Author Topic: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?  (Read 33512 times)

Margie

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #50 on: September 11, 2016, 01:01:47 PM »
Almost hesitating to put this out there (we like how quiet it still is!)  but the azores offer great weather, European lifestyle and the smaller islands are very relaxed without anywhere to really spend your money (no malls, movie theaters, etc)  The larger islands have all of that and golfing, etc.

You can purchase a small house and live within minutes of the ocean with an ocean view from everywhere you are.  This summer my husband and son saw dolphins go by while they were fishing from shore.  (we always go whale watching and always see them from the boat) but to see from the shore is pretty neat.   My son also caught some octopus which is his favourite meal so he was pretty thrilled.  Caught one by fishing rod and the other with a net! 

Most towns have a swimming area that is blocked off from the ocean with rocks or concrete so you have ocean water but not the current.  Fishing and swimming from piers if you want open water swimming.

A normal day is fishing, swimming, hiking, biking etc....really like camping except you sleep in a house with plumbing, etc....

You can get away without a car because trucks come into each town with fish, fruit, milk, etc...you could essentially never leave your little town.    And because it is all volcanic ash - the land is so fertile.  Even if you can't garden - you can there!  Everything is so fresh I gain at least 5 pounds every visit just from all the eating.... and fresh juice! 

The crime is almost non-existent because everyone knows everyone.  My kids have been going since they were babies and a few years ago my son said "I love it here - it's so unsafe"  as he climbed up a cliff to jump into the ocean.  It was hilarious.   He is a boy's boy. 

Lots of german and dutch immigrants now buying cottages and moving there.  Portuguese people are typically friendly and very generous. 

Sata international is a nice airline - nice service and decent scheduling.  The ferries have all been upgraded in the last few years and the marinas are now more accessible. 

Google Horta Marina to see all the pictures painted on the marina walls by sailors who have gone through.

So many places to visit!!

deadlymonkey

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #51 on: September 12, 2016, 10:46:10 AM »
Almost hesitating to put this out there (we like how quiet it still is!)  but the azores offer great weather, European lifestyle and the smaller islands are very relaxed without anywhere to really spend your money (no malls, movie theaters, etc)  The larger islands have all of that and golfing, etc.

You can purchase a small house and live within minutes of the ocean with an ocean view from everywhere you are.  This summer my husband and son saw dolphins go by while they were fishing from shore.  (we always go whale watching and always see them from the boat) but to see from the shore is pretty neat.   My son also caught some octopus which is his favourite meal so he was pretty thrilled.  Caught one by fishing rod and the other with a net! 

Most towns have a swimming area that is blocked off from the ocean with rocks or concrete so you have ocean water but not the current.  Fishing and swimming from piers if you want open water swimming.

A normal day is fishing, swimming, hiking, biking etc....really like camping except you sleep in a house with plumbing, etc....

You can get away without a car because trucks come into each town with fish, fruit, milk, etc...you could essentially never leave your little town.    And because it is all volcanic ash - the land is so fertile.  Even if you can't garden - you can there!  Everything is so fresh I gain at least 5 pounds every visit just from all the eating.... and fresh juice! 

The crime is almost non-existent because everyone knows everyone.  My kids have been going since they were babies and a few years ago my son said "I love it here - it's so unsafe"  as he climbed up a cliff to jump into the ocean.  It was hilarious.   He is a boy's boy. 

Lots of german and dutch immigrants now buying cottages and moving there.  Portuguese people are typically friendly and very generous. 

Sata international is a nice airline - nice service and decent scheduling.  The ferries have all been upgraded in the last few years and the marinas are now more accessible. 

Google Horta Marina to see all the pictures painted on the marina walls by sailors who have gone through.

So many places to visit!!

I love this, we have not considered moving there yet whenever we are FI, but do try to visit the azores every year or two thanks to space-A military flights into Lajes.  Great place for a quiet vacation.

SnackDog

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #52 on: September 15, 2016, 02:08:50 AM »
We have been scouring the US for places with decent winter weather, acceptable summer weather, diverse dining, low cost and culture, particularly a university.  It's not that easy.

Any place with snow is out. The northwest is too rainy and expensive. Southeast is not our cup of tea and muggy summers. Austin is only nice place in Texas but too many allergies and hipsters. Palm Springs is over priced and overrun with vacationing dolts from LA. Santa Fe is too artsy and Adobe for us.

Currently mulling over Reno and Tucson. Leaning toward Arizona in general but only areas with enough elevation to survive summer.

Suggestions?

paddedhat

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #53 on: September 15, 2016, 05:27:15 AM »
We have been scouring the US for places with decent winter weather, acceptable summer weather, diverse dining, low cost and culture, particularly a university.  It's not that easy.

Any place with snow is out. The northwest is too rainy and expensive. Southeast is not our cup of tea and muggy summers. Austin is only nice place in Texas but too many allergies and hipsters. Palm Springs is over priced and overrun with vacationing dolts from LA. Santa Fe is too artsy and Adobe for us.

