Author Topic: Did you share your financial position with your boss?  (Read 6565 times)

Pootie22

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Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« on: November 29, 2016, 04:37:13 PM »
I was wondering about how much detail people who are already FIRED share with their boss when they gave them notice that they were quitting. Did you tell you boss that you were quitting or that you are retiring? Did the boss ask you how you would support yourself? Were they skeptical, curious or didn't seem to care much?

Spork

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2016, 05:02:43 PM »
My direct boss and I were (and still are) friends.  He knew that he and I had different spending habits.  He knew I had plans on retiring early.  During one review he rolled his eyes and said "we have to come up with goals and objectives for next year."  My answer: "My goal is to retire."  He was a little taken aback by the schedule, but just asked for 6 months of notice so he could hire/train a replacement. 

I gave him 6 months... and through corporate red tape and bullshit, it took 5 1/2 months to get someone in.  So... I "trained" my replacement in a couple of weeks.

There were others that were skeptical and curious... A few really buckled down and planned on doing it themselves.  But over time, everyone I know of that was inspired saw something shiny and wondered off in pursuit of it.
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Pootie22

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2016, 05:27:43 PM »
Did he ask you any details about how much money you had saved or about where you would get your income from?

Spork

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2016, 06:03:22 PM »
Did he ask you any details about how much money you had saved or about where you would get your income from?

No.  No one did.  Lots of wild assumptions of both sides:
* You must have 10 million dollars
* I know Spork... he can easily live off of $8000/year.

My boss knew I had lots saved.  We never talked amounts, but we talked strategies.  Mine was save every penny you can.  His wasn't... but we both understood each other.
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Financial.Velociraptor

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2016, 07:23:48 PM »
I told immediate boss I was going to live on investment income (he's all like, you mean "retired?")  Heehee.  Most of the old coworkers know now too.  No one has asked for a number which would be kind of rude.  Not that they can't see it for themselves if they bother to read my blog...
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StetsTerhune

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2016, 07:44:37 PM »
I had some consulting work lined up and told my boss I was quitting to do that. He assumed that that's full-time work and I didn't correct him (I've probably averaged 2 hours a week of work). The one "work friend" who's an actual friend knows everything, but everyone else thinks I'm working full-time.

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2016, 09:04:59 AM »
I told my bosses I needed to do something with more time freedom and location flexibility. They sort of asked about money, but knew it wasn't a part of the equation since I'm the odd duck of the office.

The one boss figured out that I was retiring because I shared quite a few articles from MadFientist, MMM, and GoCurryCracker over the years. He asked me point blank a few days later. Then talked about some fun investment ideas he thought I would like. (Buying young wine to age being the most prominent)

The other boss found out shortly thereafter.

Their boss was the most incredulous.

Needless to say, they stopped pestering me about staying on longer than agreed upon once it was clear that I was retiring.

lhamo

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2016, 09:30:28 AM »
At the time I quit, my salary was basically just paying for taxes and my kids school fees anyway.  I was pretty open with my boss that one of the reasons for us pursuing the special academic program DS enrolled in was that it would save us hundreds of thousands of dollars in school and university fees.  And he also knew we owned/planned to sell our apartment in Beijing.

I think it made him disinclined to discuss possible part-time remote consulting opportunities for me, which he raised briefly at the beginning but then never brought up again.  Which is fine -- I didn't need them after all.
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Spork

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2016, 10:05:02 AM »

I will also add: When my retirement bubbled up the chain, they guy that was VP and CTO effectively told my boss I could ask for anything.  Now: I have no earthly idea what his idea of "anything" was, but it sort of pissed me off.  This company had been underpaying me (and everyone else) by a pretty large margin because they were the only tech game in town.  The idea that now that I had no reason I had to be there and they were going to adjust me up to a market rate salary is just insulting.  I told them "I wasn't sure what they could offer me that would make me stay."   
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Libertea

