Author Topic: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?  (Read 15497 times)

Brokenreign

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #50 on: April 03, 2018, 08:13:47 AM »
I definitely recommend testing the waters before making any big or expensive purchases or irreversible lifestyle changes. I've tried a lot of different things (always starting with the cheapest and easiest, least hassle thing first) to see if its something I might want to do long term. For example if I found out I didn't like long term slow travel as much as I though I would because I missed the more settled life, I'd probably.be able to figure that out just as fast if I were tent camping or using motels and my old car as I would if I had a new shiny RV or camper van or sailboat.
In my case, there's a good chance of the irreversible lifestyle happening in any case, not just because of being retired, but because I'm also looking at a high likelihood of relocating during FIRE.  I don't particularly want to keep living where I am now, so unless I change my mind in the future, I'll be selling my house within the first year or so after FIRE.  I probably wouldn't buy an RV until I had a buyer.  One thing I liked about the RV idea was taking my time traveling around to see different areas I might be interested in relocating to.  And who knows, maybe I would find I actually like the RV life and would want to continue with that longer.  On the other hand, I don't need an RV to travel, and I could always change things up later on and switch to an RV if my experiences pushed me in that direction.  It does give me some anxiety thinking about not having a home to return to.
I sold my house last fall and have had quite a bit of anxiety about being "homeless with dog". My IBL (inner bag lady) screams at me fairly often ;-).. But that's abating now that I found its a bit easier to do short or long term rentals and know that I could buy again if I want to. Since I have been staying in one area for the winter a few months after I sold my house, and am moving on tomorrow.(but may end up back thete this summer as its a nice area and close to family and friends), my IBL might start screaming at me again.  However, like you, I'm mainly going places to check out areas I want to relocate so may end up getting another rental soon and just travel part time. 

ETA this was also the reason I didnt want to buy anything like an RV or camper van/truck. I wasn't sure If I'd like full timing with my dog (I don't) so just going with what I already had will make it easier to change things with zero extra expense or hassle. If I loved it I could always upgrade if I wanted.

Why don't you like full-timing with your dog? I ask because we're mulling over going full-time with a dog in an RV....

The #1 reason we went the RV route is because we have a dog and it's difficult to find AirBnBs and short term rentals with a dog. Without her, we 100% would have gone with a station wagon and a bike rack.

Brokenreign

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #51 on: April 03, 2018, 12:22:37 PM »
I definitely recommend testing the waters before making any big or expensive purchases or irreversible lifestyle changes. I've tried a lot of different things (always starting with the cheapest and easiest, least hassle thing first) to see if its something I might want to do long term. For example if I found out I didn't like long term slow travel as much as I though I would because I missed the more settled life, I'd probably.be able to figure that out just as fast if I were tent camping or using motels and my old car as I would if I had a new shiny RV or camper van or sailboat.
In my case, there's a good chance of the irreversible lifestyle happening in any case, not just because of being retired, but because I'm also looking at a high likelihood of relocating during FIRE.  I don't particularly want to keep living where I am now, so unless I change my mind in the future, I'll be selling my house within the first year or so after FIRE.  I probably wouldn't buy an RV until I had a buyer.  One thing I liked about the RV idea was taking my time traveling around to see different areas I might be interested in relocating to.  And who knows, maybe I would find I actually like the RV life and would want to continue with that longer.  On the other hand, I don't need an RV to travel, and I could always change things up later on and switch to an RV if my experiences pushed me in that direction.  It does give me some anxiety thinking about not having a home to return to.
I sold my house last fall and have had quite a bit of anxiety about being "homeless with dog". My IBL (inner bag lady) screams at me fairly often ;-).. But that's abating now that I found its a bit easier to do short or long term rentals and know that I could buy again if I want to. Since I have been staying in one area for the winter a few months after I sold my house, and am moving on tomorrow.(but may end up back thete this summer as its a nice area and close to family and friends), my IBL might start screaming at me again.  However, like you, I'm mainly going places to check out areas I want to relocate so may end up getting another rental soon and just travel part time. 

ETA this was also the reason I didnt want to buy anything like an RV or camper van/truck. I wasn't sure If I'd like full timing with my dog (I don't) so just going with what I already had will make it easier to change things with zero extra expense or hassle. If I loved it I could always upgrade if I wanted.

Why don't you like full-timing with your dog? I ask because we're mulling over going full-time with a dog in an RV....

The #1 reason we went the RV route is because we have a dog and it's difficult to find AirBnBs and short term rentals with a dog. Without her, we 100% would have gone with a station wagon and a bike rack.
I think mainly its because I like to do a lot of outdoorsy things I can't take my dog along on and I'm not OK with leaving her alone in a vehicle all day (even an RV). Plus going places where dogs aren't allowed or only allowed in limited areas like in Nat Parks and state parks or just wanting to do non-doggie things like go to a museum or spend the day in a city or going inside buildings. Go out at night. Etc.

For example I went to Zion a couple of weeks ago to bike and hike, followed by a stop in Vegas for a couple of days and then a few days skiing in Cali. If I had the dog with me (sis was watching her) I wouldn't really have been able to do much other than sightsee. Sure there's always boarding but it's not always available close by and it can get pricey. And as a solo traveler this makes doing some things even more difficult.

So for me being that restricted on a full time 24/7 basis was too much. However this is probably just me and YMMV. Lots of people travel, and especially RV, with their dogs full time and love it. I like it but not full time.

ETA: I still plan to.do a long cross country trip with her but have learned that what works best for me is to stop somewhere for a fairly long while (month or so) and get a place near areas I want to explore and do various activities in. That way I can still do many doggie things but also have a lot of time to go do things I wouldn't be able to take her knowing she's safe and comfortable in a secure place.

Thanks for the input Spartana. One of the other reasons for the RV was the presence of a powered roof vent (to keep it cool) and a furnace (to keep it warm) so we could leave the dog for an afternoon if needed. I could see how many would not be comfortable doing that though. Frankly I don't think she even likes me that much so she's probably happier staying in the vehicle on her own.

They are very restrictive for outdoors activities though - they aren't allowed in pretty much any nat parks in the US it seems and half of Canadian parks seem to be caribou habitat (sprawling SOBs!) so they're not allowed there either.