Currently mulling over Reno and Tucson. Leaning toward Arizona in general but only areas with enough elevation to survive summer.

Suggestions?

We have been snowbirds for the last four years, and spent our lives in the Northeast.  We have been all over North America during our travels, and have found that the only place that we could live year round would be southern CA. When it comes to why we will continue to live a snowbird life and not move to CA. the reasons are numerous, including much higher cost of living, high home ownership costs, and it's far more crowded than I find comfortable. As for mulling over Reno,  any place with an average January low of 25* F and a July high of 91* is no place you will find me.  Tuscon is a bit warmer in winter, but barely, and WAY too hot in summer, for my taste.  As for a perfect climate in AZ. there are a number of RV bloggers who stay in the state ( or the southwest)year round, and migrate, to and from, higher elevations to find comfortable living. When it comes to being retired, suffering through shit weather is not a popular pastime, and finding a year round climate that is comfortable is pretty difficult. If there is a perfect place you are looking for, it tends to be pretty full already. San Diego comes to mind as a perfect example.

Roots&Wings

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #54 on: September 15, 2016, 10:53:21 AM »
A friend of mine lives in Flagstaff in summer and winter in Tucson. Flagstaff even this time of year is pretty chilly at night (30s/40s).

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #55 on: September 15, 2016, 11:53:55 AM »
We have been scouring the US for places with decent winter weather, acceptable summer weather, diverse dining, low cost and culture, particularly a university.  It's not that easy.

Any place with snow is out. The northwest is too rainy and expensive. Southeast is not our cup of tea and muggy summers. Austin is only nice place in Texas but too many allergies and hipsters. Palm Springs is over priced and overrun with vacationing dolts from LA. Santa Fe is too artsy and Adobe for us.

Currently mulling over Reno and Tucson. Leaning toward Arizona in general but only areas with enough elevation to survive summer.

Suggestions?

LOL, guilty as charged. 

Though it appears to me after 25 years in Austin that the allergies thing is, so to speak, overblown.  Learn to sniffle from New Year's until mid January without freaking out, after that no big deal.  YMMV. 

Real estate's gotten pricey, culture here now includes some very spendy layers coexisting with the artsy/musical ones.  Possibly the best of both worlds might be to live in a town nearby and visit Austin on selected occasions.  San Marcos would be an excellent choice for that.  There's even a viable bus line from there to Austin for anyone who wants to be car free. 

Curious to see other replies, and follow your explorations.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #56 on: September 15, 2016, 04:19:31 PM »
We have been scouring the US for places with decent winter weather, acceptable summer weather, diverse dining, low cost and culture, particularly a university.  It's not that easy.

Any place with snow is out. The northwest is too rainy and expensive. Southeast is not our cup of tea and muggy summers. Austin is only nice place in Texas but too many allergies and hipsters. Palm Springs is over priced and overrun with vacationing dolts from LA. Santa Fe is too artsy and Adobe for us.

Currently mulling over Reno and Tucson. Leaning toward Arizona in general but only areas with enough elevation to survive summer.

Suggestions?

LOL, guilty as charged. 

Though it appears to me after 25 years in Austin that the allergies thing is, so to speak, overblown.  Learn to sniffle from New Year's until mid January without freaking out, after that no big deal.  YMMV. 

Real estate's gotten pricey, culture here now includes some very spendy layers coexisting with the artsy/musical ones.  Possibly the best of both worlds might be to live in a town nearby and visit Austin on selected occasions.  San Marcos would be an excellent choice for that.  There's even a viable bus line from there to Austin for anyone who wants to be car free. 

Curious to see other replies, and follow your explorations.

I want to make fun of SnackDog's overly stringer criteria.. but.. I think I feel the same way.
The Flagstaff recommendation is interesting.
What is this about Austin and allergies? BTW, for the Austinite, how would you compare San Antonia, if Austin did get too pricey?

Bicycle_B

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #57 on: September 16, 2016, 05:02:16 PM »
We have been scouring the US for places with decent winter weather, acceptable summer weather, diverse dining, low cost and culture, particularly a university.  It's not that easy.

Any place with snow is out. The northwest is too rainy and expensive. Southeast is not our cup of tea and muggy summers. Austin is only nice place in Texas but too many allergies and hipsters. Palm Springs is over priced and overrun with vacationing dolts from LA. Santa Fe is too artsy and Adobe for us.

Currently mulling over Reno and Tucson. Leaning toward Arizona in general but only areas with enough elevation to survive summer.

Suggestions?

LOL, guilty as charged. 

Though it appears to me after 25 years in Austin that the allergies thing is, so to speak, overblown.  Learn to sniffle from New Year's until mid January without freaking out, after that no big deal.  YMMV. 

Real estate's gotten pricey, culture here now includes some very spendy layers coexisting with the artsy/musical ones.  Possibly the best of both worlds might be to live in a town nearby and visit Austin on selected occasions.  San Marcos would be an excellent choice for that.  There's even a viable bus line from there to Austin for anyone who wants to be car free. 