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2016, 03:31:40 PM »
No.  But I'm really downshifting/semi-retiring as opposed to all-out retiring.  It entails taking a huge paycut (down to about 25% of my current salary), so it wouldn't have been entirely surprising if people had wondered about it.  But my boss really only cared in as much as it meant he needed more manpower.  They have five more weeks to find it....

ender

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2016, 03:49:12 PM »

I will also add: When my retirement bubbled up the chain, they guy that was VP and CTO effectively told my boss I could ask for anything.  Now: I have no earthly idea what his idea of "anything" was, but it sort of pissed me off.  This company had been underpaying me (and everyone else) by a pretty large margin because they were the only tech game in town.  The idea that now that I had no reason I had to be there and they were going to adjust me up to a market rate salary is just insulting.  I told them "I wasn't sure what they could offer me that would make me stay."

"I'd probably keep working a few more months for $1,000,000/year, LMK"

Cassie

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2016, 04:47:37 PM »
Even though I wasn't young at 58 people were very surprised because I only had 15 years in with the state so hence a small pension and would have to take a small penalty for not waiting until 60. A few tried to talk me out of it.  Many people stayed 10 or more years to get the bigger pension but not worth it to me.

BeginnerStache

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2016, 07:49:40 AM »
My company was trying to send me overseas for some training on new machines we were looking to design and sell. I thought I was being generous by letting the engineering manager (my boss's boss) know I would be retiring in probably 3-4 years (likely sooner). So long term having me be the only engineer understanding the design and engineering of these new machines might not be a great ideal. They did pick someone else to go however, I got the absolute worst raise by far in my 6 years working here. I am sure that was a large part of it. I somewhat regret telling them. But at least I can say I was honest and trying to look out for the company.   

mandy_2002

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2016, 07:45:30 AM »
I was very honest that I was rerouting and did not plan to work more, at least not in the engineering field. I think most of the people I worked with have the same ability to retire  as me, worth similar salaries, and I was hoping my exit would be a kick in the butt for them. I did not get into numbers, but I did talk about the shockingly simple math and the 4% rule a lot since we were all engineers.
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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2016, 08:48:51 PM »
I told my boss (who I rarely saw as he worked in a different place) that I was quitting to take a few years sabbatical to do other things. I did this before (took a 2 year sabbatical to travel) while working for the same agency and was rehired by them when I returned so everyone accepted it. At the time I didn't plan to RE and just planned a 5 year "work break" so was the truth. After about a year off I figured out I could permently retire so did that.
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lthenderson

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2016, 09:14:18 AM »
There was no surprise since our company, an S corporation ESOP, regularly turned out millionaires. Most of the people ahead of me retired at 55 when they could get at 401k money and live off of it until they could access their ESOP accounts. They hadn't heard of the 72(t) rule either which allows people to access their ESOP accounts much earlier also penalty free, though with more restrictions.

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2016, 06:40:04 AM »
There was no surprise since our company, an S corporation ESOP, regularly turned out millionaires. Most of the people ahead of me retired at 55 when they could get at 401k money and live off of it until they could access their ESOP accounts. They hadn't heard of the 72(t) rule either which allows people to access their ESOP accounts much earlier also penalty free, though with more restrictions.

This just blows my mind that there are 401K millionaires who have not heard of the 72(t) rule.
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lthenderson

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2016, 09:06:45 AM »
There was no surprise since our company, an S corporation ESOP, regularly turned out millionaires. Most of the people ahead of me retired at 55 when they could get at 401k money and live off of it until they could access their ESOP accounts. They hadn't heard of the 72(t) rule either which allows people to access their ESOP accounts much earlier also penalty free, though with more restrictions.

This just blows my mind that there are 401K millionaires who have not heard of the 72(t) rule.

I think it was a generational thing. I was the first new hire in decades when I joined the company. Most of the old timers couldn't see advantages to having a Roth component to the 401k plan until I started showing them how much taxes they will be paying when they start withdrawing their untaxed millions. I'm pretty sure most of those still working there are very familiar with both concepts.