RelaxedGal

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #52 on: April 03, 2018, 07:29:14 PM »
Hello all,

I have just recently started learning about the FIRE community, and, as someone who is intrigued but intimidated by the commitment, I was wondering if those who are post-FIRE had an idea of what they wanted to do with their time/hobbies they wanted to dive into/places they wanted to visit before they retired early, or did your plans about what your retirement would look like start to form more when you were closer to achieving it or had already done so?

Thanks in advance, I'd be glad to hear from you!

I wanted to go home. 

I grew up in a tourist town in Michigan where there are few-to-none programming jobs.  Moved to Massachusetts at 25 to be with my boyfriend-now-husband.  Decided I'd have to save like mad if I ever wanted to move back to Michigan because there was no way I'd be able to find a job there.

We're on track to move back at 50.  Or so.  The original plan was 40 but a kid and some lifestyle inflation have moved the goalpost.  Can't move 'til she graduates high school (or did he say college?) and we like to travel (not a lot of flights into that part of Michigan).  But some day I want to go home for good.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2018, 07:31:08 PM by RelaxedGal »

Hirondelle

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #53 on: April 04, 2018, 12:45:36 AM »
Hello all,

I have just recently started learning about the FIRE community, and, as someone who is intrigued but intimidated by the commitment, I was wondering if those who are post-FIRE had an idea of what they wanted to do with their time/hobbies they wanted to dive into/places they wanted to visit before they retired early, or did your plans about what your retirement would look like start to form more when you were closer to achieving it or had already done so?

Thanks in advance, I'd be glad to hear from you!

I wanted to go home. 

I grew up in a tourist town in Michigan where there are few-to-none programming jobs.  Moved to Massachusetts at 25 to be with my boyfriend-now-husband.  Decided I'd have to save like mad if I ever wanted to move back to Michigan because there was no way I'd be able to find a job there.

We're on track to move back at 50.  Or so.  The original plan was 40 but a kid and some lifestyle inflation have moved the goalpost.  Can't move 'til she graduates high school (or did he say college?) and we like to travel (not a lot of flights into that part of Michigan).  But some day I want to go home for good.

Wouldn't coast-FI be a good option for you? Save till a certain % of your FI goal (let's say 75% or so), then move back and work a lower paying job/freelancing/distance working to cover bills while the money can grow to 100%?

Mrs. Rocker

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #54 on: April 06, 2018, 03:04:17 PM »
I definitely recommend testing the waters before making any big or expensive purchases or irreversible lifestyle changes. I've tried a lot of different things (always starting with the cheapest and easiest, least hassle thing first) to see if its something I might want to do long term. For example if I found out I didn't like long term slow travel as much as I though I would because I missed the more settled life, I'd probably.be able to figure that out just as fast if I were tent camping or using motels and my old car as I would if I had a new shiny RV or camper van or sailboat.
In my case, there's a good chance of the irreversible lifestyle happening in any case, not just because of being retired, but because I'm also looking at a high likelihood of relocating during FIRE.  I don't particularly want to keep living where I am now, so unless I change my mind in the future, I'll be selling my house within the first year or so after FIRE.  I probably wouldn't buy an RV until I had a buyer.  One thing I liked about the RV idea was taking my time traveling around to see different areas I might be interested in relocating to.  And who knows, maybe I would find I actually like the RV life and would want to continue with that longer.  On the other hand, I don't need an RV to travel, and I could always change things up later on and switch to an RV if my experiences pushed me in that direction.  It does give me some anxiety thinking about not having a home to return to.
I sold my house last fall and have had quite a bit of anxiety about being "homeless with dog". My IBL (inner bag lady) screams at me fairly often ;-).. But that's abating now that I found its a bit easier to do short or long term rentals and know that I could buy again if I want to. Since I have been staying in one area for the winter a few months after I sold my house, and am moving on tomorrow.(but may end up back thete this summer as its a nice area and close to family and friends), my IBL might start screaming at me again.  However, like you, I'm mainly going places to check out areas I want to relocate so may end up getting another rental soon and just travel part time. 

ETA this was also the reason I didnt want to buy anything like an RV or camper van/truck. I wasn't sure If I'd like full timing with my dog (I don't) so just going with what I already had will make it easier to change things with zero extra expense or hassle. If I loved it I could always upgrade if I wanted.

Why don't you like full-timing with your dog? I ask because we're mulling over going full-time with a dog in an RV....

The #1 reason we went the RV route is because we have a dog and it's difficult to find AirBnBs and short term rentals with a dog. Without her, we 100% would have gone with a station wagon and a bike rack.
Most people we meet on the road travel with pets, some with multiple pets. We don't mainly due to allergies but we are in the minority for sure.

DreamFIRE

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #55 on: April 06, 2018, 10:05:56 PM »
Most people we meet on the road travel with pets, some with multiple pets. We don't mainly due to allergies but we are in the minority for sure.
Now I'm imagining being in (or by) my RV and that a near-by RV has a dog barking.  Not a nice thought.  I'm one of those people that would not want to be hauling around a pet.  I'll wait until I'm ready to settle down permanently somewhere before I'll even consider getting another dog.

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #56 on: April 06, 2018, 11:51:13 PM »
I guess I've been fortunate to experience some of the 'exotic' life by being an expatriate in Norway and Dubai.  Having the company put you in fancy housing and flying business class is pretty nice, but it also gets taxing in its own physical way.  On our first assignment overseas, we sold our home and cars and pocketed lots.  But our second time around, we kept our better home and came back to it for holidays and extended breaks - so preferable. 

Life seems to naturally inflate in the child-rearing phase when you start to prefer and can afford a permanent base as well as whatever extra.  And there seem to be more and more demands - phones, cars, college, better clothes... 

But my wife and I now, with older children, are headed toward converging on this 'second career' optimization - a home in a retirement community (amenities, few disturbances, a social network, and things like yard-work covered) while getting to SCUBA dive internationally, more safaris, maybe indulge in 'Smithsonian' trips but also bike tours and hostels, and dip our toes in the emerging world.  Ultimately the goal is to formulate an efficient philanthropic lifestyle.  But, of course, all of this requires more than bare-bones FI.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #57 on: April 07, 2018, 09:41:05 AM »
Most people we meet on the road travel with pets, some with multiple pets. We don't mainly due to allergies but we are in the minority for sure.
Now I'm imagining being in (or by) my RV and that a near-by RV has a dog barking.  Not a nice thought.  I'm one of those people that would not want to be hauling around a pet.  I'll wait until I'm ready to settle down permanently somewhere before I'll even consider getting another dog.
Did I ever mention my dog's name is The Barkinator?

