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Other => Off Topic => Topic started by: Miss Piggy on August 11, 2017, 02:29:03 PM

Title: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on August 11, 2017, 02:29:03 PM
There are some words and phrases (mostly created by the media) that I'm really sick of seeing and hearing. Here are a few:

fat-shaming
body-shaming
pretty-much-anything-shaming
body positive (with or without hyphen)
birther (in the context of where Obama was born)

I'll think of more later.

Add yours below...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dr. Hasslein: Russian Bot Commander on August 11, 2017, 02:36:09 PM
The fat shaming one I think is especially insidious, as it tries to put a pleasant spin on unhealthy lifestyles.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 11, 2017, 02:50:37 PM
Starting or ending a statement on the internet with "FACT!" as if doing that somehow vacates the reality that your rant is still full of shit and most likely has no facts in it.


Hash tags of any sort.  They were created as a reference point for organizing similar Twitter statements, but now they've evolved into shorthand statements by themselves on all kinds of media.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: A Definite Beta Guy on August 11, 2017, 02:54:44 PM
I'm usually on-board with not being overly sensitive, but I don't see what's wrong with "Fat-Shaming." I think its application (like against the Beach Body Ready campaign) might be ridiculous, but we shouldn't be making overweight people feel bad about themselves, and should be mindful that people are sensitive about their weight.

Most terms probably fall in this category.

I really don't like that clapping emoji people put between words in their Tweets or Facebooks. I hate emoji talk in general, but that specifically grinds my gears. :)

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on August 11, 2017, 02:56:51 PM
I'd like to add baby bump to the list, although that doesn't bother me nearly as much as whatever-shaming. (And I just saw a new one: makeup-shaming.)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on August 11, 2017, 03:24:26 PM
I really, really hate headlines that start "People are [doing x]!" If you're writing about a person, give me their name, and if you're writing about a trend, please describe the trend rather than "people's" reaction to it. I'm reading an article, not a text message from a gossip-happy friend.

I'm also real tired of the phrase "fake news."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 11, 2017, 04:42:58 PM
I really, really hate headlines that start "People are [doing x]!" If you're writing about a person, give me their name, and if you're writing about a trend, please describe the trend rather than "people's" reaction to it. I'm reading an article, not a text message from a gossip-happy friend.

I'm also real tired of the phrase "fake news."

In the vein of clickbat titles, Facebook posts where the post is the headline. Inside that is the embedded article with the headline. And below that is what should be a summary of the article, but is in fact the headline repeated again!  And rarely do these redundant headlines actually tell you what the article will be about.  I realize that is the very definition of "click bait" in that they're enticing you to read the article to see what it is even about, but now it just turns me off instead.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dr. Hasslein: Russian Bot Commander on August 11, 2017, 04:49:00 PM
I really, really hate headlines that start "People are [doing x]!" If you're writing about a person, give me their name, and if you're writing about a trend, please describe the trend rather than "people's" reaction to it. I'm reading an article, not a text message from a gossip-happy friend.

I'm also real tired of the phrase "fake news."

In the vein of clickbat titles, Facebook posts where the post is the headline. Inside that is the embedded article with the headline. And below that is what should be a summary of the article, but is in fact the headline repeated again!  And rarely do these redundant headlines actually tell you what the article will be about.  I realize that is the very definition of "click bait" in that they're enticing you to read the article to see what it is even about, but now it just turns me off instead.

The real MVPs are the ones who go read the clickbait and then comment the big reveal
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ncornilsen on August 11, 2017, 05:27:59 PM
Bae.

that is all.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: bobechs on August 11, 2017, 05:35:04 PM
Using principal and principle as one and the same word.

Right here on this site is where it flourishes, folks.