C40

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2016, 08:13:19 PM »
I shared enough with my boss that he most likely knew I had at least a pretty good chunk of "fuck you" money. He knew that I spent very little. Sometimes I'd talk about investing - about some stocks I owned or recently bought. I never told him I planned to retire early. By the time I quit, it wasn't a surprise for him, but I think that was more because I had transitioned to part time work first (2 weeks per month).
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BuffaloStache

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #19 on: December 16, 2016, 03:47:43 PM »
I'm far from this, but think it would very much depend on the relationship I had with my boss. I had a boss who I was very close with, but he got laid off earlier this year. My new boss, I definitely wouldn't go into any details. In either case I probably wouldn't talk numbers.

...More than anything, if I have any respect for the company I'm RE-ing from, I'd just be sure to give them a longer-than-usual notice. Probably not the 3-4 years that BeginnerStache was talking about, but somewhere in the 6 months to 1 year range.
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tonysemail

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2016, 04:29:12 PM »
heck no!  there's no way that I would share this with my boss.
Two weeks notice.
but kudos to you BeginnerStache!

BuffaloStache

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #21 on: December 16, 2016, 04:58:48 PM »
Two weeks notice.


This is an interesting topic. Colorado, for example, is an "employment-at-will" state. This means that, legally, you don't have to give any notice at all. You can literally walk into work, tell your boss you are leaving, then walk out the door. I've seen this happen in practice twice, and both times management was extremely pissed off by this (you would definitely be burning bridges).
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Spork

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2016, 07:24:05 PM »
Two weeks notice.


This is an interesting topic. Colorado, for example, is an "employment-at-will" state. This means that, legally, you don't have to give any notice at all. You can literally walk into work, tell your boss you are leaving, then walk out the door. I've seen this happen in practice twice, and both times management was extremely pissed off by this (you would definitely be burning bridges).

You know: if I worked in a toxic environment with a bunch of asshats I never wanted to see again... I'd do this.  But I never have.  I've always worked with folks I liked and respected (and remained friends with afterwards).  That's why I talked ahead of time with my boss and tried to make a long term plan.  He's still my friend and I'm happy about that.
Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
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Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #23 on: December 17, 2016, 02:55:30 AM »
I will also add: When my retirement bubbled up the chain, they guy that was VP and CTO effectively told my boss I could ask for anything.  Now: I have no earthly idea what his idea of "anything" was, but it sort of pissed me off.  This company had been underpaying me (and everyone else) by a pretty large margin because they were the only tech game in town.  The idea that now that I had no reason I had to be there and they were going to adjust me up to a market rate salary is just insulting.  I told them "I wasn't sure what they could offer me that would make me stay."

I'd have been tempted to get their offer and publicise it to try to force a raise for my soon-to-be-ex colleagues.

I'm not a nice person. The bridges I burn light the way for those who follow.

BuffaloStache

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #24 on: December 17, 2016, 04:35:36 PM »
You know: if I worked in a toxic environment with a bunch of asshats I never wanted to see again... I'd do this.  But I never have.  I've always worked with folks I liked and respected (and remained friends with afterwards).  That's why I talked ahead of time with my boss and tried to make a long term plan.  He's still my friend and I'm happy about that.

I almost agree with this, except when I'm presented in shitty situations like this I tend to revert to being overly hyper-professional (so much so that it comes off as just a tad condescending, but not enough to be overtly so) just to expose the asshats to some manners/common decency. :-P
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snogirl

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #25 on: December 17, 2016, 05:07:16 PM »
Two weeks notice.


This is an interesting topic. Colorado, for example, is an "employment-at-will" state. This means that, legally, you don't have to give any notice at all. You can literally walk into work, tell your boss you are leaving, then walk out the door. I've seen this happen in practice twice, and both times management was extremely pissed off by this (you would definitely be burning bridges).