"Listen, and understand. That Barkinator is out there. It can’t be bargained with. It can’t be reasoned with. It doesn’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until you give it snackies".

My neighbours also have a barkinator. Whenever the tiny dog is outside, it barks. Luckily the past half year has been winter, so the dog has been inside most of the time. But now spring is approaching fast and I am already hearing the dog more and more often. We hear it when we are inside our house.

Wonder why some dogs do that? I know many other dogs that don't bark all the time.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2018, 11:10:54 PM by Linda_Norway »

DreamFIRE

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #58 on: April 07, 2018, 10:06:39 AM »
Most people we meet on the road travel with pets, some with multiple pets. We don't mainly due to allergies but we are in the minority for sure.
Now I'm imagining being in (or by) my RV and that a near-by RV has a dog barking.  Not a nice thought.  I'm one of those people that would not want to be hauling around a pet.  I'll wait until I'm ready to settle down permanently somewhere before I'll even consider getting another dog.
Did I ever mention my dog's name is The Barkinator?

"Listen, and understand. That Barkinator is out there. It canít be bargained with. It canít be reasoned with. It doesnít feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until you give it snackies".

My neighbours also have a barkinator. Whenever the tiny dog is outside, it barks. LikeÝy the past half year has been winter, so the dog has been inside most of the time. But now spring is approaching fast and I am already hearing the dog more and more often. We hear it when we are inside our house.

Wonder why some dogs do that? I know many other dogs that don't bark all the time.
I have a neighbor a couple houses down across the street that the dog barks from time to time for seemingly no reason.  If it's perfectly quiet in my house, I can hear it bark right through the wall, but fortunately, if the TV is on, or music is playing, or a fan/filter, it masks it completely.  I like dogs, just not the barking part.  I recall there was a study years ago to determine why dogs bark, and the conclusion was, "It's what they do."

Rollin

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #59 on: April 09, 2018, 12:47:34 PM »
I tried some bicycle camping touring (one of my dreams) but have a small dog I take with me and she hates it. Plus a huge hassle for me since I have nowhere safe to lock her inside even to go inside somewhere for a few minutes. So for now its the van but I bring my bike and do day rides with her so works good.

I put mine in a comfortable spot in a front rack so that she can see where she is going. She did not seem to like sitting behind me blocked by my body. I have a very compact backpack (fits in my pocket) and stuff her in when I go inside (like yesterday at the library). The only people that seem to see her are kids, as I hear them squeal when they finally spot her head sticking out!

RelaxedGal

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #60 on: April 09, 2018, 01:37:41 PM »
Hello all,

I have just recently started learning about the FIRE community, and, as someone who is intrigued but intimidated by the commitment, I was wondering if those who are post-FIRE had an idea of what they wanted to do with their time/hobbies they wanted to dive into/places they wanted to visit before they retired early, or did your plans about what your retirement would look like start to form more when you were closer to achieving it or had already done so?

Thanks in advance, I'd be glad to hear from you!

I wanted to go home. 

I grew up in a tourist town in Michigan where there are few-to-none programming jobs.  Moved to Massachusetts at 25 to be with my boyfriend-now-husband.  Decided I'd have to save like mad if I ever wanted to move back to Michigan because there was no way I'd be able to find a job there.

We're on track to move back at 50.  Or so.  The original plan was 40 but a kid and some lifestyle inflation have moved the goalpost.  Can't move 'til she graduates high school (or did he say college?) and we like to travel (not a lot of flights into that part of Michigan).  But some day I want to go home for good.

Wouldn't coast-FI be a good option for you? Save till a certain % of your FI goal (let's say 75% or so), then move back and work a lower paying job/freelancing/distance working to cover bills while the money can grow to 100%?

Mathematically that makes perfect sense.  However my husband doesn't want to disrupt the little one's life by moving while she's in school.  In his view our options were before Kindergarten and after High School graduation.  We weren't close enough to goal in 2016.  We should be well over goal by 2029.

evanc

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #61 on: April 10, 2018, 09:52:05 AM »


We are also planning to sell our house at FIRE and then rent for an x amount of years and eventually probably buy a house again. I am wondering what we should do with the money that we get from our house. We will put 50% of the price of our house in the stock market, but we want to keep the 50% available for buying a new house after x number of years. We cannot tell now if x will turn out to be 1, 5, or even 10. I find the stock market a bit scary for a short term investment, in case x turns out to be 1 or 2. So I guess we will have to put it in bonds. But the return is only 2% or so.

@spartana: What have you done with your house money?

MMM to the rescue ;)

https://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2011/06/07/where-should-i-invest-my-short-term-stash/

NorthernDreamer

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #62 on: April 10, 2018, 10:18:02 AM »
Most people we meet on the road travel with pets, some with multiple pets. We don't mainly due to allergies but we are in the minority for sure.
Now I'm imagining being in (or by) my RV and that a near-by RV has a dog barking.  Not a nice thought.  I'm one of those people that would not want to be hauling around a pet.  I'll wait until I'm ready to settle down permanently somewhere before I'll even consider getting another dog.
Did I ever mention my dog's name is The Barkinator?

"Listen, and understand. That Barkinator is out there. It canít be bargained with. It canít be reasoned with. It doesnít feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until you give it snackies".

My neighbours also have a barkinator. Whenever the tiny dog is outside, it barks. LikeÝy the past half year has been winter, so the dog has been inside most of the time. But now spring is approaching fast and I am already hearing the dog more and more often. We hear it when we are inside our house.

Wonder why some dogs do that? I know many other dogs that don't bark all the time.
I have a neighbor a couple houses down across the street that the dog barks from time to time for seemingly no reason.  If it's perfectly quiet in my house, I can hear it bark right through the wall, but fortunately, if the TV is on, or music is playing, or a fan/filter, it masks it completely.  I like dogs, just not the barking part.  I recall there was a study years ago to determine why dogs bark, and the conclusion was, "It's what they do."

I think some breeds are more prone to barking than others. We have a lab, and she rarely barks. She is well trained though (thanks to my husband) and we have trained her not to just bark her head off all the time. I couldn't stand having a dog like that. I think dog training (or lack thereof) plays a part in how much a dog barks.

zinethstache

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #63 on: April 21, 2018, 08:25:09 PM »
I've already posted earlier in this thread re. our plans for FIRE.