Curious to see other replies, and follow your explorations.

I want to make fun of SnackDog's overly stringer criteria.. but.. I think I feel the same way.
The Flagstaff recommendation is interesting.
What is this about Austin and allergies? BTW, for the Austinite, how would you compare San Antonia, if Austin did get too pricey?

Lots of people develop allergies in Austin.  Most commonly it's an allergy called "cedar fever", actually an allergy to juniper trees.  They exude pollen in January. You sneeze, sniffle, have stuffy nose, maybe itchy eyes.  Some people get medication but I stopped after realizing it had no effect for me.  Main result personally:  due to sniffling, I do not sound suave in January.

The most frequent thing is to visit, have no problem, then develop the allergy after some years in residence.  I got mine seven years after arrival - exactly when people said I would. 

Here's a fun link re San Marcos this weekend.  San Marcos is maybe half an hour from downtown Austin, plus any traffic effects.  Far enough to still be a separate town so far.

http://freefuninaustin.com/2016/09/mermaid-parade-festival-supporting-san-marcos-river/

San Antonio is 1 to 2 hours from Austin by car, depending on where you start and finish.  Definitely cheaper, though even there, real estate prices definitely rising.  Obviously San Antonio has the most tacos and the best traditional tacos, fwiw.  Lots of military there.  Lots of Spanish neighborhoods that go back generations.  If you want a more relaxed culture, San Antonio is very homey.  My sister loves it.  Also, there is a largely unheralded layer of Austin-like culture (live bands, intellectuals, cool downtown district, etc) there too. Working out is more common in Austin. 

Also, Austin is bike-friendlier... not AT ALL perfect and still very hot, but there roads with bike lanes and grocery stores with bike racks.  Employers vary - some have bike racks and occasionally an on-site shower, most still don't.  (Those things are important in the heat IMHO).  San Antonio has very little of that as far as I know.

« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 02:00:35 AM by Bicycle_B »

SnackDog

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #58 on: October 01, 2016, 03:51:02 AM »
Spouse and I both lived in Austin long enough to know we are allergic there. People are fabulous but it is also stuck in the middle of Texas with long hours on the road to anywhere of scenic beauty. Texas is very limited when it comes to state or national parks - most land is private. We had several friends with ranches and those were fun to visit but mostly just for eating, drinking and fires. Texas is worth a close look for low income taxes but property taxes are massive.

SnackDog

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #59 on: October 01, 2016, 04:02:09 AM »
It is interesting to scour the map for places to live in the US.  There aren't many!!  It is hard to find places with natural beauty, lowish COL, stuff to do, higher education, no traffic, decent winter weather, etc.

Currently focused on Tucson and Santa Fe. SF may be too small; not sure, although it is close to Albuquerque. We have some other strange prefernces about cultural diversity which don't mesh that well with NM. I suspect we will end up farther west but winter places out that way are tough going. Southern California is out due to craven population, high prices and shocking traffic. I need a place outside California we can call home for income tax purposes as well. Wish Nevada were more interesting. The landscape in Vegas is so desolate compared to AZ or NM.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #60 on: October 02, 2016, 10:59:29 AM »
Following.

Ebrat

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #61 on: October 02, 2016, 12:49:21 PM »
It is interesting to scour the map for places to live in the US.  There aren't many!!  It is hard to find places with natural beauty, lowish COL, stuff to do, higher education, no traffic, decent winter weather, etc.

Currently focused on Tucson and Santa Fe. SF may be too small; not sure, although it is close to Albuquerque. We have some other strange prefernces about cultural diversity which don't mesh that well with NM. I suspect we will end up farther west but winter places out that way are tough going. Southern California is out due to craven population, high prices and shocking traffic. I need a place outside California we can call home for income tax purposes as well. Wish Nevada were more interesting. The landscape in Vegas is so desolate compared to AZ or NM.

Let me know if you have any questions about Tucson. I lived there for a few years. The summers are pretty hot. I knew some people who would spend a month or two in San Diego during the summer.

SnackDog

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #62 on: October 02, 2016, 02:52:06 PM »
I'm also interested know how retirees manage transportation, division of resources between summer and winter locations, mothballing and taxes.  For example, is it feasible to have a single car and drive between your summer/winter places?  If you keep car, home and other stuff in both locations how do you manage the cost/redundancy?  Do you mothball a location at the end of the season or keep it ready for a visit at any time?  Do you allow visitors to use it or even AirBnB it when you are not there?  Do you optimize your income taxes by declaring residency in the lowest tax location, assuming there is one?   Did you consider alternative ways of "following the sun", like a large RV?


SnackDog

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #63 on: October 02, 2016, 02:56:15 PM »
And thanks for the Tucson tips.  I know it is hot in the summer - I reckon we would escape to California.  We've never been there so we need to make a reconnoiter of the whole southwest by car in the next couple years.