You know: if I worked in a toxic environment with a bunch of asshats I never wanted to see again... I'd do this.  But I never have.  I've always worked with folks I liked and respected (and remained friends with afterwards).  That's why I talked ahead of time with my boss and tried to make a long term plan.  He's still my friend and I'm happy about that.
I did this in Oct. On my 56th birthday. It wasn't planned that way. I was targeting Dec 2016 because I had gotten all my ducks in a row.
My work situation was extremely toxic. For 18 months I did 2 jobs for one pay check because my supervisor was out due to an HRC complaint. I was trying to set up my FIRE so I stuck it out. They also downgraded my position during this 18 months (my hourly wage stayed the same & I just maxed out the steps for the lower pay grade.) That killed any future raises. The tipping point was someone, not directly in my chain, giving me a hard time about a database. I got up, took off my badging credentials & quit. One of the other supervisors said I was over reacting.  I said no I'm quitting, it was a pleasure working with you, walked out and didn't look back. The director begged me to come back in text messages.  He was so pissed at the guys I worked with who were jerks. But not enough to pay me or offer more $.  They made their bed.
My state is at will employment so just like the Agency changing my pay grade, I could quit. I didn't need the bridge so I could careless if it burned. My life today is awesome. No regrets.

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Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #26 on: December 18, 2016, 01:58:27 AM »
The director begged me to come back in text messages.  He was so pissed at the guys I worked with who were jerks. But not enough to pay me or offer more $.  They made their bed.
My state is at will employment so just like the Agency changing my pay grade, I could quit. I didn't need the bridge so I could careless if it burned. My life today is awesome. No regrets.

Good for you. I hope it led to a positive change for the company also.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #27 on: December 18, 2016, 04:08:01 AM »
...One of the other supervisors said I was over reacting.  I said no I'm quitting...


Love this!
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snogirl

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #28 on: December 18, 2016, 07:52:57 AM »
The director begged me to come back in text messages.  He was so pissed at the guys I worked with who were jerks. But not enough to pay me or offer more $.  They made their bed.
My state is at will employment so just like the Agency changing my pay grade, I could quit. I didn't need the bridge so I could careless if it burned. My life today is awesome. No regrets.

Good for you. I hope it led to a positive change for the company also.

The director begged me to come back in text messages.  He was so pissed at the guys I worked with who were jerks. But not enough to pay me or offer more $.  They made their bed.
My state is at will employment so just like the Agency changing my pay grade, I could quit. I didn't need the bridge so I could careless if it burned. My life today is awesome. No regrets.

Good for you. I hope it led to a positive change for the company also.

Thank you honestly it was like stepping of a cliff having faith I would fly and fly I did!
Yeah I never had done this ever
Mainly because I was tied to facepunch-like living and debt, working 2-3 jobs, than 3 years ago I found MMM and a couple of other programs that helped me immensely.  Now I run a very small one-owner business tied to my passion of the outdoors and help the over 60 crowd with their needs.  It is so fulfilling. And very part-time.  I pick and choose.  This winter though I am hardly working because I am an avid outdoors woman who loves Winter. lol
I must add that I retired from the service in 2007 so my health insurance comes from that plus a very modest pension.  It wasn't possible to even consider retiring on it since at that time I was free falling in the abyss of golden handcuffs. I had taken this job 5 years ago thinking it was all that when in reality it was a dysfunctional workplace. 
As far as it changing for the better after I left?  I don't know.  They really though I would come back and did some sneaky shenanigans after I left.  They tried to get me to EAP or FMLA.  I had the problem or so they thought.  It is a very hierarchical, fear-based organization that has been around and is public funded. So them changing?  Not a chance.
As far as the OP question?  I did not share anything with my boss or bosses or directors.  They would nod and smile when I would share small stories with coworkers.  No, they thought the sun rose and shined on them.  I shared my plans with family and close friends who were so happy when I quit.  I swear I loss half my gray hair walking out of the place. 
« Last Edit: December 18, 2016, 07:56:24 AM by snogirl »

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #29 on: December 18, 2016, 08:53:02 AM »
The director begged me to come back in text messages.  He was so pissed at the guys I worked with who were jerks. But not enough to pay me or offer more $.  They made their bed.
My state is at will employment so just like the Agency changing my pay grade, I could quit. I didn't need the bridge so I could careless if it burned. My life today is awesome. No regrets.

