Author Topic: Words/phrases I wish would go away  (Read 89167 times)

MissNancyPryor

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #650 on: August 29, 2018, 05:26:14 PM »
Another few misuses of the literally.

"Sometimes when I catch myself dwelling in the past I literally kick my balls back to reality."

"I love him so much I’m #literally sick without him"

"Voted for the first time ever in person!!! #turnfloridablue #nomoreredtide #LITERALLY"


Please, someone stop this epidemic, FIGURATIVELY speaking. It makes me want to FIGURATIVELY jump off a bridge.

It is a verbal crutch.  They want some big sounding word in there to emphasize things.  We should start offering up "utterly" which is the same number of syllables and means what they think they are saying and even ends with that handy -ly thing.  But, the vowel out front is not as smoooove and therefore the idea just won't take.  Too hard to get off the launch pad. 

RetiredAt63

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #651 on: August 29, 2018, 05:48:32 PM »
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

You people and you folks both sound terrible.  If I am talking to people, "you" works fine.  If I want their attention, "hey, everyone" works well.

I think part of this may be a geography outlook - Canadian versus American English.

« Last Edit: August 29, 2018, 05:51:14 PM by RetiredAt63 »

JanetJackson

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #652 on: August 30, 2018, 09:20:01 AM »
“CIRCLE BACK”....
I swear I’m going to... I don’t know... really lose it if this doesn’t fade in the next few years.
“DISRUPT/DISRUPTION” when referring to companies, etc. “so and so is DISRUPTING the RV industry”..... staaaahhhhp.

Here’s another thing... it’s very particular.  Sometimes people over annunciate all of the letters in ‘Important’, especially the center ‘T’. It seems to mostly be upper class white women over 35... but that’s just a total random observation.  There are at least two people on regular podcasts that I listen to who do it and it ruins the whole episode when I hear them over annunciating that ‘T’...
Uh, hate to say this JanetJ, but I believe the word you want is "enunciate". I think I understand what you mean though. By far the worst abuser of this word is Nancy Grace. Ugh.

You're right, my mistake! *although, side note: I don't know who Nancy Grace is...  NOTICE HOW I DID NOT SAY "MY BAD' BECAUSE I NEARLY VOMIT ANYTIME SOMEONE SAYS THAT. 
Ha, had to add an additional phrase I'm annoyed by.

Jouer

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #653 on: August 31, 2018, 07:46:37 AM »
Is ma'am a word that people wish would go away?   I have always thought it was a polite manner to address someone. 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html

Is sir also a problem?
I saw this article earlier this week and while I think the punishment for a kid that young was far too drastic (I forget, and I'm not reopening the article, but I think the kid was young grade school age?), I do think the issue, or in the very least, issues LIKE this seem/ed to stem from being repeatedly called something you don't want to be called. 
Who knows, that teacher could have been a male, or gender non-conforming. 
 
If I told someone (an adult) my name (which is not Luke) and they called me Luke once, I'd correct them so sweetly and politely it could sweeten a cup of coffee, but if they continued to call me Luke after a few corrections, I'd have to assume it was on purpose and to agitate and disrespect me.
Just my two cents.

If someone in my friend group got annoyed about mistakenly being called Luke, that would be their new name forever. Their old name would cease to exist. We'd be singing Lukas With The Lid Off. We'd get your dad to call you and tell you "Luke, I am your father" (even though that's not the correct line from the film). It would be glorious. 

teen persuasion

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #654 on: September 03, 2018, 09:48:47 AM »
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

You people and you folks both sound terrible.  If I am talking to people, "you" works fine.  If I want their attention, "hey, everyone" works well.

I think part of this may be a geography outlook - Canadian versus American English.

I think it is a geographical issue, but I'd put the border a good bit farther south.  Anyone using "folks" in my area (NY) would be immediately tagging themselves as a transplant.

But the "you guys" mentioned in another post is completely gender neutral here.  I'm reminded of how the nuns in my all-girls HS would object whenever they heard "youse guys", but it was the extraneous "S" sound they objected to, not the male connotations when there wasn't a male in sight.  That was 30+ years ago - I no longer hear "youse", thank goodness.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #655 on: September 03, 2018, 11:34:30 AM »
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

You people and you folks both sound terrible.  If I am talking to people, "you" works fine.  If I want their attention, "hey, everyone" works well.