Reno  looks cheap but is too much like northern California for us, meaning not different enough to escape to part of the year.  It is a pretty area and the snow is super-manageable since it easy to drive an hour away and escape it.  The lure of no income tax in Nevada is a huge plus, that's for sure.  It's also an easy drive from the Bay area.   I reckon we would reverse snow-bird if we had a base there - white Christmas in Reno to ski and summers in on the coast.  We would need to not exceed 9 months in California to avoid income tax, as I understand it.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #64 on: October 03, 2016, 10:32:14 AM »
My parents retired to Tennessee on the west side of Nashville.  Property values in the area are much cheaper than many parts of the nation.  I bought a couple houses around 50k and rent in the Clarksville and smaller cities tends to be around $600.  Mild summers and mild winters.  They have all 4 seasons.

Both of them are originally from Florida.  However, I am looking at possibly retiring to FL myself for the warmer climate.  Both TN and FL have no state income tax.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #65 on: October 03, 2016, 12:05:31 PM »
I'm also interested know how retirees manage transportation, division of resources between summer and winter locations, mothballing and taxes.  For example, is it feasible to have a single car and drive between your summer/winter places?  If you keep car, home and other stuff in both locations how do you manage the cost/redundancy?  Do you mothball a location at the end of the season or keep it ready for a visit at any time?  Do you allow visitors to use it or even AirBnB it when you are not there?  Do you optimize your income taxes by declaring residency in the lowest tax location, assuming there is one?   Did you consider alternative ways of "following the sun", like a large RV?

I know many snowbirds who rent and many snowbirds who own (I DO live in SnowBirdLand, after all). People handle these situations in all types of ways and much of it has to do with how much disposable income they have/want to spend.

Some people drive a car/RV, possibly towing a boat between the two locations. Others keep a car or two here year round. There are car storage facilities available - some even climate controlled - if you want to leave a car somewhere other than at home.

In terms of shuttering the house, I would say the vast majority of property owners in my area close everything up for the summer and don't use the property at all for 6-9 months. Obviously, this is not Mustachian! Others are what I call "back-and-forthers" who fly down for 2-4 week stretches over the hot season. I do also know people who rent out their homes when they don't intend to use them, but they use more traditional property managers as AirBnB isn't really a thing here yet.

Declaring residency can be tricky and income taxes aren't the only consideration. There are things like homestead exemptions on property taxes, taxation of pensions and other retirement assets, costs of registration, insurance and licensing. It can be complex depending on your situation.

Bicycle_B

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #66 on: October 03, 2016, 12:44:55 PM »
I'm also interested know how retirees manage transportation, division of resources between summer and winter locations, mothballing and taxes.  For example, is it feasible to have a single car and drive between your summer/winter places?  If you keep car, home and other stuff in both locations how do you manage the cost/redundancy?  Do you mothball a location at the end of the season or keep it ready for a visit at any time?  Do you allow visitors to use it or even AirBnB it when you are not there?  Do you optimize your income taxes by declaring residency in the lowest tax location, assuming there is one?   Did you consider alternative ways of "following the sun", like a large RV?
 

Not a snowbird myself, but a pattern I've heard personal testimony on is reverse snowbirding that uses an RV as one location and a home as the other, leaving the RV in place instead of driving it "home".

An acquaintance owns a campground in the Northeast (Maine or New Hampshire).  There are customers who summer there in an RV, enjoying the beautiful outdoors in relative cool, or using the place as summer base amidst other adventures.  He lets them leave the RV there during winter if they like for a nominal fee, avoiding the hassle of driving for those who have their main home far away in warmer climes.  The nominal fee is zero if they plan to summer again at the campground. 

It sounds like they fly home after the summer.  I suppose there could be cases where they drive a car back and forth and still don't want to park the RV at home, but I didn't hear him describe that.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #67 on: October 20, 2016, 05:19:42 PM »
We started renting a home in AZ for the winter months (Jan - April) to see how we liked  a few of the 55+ communities (the newer ones!)  Did this for about 3 years.  Best way to check out an area/community.  After realizing how hard it was getting to find a rental because of our 2 cats, we decided to buy a home in AZ - got a good deal on it before prices started to go up (in 2012).  Right now we are spending summers in our mid-west home (June - Dec) and heading out to AZ right after the holidays.  Next year we'll be heading to AZ in mid-Oct. & flying back for the holidays with family.  We are planning to sell our mid-west home and purchase a small place up in the Denver area - easy drive from AZ to spend the summers somewhere cooler.  We love AZ - lots of hiking, biking, swimming, golfing.  Denver seems to be just as good weather-wise, just not as hot in the summer.  We figure what the heck - if we find out it's not what we want/like, we'll just sell.  At this point in our life I don't want to spend years deciding - lets just do it and see what happens.  We aren't getting any younger (at 54 & 64).  Thankfully finances aren't an issue. 

Joan-eh?

