Author Topic: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated  (Read 16608 times)

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #50 on: March 17, 2019, 01:02:11 AM »
Thanks. A bit ironic to get face punches for oversaving on this forum, but I will take it!

TomTX

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #51 on: March 17, 2019, 07:10:45 AM »
Thanks. A bit ironic to get face punches for oversaving on this forum, but I will take it!

Why would it be ironic? This isn't Bogleheads.

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #52 on: March 17, 2019, 08:41:38 AM »
I will have to check out Bogleheads. Maybe that's the problem - I'm a Boglehead in the wrong forum!

But seriously - posting has been very helpful to me. When I look back to where I was in November when I started this post (anxious about quitting) to where I am now, I realize I have come a long way because of your constructive comments. I still have some loose ends to tie up (and likely a bit more anxiety to get past) but I hope to be FIREd by this June.

2Birds1Stone

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #53 on: March 17, 2019, 09:51:34 AM »
Do it! It's about time :)

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #54 on: March 17, 2019, 10:06:54 AM »
Don't go to Bogleheads unless you want to be scared into saving another $2.5 mil before retiring!

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #55 on: March 17, 2019, 12:08:00 PM »
Ha...ok!

frugalecon

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #56 on: March 17, 2019, 07:18:47 PM »
Don't go to Bogleheads unless you want to be scared into saving another $2.5 mil before retiring!

My favorite BH threads are the ones that discuss MMM. The knives really come out!

That said, there are some good threads on that site. I think I am about a 50:50 combination of this forum and that forum.

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #57 on: March 18, 2019, 07:19:20 AM »
So I popped over to Bogleheads for the first time and wandered around the forum a bit (not as nicely organized as this one). I discovered a couple of articles that indicated you can use a SWR of MORE than 4% as a 65 year old couple since there's only a 1% chance that you will BOTH live another 30 years...and only a 16% chance that one of you will live another 30 years. Life expectancy actuarial data (as in the Rich, Broke, Dead calculator) can be strangely comforting.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2019, 09:26:04 AM by Omy »

Linea_Norway

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #58 on: March 18, 2019, 08:10:17 AM »
I also had a short look at Bogleheads and searched on articles containing MMM. The few posts I saw were about people saving 3-4 mil $ for retirement and 100K a year FIRE budget. The whole site itself seems to be more about investing in general.

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #59 on: April 01, 2019, 06:36:52 AM »
DH and I were talking about when he should tell his boss that he is retiring. He thinks he can safely tell him this month without risking $150k in options that vest in June, but I'm not so sure. Thoughts?

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #60 on: April 01, 2019, 07:43:04 AM »
Is he required to give more than two weeks notice?

Linea_Norway

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #61 on: April 01, 2019, 09:44:34 AM »
DH and I were talking about when he should tell his boss that he is retiring. He thinks he can safely tell him this month without risking $150k in options that vest in June, but I'm not so sure. Thoughts?

If he has 2 weeks notice, I would wait until the money is on his bank account and resign the day after. If he doesn't hold out, use some sickleave.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #62 on: April 01, 2019, 10:28:36 AM »
DH and I were talking about when he should tell his boss that he is retiring. He thinks he can safely tell him this month without risking $150k in options that vest in June, but I'm not so sure. Thoughts?

If he has 2 weeks notice, I would wait until the money is on his bank account and resign the day after. If he doesn't hold out, use some sickleave.
+50. The shorter the notice the better.
 I did 7 months notice, in a positive environment, and regretted it.

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #63 on: April 02, 2019, 06:38:56 AM »
Thanks for the responses. I agree completely, but he feels that he "owes" the people on his team more notice. Also, he is responsible for project planning that he is included in so he feels uncomfortable planning when he won't be there to implement. He does not have an obligation to give more than 2 weeks notice.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2019, 06:40:36 AM by Omy »

Aelias

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #64 on: April 02, 2019, 07:54:40 AM »
He just needs to go into it with his eyes open - if he gives an extended notice, there's a good chance (I'd say better than 50/50) that they will push him out before $150K vests.  Because it's a company, and companies are gonna act like companies.

That being said, it's clear from your previous posts that $150K isn't going to make or break your retirement and that you already have more than you need. So, what's the big deal if he loses the $150K?  That's the beauty of FI -- once you're sure you have enough, additional money becomes meaningless. So, if he wants to stay on to grab that last $150K, go for it.  If he feels like the right thing to do is give an extended notice and risk losing the $150K, go for it.  You're FI -- additional money should not be a driving factor anymore.