Good for you. I hope it led to a positive change for the company also.

Thank you honestly it was like stepping of a cliff having faith I would fly and fly I did!
Yeah I never had done this ever
Mainly because I was tied to facepunch-like living and debt, working 2-3 jobs, than 3 years ago I found MMM and a couple of other programs that helped me immensely.  Now I run a very small one-owner business tied to my passion of the outdoors and help the over 60 crowd with their needs.  It is so fulfilling. And very part-time.  I pick and choose.  This winter though I am hardly working because I am an avid outdoors woman who loves Winter. lol
I must add that I retired from the service in 2007 so my health insurance comes from that plus a very modest pension.  It wasn't possible to even consider retiring on it since at that time I was free falling in the abyss of golden handcuffs. I had taken this job 5 years ago thinking it was all that when in reality it was a dysfunctional workplace. 
As far as it changing for the better after I left?  I don't know.  They really though I would come back and did some sneaky shenanigans after I left.  They tried to get me to EAP or FMLA.  I had the problem or so they thought.  It is a very hierarchical, fear-based organization that has been around and is public funded. So them changing?  Not a chance.
As far as the OP question?  I did not share anything with my boss or bosses or directors.  They would nod and smile when I would share small stories with coworkers.  No, they thought the sun rose and shined on them.  I shared my plans with family and close friends who were so happy when I quit.  I swear I loss half my gray hair walking out of the place.

I'm soooo pleased it worked out so well for you. The more I hear about this company the more pleased I am you were able to get out of there and do this more rewarding work. :)

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #30 on: December 18, 2016, 11:50:16 AM »
I shared generalities and my annual non-tax spend with one of a collection of bosses.  The collection was pretty bad at HR functions and managing employee workload.  Another coworker and I had the discussion that if a couple of the junior, better-managing bosses A and B split off to form a separate firm, we would follow them.  After a raise was smaller than expected, a promised bonus was reneged, and I decided I didn't want to work another Tax Season, I started discussing (months before leaving) with A quitting the firm.  I mentioned the "go and we'll follow" discussion to him, but he said that he (and probably B) wouldn't have the capital to go off on their own.

I knew a minimum that they had to be making.  I confided to A that I was not going to look for another job for at least months and possibly longer, that I had enough to live comfortably for a decade or perhaps forever, due in large part to spending X but making 4X.  I pointed out to him that saving more of his income would give him the flexibility to split off, to spend more time with his young child (he had been complaining that he wouldn't see his child for most of Tax Season), or to cut his hours.  He was impressed with the idea, but seemed unwilling to make the spending cuts necessary to change things.  He likes that high-spending life.

So, I shared with one, but only as I was already going out the door and with the specific purpose of trying to help.
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Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #31 on: December 18, 2016, 03:19:25 PM »
So, I shared with one, but only as I was already going out the door and with the specific purpose of trying to help.

I'd always thought there was never a reason to share finances with your boss, but this does seem like the example that breaks the rule.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #32 on: February 23, 2017, 01:56:28 AM »
Two weeks notice.
This is an interesting topic. Colorado, for example, is an "employment-at-will" state. This means that, legally, you don't have to give any notice at all. You can literally walk into work, tell your boss you are leaving, then walk out the door. I've seen this happen in practice twice, and both times management was extremely pissed off by this (you would definitely be burning bridges).

