy for you.   I read the world ďfailureĒ as being tongue-in-cheek.

Iím happy for you if youíre taking the job for a new intellectual challenge, personal interest or even just to see what it would be like working as a contractor.    If you are taking the job for the money, then I hope itís earmarked for spending on something that you would be hesitant to do/buy if the expense was to fall within your normal SWR planning.

Personally, I hope to stay professionally engaged with new challenges for a few months each year for the foreseeable future of my FIRE.


Lews Therin

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2019, 08:21:14 AM »
Have you earmarked that money for anything?

lhamo

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2019, 08:25:25 AM »
Sounds like a good way to wait out the rain.

But if you try this during peak hiking season expect some serious face punches!

I'm a red panda

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2019, 08:27:10 AM »
Just don't fail at FI, and you're good.

HAPPYINAZ

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2019, 08:29:30 AM »
You said you love the freedom of retirement, don't need the money, and are not happy that you are signing up for this job.  So I am wondering why are you doing it? 

Paul der Krake

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2019, 08:34:29 AM »
I thought we were in this together. I feel betrayed.

Dicey

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #22 on: January 23, 2019, 08:51:47 AM »
Some people work all year and take one vacation.

Sol is vacationing all year, save for a brief burst surge spasm of working.

I think it's a great way to keep your skills sharp. If you don't need the money (and I believe you), why not earmark (hee) it for a charitable cause you really care about? For example, I can see you holding a sign, "Will Work briefly For Water". Just stay away from freeway off ramps, please.

Go, sol!

lexde

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #23 on: January 23, 2019, 09:03:12 AM »
RETIREMENT POLICE
ARREST REPORT

Name: sol
Booked: Wednesday, January 23, 2019
Charge(s): WWR - Working While Retired
Narrative: Defendant is charged with first offense WWR. Held out to MMM forum members that he had retired, then took a part time position based on leveraging his knowledge and financial independence to *WORK* while retired. Retirement police code of law states strictly that any activities following an announcement of retirement MUST be unchallenging and/or performed for no- or negligible-wages only. Released with a warning for first offense.

Release date: 12/23/2019 11:03EST

MasterStache

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #24 on: January 23, 2019, 09:07:55 AM »
Au contraire.

See before having FU money and being able to RE, you likely didn't have the financial means and thus courage to ask for what you really wanted. Now you have complete and total control. Sure doesn't sound like failure to me ( :   

oldmannickels

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #25 on: January 23, 2019, 09:10:47 AM »
called it!

Paul der Krake

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2019, 09:27:56 AM »
RETIREMENT POLICE
ARREST REPORT

Name: sol
Booked: Wednesday, January 23, 2019
Charge(s): WWR - Working While Retired
Narrative: Defendant is charged with first offense WWR. Held out to MMM forum members that he had retired, then took a part time position based on leveraging his knowledge and financial independence to *WORK* while retired. Retirement police code of law states strictly that any activities following an announcement of retirement MUST be unchallenging and/or performed for no- or negligible-wages only. Released with a warning for first offense.

Release date: 12/23/2019 11:03EST


lexde

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #27 on: January 23, 2019, 09:34:34 AM »
RETIREMENT POLICE
ARREST REPORT

Name: sol
Booked: Wednesday, January 23, 2019
Charge(s): WWR - Working While Retired
Narrative: Defendant is charged with first offense WWR. Held out to MMM forum members that he had retired, then took a part time position based on leveraging his knowledge and financial independence to *WORK* while retired. Retirement police code of law states strictly that any activities following an announcement of retirement MUST be unchallenging and/or performed for no- or negligible-wages only. Released with a warning for first offense.

Release date: 12/23/2019 11:03EST



sol

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #28 on: January 23, 2019, 10:08:16 AM »
I knew I could count on all of you for a laugh, and a thoughtful pause.

Cant you think of anything else you want to do?

Many many things, which I have been doing for the past five months.  I have been able to restart long dormant hobbies, devote myself to a regular workout regime, and finish a bunch of projects around the house that I had been putting off.