I think part of this may be a geography outlook - Canadian versus American English.

I think it is a geographical issue, but I'd put the border a good bit farther south.  Anyone using "folks" in my area (NY) would be immediately tagging themselves as a transplant.

But the "you guys" mentioned in another post is completely gender neutral here.  I'm reminded of how the nuns in my all-girls HS would object whenever they heard "youse guys", but it was the extraneous "S" sound they objected to, not the male connotations when there wasn't a male in sight.  That was 30+ years ago - I no longer hear "youse", thank goodness.

I hear "youse" from one local person here.  It was a surprise the first time I heard it.

"Guys" seems to have become partially gender neutral and "gals" has basically disappeared.  If I said "the guys are working on that" it would be though that they were male, but I could easily see someone say "hey guys, let's head out" when everyone being addressed is female.

Dicey

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #656 on: September 03, 2018, 11:44:15 AM »
“CIRCLE BACK”....
I swear I’m going to... I don’t know... really lose it if this doesn’t fade in the next few years.
“DISRUPT/DISRUPTION” when referring to companies, etc. “so and so is DISRUPTING the RV industry”..... staaaahhhhp.

Here’s another thing... it’s very particular.  Sometimes people over annunciate all of the letters in ‘Important’, especially the center ‘T’. It seems to mostly be upper class white women over 35... but that’s just a total random observation.  There are at least two people on regular podcasts that I listen to who do it and it ruins the whole episode when I hear them over annunciating that ‘T’...
Uh, hate to say this JanetJ, but I believe the word you want is "enunciate". I think I understand what you mean though. By far the worst abuser of this word is Nancy Grace. Ugh.

You're right, my mistake! *although, side note: I don't know who Nancy Grace is...  NOTICE HOW I DID NOT SAY "MY BAD' BECAUSE I NEARLY VOMIT ANYTIME SOMEONE SAYS THAT. 
Ha, had to add an additional phrase I'm annoyed by.
Re: Nancy Grace - consider yourself lucky. She's a talking head for some cable news show. In my traveling days, one of my regular hotels had a crappy cable package (read: no HGTV) and she was on whatever network I watched instead. She's still around, so someone may chime in to help. I'd Google her, but I don't want her in my retinas.

nnls

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #657 on: September 03, 2018, 05:47:54 PM »
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

You people and you folks both sound terrible.  If I am talking to people, "you" works fine.  If I want their attention, "hey, everyone" works well.

I think part of this may be a geography outlook - Canadian versus American English.

I think it is a geographical issue, but I'd put the border a good bit farther south.  Anyone using "folks" in my area (NY) would be immediately tagging themselves as a transplant.

But the "you guys" mentioned in another post is completely gender neutral here.  I'm reminded of how the nuns in my all-girls HS would object whenever they heard "youse guys", but it was the extraneous "S" sound they objected to, not the male connotations when there wasn't a male in sight.  That was 30+ years ago - I no longer hear "youse", thank goodness.

I hear "youse" from one local person here.  It was a surprise the first time I heard it.

"Guys" seems to have become partially gender neutral and "gals" has basically disappeared.  If I said "the guys are working on that" it would be though that they were male, but I could easily see someone say "hey guys, let's head out" when everyone being addressed is female.

I hear "youse" a lot in Australia. It annoys me everytime

Dee

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #658 on: September 03, 2018, 08:17:01 PM »
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."

Anon in Alaska

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #659 on: September 04, 2018, 01:43:46 AM »
Stop saying "pleaded" when you can say "pled". The defendant has not "pleaded guilty" he has "pled guilty". The previous standard is now archaic and should be scrapped. The longer form is wasteful and adds nothing.

JanetJackson

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #660 on: September 04, 2018, 06:13:19 AM »
Stop saying "pleaded" when you can say "pled". The defendant has not "pleaded guilty" he has "pled guilty". The previous standard is now archaic and should be scrapped. The longer form is wasteful and adds nothing.
I have noticed this A LOT in news articles lately.  To the point where I've wondered if something has changed grammatically, for this to be acceptable.

dandarc

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #661 on: September 11, 2018, 04:34:36 PM »
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."
How do you feel about "y'all"?