Mother Fussbudget

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #65 on: April 02, 2019, 08:32:33 AM »
He just needs to go into it with his eyes open - if he gives an extended notice, there's a good chance (I'd say better than 50/50) that they will push him out before $150K vests.  Because it's a company, and companies are gonna act like companies.

THIS!

Also, wanted to add a link to the topic mentioned earlier:  Stop Worrying About the 4% Rule

I accelerated FI by becoming a real estate investor (REI) - mostly SFH's providing a regular income source & tax deductions via depreciation.  You already have 1 rental property... 
Q: Have you considered purchasing other rental properties (even if you use property management to maintain them) and use the extra income to cover healthcare costs, and any other costs in FI? (i.e. travel, vacations, philanthropy, etc)  The tax benefits alone made REI worthwhile in my case. 


pbkmaine

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #66 on: April 02, 2019, 08:43:23 AM »
So, let him write up his resignation letter. He can post it the minute that $150k hits your account.

Exflyboy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #67 on: April 02, 2019, 06:55:08 PM »
OK your numbers are identical to ours (almost).. Which are:

1) We make $1850/month in rent.
2) Have about $2.5M in saved assets.. Actually we have $2.1M but have roughly $0.5M in pensions we could take now.
3) We spent $50k last year.

We don't make any income and we're 57 and almost 54.

So we make roughly $20k in rental profits (after deducted expenses) and about $12k after tax Qdivs (zero% federal income tax).

So this puts our MAGI at $32k.

We then sell about $30k's worth of investments which yield about $10k in long term cap gains (also taxed at zero% federal).

So now our MAGI is at $42k..

We then put $8k into an HSA which brings our MAGI down to $34k.

So thats gives us $54k to spend but our MAGI is $34k.

With this MAGI we spend $8 per month on an ACA Bronze plan and pay zero% federal.. The State whacks us for about $2k.

Thats what our finances look like..:)

WR of just under 1.5%.. Its hard to see how we could ever run out of money.. Even if the big one on the left coast does flatten our house!

« Last Edit: April 02, 2019, 07:01:25 PM by Exflyboy »

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #68 on: April 02, 2019, 09:11:57 PM »
Wow...very cool...just opposite coasts! Your numbers are very encouraging, ex flyboy.

Thanks for all the replies on waiting to give notice (or not) until after options vest. If there's even a 1% chance they could walk him out before vesting, it's probably not worth the risk. Even if we don't need it, it's a nice little security blanket.

SachaFiscal

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #69 on: April 04, 2019, 03:43:39 PM »
So I popped over to Bogleheads for the first time and wandered around the forum a bit (not as nicely organized as this one). I discovered a couple of articles that indicated you can use a SWR of MORE than 4% as a 65 year old couple since there's only a 1% chance that you will BOTH live another 30 years...and only a 16% chance that one of you will live another 30 years. Life expectancy actuarial data (as in the Rich, Broke, Dead calculator) can be strangely comforting.

Wow that is kind of eye opening. So many people wait to 65 or even longer to retire but chances are they might have many years left. My father passed away at the age of 60, many years before he would have retired.  He had lived a frugal life and saved a nice retirement sum but never got to do all the travel or other retirement activities he had planned.  He was a healthy guy (good diet, moderate exercise) but got a rare disease.  My mom died a couple decades years later of another rare disease.  We really don't know how long we have left.  It is out of our control. Think about what that time is worth to you and your husband.  It's been over a year since I left work and I'm so glad that I did.  Even when the market fell 6 months after I quit, I still was happy I left. Even if I get diagnosed with some rare cancer now, at least I had that year where I wasn't a corporate servant and had control over how I spent my time.



Linea_Norway

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #70 on: April 05, 2019, 11:01:22 AM »
So I popped over to Bogleheads for the first time and wandered around the forum a bit (not as nicely organized as this one). I discovered a couple of articles that indicated you can use a SWR of MORE than 4% as a 65 year old couple since there's only a 1% chance that you will BOTH live another 30 years...and only a 16% chance that one of you will live another 30 years. Life expectancy actuarial data (as in the Rich, Broke, Dead calculator) can be strangely comforting.

