Author Topic: In case ACA is overturned, then what?  (Read 5969 times)

sol

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Re: In case ACA is overturned, then what?
« Reply #50 on: May 14, 2019, 11:43:03 AM »
I'm still confused when people suggest it's good* to pay the insurance company the ACA subsidized rate

Many of us like the fact that the ACA attempted to fix our broken healthcare insurance market, offering lifesaving medical care to millions of Americans who would otherwise wouldn't have been able to get it.  The ACA means that people are no longer uninsurable.  It also means insurance companies can't drop when you do have an accident and incur expenses, like they could before.  Oh, and it prioritized preventative care that lowers long term healthcare costs for the country, instead of just maximizing private insurance company profits by providing the minimum coverage to healthy people at the minimum cost.

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$28,303, when my private plan is only $12,200. (and just as good)

It's definitely not just as good, even if it looks like it to you, because non-ACA plans don't have the same legal protections.  They can have lifetime caps, and they are revocable at any time for any reason.  They are just as good as long as you don't need to use them.

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Well, I guess it's good if you can get hardworking tax payers to pay for your health insurance.

Not just yours or mine, everybody's.  That's the point of national healthcare plan, it is designed to keep your country healthy and happy.  We spend money on all kinds of things that are designed to keep people healthy and happy. 

Your argument here could just as easily be applied to medicare.  Why should I pay for an old person's healthcare, must be great to get hardworking tax payers to pay for your grandma's health insurance.  The answer is that because someday you're going to be that old person.  Ditto for things like disability insurance, must be nice to get hardworking taxpayers to pay for your injury rehab or adult home care costs.  Or unemployment, must be nice to get hardworking taxpayers to send you a check each week while you stay home and watch tv.  I think you might be missing the point of these programs.

Instead I had to choose one of the marketplace insurance companies in my area.

You have ALWAYS had to choose one of the plans offered in your area.  The ACA didn't change that.  In fact, the ACA very specifically stayed away from mandating that any company offer any service in any particular place, because that would have been an unjust interference in the free market.  The only thing the ACA did was offer insurance companies more money to expand into more markets, in an attempt to increase competition.

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Also the premiums started doubling every year with less competition, more red tape, and massive corruption.

I'm going to ignore your "massive corruption" claim because I think it's pretty rich.  I'm going to ignore your "more red tape" claim because insurance is always about red tape, no matter where you get it.

But on your "premiums started doubling" claim I'm going to push back a little.  Premiums have not doubled in any year, and I think it's pretty well accepted by now that the ACA actually slowed the rate of health insurance premium increases for the country.  Some places and some plans still increased faster than average, and some slower, but the nationwide average rate of increase now is definitely lower than it would have been without the ACA.  So you're either misinformed or just lying.  Given the vitriolic slant of rest of your post, I think I know which it is.

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Anyway good riddens to the program and hoping for more variety and free market with healthcare.

You mean like what we had back in 2009?  You seriously want to go back to that?

That's the most extreme opinion about American healthcare I've yet heard expressed on this forum.  We treid "free market healthcare" for decades and it was a disaster, that's why we have this whole mess to begin with.  I've heard people complain about various aspects of the ACA.  Some people don't like specific parts of the law, or think it didn't do enough, or would like to modify it, or even replace it with something similar but better, but you're the first person I've heard openly wish to go back to what we had in 2009.  That was a national crisis, if you remember correctly.  Premiums going up 20% per year, millions of people uninsured, pregnant women getting dropped by their insurance companies at their first prenatal visit, whole states with no non-employer private plans available at all?  You really want to go back to that nonsense?

mtnrider

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Re: In case ACA is overturned, then what?
« Reply #51 on: May 14, 2019, 12:40:48 PM »
I was in better shape for retirement without the ACA.   There was a lot more companies with plans and more insurance companies fighting for my business.  I remember I could choose between BlueCross & Aetna and 12 others.  Instead after the chance BlueCross & Aetna was no longer offering their insurance in the county that I lived in.  Instead I had to choose one of the marketplace insurance companies in my area.

Also the premiums started doubling every year with less competition, more red tape, and massive corruption.  "Total cost of the HealthCare.gov website had reached $1.7 billion" according to wikipedia.  Anyway good riddens to the program and hoping for more variety and free market with healthcare.

I feel for you that you need to pay more for insurance, and it can be hard to come to terms with the rest of society telling you how to run your finances.  Auto insurance, for example, seems like an heavy lift for teens.  Why should the government require that they purchase expensive insurance?

You haven't provided any actual data, so it's hard to understand what you're getting at.  Did your rates double because you started making more money and no longer qualify for subsidies?  Or did they double because you aged into the next band?  Or did they double because you're comparing 2013 pricing, at your 2013 income, with 2019 pricing at your 2019 income?

I also strongly feel that the ACA is an overwhelming net good for society.  That's not to say that there aren't individual losers.  These cases are the sort of things that government should be looking at.




des999

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Re: In case ACA is overturned, then what?
« Reply #52 on: May 14, 2019, 04:55:45 PM »
I'm still confused when people suggest it's good* to pay the insurance company the ACA subsidized rate,
$28,303, when my private plan is only $12,200. (and just as good)
See my previous post for details.

*Well, I guess it's good if you can get hardworking tax payers to pay for your health insurance.


hey, look at me, I'm young and healthy, my insurance should be cheaper than everyone else.  I'm not paying for old people, sick people, sick kids, etc..  That's all easy to say when you and your family are healthy.  I'd like to hear this same argument from someone that has a child born with some medical condition that the old system would have told to fly a kite/we can't insure you. 

It's not all old people or people that don't take care of their health.   I know that is a convenient excuse, but we have to choose to either help others or not, remembering that someday we may need that same help.