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #68 on: September 30, 2017, 04:52:18 PM »
we are enjoying Portugal and Spain, and Croatia. Just a vacations now, but imagining migrating every 6 months.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #69 on: October 01, 2017, 03:27:00 PM »
More of a rainbird. At the moment, DH and I try to take two 10-day vacations in the Canary Islands during the dark and soggy British winter, but when we retire we plan to hop off for six weeks in January and February every year, staying in hotels cheaply at low season and riding our bikes a lot.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #70 on: October 01, 2017, 05:23:09 PM »
Northern NV has a mild 4 seasons.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #71 on: January 30, 2018, 12:53:11 PM »

I saw a complaint upthread that I'd like to address. Yes, there are a metric craptons of strip malls, shopping centers and restaurants in Palm Springs/Palm Desert, but they are only superficial. The opportunity to commune with nature is immense.

That was my complaint - sorry!  We just spent another ten days in Bermuda Springs/Palm Springs and took a lot of road trips and hiked around.  I'd agree there are lots of very beautiful places to hike in the Palm Springs area and great road trips, but I still don't enjoy the feel of it that much when I'm there. 

We did find a place to buy though... in Borrego Springs as someone suggested way back in the thread.  If you like nature, hiking, the arts, astronomy,  and the desert - or golf - and don't mind a tiny town this is an inexpensive place with excellent winter weather - although they do have to cut back on water use drastically (mostly grapefruit farming - residential is only 10% of the use).   Borrego Springs is smack dab in the middle of the Anzo-Borrego desert and 1 hour and 15 minutes from Palm Springs and 1 hour and 50 minutes from San Diego. 

http://www.visitcalifornia.com/ca/attraction/borrego-springs

Livingthedream55

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #72 on: January 31, 2018, 07:12:59 AM »
Try Airbnb. 

I'm really interested in this topic.  We are thinking of migrating South for the winter. 

We were just in SoCal and the weather was lovely and nice to see palm and citrus trees. 

It would be nice to own a place that we can rent out pt but pulling the trigger on that at current exchange rates isn't so attractive.

We're going to check out Arizona next.

Excellent idea! I just peaked at San Miguel de Allende, Mexico (and surrounding towns) for January - February, 2019 and found private rooms for under $300 a month! I think as a single traveler I would enjoy having housemates for a couple of months.

I live in Massachusetts and would LOVE to sample different locations every winter once I retire - NEXT YEAR!!!! Wooohoooo!

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #73 on: January 31, 2018, 07:57:58 AM »
I saw a complaint upthread that I'd like to address. Yes, there are a metric craptons of strip malls, shopping centers and restaurants in Palm Springs/Palm Desert, but they are only superficial. The opportunity to commune with nature is immense.

That was my complaint - sorry!  We just spent another ten days in Bermuda Springs/Palm Springs and took a lot of road trips and hiked around.  I'd agree there are lots of very beautiful places to hike in the Palm Springs area and great road trips, but I still don't enjoy the feel of it that much when I'm there. 

We did find a place to buy though... in Borrego Springs as someone suggested way back in the thread.  If you like nature, hiking, the arts, astronomy,  and the desert - or golf - and don't mind a tiny town this is an inexpensive place with excellent winter weather - although they do have to cut back on water use drastically (mostly grapefruit farming - residential is only 10% of the use).   Borrego Springs is smack dab in the middle of the Anzo-Borrego desert and 1 hour and 15 minutes from Palm Springs and 1 hour and 50 minutes from San Diego. 

http://www.visitcalifornia.com/ca/attraction/borrego-springs
Huh. I grew up in Riverside, and I've heard of, but never been to Borrego Springs. My BFF lives in Ramona, towards Julian, and I've been to the Salton Sea, so perhaps we'll connect the dots on our next trip south and check it out. Congratulations on finding your own little piece of desert heaven! Have you checked out Slab City and Salvation Mountain yet? Also, I see you're only about 30 miles from the Costco in La Quinta, which is conveniently adjacent to a 24 hour Super Wal-Mart, so provisioning up will be relatively easy. If you dislike WM as much as I do, go just a bit further to Winco in Indio. Huge section with an amazing Bulk Foods section, and they're employee owned, so they earn a living wage, like Costco employees do. I dislike WM's pay structure, but sometimes you really, really need something after hours. 

JoJo

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #74 on: January 31, 2018, 05:02:10 PM »
When I get older, like 70's I might do what my aunt and uncle did... they had a small trailer they kept in Mesa, AZ.  They paid monthly fees and there was a pool, activities, etc.  Then they had a minivan that let them relocate from MN to AZ and vice versa.

totoro

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #75 on: February 01, 2018, 09:41:49 AM »
I saw a complaint upthread that I'd like to address. Yes, there are a metric craptons of strip malls, shopping centers and restaurants in Palm Springs/Palm Desert, but they are only superficial. The opportunity to commune with nature is immense.

That was my complaint - sorry!  We just spent another ten days in Bermuda Springs/Palm Springs and took a lot of road trips and hiked around.  I'd agree there are lots of very beautiful places to hike in the Palm Springs area and great road trips, but I still don't enjoy the feel of it that much when I'm there. 