But I'm also a family man, with daily responsibilities, so all of things I want to do have to fit into little six hour windows in the middle of weekdays.  I want to hike the Pacific Crest Trail too, but that's not exactly on my agenda until after my kids are grown.

Are you able to rationalize your failed retirement by donating your wages to a worthy cause?  That might help with any complicated feelings.

Even before I retired, I donated half of my 2018 wages to charity.  It was a condition of delaying my retirement from civil service (which also feels like charity sometimes) for as long a I did.  Since then, I have taken on a variety of volunteer gigs and "donated" my time and expertise to rescuing programs that desperately needed effective leadership.  I have found these efforts to be both more difficult and simultaneously more rewarding than just cutting a bunch of $1,000 checks.  Giving away money is quick and easy, when you have a lot of it.  Stepping into a floundering local situation to personally try to save the cause feels more altruistic to me than just burying them in cash.

I can understand that someone wants to fatten his retirement stash. I that the real reason behind doing this? Or has it something to do with needing a sense of purpose and using your professional skills.

The money is entirely inconsequential.  It will be a few thousand dollars at most, roughly a single month's spending from a stash that I expect to last more than 50 years.

The reasons for taking the job are complicated.  I'm trying to make a list:

1.  I have a PhD in this one little thing, and there aren't all that many people who do this one little thing who aren't already doing it full time.  When a local company needs an extra person to do that thing for a while, they have a hard time scaling up.  So part of the reason for taking the job is that I'm helping them out of a jam, and these are people that I like and respect.  Of course, I also gouged them on the price a little bit because I knew they were in a jam, so apparently I don't like and respect them too much.

2.  Related to #1, working even a few weeks here and there is a good way to keep myself relevant in the field in case I ever do decide to go back to work.  I don't plan to ever have another full time job, but then again I also didn't plan to have a part time job and yet here we are.  It's nice to keep your options open, I guess?

3.  I like feeling useful.  They called me because I was good at certain parts of the job (and not others, obviously) and we talked about the work in a way that made me feel worthwhile and respected for my professional expertise, and like all people I am not immune to flattery.  I really like the part of the job where you sit around and tell people how to do it, and I didn't like the part of the job where you sit in front a big fancy computer and actually grind through the steps.  For the next three weeks I'll get to do a little of both, but they mostly hired me to do the fun parts.

None of these reasons are related to money.  My investment accounts have already gained and lost more dollars in three hours of this morning's trading than I will make for three weeks of work.

it is very very attractive to show off a bit about how amazing and awesome you are

You think I'm attractive!  Hooray!  Sorry girl, I'm married.

In this case, this particular company needed short term backup because they sort of dug themselves into a hole.  My former federal colleagues who are now furloughed can't do the work for ethical reasons, but I'm not a fed anymore.  For reasons beyond everyone's control, I'm about the only person who CAN step up.

And we're both clear on this being a short-term gig, at this price.  They couldn't afford to pay me this hourly wage as a full time employee, not without causing havoc with their other employees.  But as a short term patch, it makes sense for them to overpay.

Considering the emphasis on money, it worries me that you may be hung up on valuing your free time vs work time in a dollar amount

I knew that taking this job would put a dent in my leisure activities, so my partner and I sat down and discussed what it would take to pull me out of retirement.  Aside from the reasons listed above, we came up with a list of criteria that would make the job seem tolerable for a few weeks, including the hour cap, working from home, and an hourly wage.

When I told him how much I wanted, the phone went quiet for a few seconds and then he said he'd have to call me back.  I was pretty sure he wouldn't be able to swing it, so when he called back and agreed to it I was surprised enough that I literally said "Really?!" right into the phone.  I would have been happy to turn it down if he had tried to counteroffer a lower amount.  So the money clearly wasn't irrelevant, but seems more about feeling valued than about the inconsequential addition to my investment accounts.

Have you earmarked that money for anything?

