Author Topic: Lazy  (Read 714 times)

Beard N Bones

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 32
  • Location: Canada
Lazy
« on: December 16, 2017, 09:04:35 PM »
Serious question - something I've been pondering:

Is laziness an issue with anyone that is FIRE?  And by "an issue" I'm asking if you've found that laziness has prevented you from living life to its fullest (whatever that looks like to you!).

Freedom17

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 371
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Hong Kong
Re: Lazy
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2017, 09:18:58 PM »
Not for me. I've been way too busy after retirement. I might actually enjoy being a bit lazy frankly. I do tend to overfill my schedule though, so between learning guitar, a few days consulting, family, gym and hobbies it's been flat out. I've just signed up for a windsurfing and language course as well.

I think that when I worked I was stuck in an office for 8 hours a day and even if I finished my work early I was still stuck there. Now that my time is my own I really dont like to waste it and this has prevented me from being lazy. I sometimes have sort of quiet days and usually feel bad about them like I wasted a day.

The funny thing is I used to make fun of 'work hard play hard' type people and usually prefer to relax, so most of this transformation has been a result of FIREing.



soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2778
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
Re: Lazy
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2017, 04:32:33 AM »
I just wrote on another thread for 2018 something I would like to work on.

Even the word Lazy has alot of different meanings at least in how it fits in with me. People always say I dont know how you do it with 4 kids etc.. But I am lazy . I watch Wayyyyyyyyyyyyyy to much Tv and if its not running the kids around or doing or watching there stuff I pretty much sit in my chair. I do work out 5-6 days a week and I have remodeled alot of the house over the last two years and do all the grocery shopping and cooking but I am a couch potato. I was thinking about picking up like a 20 hour a week gig just to make a few extra bucks for fun money and to have a bit more social contact but I am to lazy to really put effort into it. I always seem to have a big soccer tournament coming up I need to travel to with one of the kids and when I get home an exhausted.  When I look at what I all get done and analyze it I really am not lazy its just I get up 3-3:30 and by Noon have done a ton.  So part of it is change my own perception of myself and some of it is I need to watch less Tv.  But I am getting there especially since i cut the cable chord this week to push myself.
" In life you don't get what you deserve you get what you negotiate"

libertarian4321

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1216
Re: Lazy
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2017, 04:42:09 AM »
Is laziness an issue with anyone that is FIRE?  And by "an issue" I'm asking if you've found that laziness has prevented you from living life to its fullest (whatever that looks like to you!).

You mean by like doing what you want, as opposed to trudging into an office and mindlessly pushing paper for cash?

Is it lazy to read "War and Peace" or watch season 32 of "Real Housewives of Tuscaloosa" versus sitting at a desk, sucking coffee, pushing meaningless reports around, while intermittently sucking up to the boss and attending ridiculous cake parties?

If by "lazy" you mean "doing what you want, rather than doing what the corporate dolt you used to work for wants" is lazy, then, yeah.  You can call me lazy. You can also call me free.  Independent, Happy.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2017, 04:49:22 AM by libertarian4321 »

Financial.Velociraptor

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1037
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Houston TX
  • Devour your prey raptors!
    • Financial Velociraptor
Re: Lazy
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2017, 08:07:43 AM »
I'm lazy and its glorious.  For the first six months of FIRE I slipped all the way into sloth.  You get past that stage.  My favorite thing on weekends while still working was to sleep in.  I planned to sleep till 10 AM or later every day in FIRE.  Even though I consider myself lazy, I rarely sleep past 730 now.  I get up without an alarm naturally because I'm excited to face the day. 

Don't stress so much.
Achieve Financial Escape Velocity - Financial Velociraptor

jim555

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1364
Re: Lazy
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2017, 08:33:14 AM »
Lazy is living life to its fullest.