But I see the conversation has shifted to dogs barking and I have some thoughts on that. I am a full time rv'er. We've suffered a bit of a set back (long story) so right now we are at my in-laws in a rural housing development. The lots here are 1/2 acre so it isn't like the houses are piled on top of each other.

Typical campgrounds such as Thousand Trails have strict dog rules as well as very strict driving speed rules. Here in suburbia there seem to be no dog rules and no one drives the speed limit.

It is crazy! Between the cars going up and down this dead end street at way over the speed limit and the dogs barking I am going nuts.

I cannot wait for the peace and quiet of the RV park. Never did I think I would be making this observation.

We don't have kids nor pets so our travels are pretty much unfettered. We will not be getting any pets until we decide to settle down in one location again and we are now safely past the kid phase of life.

Campgrounds are far quieter overall. They even have quiet hours which are "mostly" followed by everyone.

auntie_betty

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #64 on: April 22, 2018, 07:10:39 AM »
Three years in and still working it out!

The plan was always to move to Spain from the UK - that was done within two months, then we decided to move from inland to the coast so that took time to sort out. Now I find myself doing the things I knew I would love - long walks, reading, eating out, having a coffee out without going 'How much? That's put my retirement back by 1 hr 22 minutes'.

I'm not doing one of the things I thought I would - going out with a walking group - as they usually have 30-50 people going along and that's way to many for me.

I'm doing things I never thought I would - a LOT of exercise. Apart from walking that was not my thing at all but I'm really enjoying it.

I'm doing some of the other stuff I wanted - exploring Spain for instance - but not doing two to three week plus trips which I wanted - turns out I'm more of a home lover than I thought and can only live out of a suitcase for so long.

What I am doing which I didn't think I would is spending so much time on internet - so with that, I'm off!

Gin1984

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #65 on: April 22, 2018, 08:21:08 AM »
My reason for FI is different than many others here.  I have medical issues exasperated by physical labor and stress.  I found out in college, that when I did not need the income to live, I was less stressed which meant I physically felt better.  So that was my goal.  And, we are almost there sort of.  We live on one salary.  It means having less luxuries that I want (so we are also investing for those) but it is possible.  I've been able to be on less meds and be in less pain overall now.  But life changes, so my goal is to get to needing neither income for basics. 

Linda_Norway

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #66 on: April 25, 2018, 02:30:28 AM »
DH has been on sick leave for quite some time now. He cannot physically do much after a minor operation. But he has manages to fill his time with making a packraft boat and sewing a pair of neat trousers for me. And has a pile of other projects in mind. I am not worried for him to keep himself entertained after FIRE.

I have not had so much time off without being on holiday, so I cannot talk for myself.

dude

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #67 on: April 25, 2018, 08:26:35 AM »
I definitely recommend testing the waters before making any big or expensive purchases or irreversible lifestyle changes. I've tried a lot of different things (always starting with the cheapest and easiest, least hassle thing first) to see if its something I might want to do long term. For example if I found out I didn't like long term slow travel as much as I though I would because I missed the more settled life, I'd probably.be able to figure that out just as fast if I were tent camping or using motels and my old car as I would if I had a new shiny RV or camper van or sailboat.
In my case, there's a good chance of the irreversible lifestyle happening in any case, not just because of being retired, but because I'm also looking at a high likelihood of relocating during FIRE.  I don't particularly want to keep living where I am now, so unless I change my mind in the future, I'll be selling my house within the first year or so after FIRE.  I probably wouldn't buy an RV until I had a buyer.  One thing I liked about the RV idea was taking my time traveling around to see different areas I might be interested in relocating to.  And who knows, maybe I would find I actually like the RV life and would want to continue with that longer.  On the other hand, I don't need an RV to travel, and I could always change things up later on and switch to an RV if my experiences pushed me in that direction.  It does give me some anxiety thinking about not having a home to return to.
I sold my house last fall and have had quite a bit of anxiety about being "homeless with dog". My IBL (inner bag lady) screams at me fairly often ;-).. But that's abating now that I found its a bit easier to do short or long term rentals and know that I could buy again if I want to. Since I have been staying in one area for the winter a few months after I sold my house, and am moving on tomorrow.(but may end up back thete this summer as its a nice area and close to family and friends), my IBL might start screaming at me again.  However, like you, I'm mainly going places to check out areas I want to relocate so may end up getting another rental soon and just travel part time. 

ETA this was also the reason I didnt want to buy anything like an RV or camper van/truck. I wasn't sure If I'd like full timing with my dog (I don't) so just going with what I already had will make it easier to change things with zero extra expense or hassle. If I loved it I could always upgrade if I wanted.

Why don't you like full-timing with your dog? I ask because we're mulling over going full-time with a dog in an RV....

The #1 reason we went the RV route is because we have a dog and it's difficult to find AirBnBs and short term rentals with a dog. Without her, we 100% would have gone with a station wagon and a bike rack.
I think mainly its because I like to do a lot of outdoorsy things I can't take my dog along on and I'm not OK with leaving her alone in a vehicle all day (even an RV). Plus going places where dogs aren't allowed or only allowed in limited areas like in Nat Parks and state parks or just wanting to do non-doggie things like go to a museum or spend the day in a city or going inside buildings. Go out at night. Etc.

For example I went to Zion a couple of weeks ago to bike and hike, followed by a stop in Vegas for a couple of days and then a few days skiing in Cali. If I had the dog with me (sis was watching her) I wouldn't really have been able to do much other than sightsee. Sure there's always boarding but it's not always available close by and it can get pricey. And as a solo traveler this makes doing some things even more difficult.

So for me being that restricted on a full time 24/7 basis was too much. However this is probably just me and YMMV. Lots of people travel, and especially RV, with their dogs full time and love it. I like it but not full time.

ETA: I still plan to.do a long cross country trip with her but have learned that what works best for me is to stop somewhere for a fairly long while (month or so) and get a place near areas I want to explore and do various activities in. That way I can still do many doggie things but also have a lot of time to go do things I wouldn't be able to take her knowing she's safe and comfortable in a secure place.

I'm wrestling with this dilemma for my planned Retirement Road Trip next year.  Just got a new dog, and he's not all that suitable for backcountry travel in warm weather (125lb Bullmastiff). Current plan is to buy a used Toyota Sienna van, do some minor mods (bed, storage, etc), and travel cross country for 2-3 months. It would be easier on my wife -- who is not retiring and not going on this road trip with me -- if I took the Boy along. But I know it would be a pretty big logistical hassle, especially for those times when I want to go into the mountains/backcountry for multi-day adventures. Though I do plan to explore kenneling/daycare options for him too see if I can work it out. It would love to have him along if it wouldn't cramp my activities too much.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #68 on: April 26, 2018, 12:51:07 AM »
It sounds to me like getting a dog in retirement is very much limiting your activities. Maybe think twice before you get a dog?