Dee

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #662 on: September 11, 2018, 06:31:19 PM »
The mere thought of my mother saying "y'all" is quite amusing. We were from Northern Ontario, where "y'all" is not in common parlance.

sui generis

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #663 on: September 11, 2018, 10:28:23 PM »
Stop saying "pleaded" when you can say "pled". The defendant has not "pleaded guilty" he has "pled guilty". The previous standard is now archaic and should be scrapped. The longer form is wasteful and adds nothing.
I have noticed this A LOT in news articles lately.  To the point where I've wondered if something has changed grammatically, for this to be acceptable.
In law school, that's how they teach you to say it.  Well, they didn't ever explicitly point out that "it's pleaded, not pled."  But it was definitely everywhere. Pled was not used.  I simply conformed, never asked.

Mississippi Mudstache

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #664 on: September 12, 2018, 06:08:02 AM »
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."
How do you feel about "y'all"?

I say "y'all" all the time. It's a succinct, gender-neutral solution to the ubiquitous English problem of the absence of a plural second-person personal pronoun. I don't care if it positions me geographically when I say it. I have no problem with the fact that I'm from the South.

Go an hour north of where I live though, and "y'all" becomes "y'uns". That one drives me apeshit.

MrsWolfeRN

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #665 on: September 12, 2018, 08:23:43 PM »
Stop saying "pleaded" when you can say "pled". The defendant has not "pleaded guilty" he has "pled guilty". The previous standard is now archaic and should be scrapped. The longer form is wasteful and adds nothing.
I have noticed this A LOT in news articles lately.  To the point where I've wondered if something has changed grammatically, for this to be acceptable.
In law school, that's how they teach you to say it.  Well, they didn't ever explicitly point out that "it's pleaded, not pled."  But it was definitely everywhere. Pled was not used.  I simply conformed, never asked.

Haha, in nursing school, it's "dilatated" and "dilatation" not "dilated" and "dilation" .  IRL midwives don't say these the "proper" way, because it sounds weird.

marble_faun

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #666 on: September 13, 2018, 11:12:29 AM »
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."
How do you feel about "y'all"?

I say "y'all" all the time. It's a succinct, gender-neutral solution to the ubiquitous English problem of the absence of a plural second-person personal pronoun. I don't care if it positions me geographically when I say it. I have no problem with the fact that I'm from the South.

Go an hour north of where I live though, and "y'all" becomes "y'uns". That one drives me apeshit.


Love y'all!  Also from the South.  My accent has smoothed out during my years away from home, but y'all will always remain. That and pronouncing short E like short I, as in Kinny Rogers, not Kehhhnny.

Mississippi Mudstache

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #667 on: September 13, 2018, 11:21:12 AM »
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."
How do you feel about "y'all"?

I say "y'all" all the time. It's a succinct, gender-neutral solution to the ubiquitous English problem of the absence of a plural second-person personal pronoun. I don't care if it positions me geographically when I say it. I have no problem with the fact that I'm from the South.

Go an hour north of where I live though, and "y'all" becomes "y'uns". That one drives me apeshit.


Love y'all!  Also from the South.  My accent has smoothed out during my years away from home, but y'all will always remain. That and pronouncing short E like short I, as in Kinny Rogers, not Kehhhnny.

Ha! My wife does that. Always tough to tell when she's saying "pen" vs. "pin". I never did pick that one up for some reason, even though it was a common pronunciation where I grew up.

tralfamadorian

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #668 on: September 13, 2018, 06:24:14 PM »
Love y'all!  Also from the South.  My accent has smoothed out during my years away from home, but y'all will always remain. That and pronouncing short E like short I, as in Kinny Rogers, not Kehhhnny.

Some parts of accents really stick! I'm moderately non-rhotic unless in a really formal situation like a job interview.

calimom

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #669 on: September 13, 2018, 07:15:13 PM »
"Alot"is not a word. "A lot" is two words. Do people not have autocorrect?

"Anyways" may or may not be a word. But why add the s?

tralfamadorian

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #670 on: September 13, 2018, 07:20:23 PM »
"Alot"is not a word. "A lot" is two words. Do people not have autocorrect?