Sun Hat

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 189
  • Location: Canada
Re: Lazy
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2017, 08:47:27 AM »
Edited after some more thought

I'm fairly lazy, but that doesn't keep me from living life to its fullest, for me, that IS living life to its fullest! It used to be that I'd work 10-12 hours a day at a job. Now I do a few hours of somewhat productive activity a day, together with a lot of leisure. For instance, I've just done a first coat of paint on half of a room. Now I'll have tea and play with my dog before doing a second coat, because although I'll enjoy having the room painted, I enjoy tea and playing with my dog just as much. In FIRE, I can have it all!
« Last Edit: December 17, 2017, 01:24:51 PM by Sun Hat »

Ladychips

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 311
Re: Lazy
« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2017, 09:59:32 AM »
For instance, yesterday was a great day. I walked the dog, groomed dog, vacuumed, painted my hallway, walked dog again, made and ate dinner, painted the hallway again, played with dog and knit. Other than a pretty hallway, I don't have much to show for my day, but I enjoyed the heck out of it, so it was a win.

I bet your dog would say it was a win day too (if he/she could talk...)!!

bacchi

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2228
Re: Lazy
« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2017, 10:22:19 AM »
Lazy is living life to its fullest.

Word.

Stachey

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1030
Re: Lazy
« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2017, 10:29:32 AM »
I read a spanish proverb once that went like this:

"How glorious it is to do nothing and then rest."

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/writing-myself-a-happy-ending-hopefully/

If you open a Tangerine account with $100, you will get a $50 sign up bonus!  That can't be a bad thing.  Use Orange Key: 40425919S1

Peter Gibbons

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 36
  • Age: 46
  • Location: SE Michigan
Re: Lazy
« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2017, 10:57:01 AM »
I read a spanish proverb once that went like this:

"How glorious it is to do nothing and then rest."

I think this proverb is translated well into the modern day in a famous scene from Office Space:

Peter Gibbons: What would you do if you had a million dollars?
<<<snip>>>
Lawrence: Well, what about you now? What would you do?
<<<snip>>>
Peter Gibbons: Nothing.
Lawrence: Nothing, huh?
Peter Gibbons: I would relax... I would sit on my ass all day... I would do nothing.
Lawrence: Well, you don't need a million dollars to do nothing, man. Take a look at my cousin: he's broke, don't do shit.

Having the option of "doing nothing" is one of the most important perks of early retirement !!

wordnerd

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 574
Re: Lazy
« Reply #11 on: December 17, 2017, 11:12:35 AM »
I read a spanish proverb once that went like this:

"How glorious it is to do nothing and then rest."

I think this proverb is translated well into the modern day in a famous scene from Office Space:

Peter Gibbons: What would you do if you had a million dollars?
<<<snip>>>
Lawrence: Well, what about you now? What would you do?
<<<snip>>>
Peter Gibbons: Nothing.
Lawrence: Nothing, huh?
Peter Gibbons: I would relax... I would sit on my ass all day... I would do nothing.
Lawrence: Well, you don't need a million dollars to do nothing, man. Take a look at my cousin: he's broke, don't do shit.

Having the option of "doing nothing" is one of the most important perks of early retirement !!

I was excited to see "Peter Gibbons" weighing in on this topic :)

Beard N Bones

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 32
  • Location: Canada
Re: Lazy
« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2017, 02:22:35 PM »
Freedom17 and soccerluvof4 - you have written words of encouragement.  Thank you for your perspective.

Full disclosure here:  Our family has not reached FIRE, yet.  We are well on our way, and yes, the thought of it is exciting.  That said, one thing that concerns me in obtaining FI: my motivation to take care of my responsibilities in life (ie. myself (like excercise), my family (quality time with kids), etc) will decrease.  Just because my responsibilities to work will end, it shouldn't mean that my responsibilities to other areas in life should also end.  Maybe my thinking is erroneous.  Maybe I'm the only one that may deal with this.  And that is why I ask those that are already FI.

If laziness IS living life to its fullest, than I'd rather work - work by putting lots of energy into being a great husband, by being an awesome dad, by being a responsible pet owner, in being a caring neighbour, and being one damn good hunter.  Now don't get me wrong, I think there is a season for everything.  I'm not advocating for being a slave to a job or societies expectations.  I agree, there are times in life where sleeping in is awesome, where doing nothing all day is the right thing to do, times where we aren't responsible for anyone but ourselves, times where you look back in a day and say "I wasn't contributing to society today like everyone says I should," and I am good with that!  But to sleep life away, doing nothing of value, and taking no responsibility (to oneself even!) I have a hard time with.