Rubic

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #69 on: April 26, 2018, 04:03:22 AM »
It sounds to me like getting a dog in retirement is very much limiting your activities. Maybe think twice before you get a dog?

+1

After my parents last dog, they decided they didn't want to be tied
down anymore with a pet.  It's been very liberating for them.

dude

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #70 on: April 26, 2018, 07:37:12 AM »
@dude in your case I think bringing the pup along will be hard since you'll probably be doing mostly back country hike-in climbing and that won't work with a dog (trust me I've tried ;-)). And if you are solo or with just one partner you can't leave them alone. I think if you will just be backpacking and doing some scrambling you'd be ok with the dog but at your skill level I don't think you'd be happy with just doing that. Plus you'll want to do a lot of other outdoor things that you can't do with the dog and will have to decide how you feel about leaving him alone in the van long term or staying close to a place you can board him at.  Since you have a younger and MUCH bigger dog you probably don't have to worry as much as I do about someonebstealing or something eating my little snack size dog ;-).

In any case you can try it out and decide then. Maybe a shorter local trip. See what works and what doesn't. In my case I'm still trying to figure it out. Might still continue on with my original dirt bagger plans but looking at different options. One is to live closer to my sister so she can watch the dog while I take shorter (one month) but more active outdoor trips. This might be a good option for you too.

Or I might end up taking her and just renting a place longer term in an area I love that has ALL the stuff I want to do near by so I can leave the pup safe at home and do more all day long things. That option probably won't work for you unless you have a VERY understanding wife - preferably one that isn't armed ;-). I have a rental place until the 30th in SoCal so only have a few days to decide what to do next. UGH decisions decisions.

ETA: One of the hardest things for me has been driving all the way to a Nat Park or State Park and not being able to take the dog on any trails or really anywhere except paved road scene campground. Its kind of mental anguish to be somewhere like the Grand Tetons and you can only look at things. Good thing is there is lots of boarding options but your big guy might not be welcome everywhere. But if he carries you stuff that might be a different story.

LOVE that picture!  For sure will have to test the waters with the Boy. Might be able to find suitable arrangements when necessary at rover.com -- we'll see.

Will

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #71 on: April 26, 2018, 05:05:10 PM »
Current plan is to buy a used Toyota Sienna van, do some minor mods (bed, storage, etc), and travel cross country for 2-3 months.

I would like to know more about this.  You've got me checking used Sienna prices.

Cassie

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #72 on: April 27, 2018, 09:57:37 AM »
National parks are not dog friendly at all because dogs make the wildlife angry. Particularly Bison get really worked up when they see a dog. Our poor dogs spent a week in RV or being walked around the campground. We took them in the car too but then couldn't do any trails.  Even if you have a small dog in a pack being carried they won't let you on a trail.

Monkey Uncle

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #73 on: April 27, 2018, 06:15:15 PM »
National parks are not dog friendly at all because dogs make the wildlife angry. Particularly Bison get really worked up when they see a dog. Our poor dogs spent a week in RV or being walked around the campground. We took them in the car too but then couldn't do any trails.  Even if you have a small dog in a pack being carried they won't let you on a trail.

Go to a National Forest or BLM land instead.  Far fewer regulations about what you can and can't do.  Generally Fido is welcome, although there may be restrictions in campgrounds, visitor's centers, etc.

dude

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #74 on: April 30, 2018, 07:55:02 AM »
@dude in your case I think bringing the pup along will be hard since you'll probably be doing mostly back country hike-in climbing and that won't work with a dog (trust me I've tried ;-)). And if you are solo or with just one partner you can't leave them alone. I think if you will just be backpacking and doing some scrambling you'd be ok with the dog but at your skill level I don't think you'd be happy with just doing that. Plus you'll want to do a lot of other outdoor things that you can't do with the dog and will have to decide how you feel about leaving him alone in the van long term or staying close to a place you can board him at.  Since you have a younger and MUCH bigger dog you probably don't have to worry as much as I do about someonebstealing or something eating my little snack size dog ;-).

In any case you can try it out and decide then. Maybe a shorter local trip. See what works and what doesn't. In my case I'm still trying to figure it out. Might still continue on with my original dirt bagger plans but looking at different options. One is to live closer to my sister so she can watch the dog while I take shorter (one month) but more active outdoor trips. This might be a good option for you too.

Or I might end up taking her and just renting a place longer term in an area I love that has ALL the stuff I want to do near by so I can leave the pup safe at home and do more all day long things. That option probably won't work for you unless you have a VERY understanding wife - preferably one that isn't armed ;-). I have a rental place until the 30th in SoCal so only have a few days to decide what to do next. UGH decisions decisions.

ETA: One of the hardest things for me has been driving all the way to a Nat Park or State Park and not being able to take the dog on any trails or really anywhere except paved road scene campground. Its kind of mental anguish to be somewhere like the Grand Tetons and you can only look at things. Good thing is there is lots of boarding options but your big guy might not be welcome everywhere. But if he carries you stuff that might be a different story.

LOVE that picture!  For sure will have to test the waters with the Boy. Might be able to find suitable arrangements when necessary at rover.com -- we'll see.
well there's always this route. I know you're super fit (seen the climbing videos!) but not sure even you could free solo climb while carrying a 150 dog in a pack ;-).

As long as I'm hijacking the thread with doggie talks, one other thing to consider if solo is getting injured or sick (you or your dog) and not having phone capabilities or anyway to get help. When I left last Aug first my truck broke down in the Sierras, then my dog got badly injured (found out later it was a torn CCL - doggie version of ACL), then she got very barfy and poopy from meds, then I got severe food poisoning (and was like my dog ;-)) in a remote area. And oh yeah, it was well over 100 degrees. Good times ;-). It all worked out but was pretty rough for a bit at the start. So stuff to think about if solo and far from home with your big guy.

OK done hijacking the thread.

good point!  I have a Spot beacon!

chasesfish

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #75 on: May 02, 2018, 08:23:53 AM »
Wanted to pitch an idea to those who've already FIREd...