"Anyways" may or may not be a word. But why add the s?


Jouer

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #671 on: September 17, 2018, 01:54:08 PM »
"Alot"is not a word. "A lot" is two words. Do people not have autocorrect?

"Anyways" may or may not be a word. But why add the s?

I prefer including the S. Certainly in casual emails, posts, texts. It just feels better.

accolay

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #672 on: September 17, 2018, 09:50:58 PM »
I'm tire of "super" unless used with "super duper" "Superman" ""Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" or other preexisting phrase.

Super is out of control! It must be stopped!

jinga nation

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #673 on: September 26, 2018, 10:52:57 AM »
"I'm not racist, but <proceeds to say something borderline/overtly racist>"

accolay

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #674 on: September 26, 2018, 03:40:35 PM »
How about "normalcy" instead of normality?

Damn you Harding.

ketchup

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #675 on: September 26, 2018, 07:16:32 PM »
How about "normalcy" instead of normality?

Damn you Harding.
"Normality" only ever makes me think of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

Mississippi Mudstache

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #676 on: September 27, 2018, 09:50:20 AM »
How about "normalcy" instead of normality?

Damn you Harding.

I never even noticed that one. Normalcy definitely sounds better to my ear, but normality doesn't sound too off, either.

I've been hearing the word "trickeration" in place of "trickery" on football broadcasts for the last decade or so. Drives me crazy every time I hear it, but it's basically the new normal at this point.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #677 on: September 29, 2018, 06:55:18 AM »
How about when someone says axed instead of asked?

I axed my kid not to do that. Wow, that must have hurt!

sui generis

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #678 on: September 30, 2018, 08:32:42 AM »
"Axed" is actually a legitimate pronunciation, apparently. Years ago I listened to an episode of A Way With Words and they did a long piece on the history of it. Apparently it was the dominate pronunciation at times and in certain places hundreds of years ago.

Cwadda

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #679 on: September 30, 2018, 06:11:43 PM »
Meanwhile, "literally" is getting worse by the day. I cringe noticeably every time I hear it used improperly.

Dave1442397

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #680 on: September 30, 2018, 06:17:46 PM »
"Axed" is actually a legitimate pronunciation, apparently.

It certainly is if you live in The Bronx/Yonkers.


Dee

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #681 on: September 30, 2018, 07:47:31 PM »
I have a friend who has literally taken to using literally several times per sentence. It is literally driving me bonkers.

Cwadda

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #682 on: September 30, 2018, 07:55:03 PM »
I have a friend who has literally taken to using literally several times per sentence. It is literally driving me bonkers.

Wouldn't it figuratively be driving you bonkers though?

calimom

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #683 on: October 01, 2018, 12:09:00 AM »
A colleague routinely posts in her blog about the most mundane things that really don't bear reporting. She is quite effusive. An example: "I met with Client in their AMAZING conference room and we had the most AWESOME discussion about their needs. We've come up with an AMAZING solution. Am so grateful and blessed by my AWESOME clients!!"

Just keep it to yourself, hon.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #684 on: October 01, 2018, 04:08:44 AM »
A colleague routinely posts in her blog about the most mundane things that really don't bear reporting. She is quite effusive. An example: "I met with Client in their AMAZING conference room and we had the most AWESOME discussion about their needs. We've come up with an AMAZING solution. Am so grateful and blessed by my AWESOME clients!!"

Just keep it to yourself, hon.

Tell her you didn't ax her for that information.

ketchup

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #685 on: October 01, 2018, 09:13:09 AM »
"Axed" is actually a legitimate pronunciation, apparently. Years ago I listened to an episode of A Way With Words and they did a long piece on the history of it. Apparently it was the dominate pronunciation at times and in certain places hundreds of years ago.
They could also be a Futurama fan. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOz8vYzFiYE (fun fact: in support of that one-line joke in one episode, they continue saying it that way for the entire run of the show)

BTDretire

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #686 on: October 01, 2018, 09:58:18 AM »
"Alot"is not a word. "A lot" is two words. Do people not have autocorrect?

"Anyways" may or may not be a word. But why add the s?