I worked for most of 2018, and all of that income was earmarked 50% for savings and 50% for charity.  I walked away from that job, because I felt I had filled both of those buckets beyond the brim, for now.  This money is likely to be my only earned income for the year, so I'll probably end up putting it all into my Roth IRA.  I might peel off a grand for something fun that I wouldn't otherwise buy, like a new bike, but then I'll still put the full amount into the Roth up to the limit of my earned income.  So it's kind of like I'm using that money as an excuse to transfer funds from one type of savings account to another.

Exflyboy

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2019, 10:17:49 AM »
Why does this all feel strangely familiar?

My only constructive comment is that when I did this it was THE most fun work I have ever done.. Why? well because the office politics or backstabbing and trying to one-up your colleagues is as real as ever.. The only difference is.. You don't give a shit.

I can now see why the Romans built the Colosseum. What could be more fun than a family friendly Saturday night outing to watch "The game"? Highly entertaining.. Now they pay YOU to watch!..:)

I would have gone back for another go but mine was a travelling job and the BS Healthcare would have me out of network with zero coverage almost all the time.... Too big of a risk for me at my great age!

So can you put all this money into their 401K plan and thus "take it" tax free?

radram

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2019, 10:20:58 AM »
Forgive me, fellow forum members, for I have disappointed you almost as much as I have disappointed myself.  I have failed at retirement.  I am going back to work, 151 days after retiring.

I did not want another job.  I do not need the money.  I love retirement and the freedom it brings.  Nevertheless, I am about to sign another I-9 and will be receiving a regular paycheck.  I'm not happy about it.

But everyone has a price, right?  A former coworker sent me a lead, a local company looking for someone with my unusual skill set, and out of professional courtesy I went in to talk to them.  I told them up front that I was retired, and not looking for another job.  I told them I couldn't possibly work anything resembling full time, and they said okay.  I told them I wanted to work from home at least four days per week, and they said okay.  I told them I couldn't commit to more than a few weeks of employment, and they said okay.  So I told them I wanted a 35% raise over the previous wage I had already walked away from, and they grumbled about it but they said okay to that too.

So later this week I'm going back to work, part time, for a three week commitment with the option to extend.  I anticipate working approximately 60 hours and clearing a few thousand dollars total, a negligible amount of money for a recent retiree who is near his expected lifetime peak net worth.  It will make no material difference in my family finances.  I'm still undecided on how I feel about this situation.

Might I also recommend you insist on 100% wage deposit into their 401k up until you reach the max. I doubt they would match, but why not ask. That is what I did when I took a 3 week fill-in job at my prior place of employment. It keeps all other financial plans and income levels the same. That was very important to me due to the ACA income rules.

sol

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2019, 10:38:24 AM »
Might I also recommend you insist on 100% wage deposit into their 401k up until you reach the max.
So can you put all this money into their 401K plan and thus "take it" tax free?

Sadly, I will not be eligible for the 401k as a part time employee in my first year.  I'd have to work more than 20 hours per week, and frankly I'd rather just pay the taxes than commit to working that much.

I did increase my hourly wage ask to compensate for the lack of TSP matching funds and pension contributions I was previously earning as fed.

I might be able to accrue the same benefit with a traditional IRA, depending on how our income shakes out for the year.  All of the tax planning is complicated by our plans to sell a rental house this year, which I expect will generate ordinary income tax rates against our accumulated depreciation.

It doesn't really matter, though.  We're talking about a few hundred dollars here or there.  I blew almost $200 last week taking my parents out to dinner on a whim.  Being rich is pretty great, I highly recommend it.  You get to focus your spending on things that are really important to you, with much less concern about the dollar price of things.

infromsea

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #32 on: January 23, 2019, 11:07:45 AM »

CCCA

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #33 on: January 23, 2019, 11:21:47 AM »
I think it sounds like a good idea.  It doesn't sound like much of a commitment and you might actually like it.  Always good to have options, even if you don't need them.