We don't fully know what we want to do or how we want to live post-FIRE, which will probably be early next year.  I'm debating buying a small "2nd home" in a beach community in NC.  Its a pleasant place/area to live from late April through October and could domicile my permanent address in NC, which is pretty critical for some health insurance reasons (they have nationwide plans available AND have the most important hospital system in network if they do away with the nationwide coverage). 

I have all these questions like:  Would we really enjoy full time travel?  Would we really be able to up and move as far away as Hawaii with our family on the east coast?  Will I get incredibly bored (hope not)?  Do we really like a big city or a quiet area?  Unknowns about family status and kids?

I'm targeting quitting the job at the end of February, would take a couple months to sell my existing home (will sell fast, all about maximizing value). I figure we can get 5-7 months at the beach, try "full-time" travel for another 5+ months, and have another season at the beach all to test out this FI and not working thing.  We'd probably have an endless turnstyle of visitors during the busy season.

If I just do the 20% down, 80% 30 year mortgage it doesn't seem like a huge outlay and I can always just vacation rental the thing at a small annual loss if the real estate market completely tanks in the area and I don't want the property anymore. 

$250,000 - $400,000 gets a nice place and its well within my housing budget for FI.

Thoughts?  What could I be missing?

itchyfeet

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #76 on: May 03, 2018, 06:57:06 AM »
Hey Chases fish, your thoughts and questions are similar to those going through my head.

I have been looking forward to long term slow travel for my whole life, but now on the verge of this becoming a reality I am questioning whether I will really find fullfillmemt in this. The reason for my change of desire stems from the fact that for the past 4 years I have been working as an expat far from home  and on top of that traveling a lot internationally for work. Maybe I have now had my travel fix. Maybe there is to much of a good thing. I really donít know.

DW is confident that once my travel is not hectic work travel, but slow recreational travel,  that my desire to explore the world will return. I am not so sure. These days I definitely look forward to seeing friends and family and spending time with friends and family  over seeing some random previously unvisited city.

Because I donít know where I want to live, how much travel I want to do and whether I will be bored, I am considering my FIRE from this December more of a sabbatical/ mini retirement for now.

If it morphs into permanent retirement, then great as we are financially ready. However, if I am bored and donít really want to travel so much, Iíll just get another job in the city where I grew up, close to friends and family, and delay moving to the beach for a bit whilst I reimagine my retirement.

I really hope that I will love a slow life after desiring it for so long. We shall see.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #77 on: May 03, 2018, 07:04:56 AM »
We are planning to travel a lot (hiking trips and the like), but keeping a home base. If we travel a great part of the year, the home base could be a small, el cheapo, apartment. But just a place where you can store some of your personal stuff and can return to between trips.

We also plan to move out into the country to a more LCOL area. But we intend to rent first. We have seen some potentially good places to rent, close to the sea and a great view. Just not very central. I think we will buy something when we decide to like it.
But DH and I both have elderly parents. We risk having to move in with them sometime in the future when they are in times of needing help.

Cali

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #78 on: May 06, 2018, 08:29:05 AM »
Lol. A friend sent this to me.

John Galt incarnate!

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #79 on: June 25, 2018, 04:13:42 PM »
I knew what I did not want...and what I did not have to put up with anymore.

 I like a very calm life...and really have little desire to travel much now.

 Having every day be a never ending vacation, and not broke, can really bring on much satisfaction no matter what you are doing.

 The activity matters little; having the freedom mindset to do or not to do by choice, is the greatest gift of FIRE.


Hear, hear!

Well said!

Holyoak, you and I are kindred spirits.

I have no desire to travel because I live in the mountains, a million miles from nowhere  where every day  is quiet and beautiful.







« Last Edit: June 25, 2018, 04:17:11 PM by John Galt incarnate! »

Cookie78

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #80 on: June 25, 2018, 08:16:14 PM »
I knew what I did not want...and what I did not have to put up with anymore.

 I like a very calm life...and really have little desire to travel much now.

 Having every day be a never ending vacation, and not broke, can really bring on much satisfaction no matter what you are doing.

 The activity matters little; having the freedom mindset to do or not to do by choice, is the greatest gift of FIRE.


Hear, hear!

Well said!

Holyoak, you and I are kindred spirits.

I have no desire to travel because I live in the mountains, a million miles from nowhere  where every day  is quiet and beautiful.


Ooooooh so envious!

I just moved back to the city 2 days ago and the noise and congestion is already seriously impacting my mental health. I love this house and the yard, but the location is not for me! Hopefully I can wrap everything up in the city soon and escape to more peaceful places.

DreamFIRE

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #81 on: June 25, 2018, 09:03:30 PM »
I knew what I did not want...and what I did not have to put up with anymore.

 I like a very calm life...and really have little desire to travel much now.

 Having every day be a never ending vacation, and not broke, can really bring on much satisfaction no matter what you are doing.

 The activity matters little; having the freedom mindset to do or not to do by choice, is the greatest gift of FIRE.


Hear, hear!

Well said!

Holyoak, you and I are kindred spirits.

I have no desire to travel because I live in the mountains, a million miles from nowhere  where every day  is quiet and beautiful.


Ooooooh so envious!

I just moved back to the city 2 days ago and the noise and congestion is already seriously impacting my mental health. I love this house and the yard, but the location is not for me! Hopefully I can wrap everything up in the city soon and escape to more peaceful places.

That made me think of the recent thread about suburban noise pollution.

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/off-topic/suburban-noise-pollution/

Linda_Norway

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #82 on: June 26, 2018, 03:14:16 AM »
I knew what I did not want...and what I did not have to put up with anymore.

 I like a very calm life...and really have little desire to travel much now.

 Having every day be a never ending vacation, and not broke, can really bring on much satisfaction no matter what you are doing.

 The activity matters little; having the freedom mindset to do or not to do by choice, is the greatest gift of FIRE.


Hear, hear!

Well said!

Holyoak, you and I are kindred spirits.

I have no desire to travel because I live in the mountains, a million miles from nowhere  where every day  is quiet and beautiful.


Ooooooh so envious!

I just moved back to the city 2 days ago and the noise and congestion is already seriously impacting my mental health. I love this house and the yard, but the location is not for me! Hopefully I can wrap everything up in the city soon and escape to more peaceful places.

That made me think of the recent thread about suburban noise pollution.