We did find a place to buy though... in Borrego Springs as someone suggested way back in the thread.  If you like nature, hiking, the arts, astronomy,  and the desert - or golf - and don't mind a tiny town this is an inexpensive place with excellent winter weather - although they do have to cut back on water use drastically (mostly grapefruit farming - residential is only 10% of the use).   Borrego Springs is smack dab in the middle of the Anzo-Borrego desert and 1 hour and 15 minutes from Palm Springs and 1 hour and 50 minutes from San Diego. 

http://www.visitcalifornia.com/ca/attraction/borrego-springs
Huh. I grew up in Riverside, and I've heard of, but never been to Borrego Springs. My BFF lives in Ramona, towards Julian, and I've been to the Salton Sea, so perhaps we'll connect the dots on our next trip south and check it out. Congratulations on finding your own little piece of desert heaven! Have you checked out Slab City and Salvation Mountain yet? Also, I see you're only about 30 miles from the Costco in La Quinta, which is conveniently adjacent to a 24 hour Super Wal-Mart, so provisioning up will be relatively easy. If you dislike WM as much as I do, go just a bit further to Winco in Indio. Huge section with an amazing Bulk Foods section, and they're employee owned, so they earn a living wage, like Costco employees do. I dislike WM's pay structure, but sometimes you really, really need something after hours.

Yep, checked out Slab City and Salvation Mountain - a Mad Max type of experience :)  Ramona is only about an hour from Borrego Springs.   Tx for the shopping tips!

BTDretire

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #76 on: February 04, 2018, 09:36:52 AM »
I'm not a snowbird, but live near the coast in the redneck riviera.
https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/why-the-florida-panhandle-is-an-american-paradise
 We see 10s of thousands of snowbirds arrive for winter, many wait until just after Christmas,
preferring to stay and have Christmas with their family, others arrive a month before.
 Then in March or April the head back home, most opting to leave before the colleges have their spring breaks.
 We get snowbirds from all over, but, it includes a lot of people from Canadian, Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin,
Indiana and illinois.

gerardc

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #77 on: February 04, 2018, 01:57:01 PM »
Rent furnished 3-6 months at a time. More flexible and you don't leave an empty apartment behind. Realistic?

Cassie

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #78 on: February 04, 2018, 03:56:38 PM »
WE looked at renting a home in Florida and it was expensive plus most were booked out more than a year in advance.  Also very few were pet friendly. Now I am looking at putting our rv for 2 winter months in a rv park in florida and finding issues.  Some are expensive, booked more then a year in advance or don't want motorhomes more then 15 years old.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2018, 05:21:14 PM by Cassie »

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #79 on: February 04, 2018, 04:01:24 PM »
Rent furnished 3-6 months at a time. More flexible and you don't leave an empty apartment behind. Realistic?
Lots of people do this in my area. It is a bit $$. A 1bd apartment in a decent area in FL will cost about $2000-$3000 per month during winter.

LateToTheParty

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #80 on: February 05, 2018, 07:29:10 AM »
+1 for the Redneck Riviera - the emerald coast of Alabama and Florida. Amazing beaches, warm weather (although temps can dip for brief periods) and relatively inexpensive furnished monthly “snowbird” rentals over the winter. The busy season for rentals here is in the summer, when people flock to the beach to escape the heat and humidity of the interior.


Leisured

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #81 on: February 18, 2018, 06:41:44 PM »
To put things in perspective: the Arctic Tern has the longest migration pattern of any bird. It spends the northern summer in the Arctic, then flies south and spends the southern summer on the Antarctic coast. it sees more daylight than any other creature.

The human parallel would be someone spending the northern summer in say Alaska or Norway, then the southern summer in southern Chile or south island New Zealand. If arctic terns can do it, we can aspire to do the same, but without the hard work of flying.

PKate

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #82 on: February 18, 2018, 07:38:02 PM »
Central to northern New Hampshire is amazing in summer and fall and more affordable than the southern part of the state.  Lots of mountains and other outdoor stuff.  The ocean and Boston are no more than 2 hours away.  Montreal is 4 hours away. NH is full of small town centers and historic homes tucked into the woods with mountains in the background. 

If you just want a vacation spot 3 Season cottages are affordable and there are still a few towns without zoning or permits other than state requirements like septic  (zoning and permits vary dramatically depending on the town)  Anything on a lake will be expensive. 

NH has no income tax, no sales tax, but property taxes can vary wildly depending on the town. 


Bird In Hand

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #83 on: February 20, 2018, 09:52:29 AM »
PKate, there is certainly a lot to like about northern NE (IMO).  It's hard to beat spring and fall in country/rural/small-town northern NE.  Summer has too much in the way of humidity/mosquitos/tourists for my taste.  And winter of course lasts a little too long.

The more I think about it, the more my ideal retirement would involve living in different places at different times of the year.  Even just in the US I could easily envision spending the fall and Christmas in NE, the winter in the SE desert, the summer somewhere in the NE or Western mountains, and the spring just about anywhere.