Try to do better.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on August 11, 2017, 05:41:44 PM
Irregardless- not even really a word
Utilize- most of the time "use" will do just fine
"Dialogue " as a verb
Most nouns that are pressed into usage as verbs when a perfectly good verb already exists
"Thru"
"Dilatate" - I know it is actually correct but "dilate" just sounds so much better
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Alf91 on August 11, 2017, 05:42:41 PM
Lit.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GenXbiker on August 11, 2017, 05:54:06 PM
This is an easy one for me - nothing else comes close:

"millennials"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: egillespie on August 11, 2017, 06:17:59 PM
Victim
Underrepresented
Marginalized
Narrative

I trust nobody who uses such language...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Adventine on August 11, 2017, 06:32:38 PM
Twinning
AF (as fuck)
On fleek
Squad
Girlboss
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RangerOne on August 11, 2017, 06:36:41 PM
triggered
snowflake
fake news
cuck
brain washed

I generally don't like terms used to shut down conversation by pigeon holing the person you are talking to.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Laura33 on August 11, 2017, 06:55:35 PM
"Beg the question" to mean "raise the question."

"Literally" to mean "figuratively."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Vertical Mode on August 11, 2017, 07:14:21 PM
Pretty much all of the derogatory political barbs ("libtard", etc.)

-turnt
-bae
-fleek (where the fuck did this even come from?)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on August 11, 2017, 07:33:16 PM
-turnt
-bae
-fleek (where the fuck did this even come from?)

I think all three of those are slang from African American Vernacular English that have entered common usage. A lot of "new" phrases come from AAVE that way. (I think "on fleek" can be traced to one particular vine video, actually.)

Personally, I'm usually more frustrated by poor usage of words than by the invention of new ones. Slang will come and go, but ambiguous and misleading grammar... that's forever.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dee on August 11, 2017, 07:48:03 PM
"Winning at life." Ugh.

My spouse hates "game changer" and I don't blame him.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marty998 on August 11, 2017, 11:51:00 PM
"Winning at life." Ugh.

My spouse hates "game changer" and I don't blame him.

I hate game changers that going forward will put you ahead of the curve before you go whoa whoa whoa lets take a step back and think differently.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 12, 2017, 12:03:46 AM
* baby moon
* bucket list
* reach out
* circle back
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on August 12, 2017, 02:37:47 AM
"Winning at life." Ugh.

My spouse hates "game changer" and I don't blame him.

I hate game changers that going forward will put you ahead of the curve before you go whoa whoa whoa lets take a step back and think differently.

Going forward, outside the box thinking needs the leverage and bandwidth to proactively reprioritize better aligning with modern paradigms.  Game changing stakeholder synergy is the way to get the ball rolling to circle back and take ownership of value added low hanging fruit.

I wish that life had chosen to make me less fluent in corporate management-speak.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on August 12, 2017, 07:09:28 AM
I'm getting really sick of seeing "disinterested."

Because 99% of the time, people are using it wrongly, in place of "uninterested." Eg: "Donald Trump is disinterested in learning about how to effectively do his job."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Financial.Velociraptor on August 12, 2017, 09:42:45 AM
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: wenchsenior on August 12, 2017, 11:18:45 AM
Let's unpack this/There's a lot to unpack here

Trigger/trigger warning
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: FINate on August 12, 2017, 11:25:00 AM
YOLO
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on August 12, 2017, 11:38:02 AM
"I could care less"

NO. THINK ABOUT IT.

Also, don't put apostrophes for the plural form on acronyms. Tell me about your IRAs, not your IRA's.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dandarc on August 12, 2017, 11:48:48 AM
"Literally" to mean "figuratively."
That one's literally in the dictionary now, which literally makes my eyes bleed.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on August 12, 2017, 12:05:09 PM
Also, don't put apostrophes for the plural form on acronyms. Tell me about your IRAs, not your IRA's.

I was taught this was the correct way to pluralize acronyms...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Stache-O-Lantern on August 12, 2017, 12:21:26 PM
I've notice the word "iconic" has started to become overused, generally in writing, not in speech.  To the point it's starting to annoy me.