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #34 on: January 23, 2019, 11:36:39 AM »

Linda_Norway

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #35 on: January 23, 2019, 11:38:59 AM »
So what you do is a little, well priced consultancy gig to help out a company that you want to help out. And you are the only one available who can do it. Sort of charity, but getting paid for it. Nice of you to help them out. And it might be nice for you to polish your skills a bit.

okits

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2019, 01:18:41 PM »
When I told him how much I wanted, the phone went quiet for a few seconds and then he said he'd have to call me back.  I was pretty sure he wouldn't be able to swing it, so when he called back and agreed to it I was surprised enough that I literally said "Really?!" right into the phone.  I would have been happy to turn it down if he had tried to counteroffer a lower amount.  So the money clearly wasn't irrelevant, but seems more about feeling valued than about the inconsequential addition to my investment accounts.

To do when sol re: retires: work on poker face.  :D

Are you able to rationalize your failed retirement by donating your wages to a worthy cause?  That might help with any complicated feelings.

Even before I retired, I donated half of my 2018 wages to charity.  It was a condition of delaying my retirement from civil service (which also feels like charity sometimes) for as long a I did.  Since then, I have taken on a variety of volunteer gigs and "donated" my time and expertise to rescuing programs that desperately needed effective leadership.  I have found these efforts to be both more difficult and simultaneously more rewarding than just cutting a bunch of $1,000 checks.  Giving away money is quick and easy, when you have a lot of it.  Stepping into a floundering local situation to personally try to save the cause feels more altruistic to me than just burying them in cash..

I remembered your 2018 wage donations and your past advocacy for charitable giving (vs. optional personal consumption).  👍 Iíve done volunteer work that almost anyone could do, and volunteer work that few people have the background to do, and the latter is a great use of oneís time.  Good on you for getting some programs back on the right track (obviously a difficult enough task that the larger organization is struggling to do it with the staff and skills they currently have).

I knew I could count on all of you for a laugh, and a thoughtful pause.

I am certain you will be forever reminded of your recidivism.  Hopefully we are funny enough to be worth it!  😄

Mr. Green

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2019, 04:44:35 PM »
I did a two month stint at at Publix after I FIREd. Now my sister's fiance is starting a company and he's going to pay me for a week of work. If it works out it might turn into a recurring deal a few weeks a year with me travelling to conferences as tech support. As a person that loves learning and has total control of his time, I jump at the chance to get paid to learn something new that I'm interested in knowing more about. I would have done the grocery job and this upcoming one for free just because I'm interested in the knowledge. It's a wonderful perk of "retirement." If anything it enables me to have these kinds of experiences because my schedule is not dictated by a job.

The bursts of work and learning are also very fun now that my default state is a much more relaxed pace of life.

DreamFIRE

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2019, 05:33:44 PM »
Sol states, " I anticipate working approximately 60 hours"

OMG.  And you thought this 60 hours of work warranted creating a thread about how you failed at FIRE???

Why not simply post in your cohort thread like most people do about something so insignificant?  Plenty of people do side gigs and will put in a lot more hours than that.  That's insignificant.

sol

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2019, 05:59:30 PM »
OMG.  And you thought this 60 hours of work warranted creating a thread about how you failed at FIRE???

We get it, you hate me but you can't resist stalking my forum posts just to argue with me.  You're my unrequited frenemy.  Someday they'll make a sitcom about us.

DreamFIRE

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #40 on: January 23, 2019, 06:26:22 PM »
OMG.  And you thought this 60 hours of work warranted creating a thread about how you failed at FIRE???

We get it, you hate me but you can't resist stalking my forum posts just to argue with me.  You're my unrequited frenemy.  Someday they'll make a sitcom about us.

I don't "hate" anyone on here.  But I did find it ironic that you said I was stalking your forum posts when it seemed to be the other way around, such as this post that you responded to:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/investor-alley/aaaaand-the-bear-market-is-over/msg2256813/#msg2256813

This is the first "sol" thread I've ever responded to as far as I can recall.  I've never read your journal if you have one.

When I read the subject, I thought it might be more serious.  But then, I've seen plenty of "click bait" on the interwebs, so I'm not surprised.

Mr. Green

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #41 on: January 23, 2019, 11:52:01 PM »
I took Sol's post to be more in jest than serious. Maybe I'm just imagining that.

sol

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #42 on: January 24, 2019, 12:00:51 AM »
I took Sol's post to be more in jest than serious. Maybe I'm just imagining that.