You know: if I worked in a toxic environment with a bunch of asshats I never wanted to see again... I'd do this.  But I never have.  I've always worked with folks I liked and respected (and remained friends with afterwards).  That's why I talked ahead of time with my boss and tried to make a long term plan.  He's still my friend and I'm happy about that.
I did this in Oct. On my 56th birthday. It wasn't planned that way. I was targeting Dec 2016 because I had gotten all my ducks in a row.
My work situation was extremely toxic. For 18 months I did 2 jobs for one pay check because my supervisor was out due to an HRC complaint. I was trying to set up my FIRE so I stuck it out. They also downgraded my position during this 18 months (my hourly wage stayed the same & I just maxed out the steps for the lower pay grade.) That killed any future raises. The tipping point was someone, not directly in my chain, giving me a hard time about a database. I got up, took off my badging credentials & quit. One of the other supervisors said I was over reacting.  I said no I'm quitting, it was a pleasure working with you, walked out and didn't look back. The director begged me to come back in text messages.  He was so pissed at the guys I worked with who were jerks. But not enough to pay me or offer more $.  They made their bed.
My state is at will employment so just like the Agency changing my pay grade, I could quit. I didn't need the bridge so I could careless if it burned. My life today is awesome. No regrets.

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snogirl,

Awesome, could you add details and post this story at
http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/epic-fu-money-stories ? It is EPIC enough.

As for myself, everyone, including boss (who I like), strongly and correctly suspects that I'm FI.
I'm getting to the point where I'm wishing for an excuse to RE.  I'm almost at the point of manufacturing something over Compensating Time Off restrictions, as I'd rather have time off than the extra money from overtime.


Edit for spelling.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2017, 12:04:47 PM by markbike528CBX »

dude

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #33 on: February 23, 2017, 07:56:53 AM »
In my workplace (Fed LEO), retiring is a given, it's just a matter of when -- somewhere between the date one is first eligible and the mandatory retirement age (57th birthday). I've told my boss (just yesterday actually) that I'm planning on going on my eligibility date.  We all know more or less how much a person's pension is going to be based on their grade and time in service, but a 20-year LEO career only gets you 34% of your High-3 average, and so it comes down to how much do you have in your TSP and when you plan to claim SS. In my office, we pretty much share info on TSP balances, but I wouldn't share that with my boss(es), because I wouldn't want it affecting decisions on performance awards and such.

Dicey

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #34 on: March 04, 2017, 11:57:20 AM »
snogirl,
Awesome, could you add details and post this story at
http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/epic-fu-money-stories ? It is EPIC enough.
markbike, FTFY.

OP, Yes, please do!
I did it! I have a journal!
http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/a-lot-like-this/
And hell yes, I am still moving confidently in the direction of my dreams...

BuffaloStache

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #35 on: March 11, 2017, 12:12:32 PM »
In my office, we pretty much share info on TSP balances, but I wouldn't share that with my boss(es), because I wouldn't want it affecting decisions on performance awards and such.

This is valid even for those not in government work. Sharing 401k balances, 'stash balances, etc., could end up hurting you when it comes to yearly salary adjustments/performance awards. May result in needed to work an extra year or so.
My Log

zinethstache

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #36 on: March 11, 2017, 12:46:47 PM »
My boss and bosses boss knew enough pieces of the puzzle ahead of time. They both knew my husband was a property investor.  They knew that he'd worked a day job prior to that and we were growing his business. They knew when I sold my home and lived in a fifth wheel at my parents for free.

Last summer my boss asked if I was going to quit, could I give more than two weeks. I tricked him and worked another six months. I did end up working 3 1/2 weeks after I gave notice.