Please note that laziness can be had pre-retirement or post-"working for the man."  I just wonder if it is a greater issue once retired.  A couple of random points to give perspective from where I am coming from.
  • In my line of work (healthcare), I most often see a decline in health from those who retire and do nothing.
  • And, I also see a large number of people around me who don't work and they piss their life away on drugs, alcohol and gang life - and I think much of it has to do with money being given to them and they didn't have to work for it.
Those are just two reasons off the top of my head of why being lazy and having no responsibilities bother me.
Thank you to all who have responded thus far.  The discussion has been helpful to me.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2017, 04:07:28 PM by Beard N Bones »

Yabous

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 2
Re: Lazy
« Reply #13 on: December 17, 2017, 05:19:33 PM »
Freedom17 and soccerluvof4 - you have written words of encouragement.  Thank you for your perspective.

Full disclosure here:  Our family has not reached FIRE, yet.  We are well on our way, and yes, the thought of it is exciting.  That said, one thing that concerns me in obtaining FI: my motivation to take care of my responsibilities in life (ie. myself (like excercise), my family (quality time with kids), etc) will decrease.  Just because my responsibilities to work will end, it shouldn't mean that my responsibilities to other areas in life should also end.  Maybe my thinking is erroneous.  Maybe I'm the only one that may deal with this.  And that is why I ask those that are already FI.

If laziness IS living life to its fullest, than I'd rather work - work by putting lots of energy into being a great husband, by being an awesome dad, by being a responsible pet owner, in being a caring neighbour, and being one damn good hunter.  Now don't get me wrong, I think there is a season for everything.  I'm not advocating for being a slave to a job or societies expectations.  I agree, there are times in life where sleeping in is awesome, where doing nothing all day is the right thing to do, times where we aren't responsible for anyone but ourselves, times where you look back in a day and say "I wasn't contributing to society today like everyone says I should," and I am good with that!  But to sleep life away, doing nothing of value, and taking no responsibility (to oneself even!) I have a hard time with.

Please note that laziness can be had pre-retirement or post-"working for the man."  I just wonder if it is a greater issue once retired.  A couple of random points to give perspective from where I am coming from.
  • In my line of work (healthcare), I most often see a decline in health from those who retire and do nothing.
  • And, I also see a large number of people around me who don't work and they piss their life away on drugs, alcohol and gang life - and I think much of it has to do with money being given to them and they didn't have to work for it.
Those are just two reasons off the top of my head of why being lazy and having no responsibilities bother me.
Thank you to all who have responded thus far.  The discussion has been helpful to me.

Interesting perspective on this...I have to say that my recent experiences in the health care sector I have found that health care workers are sadly unhealthy. Even my two surgeons in the past two years were seriously not healthy in their physical state. I found this perplexing, but understandable given the stresses of the healthcare profession in the U.S. I was even thinking someone needs to start a support program so these health workers can actually be healthy!  But alas that is the state of how we do things here in America.....sanity does not rule.

Sun Hat

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 189
  • Location: Canada
Re: Lazy
« Reply #14 on: December 17, 2017, 05:34:03 PM »
That said, one thing that concerns me in obtaining FI: my motivation to take care of my responsibilities in life (ie. myself (like excercise), my family (quality time with kids), etc) will decrease.  Just because my responsibilities to work will end, it shouldn't mean that my responsibilities to other areas in life should also end.  Maybe my thinking is erroneous.  Maybe I'm the only one that may deal with this.  And that is why I ask those that are already FI.

My work field was the military, and there was a terrible statistic of people dying within two years of retirement because they stopped doing pretty much everything other than watching TV. At our pre-retirement seminars, they tell us to know who we are outside of work so that we're not lost without it. I think that advice is sound for everyone, and I think that you've identified who you are - dad, hunter, athlete/fit person.

So long as you retire "to" the things that you love, I think that you'll be fine.

[Edited to encompass a break to throw snowballs at/for my dog]
« Last Edit: December 17, 2017, 05:56:27 PM by Sun Hat »