Also I think it's dumb in news articles when they call where people live "(place)-based".  As if most people were international jet-setters that keep an apartment somewhere but don't really live anywhere.  At least that's how I read it in my mind.  No matter how small the town, articles will say "(place)-based".  I saw one today that referred to a "Shelburne-based woman".   Shelburne is a town of about 7,000.  Seems silly, and to me a subtle promotion of lifestyle inflation.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on August 12, 2017, 12:23:23 PM
Also, don't put apostrophes for the plural form on acronyms. Tell me about your IRAs, not your IRA's.

I was taught this was the correct way to pluralize acronyms...
No. Apostrophes are for possessives and contractions. The only exception is for the plural of single letters. "Dot your i's and cross your t's.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: wenchsenior on August 12, 2017, 12:37:27 PM
Also, don't put apostrophes for the plural form on acronyms. Tell me about your IRAs, not your IRA's.

I was taught this was the correct way to pluralize acronyms...

Not unless the IRA is in possession of something.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on August 12, 2017, 03:06:05 PM
Update: the NYT style guide says:

Quote
Use apostrophes for plurals of abbreviations that have capital letters and periods: M.D.'s, C.P.A.'s. Also use apostrophes for plurals formed from single letters: He received A's and B's on his report card. Mind your p's and q's.

But do not use apostrophe's for plurals of abbreviations without periods, or for plurals formed from figures: TVs, PCs, DVDs; 1990s, 747s, size 7s.

So it depends, but "IRA's" is indeed incorrect. Now I know.

More thoughts on topic: I HATE "on accident," and I wish people would stop talking about "toxins" in food as opposed to in snake bites.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: gggggg on August 12, 2017, 04:04:40 PM
Cringy. I can't stand it, luckily I think it's use is subsiding a little.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: purple monkey on August 12, 2017, 07:27:05 PM
Strangers saying, "I'll pray for you."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GenXbiker on August 12, 2017, 08:02:19 PM
"I could care less"

NO. THINK ABOUT IT.

I know, right?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: gerardc on August 12, 2017, 08:06:21 PM
Starting or ending a statement on the internet with "FACT!" as if doing that somehow vacates the realityfact that your rant is still full of shit and most likely has no facts in it.

And replacing the word "fact" with "reality" is better how?


"Literally" to mean "figuratively."

That's true but you have to understand that all superlatives are eventually abused, e.g. "really" now means very/much in many situations, "epic" is getting abused too, etc. Language evolves with time.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 12, 2017, 10:23:01 PM
Starting or ending a statement on the internet with "FACT!" as if doing that somehow vacates the realityfact that your rant is still full of shit and most likely has no facts in it.

And replacing the word "fact" with "reality" is better how?


I don't like using the same word twice in a sentence, especially when it just begs to be punned.  Also, I chose "reality" because most of my encounters with the FACT! users tend to be conspiracy nutters whose sense of reality is certainly debatable.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on August 13, 2017, 01:35:06 AM
Punish.

Some of my husband's friends use it as a noun rather than a verb.

"I have to work this weekend; it's such a punish."

*rolls eyes*

Also, "I'm not like other girls", "I don't have female friends, too much drama", or any variation thereof.

I find those who complain about drama tend to be those perpetuating it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: gooki on August 13, 2017, 03:05:11 AM
Trending
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 13, 2017, 04:57:45 AM
Using principal and principle as one and the same word.

Right here on this site is where it flourishes, folks.

Try to do better.
I remember this one from grade school. "The principal is your pal."

(Pro tip: It may or not be true, but my pleated-plaid-uniform-wearing, Catholic School self did not know this then. It works.)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 13, 2017, 05:14:04 AM
Here's one. My brother frequently says "at this point in time". Every damn time, my wacko brain says, "What about this point in space?" Then my brain links "What about time?" and "What about space?" and the next thing you know the theme song from an obscure one-season TV show called "It's About Time" starts playing in my head.