Wow that is kind of eye opening. So many people wait to 65 or even longer to retire but chances are they might have many years left. My father passed away at the age of 60, many years before he would have retired.  He had lived a frugal life and saved a nice retirement sum but never got to do all the travel or other retirement activities he had planned.  He was a healthy guy (good diet, moderate exercise) but got a rare disease.  My mom died a couple decades years later of another rare disease.  We really don't know how long we have left.  It is out of our control. Think about what that time is worth to you and your husband.  It's been over a year since I left work and I'm so glad that I did.  Even when the market fell 6 months after I quit, I still was happy I left. Even if I get diagnosed with some rare cancer now, at least I had that year where I wasn't a corporate servant and had control over how I spent my time.

This is how I feel too. My father died at 50 and has never enjoyed the freedom of not having to work. My MIL on the other hand, retired at 50. She just died at the age of 75 or so. So she had 25 years of freedom, the last ones were not positive because of dementia. But what a difference. I rather follow her path, apart from those last years. My mother als retired relatively early, because she had a governmental job that paid people to retire earlier. She seems to enjoy her freedom as well.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2019, 01:53:22 AM by Linea_Norway »

deborah

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #71 on: April 06, 2019, 11:46:12 AM »
If you give a lot of notice, you can become irrelevant. People donít include you in decision making because you are leaving. You arenít given work because you are leaving, so you get to do the nasty jobs.

ender

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #72 on: April 06, 2019, 01:27:43 PM »
So I popped over to Bogleheads for the first time and wandered around the forum a bit (not as nicely organized as this one). I discovered a couple of articles that indicated you can use a SWR of MORE than 4% as a 65 year old couple since there's only a 1% chance that you will BOTH live another 30 years...and only a 16% chance that one of you will live another 30 years. Life expectancy actuarial data (as in the Rich, Broke, Dead calculator) can be strangely comforting.

Wow that is kind of eye opening. So many people wait to 65 or even longer to retire but chances are they might have many years left. My father passed away at the age of 60, many years before he would have retired.  He had lived a frugal life and saved a nice retirement sum but never got to do all the travel or other retirement activities he had planned.  He was a healthy guy (good diet, moderate exercise) but got a rare disease.  My mom died a couple decades years later of another rare disease.  We really don't know how long we have left.  It is out of our control. Think about what that time is worth to you and your husband.  It's been over a year since I left work and I'm so glad that I did.  Even when the market fell 6 months after I quit, I still was happy I left. Even if I get diagnosed with some rare cancer now, at least I had that year where I wasn't a corporate servant and had control over how I spent my time.

There are a lot of things that start changing from the ER perspective by the time you hit 65 for a retirement age...

Your health, access to Social Security/medicaid, likelihood of inheritances, pensions, etc.

RecoveringCarClown

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #73 on: April 25, 2019, 08:22:34 PM »
Just lost another, sudden heart attack, was in great shape, mid 40ís, avid biker.  Lotís of money in the bank, so sad.  :(

dougules

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #74 on: April 26, 2019, 11:07:17 AM »
Just lost another, sudden heart attack, was in great shape, mid 40ís, avid biker.  Lotís of money in the bank, so sad.  :(

I'm sorry to hear that.  Is there a reason you're losing so many friends in their 30s and 40s?

dude

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #75 on: April 26, 2019, 11:52:12 AM »
Wait, you live on $50k/year, but have the means (between rental income and drawing on investments) to pull $120k+/year and you're worried about healthcare costs??? Shit, even if you gotta pay $20k/year, you'd have $50k more per year to spend than you're living on now (and that's before you ever take a dime in Social Security). What is the problem again?

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #76 on: April 26, 2019, 12:17:55 PM »
Agreed. When I first posted in November, I had a lot of irrational anxiety about retiring. Now I am counting the days. Current plan: Hubs will give notice in May (after options vest), and I will finish up a few transactions and put my license in referral status (by September).

FIREstache

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #77 on: April 26, 2019, 02:53:12 PM »

I'm locked in for OMY, but it's the 2MY that I had been contemplating.  I even started a case study a few days ago.  It seems most people think I should just do OMY, not 2MY.

Exflyboy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #78 on: April 26, 2019, 03:10:35 PM »
Agreed. When I first posted in November, I had a lot of irrational anxiety about retiring. Now I am counting the days. Current plan: Hubs will give notice in May (after options vest), and I will finish up a few transactions and put my license in referral status (by September).

Thats what I would do. $150k in options vesting is still a nice cherry on top.. Thats May 2019 right?

Like us you have plenty of money and under the ACA your HC costs will be tiny if you can follow the plan I laid out above.