Broadening destinations to anywhere in the world, I can't even begin to imagine the possibilities.  Maybe I'll work on figuring that out once we retire.

Mrs. Rocker

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #84 on: February 20, 2018, 10:07:14 AM »
Maybe you need to consider a nomadic RV life. There are many folks out there that live and travel full-time in an RV. We love it and choose to travel slowly so we have plenty of time to explore the area we are in along with having down time.

PKate, there is certainly a lot to like about northern NE (IMO).  It's hard to beat spring and fall in country/rural/small-town northern NE.  Summer has too much in the way of humidity/mosquitos/tourists for my taste.  And winter of course lasts a little too long.

The more I think about it, the more my ideal retirement would involve living in different places at different times of the year.  Even just in the US I could easily envision spending the fall and Christmas in NE, the winter in the SE desert, the summer somewhere in the NE or Western mountains, and the spring just about anywhere.

Broadening destinations to anywhere in the world, I can't even begin to imagine the possibilities.  Maybe I'll work on figuring that out once we retire.

Bird In Hand

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #85 on: February 20, 2018, 11:20:49 AM »
Maybe you need to consider a nomadic RV life. There are many folks out there that live and travel full-time in an RV. We love it and choose to travel slowly so we have plenty of time to explore the area we are in along with having down time.

Maybe!  It would be out of character for my wife and I, who are generally homebodies.  But it's certainly something we've pondered from time to time.

Mrs. Rocker

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #86 on: February 20, 2018, 12:09:34 PM »
We were never socialites and considered ourselves homebodies as well. We did enjoy traveling and exploring but never liked the crowded touristy areas. Now as full-time RVers we still avoid many of the touristy areas but highly enjoy exploring nature and the countrysides wherever we happen to be. Right now we are in Texas in a quiet area overlooking a lake. Hard to beat when our home state of WI is experiencing an ice storm. We love this life and meet lots of others on the road that enjoy it as well.
Maybe you need to consider a nomadic RV life. There are many folks out there that live and travel full-time in an RV. We love it and choose to travel slowly so we have plenty of time to explore the area we are in along with having down time.

Maybe!  It would be out of character for my wife and I, who are generally homebodies.  But it's certainly something we've pondered from time to time.

gerardc

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #87 on: March 04, 2018, 08:21:38 PM »
Rent furnished 3-6 months at a time. More flexible and you don't leave an empty apartment behind. Realistic?
Lots of people do this in my area. It is a bit $$. A 1bd apartment in a decent area in FL will cost about $2000-$3000 per month during winter.

I'm not sure what your criteria for decent are, but most 1bd apartments I can find in coastal South Florida (which I think is more expensive) are around $1500.

LifeHappens

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #88 on: March 05, 2018, 09:34:33 AM »
Rent furnished 3-6 months at a time. More flexible and you don't leave an empty apartment behind. Realistic?
Lots of people do this in my area. It is a bit $$. A 1bd apartment in a decent area in FL will cost about $2000-$3000 per month during winter.

I'm not sure what your criteria for decent are, but most 1bd apartments I can find in coastal South Florida (which I think is more expensive) are around $1500.
For a high season rental? I'm specifically talking about monthly rentals in the winter, not annual leases.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #89 on: March 31, 2018, 11:23:11 AM »
We'll be trying out this life for the first time this year - spring/summer/early fall in the PNW and late fall/winter/early spring in a small beach town in Mexico. We lined up a 6 month rental in Mexico for $500/month, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, furnished, including electricity, water (not drinking water though), garbage (we pay tip), and first tank of propane. Wifi will be an additional $30/month. And it has a fenced in yard with garden space and fruit trees! Coming from a HCOL area, we were stoked, and I'll bet we are overpaying :). I have a friend who had an apartment in the same general area (different town) this past year and paid $200/month!

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #90 on: March 31, 2018, 11:51:13 AM »
We'll be trying out this life for the first time this year - spring/summer/early fall in the PNW and late fall/winter/early spring in a small beach town in Mexico. We lined up a 6 month rental in Mexico for $500/month, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, furnished, including electricity, water (not drinking water though), garbage (we pay tip), and first tank of propane. Wifi will be an additional $30/month. And it has a fenced in yard with garden space and fruit trees! Coming from a HCOL area, we were stoked, and I'll bet we are overpaying :). I have a friend who had an apartment in the same general area (different town) this past year and paid $200/month!

Where in Mexico?

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #91 on: April 01, 2018, 10:14:04 AM »
We'll be trying out this life for the first time this year - spring/summer/early fall in the PNW and late fall/winter/early spring in a small beach town in Mexico. We lined up a 6 month rental in Mexico for $500/month, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, furnished, including electricity, water (not drinking water though), garbage (we pay tip), and first tank of propane. Wifi will be an additional $30/month. And it has a fenced in yard with garden space and fruit trees! Coming from a HCOL area, we were stoked, and I'll bet we are overpaying :). I have a friend who had an apartment in the same general area (different town) this past year and paid $200/month!