"It's about time
It's about space
About two men in the strangest place"

The funny thing about that is that we all used to sing it as:

"It's about time
It's about space
It's about time to slap your face"

Maybe my brain is smarter (and funnier) than I give it credit for.

Here's a link for you, but don't say I didn't warn you. It's pure drivel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1G-TsdNWGg

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Neal300 on August 13, 2017, 07:08:05 AM
Baby moon
Body-shaming
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: wenchsenior on August 13, 2017, 08:39:54 AM
Update: the NYT style guide says:

Quote
Use apostrophes for plurals of abbreviations that have capital letters and periods: M.D.'s, C.P.A.'s. Also use apostrophes for plurals formed from single letters: He received A's and B's on his report card. Mind your p's and q's.

But do not use apostrophe's for plurals of abbreviations without periods, or for plurals formed from figures: TVs, PCs, DVDs; 1990s, 747s, size 7s.

So it depends, but "IRA's" is indeed incorrect. Now I know.

More thoughts on topic: I HATE "on accident," and I wish people would stop talking about "toxins" in food as opposed to in snake bites.

Apostrophes are a pain in the butt to learn, no doubt.  DH still struggles with them, and he's written for decades.  I really should just give him a short cheat sheet to tape to his computer monitor.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 13, 2017, 11:17:26 AM
"Without further ado" and "BLUF (bottom line up front)"

I have no problem with the phrases themselves, but they're used so much by people who don't understand they're meant to convene BREVITY.  You don't use either of them after speaking or writing a paragraph of information.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Vertical Mode on August 13, 2017, 09:17:08 PM
-turnt
-bae
-fleek (where the fuck did this even come from?)

I think all three of those are slang from African American Vernacular English that have entered common usage. A lot of "new" phrases come from AAVE that way. (I think "on fleek" can be traced to one particular vine video, actually.)

Personally, I'm usually more frustrated by poor usage of words than by the invention of new ones. Slang will come and go, but ambiguous and misleading grammar... that's forever.

Well, that at least explains why I don't understand 'on fleek', then - don't use Vine, not planning to.

With respect to using and/or pioneering new words...I guess I will never be Shakespeare, lol.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: lost_in_the_endless_aisle on August 13, 2017, 09:32:06 PM
"traveling at a high rate of speed" to mean "fast"
saying "utilize" when saying "use" will do (more syllables != sounding smart)
"whopping"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 14, 2017, 01:36:54 AM
"traveling at a high rate of speed" to mean "fast"
saying "utilize" when saying "use" will do (more syllables != sounding smart)
"whopping"
Oh, good ones! Ditto for using "simplistic" instead of "simple". Argh!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: kei te pai on August 14, 2017, 01:52:14 AM
Starting a sentence with"so", as in "so, I said him...."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: stackorstarve on August 14, 2017, 05:51:59 AM
Lol this thread is full of middle aged people hating on millennials I love it. That being said I hate the word "millennials" because it actually describes so few of us.

Also any term used without elaboration to dismiss an argument.

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Leisured on August 14, 2017, 07:23:52 AM
epicentre    should be centre     Epicentre comes from geology and assumes a three dimensional region.
disinterested     uninterested.  Unless the person is being disinterested, that is unbiased.  Thanks Kris
at this point in time     now    Thanks Dicey
ramp up              rise
spiral up (or down)    rise (or fall)
decimate                   reduce    Decimate literally means reduce by one tenth. From Latin.
iconic            perhaps characteristic.  Thanks Stache
utilize            use    Thanks Lost
simplistic      simple   Thanks Dicey
marginal          slight
marginally       slightly
significant         higher or lower      Significant has a meaning in statistics, so if A is different from B by more than 5%, this difference is seen, usually, as a significant difference.

baby bump is OK, being descriptive. In Australia we sometimes use ‘preggers’   Take your choice.