More than likely your bigger problem will be to allow yourse;ves to spend money..:)

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #79 on: April 26, 2019, 04:10:05 PM »
Your post gave me a lot of confidence. How much can you put in an HSA? We are contemplating another rental (to help a family member and to give us more cash flow)...wondering just how much we can reduce MAGI by doing that.

Exflyboy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #80 on: April 26, 2019, 04:57:17 PM »
For us 57 and 54 we can put almost $8k into the HSA.. when we are both over 55 we can put $9k.. if you are both <55 you can put $7k.

Your rental income will be real income so your HSA contribution will ONLY be a dollar for dollar reduction.

But if you sell appreciated assets to make income then your MAGI increase is only the capital gain.. so for us roughly every $3 we sell generates $1 of MAGI.

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #81 on: April 26, 2019, 06:23:09 PM »
Thanks for the clarification. I'm a little concerned about the second rental throwing us out of subsidy range, but DH feels that it's wrong to take advantage of subsidies when you have plenty of assets. I see his point, but disagree. We have paid SO much in taxes over the years that I feel it's reasonable to take advantage of the options offered to us.

Exflyboy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #82 on: April 26, 2019, 07:07:43 PM »
Thanks for the clarification. I'm a little concerned about the second rental throwing us out of subsidy range, but DH feels that it's wrong to take advantage of subsidies when you have plenty of assets. I see his point, but disagree. We have paid SO much in taxes over the years that I feel it's reasonable to take advantage of the options offered to us.

Absolutely.. Put it another way. If the Gov is dumb enough to write a subsidy law based soley on income well.. guess what will happen? Its a very small percentage of claimants in any case.

Maybe having to pay over $1300/month might change his mind?..:)

Besides, Healthcare is so expensive mainly because the HC companies own the Government. If it was'nt as corrupt it would cost half what it does.

I don't have a lot of qualms about taking a subsidy.. And you're right, we paid a LOT of taxes over the years.

RecoveringCarClown

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #83 on: April 26, 2019, 07:16:50 PM »
Just lost another, sudden heart attack, was in great shape, mid 40ís, avid biker.  Lotís of money in the bank, so sad.  :(

I'm sorry to hear that.  Is there a reason you're losing so many friends in their 30s and 40s?

No real reason, cancer, genetics, freak accident, etc.  I know a huge number of people and I guess I am fairly popular as I have friends all over the world in this age group.  I suppose some you could call acquaintances instead of friends, but still sucks.  Not looking forward to getting old enough where this accelerates.

Also, sorry to drag down your thread OMY, that was not my intent. :)

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #84 on: April 26, 2019, 07:26:34 PM »
Not at all, RCC. It's the most compelling reason to retire and start enjoying the fruits of our labor.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #85 on: April 26, 2019, 09:33:15 PM »
Not at all, RCC. It's the most compelling reason to retire and start enjoying the fruits of our labor.

[singing Hosannas, Bach playing]  It is nice to see  a) The OP get it,  b) The OP to put it so powerfully, succinctly and beautifully 
 

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #86 on: April 27, 2019, 05:25:58 AM »
I will let you know if I still feel the same when DH gives notice...ha! But seriously, I do feel much more confident about retiring than I did 6 months ago. The good advice and face punches I've received on this forum have helped a lot.

Exflyboy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #87 on: April 27, 2019, 04:39:10 PM »
I will let you know if I still feel the same when DH gives notice...ha! But seriously, I do feel much more confident about retiring than I did 6 months ago. The good advice and face punches I've received on this forum have helped a lot.

Honestly this is the biggest transition you will ever make in your lives! I know a lot of people say they can just walk out without a care in the world, but I couldn't. My NW has grown by about 70% since I quit 5 years ago and I would say its only been quite recently that I have felt financially secure.

Numbers are one thing.. Feeling good about cutting off a firehose of cash that was mostly inflating a giant NW balloon is a different thing entirely..:)

StacheInAsia

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #88 on: April 29, 2019, 09:48:46 PM »
Honestly this is the biggest transition you will ever make in your lives! I know a lot of people say they can just walk out without a care in the world, but I couldn't. My NW has grown by about 70% since I quit 5 years ago and I would say its only been quite recently that I have felt financially secure.

Numbers are one thing.. Feeling good about cutting off a firehose of cash that was mostly inflating a giant NW balloon is a different thing entirely..:)

"Feeling good about cutting off a firehose of cash" that increases the NW balloon is definitely something I have been struggling with after hitting FI.