Where in Mexico?

Costa Alegre area:  Barra de Navidad, Melaque, La Manzanilla, Boca de Iguanas.

pdxvandal

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #92 on: April 03, 2018, 03:25:41 PM »
We'll be trying out this life for the first time this year - spring/summer/early fall in the PNW and late fall/winter/early spring in a small beach town in Mexico. We lined up a 6 month rental in Mexico for $500/month, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, furnished, including electricity, water (not drinking water though), garbage (we pay tip), and first tank of propane. Wifi will be an additional $30/month. And it has a fenced in yard with garden space and fruit trees! Coming from a HCOL area, we were stoked, and I'll bet we are overpaying :). I have a friend who had an apartment in the same general area (different town) this past year and paid $200/month!

Sounds great! Maybe in my plan someday.

What are you doing with your primary residence in the PNW? And do you have concerns with crime in Jalisco? I know PV is pretty safe, but seems like the U.S. gov is putting out more warnings throughout the country.

MJseast

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #93 on: April 03, 2018, 04:15:30 PM »
We'll be trying out this life for the first time this year - spring/summer/early fall in the PNW and late fall/winter/early spring in a small beach town in Mexico. We lined up a 6 month rental in Mexico for $500/month, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, furnished, including electricity, water (not drinking water though), garbage (we pay tip), and first tank of propane. Wifi will be an additional $30/month. And it has a fenced in yard with garden space and fruit trees! Coming from a HCOL area, we were stoked, and I'll bet we are overpaying :). I have a friend who had an apartment in the same general area (different town) this past year and paid $200/month!

Sounds great! Maybe in my plan someday.

What are you doing with your primary residence in the PNW? And do you have concerns with crime in Jalisco? I know PV is pretty safe, but seems like the U.S. gov is putting out more warnings throughout the country.

We're renting the city house out for at least the next few years - we have someone lined up to rent for at least 18 months, but likely 2 years, and we'll stay on our property (off grid "tiny house" about 3 hours away) when we're not in Mexico. We'll try this lifestyle for a few years, and then decide what to do with the house. Maybe we'll move back. Maybe we'll sell. Maybe we'll keep renting it out.

No concerns about crime in Jalisco, at least not where we are going. We were just there visiting a few months ago and it seemed much safer than being in the U.S.

Gone Fishing

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #94 on: April 16, 2018, 07:55:26 PM »
Snowbirding is looking better and better, even considering our relatively mild winters.  Anyone do it with kids?

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #95 on: May 21, 2018, 10:58:25 PM »
Speaking of this, does anyone have a good site for searching month-long plus rentals?  I  love vrbo, but it is not easy to search for monthly rentals (cost, availability) and most would rather rent out for four separate weeks (and charge more) than rent a full month at a time.

Any good snow/summer bird specific rental sites?

I rent a condo on VRBO, and I have default settings on my listing for 20% off for monthly rentals. However, I am also very open to someone asking me for a quote for a month or more, and, if the person sounds nice, and the dates work for me, I will give the best quote I can, perhaps more than 20% off.

Before Expedia bought VRBO/HomeAway, it was very easy to display a rate chart with daily, weekly, and monthly rates, but now those discounts are hidden. I don't know why the company makes it so hard for travelers to find out about them. It frustrates me. I added "weekly, monthly rates" to the header on my listing, to cue travelers that I am open to longer rentals.

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« Reply #96 on: May 21, 2018, 11:53:19 PM »
we have a Lake Mead view RV lot in an upscale community near Las Vegas in Boulder City, NV. There are many snowbirds that come to our community. Would love to rent our space to a fellow member with a RV.

Cassie

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #97 on: May 22, 2018, 11:06:10 AM »
Hi, do you do monthly rental or are you looking to find someone to stay for the season ?  We live in northern Nevada and it might be fun to spend a month there in the winter.

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #98 on: May 30, 2018, 07:35:55 AM »
I wish we could hear a little about actual expenses and locations.  If Jon Snow and Mrs. JS would let me I would crawl into their carryon luggage to see what is up with the Baja side of life.   

I have no good sense of how cheap the cheap is and if it is relatively safe in Mexico (I hear the northern Baja can be dicey). 

Lacking details I guess I will figure it out. 

Aegishjalmur

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Re: Snowbirds: What's your migration pattern?
« Reply #99 on: June 23, 2018, 02:58:07 PM »
If you like camping or RVing the NM state park pass is a great way to do snowbirding. The annual pass is $230 for out of staters(tip- start as early in a month as you can as the pass is good until the end of that month the next year so you can get 13 months use vs 12). The pass gets you the developed camp sites at no extra cost, if you want utility hookups you pay the difference ($4). They usually have water pumps to fill up water bottles and toilets. Some have showers which are no cost as well. Several have awesome trails. Some of the northern NM parks are at high elevation so are a great way to escape the heat if reverse snowbirding.