They both were supportive and happy for me. Both are workaholics with young children so they didn't express pangs of jealousy or anything like that. I was very careful to do my job well until the very, very end. You never know, I might hate this FIREd life and if so, that is where I would likely return to work, but only if for some crazy reason I need a big paycheck. It would be more natural for me to get side gig work using my hobby skills and not have a stressful job down the road.

life_travel

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #37 on: March 11, 2017, 10:07:48 PM »
Quote from: snogirl link=topic=64885.msg1345253#msg1345253 date=1482072777


Thank you honestly it was like stepping of a cliff having faith I would fly and fly I did!
Yeah I [i
never[/i] had done this ever
Mainly because I was tied to facepunch-like living and debt, working 2-3 jobs, than 3 years ago I found MMM and a couple of other programs that helped me immensely.  Now I run a very small one-owner business tied to my passion of the outdoors and help the over 60 crowd with their needs.  It is so fulfilling. And very part-time.  I pick and choose.  This winter though I am hardly working because I am an avid outdoors woman who loves Winter. lol
I must add that I retired from the service in 2007 so my health insurance comes from that plus a very modest pension.  It wasn't possible to even consider retiring on it since at that time I was free falling in the abyss of golden handcuffs. I had taken this job 5 years ago thinking it was all that when in reality it was a dysfunctional workplace.
As far as it changing for the better after I left?  I don't know.  They really though I would come back and did some sneaky shenanigans after I left.  They tried to get me to EAP or FMLA.  I had the problem or so they thought.  It is a very hierarchical, fear-based organization that has been around and is public funded. So them changing?  Not a chance.
As far as the OP question?  I did not share anything with my boss or bosses or directors.  They would nod and smile when I would share small stories with coworkers.  No, they thought the sun rose and shined on them.  I shared my plans with family and close friends who were so happy when I quit.  I swear I loss half my gray hair walking out of the place.
Great to hear it and good on you, snogirl! The bolded part resonated with me as I have been in my job for 11 years and from 2010-2015 I got paid extremely well, like double for what my industry paid, so I closed my eyes on any corporate BS that went on..But now since my wages halved in 2016 , my golden handcuffs are no longer shiny.. We have 3 years to go to a very modest FI( and then will leave stache to grow) but I am ready to walk ..
As for original question, I don't say anything at work, and when ready to leave , I will just give my one month notice.

Lucky Girl

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #38 on: March 14, 2017, 02:54:10 PM »
I don't tell my boss anything.  He's a good guy but likes fancy cars he can't afford.  Also owns a second home.  And his family income is no doubt lower than my own, since my spouse is pretty high income, and his is not. 

When I do retire, my spouse will still be working, but I think I will mention that we no longer need my income.  He will just assume that DH's income covers our expenses.  They do, but we will still be saving close to 50% of our income even after I RE. Not spending on nice houses and cars does not compute.

Hargrove

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Re: Did you share your financial position with your boss?
« Reply #39 on: March 14, 2017, 07:10:54 PM »
My boss says he loves what he does, which is often chewing out his staff, so no, I haven't told him a thing.

I spend half my time selling things, most of the rest defending my clients from my bosses (who never think anyone is buying enough things), and the last bit getting chewed out by those bosses (it doesn't matter if you're in the top three employees every month, because all that ever matters is the new month).

I had this idea I could distill enough cash out of this job to buy a house and reduce my cost of living enough to consider myself free from any particular job... then I found MMM and learned that's basically what FI is, and it's not as rare as I thought. Every month I watch my net worth go up and my stress level plummets as I think of how much better a situation I could walk away into. None of the work I will eventually be passionate about has a high chance of paying well, so that's what I hope to escape to by 35. I am actually grateful, though, that I found this job when I did. It's so ruthlessly non-secure that it was obvious to me that the only reasonable thing to do was build an escape plan out of the proceeds, which has put me in the best financial shape of my life, my parents' lives, their parents'...

At-will employment is total nonsense. Where I am, the culture of "but you're supposed to give notice..." protects employers, while employees (as usual) get the short end of the stick. I plan to get every benefit at my job that's available and save the max I can, then I'll probably retire at the moment they assume I'm in it for the long haul. I couldn't bring myself to feel badly about this considering literally most of our staff is under 2 years in, and that situation developed over only the last 4-5 years, as the entire industry determined that we are expendable.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 07:13:24 PM by Hargrove »