Reminds me of a little over 20 years ago, I was making a sales pitch in a Cal Tech Lab.
Taped to a counter over an expensive scale, was a note,

A lot
Alot of you are leaving this area messy, please clean up after yourself.

 Yep someone crossed out Alot and put A lot.

GuitarStv

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #687 on: October 01, 2018, 10:15:16 AM »
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

yakamashii

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #688 on: October 01, 2018, 10:23:05 AM »
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

Like aks/ask, "homo-genius" is legit:

http://grammarist.com/usage/homogenous-homogeneous/

RetiredAt63

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #689 on: October 01, 2018, 12:11:10 PM »
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

When I typed "homogenous" into a search engine it gave me homogeneous, and comments that homogenous are a variant that is not a standard accepted spelling. And then the pronunciation is as you said.  So the pronunciation does seem to follow the most common way of spelling the word.

I've learned homogenous in biology, but that term has been supplanted by homologous, which makes more sense - homologous and analogous.

marble_faun

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #690 on: October 01, 2018, 05:29:10 PM »
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

But homogenEous is a word!  According to the OED, homogenEous is the correct, older way and "homogenous" is the "erroneous" version.  (Though of course language evolves and so forth -- it does seem homogenEous has precedent.)

Homogenous is also a real word, but it historically it has been used in biology to describe organisms with a common ancestor.

By the way, I had no idea about this before, and I think I always used the two interchangeably! :-)  Just got curious and looked it up.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2018, 05:32:46 PM by marble_faun »

pbkmaine

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #691 on: October 01, 2018, 06:41:11 PM »
Is ma'am a word that people wish would go away?   I have always thought it was a polite manner to address someone. 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html

Is sir also a problem?

Not here in the South.

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #692 on: October 02, 2018, 11:27:39 AM »
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronunciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

But homogenEous is a word!  According to the OED, homogenEous is the correct, older way and "homogenous" is the "erroneous" version.  (Though of course language evolves and so forth -- it does seem homogenEous has precedent.)

Homogenous is also a real word, but it historically it has been used in biology to describe organisms with a common ancestor.

By the way, I had no idea about this before, and I think I always used the two interchangeably! :-)  Just got curious and looked it up.

Fascinating. I had no idea that homogenous and homogeneous were alternate spellings of the same word, much less that homogenous used to be a word with a different meaning altogether.

Here's one I assume we can all agree on: People should stop saying "nukular" when what they mean is "nuclear".

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #693 on: October 03, 2018, 02:44:46 PM »
If they have to give up "nukular" then they need to give up"realator" as well.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #694 on: October 03, 2018, 06:12:20 PM »
If they have to give up "nukular" then they need to give up"realator" as well.

Nukular I've heard.  Realator?    Spell check certainly does't like it.  Realtor?  Regulator?

MrsWolfeRN

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #695 on: October 03, 2018, 06:33:07 PM »
If they have to give up "nukular" then they need to give up"realator" as well.

Nukular I've heard.  Realator?    Spell check certainly does't like it.  Realtor?  Regulator?

Both of these are common in central IL. The weirdest mispronunciation I have heard was intestines, pronounced with a long I for the second i, so it rhymed with vines. This was an actual doctor who pronounced it that way.

Freckles

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #696 on: October 04, 2018, 08:15:52 PM »
If they have to give up "nukular" then they need to give up"realator" as well.

Nukular I've heard.  Realator?    Spell check certainly does't like it.  Realtor?  Regulator?

Yes, for realtor. They add in a syllable. Maybe if I spelled it "ree-la-tor."

teen persuasion

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #697 on: October 05, 2018, 07:19:25 AM »
Huh, I've heard "real-a-tor" but not "ree-la-tor".

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #698 on: October 05, 2018, 07:49:03 AM »
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

But homogenEous is a word!  According to the OED, homogenEous is the correct, older way and "homogenous" is the "erroneous" version.  (Though of course language evolves and so forth -- it does seem homogenEous has precedent.)

Homogenous is also a real word, but it historically it has been used in biology to describe organisms with a common ancestor.

By the way, I had no idea about this before, and I think I always used the two interchangeably! :-)  Just got curious and looked it up.

My world has been rocked to it's core.  :P

Paul der Krake

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #699 on: October 05, 2018, 10:20:41 AM »
Its*