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/off-topic/suburban-noise-pollution/

I also want to move out in the country to enjoy noise-free surroundings. My DH once held a talk about noise pollution and how we slowly get used to it, like a boiling frog. Also also do astronomy and appreciate clear skies. Those are only to be found far from cities.
But the other big issue with retirement is to have contact with other people. This is easiest established in a place where you have a variety of clubs to become a member of. Therefore the place most have some size. Or you should live close to such a place.

Gyosho

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #83 on: June 26, 2018, 09:28:56 AM »
I wanted to NOT WORK.

I love NOT WORKING every day!

This is my 5th week of NOT WORKING.

My sleep has improved immeasurably because I am not waking up in the middle of the night worrying about something at WORK.

"I loaf and invite my soul". -Walt Whitman

Bird In Hand

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #84 on: June 26, 2018, 09:33:37 AM »
I also want to move out in the country to enjoy noise-free surroundings.

Good luck with that.  I live "in the country", and in my experience it's hard to get away from noise pollution.  If you have a neighbor within half a kilometer or so, and they have a dog with barkinson's disease, then you will probably hear it.  If a neighbor within a km or so uses a chainsaw, you will certainly hear it.

You might be surprised at how many cars drive down your remote road, and you might wonder why they feel it's necessary to drive at twice the posted speed limit.  You might also be surprised how far away road noise can be heard, and by how many planes fly overhead.

Now it could be that "in the country" to you means many kilometers from the nearest neighbor.  In my experience these places are hard to find while still being within a reasonable driving distance to civilization and the various amenities that go along with it.  Though maybe things are different in Norway (or a particular part of Norway you're interested in, or some other country) compared with what I'm familiar with in rural New England in the US.

But I do understand your desire for peace and quiet away from human noise pollution!  Personally I'm not looking for silence so much as the ability to hear the many sounds nature without having someone's dog bark at it, or someone's car scare it away/run over it, etc.

FIRE@50

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #85 on: June 26, 2018, 09:40:07 AM »
I also want to move out in the country to enjoy noise-free surroundings.

Good luck with that.  I live "in the country", and in my experience it's hard to get away from noise pollution.  If you have a neighbor within half a kilometer or so, and they have a dog with barkinson's disease, then you will probably hear it.  If a neighbor within a km or so uses a chainsaw, you will certainly hear it.

You might be surprised at how many cars drive down your remote road, and you might wonder why they feel it's necessary to drive at twice the posted speed limit.  You might also be surprised how far away road noise can be heard, and by how many planes fly overhead.

Now it could be that "in the country" to you means many kilometers from the nearest neighbor.  In my experience these places are hard to find while still being within a reasonable driving distance to civilization and the various amenities that go along with it.  Though maybe things are different in Norway (or a particular part of Norway you're interested in, or some other country) compared with what I'm familiar with in rural New England in the US.

But I do understand your desire for peace and quiet away from human noise pollution!  Personally I'm not looking for silence so much as the ability to hear the many sounds nature without having someone's dog bark at it, or someone's car scare it away/run over it, etc.
What is your lot like? Is it mostly grass and low vegetation or do you have lots of trees? I'm thinking the trees would help block more noise...

Bird In Hand

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #86 on: June 26, 2018, 11:27:03 AM »
What is your lot like? Is it mostly grass and low vegetation or do you have lots of trees? I'm thinking the trees would help block more noise...

Mostly trees, and they do help a little bit.  Though as trees grow and mature, they tend to lose much of the lower branches as they get taller.  In my town, lots are a minimum of 2 acres, I believe.  Some lots are much larger -- next door's lot is > 20 acres.  I sure wish the bulk of that 20 acres were between our houses instead of on the other side.  :D

I'm frequently surprised at how far voices and other noises travel.  There's a neighbor about 1/4 mile down the road who I can hear yelling (he's perpetually angry) or playing his guitar from time to time.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #87 on: June 26, 2018, 11:52:28 AM »
I also want to move out in the country to enjoy noise-free surroundings.

Good luck with that.  I live "in the country", and in my experience it's hard to get away from noise pollution.  If you have a neighbor within half a kilometer or so, and they have a dog with barkinson's disease, then you will probably hear it.  If a neighbor within a km or so uses a chainsaw, you will certainly hear it.

You might be surprised at how many cars drive down your remote road, and you might wonder why they feel it's necessary to drive at twice the posted speed limit.  You might also be surprised how far away road noise can be heard, and by how many planes fly overhead.

Now it could be that "in the country" to you means many kilometers from the nearest neighbor.  In my experience these places are hard to find while still being within a reasonable driving distance to civilization and the various amenities that go along with it.  Though maybe things are different in Norway (or a particular part of Norway you're interested in, or some other country) compared with what I'm familiar with in rural New England in the US.

But I do understand your desire for peace and quiet away from human noise pollution!  Personally I'm not looking for silence so much as the ability to hear the many sounds nature without having someone's dog bark at it, or someone's car scare it away/run over it, etc.

You are hitting the nail on it's hat. People out in the country (at least some of them) feel they are missing out on city fun and compensate it by driving noisy things fast. We have been living 30km outside the big city for 18 years. Our previous house was on a hillside above a very quiet road. Through the years we have had frequent snowscooter fundriving On the meadow below our house, motorcrossing on an illegal motor cross track in the forest within a kilometer from our house. And people flying with a major big fan on their back, as well as remote controlling other flying things on that meadow below our hill. And at night time cars and motor cycles driving very fast on the small road, sometimes ending up wrapped around a street light.
Our current house is not along a road. But we are surrounded by neighbours with young children who often scream as a part of their playing. And everbody has a dog. There is often a dog on the loose, on which all the neighbouring dogs react barking. Some dogs bark all the time no matter what, when they see me outside my house and also when I'm inside. In addition there is always a neighbour building something, using a circle saw, or using a chain saw to cut trees, or cleaning snow with a snow blower or cutting grass with a petrol driven mower. Or doing something else noisy. At night it is usually quiet with the exception of when someone plays loud music. Then I put in my ear plugs.

I think our next house should be a bit away from the next house, but not completely remote away from everything.
Still, in general our previous house was quiet. The noise was incidental. But after FIRE, we plan to rent first and ask around about noise before we ever buy any other house. My DH can calculate noise from roads.

Cookie78

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #88 on: June 27, 2018, 12:32:24 AM »
I also want to move out in the country to enjoy noise-free surroundings.