I was able to negotiate a part time arrangement last year that put me at three days a week for several months, and two days a week starting from this month. It feels difficult right now to give up that final bit, even though I know that I don't really "need" the money. On the other hand, I previously hit points where I just felt "done" at full time and at three days, so I imagine the same thing will happen with this schedule eventually.

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #89 on: April 30, 2019, 06:33:22 AM »
Yes...definitely the hardest part! Logically, I know we are ready. But when another year adds $500k+ to the stash it's hard to turn off the hose. But I have started to look at it as turning on a different hose of adventure and freedom.

Exflyboy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #90 on: April 30, 2019, 02:30:52 PM »
Yes...definitely the hardest part! Logically, I know we are ready. But when another year adds $500k+ to the stash it's hard to turn off the hose. But I have started to look at it as turning on a different hose of adventure and freedom.

Honestly if OMY added $500k to my stash I would have worked another 4 years,.. Golden handcuffs and all that..:)

Omy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #91 on: April 30, 2019, 03:11:53 PM »
Yes...we've finally hit the sweet spot in our careers (especially DH who they throw money at). I am at the point where I get referrals from past clients and no longer have to prospect for my next buyers and sellers. It does seem a bit crazy to turn it down now.

On the other hand, DH is tired of the job/stress/commute. And we have "enough". As was pointed out earlier, not much is gained by hoarding even more when our contingency plans have contingency plans.

Exflyboy

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #92 on: April 30, 2019, 03:55:49 PM »
That is exactly right..

Ozlady

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #93 on: April 30, 2019, 05:02:15 PM »
PTF...in my case a 3-More-Year syndrome as the golden handcuffs is about a mil we will leave behind on the table:(

BTW Ages of DH and i  are the same as you Exflyboy :)

Problem is and always has been ...the kids , the kids....and the bloody legacy i wish to leave for them...just can't shake that off:((

But good on you OMY ..i will be checking in on you when the day comes :))

RetireAbroadAt35

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #94 on: May 02, 2019, 11:19:55 PM »
On the other hand, DH is tired of the job/stress/commute. And we have "enough". As was pointed out earlier, not much is gained by hoarding even more when our contingency plans have contingency plans.

I have contingency plans, but my contingency plans don't yet have contingency plans.  I guess the lesson is, my OMY syndrome wouldn't be helped by more contingency planning.

TomTX

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #95 on: May 03, 2019, 11:00:43 AM »
Do you have a contingency plan to avoid blowing another year working when you already have more than enough to retire?

;)

Dicey

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #96 on: May 05, 2019, 09:48:04 AM »
Problem is and always has been ...the kids , the kids....and the bloody legacy i wish to leave for them...just can't shake that off:((
I'm willing to bet a fat wad of cash that the legacy your kids would prefer is time and experiences with you, not another zero in their bank account. Your kids hopefully have a lot of time left on this earth. The magic of compounding over time will create more than you can imagine. Give them the gift of your presence now.

Malkynn

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #97 on: May 05, 2019, 09:55:27 AM »
By "legacy" do people just mean money?

How is a single generation inheritance a "legacy"?
I mean, I get it if it's a business, or a charity endowment in the family's name, a historic property, or a political dynasty or something, but are we just calling inheritances "legacy" now?

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

DoNorth

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #98 on: May 05, 2019, 11:01:02 AM »
there's a saying that goes neither travel nor triathlons get better with age.  My inlaws (68 and 69) saved a bunch of money and retired about 6 or 7 years ago.  they just came to visit us in France and had a really hard time getting around.  My wife and I noticed it, the kids noticed it.  Lots of sitting, breaks, waking up late, easily fatigued etc.  My father in law wasted prime years in his early 60s waiting on a severance buyout that never happened, vesting options that were a tiny fraction of his NW and all the while endured a torturous and much younger boss so he could continue collecting his paycheck despite already being FI.  OYS is one more year of working, sure, but more importantly its one more year of not doing something else extremely meaningful, new, fun and adventurous. 


2sk22

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Re: Serious "one more year" syndrome - advice appreciated
« Reply #99 on: May 07, 2019, 12:30:40 PM »
He's been ready for years. My "what ifs" have delayed us. He's been accommodating and thought that "stockpiling" more reserves would alleviate my anxiety. At this point my contingency plans have contingency plans. It's time for him to quit.

I have to say that you have summarized almost precisely what going on in my mind. I love the phrase "my contingency plans have contingency plans"