You're right on.  DF  is just bent out of shape because we have argued in other threads, and his sense of humor may have shriveled a little as a result.

It takes a very specific type of person to chime on a thread like this one with a reply like that one.  I'm not letting it get me down, though.  After all, I have to get up and go to work tomorrow.

dividendman

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #43 on: January 24, 2019, 12:39:12 AM »
I failed too. But my work is more serious and i've been doing it for 5 months now after 1 year off (when i thought i'd never work again). The work was just too much money, too close to home, and something interesting...

But, I might quit again soon. Sigh, went from FIRE class of 2018, to graduating early in 2017, only to take a year off and be working again in 2019!

Good to know that even the mighty Sol can fail :D


Linda_Norway

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #44 on: January 24, 2019, 01:21:42 AM »
I did a two month stint at at Publix after I FIREd. Now my sister's fiance is starting a company and he's going to pay me for a week of work. If it works out it might turn into a recurring deal a few weeks a year with me travelling to conferences as tech support. As a person that loves learning and has total control of his time, I jump at the chance to get paid to learn something new that I'm interested in knowing more about. I would have done the grocery job and this upcoming one for free just because I'm interested in the knowledge. It's a wonderful perk of "retirement." If anything it enables me to have these kinds of experiences because my schedule is not dictated by a job.

The bursts of work and learning are also very fun now that my default state is a much more relaxed pace of life.

Sounds like a good deal, a few weeks a year, making yourself useful for money doing interesting tasks. In Norwegian we would say "krydre hverdagen din", "Spicing up your days".

According to my FIL who has been FIREd for decades, you stay attractive for such incidental jobs in your field for about 5 years after FIRE. He thinks it requires a lot of investing (visiting conferences, reading professional magazines, doing projects) to stay up to date in your profession and that is something you don't want to spend your time on during FIRE. So after a few years, people won't take you as seriously anymore as they did in the beginning.

couponvan

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #45 on: January 24, 2019, 05:42:02 AM »
You are just going on a smoke break from FIRE.  :-) 

Too bad about not being able to stash something into the 401(k), but 60 hours of work shouldn't cause any blips in maximum benefits/major tax liability.  I like the 35% pay increase.  It's like getting paid for 80+ hours of work for old Sol!

Unless you have full plans in FIRE, I think it's pretty hard to be FIRE when all your friends are still working....No one can play during those 6 hours a day you are off every day.  Sitting around watching soap operas doesn't seem your style.


MasterStache

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #46 on: January 24, 2019, 06:14:12 AM »
I took Sol's post to be more in jest than serious. Maybe I'm just imagining that.

You're right on.  DF  is just bent out of shape because we have argued in other threads, and his sense of humor may have shriveled a little as a result.

It takes a very specific type of person to chime on a thread like this one with a reply like that one.  I'm not letting it get me down, though.  After all, I have to get up and go to work tomorrow.

+1

Trolls will be trolls. Good luck on your first day of your new job. (-;

solon

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #47 on: January 24, 2019, 06:18:16 AM »
You'll just take less money out of your retirement accounts. So really you ARE growing your retirement balance.

Malkynn

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #48 on: January 24, 2019, 06:37:49 AM »
I took Sol's post to be more in jest than serious. Maybe I'm just imagining that.

Yep, obvious joke click-bait title that no one whose been on this forum for more than a week would assume was anything serious.

Well negotiated sol, it's a great example of just how much negotiating power most people leave on the table for fear of losing out on income opportunities.

So few people realize just how far companies are willing to offer if you just keep saying "no".

It's sad that for most people, it's really once they don't need them that the best job opportunities pop up. It's not impossible, but quite tricky to recreate this kind of advantage while still in accumulation phase.

UnleashHell

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Re: sol fails at retirement
« Reply #49 on: January 24, 2019, 07:56:52 AM »
The retirement police are looking at you funny.
not as funny as dreamfire but you can't have everything huh?