Good luck with that.  I live "in the country", and in my experience it's hard to get away from noise pollution.  If you have a neighbor within half a kilometer or so, and they have a dog with barkinson's disease, then you will probably hear it.  If a neighbor within a km or so uses a chainsaw, you will certainly hear it.

You might be surprised at how many cars drive down your remote road, and you might wonder why they feel it's necessary to drive at twice the posted speed limit.  You might also be surprised how far away road noise can be heard, and by how many planes fly overhead.

Now it could be that "in the country" to you means many kilometers from the nearest neighbor.  In my experience these places are hard to find while still being within a reasonable driving distance to civilization and the various amenities that go along with it.  Though maybe things are different in Norway (or a particular part of Norway you're interested in, or some other country) compared with what I'm familiar with in rural New England in the US.

But I do understand your desire for peace and quiet away from human noise pollution!  Personally I'm not looking for silence so much as the ability to hear the many sounds nature without having someone's dog bark at it, or someone's car scare it away/run over it, etc.

1.6km minimum!!

Iím not looking for noise-free, just vastly reduced compared to the city. Maybe Iím just in a noisy part of my city, but itís very loud compared to my small home town. Constant traffic noise. The new runway puts planes directly over my house. Not to mention car alarms.

Where I love to be planes fly overheard so far they are seen and not heard. Traffic passing by (typically quiet and slow) is 0-5 vehicles daily. 1-2 boats running down the river per week in the summer. Lots of birds. Most of the time itís so silent you can only hear your ears ringing. Blissful :)


Trudie

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #89 on: June 30, 2018, 08:26:17 PM »
I left my job four months ago and all I can say is that FIRE is a process.  My feelings about it ebb and flow as I detox from my work.

A few observations...

While I wholeheartedly agree that being active and adventurous is good, if there are issues you're trying to work through they won't go away as soon as you turn in your key card.  You take all those parts of yourself with you, wherever you go.  Detoxing may take some time and conscious effort.  Staying busy isn't necessarily a solution.

I found that my attitude towards travel changed as well.  I enjoy it, but probably felt more of a need to do it as a means of escape when I was working.... Especially the long weekend type of trips.  I still have a desire to see new places, but I'm looking for more adventure when I travel.

I also think that most FIRE plans should evolve, just as you evolve.  You will change.  Your priorities will change.  What excites you will change.  I have found great contentment in gardening and preserving my own food.  I joined a board that I am enjoying quite a bit because I'm meeting a new group of people.

But I don't have it all figured out yet... not by a long shot.  I still struggle with people who don't understand why I am not looking for a job.  I miss the paycheck, but if truth be told it started to feel like hazard pay.

Cap_Scarlet

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #90 on: July 07, 2018, 04:23:28 PM »
I am struggling with exactly this question as we speak - what do I want to do with my life?

TartanTallulah

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #91 on: July 08, 2018, 02:49:50 PM »
I wanted to NOT WORK.

I love NOT WORKING every day!

This is my 5th week of NOT WORKING.

My sleep has improved immeasurably because I am not waking up in the middle of the night worrying about something at WORK.

"I loaf and invite my soul". -Walt Whitman

That's my first concern too. I won't find out what I want to do in retirement until my time and my brain stop being full of WORK and I've spent some time doing a whole lot of nothing much.


John Galt incarnate!

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #92 on: July 08, 2018, 03:22:54 PM »
I left my job four months ago and all I can say is that FIRE is a process.  My feelings about it ebb and flow as I detox from my work.

 I joined a board that I am enjoying quite a bit because I'm meeting a new group of people.



My older sister recently retired (she did not FIRE).

Since then she was seated on 3 boards one of which manages an arboretum.

SwordGuy

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Re: Did you know what you wanted to do post-FIRE when you started?
« Reply #93 on: July 08, 2018, 10:03:03 PM »
I retired at the start of May this year.   I'm still detoxing but my energy level is going up.

I wanted to do a number of things after I retired:

1) Grow the stash so my mentally handicapped daughter has plenty and to spare to make it easy for my son and grandkids to take care of her.  That's job #1.   The stock market hasn't been helping much this year but it's been good enough (so far) that, with the Required Minimum Distributions we have to take, we'll still keep pace with inflation. 

2) Get some additional rental properties.  Just because I understand the stock market math and history doesn't mean I trust it.  Diversification is important, plus fixing them up is fun provided I can start or stop when I want to.  It also keeps the draw on our stash at a really, really low level for the first few years.   So far, so good.  We're making good progress getting Rental #3 on line and #4 is in the closing pipeline.   Should close on it about when we finish with #3.   Found a good deal faster than expected, which was a nice thing. :)

3) Make art.   Not making great progress on this one yet.   I've started designing pieces and I've been getting the studio organized and set up to work in.   But I spent too many years sitting at a desk programming alone.   Just not ready to set in my studio by myself for long periods of time just yet.   I need an art buddy to come over and make stuff with me.   I think I need a bit more detoxing before I make better progress on it.  I already have one metalworking and one enameling conference scheduled over the next year and I'm really looking forward to both.  Great information, great people, loads of fun.

4) Teach art.   I'll be a teacher's assistant for an internationally known artist this fall at a craft school.   I'll have a blast.  I'm scheduled to teach two classes this winter.   I'm looking forward to it.  Plus, this fall I need to do a run-thru of my classes with some friends in order to work the kinks out.  (Of my class materials, not my friends.  They are beyond my help. ;) )

5) Travel.   We'll be taking a vacation at the beach in early August.  One conference is in eastern NC, another is in Oregon, and the class I'm the assistant for is in the mountains of TN.    Will probably make a few trips to GA to visit our son.    I would like to make some short weekend trips to various places around the eastern US over the next year.   Nothing expensive, just some gasoline, a few meals out, and a night or two in an inexpensive hotel.  We're both pretty worn out and have been ill several times this year, so a long trip just seems too much work for now.   We might go for an overseas trip in late 2019 or in 2020, but I don't see one earlier than that.   We have some friends in India, NZ and Australia so any of those would be good candidates.  We'll see. If the market tanks we'll go cheap, otherwise we might splurge.   

The next one wasn't in our original retirement plans.

6) Get politically active.    The bastards running things in the US executive and legislative branches, plus my state's legislative branch, need to be voted out.  All of them.   And we need some laws in place to prevent corporate and ultra-rich person money from corrupting politics.   As Sen. Ted Cruz said, people like me will crawl over broken glass if we have to in order to vote his party out.