Strunk and White Elements of Style has an excellent spoof of bureaucratic language by George Orwell, who wondered what the superb passage from Ecclesiastes 3:1-9 would look like if translated into bureaucratic language.  ‘There is a time for everything’, written about 1200 BC.  Immortal language translated into nonsense, and worth the price of the book by itself, but the Kindle edition is free.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on August 14, 2017, 07:34:37 AM
decimate                   reduce    Decimate literally means reduce by one tenth. From Latin.

Decimate refers to the Roman military practice of punishing a group of soldiers by killing one in every ten of them (typically selected by lots).  If we're going to get picky and only use ancient definitions for things it would be incorrect to define decimate as 'reduction by one tenth', that loses the original meaning almost entirely.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on August 14, 2017, 07:49:11 AM
"Literally" to mean "figuratively."
That one's literally in the dictionary now, which literally makes my eyes bleed.
NOOOOOOO!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Laura33 on August 14, 2017, 08:40:19 AM
"Literally" to mean "figuratively."

That's true but you have to understand that all superlatives are eventually abused, e.g. "really" now means very/much in many situations, "epic" is getting abused too, etc. Language evolves with time.

Well of course it does, or I'd have included my diatribe about "hopefully" (now used as "I hope" instead of as "in a hopeful manner," e.g., "hopefully, I'll win the Powerball," instead of "she walked hopefully to buy a lottery ticket"), or "impact" as a verb in sentences not involving meteorites or wisdom teeth.  And none of the "new" phrases people have mentioned here bug me much, other than when they are overused (my DD now uses "yeet" as an all-purpose word -- I thought it was just an exclamation, but, no, now it's "man, she really yeeted that turn!" and the like).

What I object to are changes that obfuscate instead of clarify.  A word or phrase should not "evolve" to mean precisely the opposite of what it was originally meant to.  Language is designed to express thoughts and feelings and ideas.  And when you can't find the right word to describe your thoughts or feelings, then go ahead, coin a new one -- I think that's pretty cool (not surprisingly, my favorite kids' author is Dr. Seuss).  But when you redefine a word to include its opposite, then you just confuse your audience, who has to stop and think and process which meaning is intended.  And that bothers me.  That's the realm of politicians and corporate consultants, not something normal people should aspire to.  And so that's where I draw the line -- where I think we should appropriately rage, rage against the dying of the light, instead of just saying, "meh, language changes."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on August 14, 2017, 08:58:55 AM
Any sort of buzzwords used as click bait, especially to get you to watch a video or click through 16 pages filled with ads just to see content.

Written in large, bold text, with extra clickbaity words colored differently.
"Millennials"
"You'll never guess his reaction"
"What she did next was astounding"

Other words/phrases that make me cringe:
"Literally" used to meant "really". That's not what it means!

"I can't."
-You can't what?
"I just can't"
-You just can't what?
"I just can't even"
-You can't even what?
"I just can't EVEN!"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Uturn on August 14, 2017, 09:40:54 AM
The use of the word hate.

Person1:  I disagree with your solution to <Problem> concerning <GroupX>
Person2:  Why do you hate <GroupX>?
Person1:  I never said that I hate <GroupX>, I simply feel there is a different solution to <Problem>.
Then we all get to see headlines about how Person1 hates <GroupX>, what are we going to do about Person1's hate speech.  Meanwhile <Problem> is still not resolved. 

Could it be that Person1 and Person2 grew up or lives in different circumstances and therefore view <Problem> from different perspectives, with neither being wrong? 

Now if Person1 or Person2 said "eradicate <GroupX> and <Problem> goes away", we can call that hate.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Fishindude on August 14, 2017, 09:52:07 AM
Organic
Grass Fed
Farm Raised

These labels have created a bunch of food snobs that really don't know much about where there food came from, yet they see these labels not fully understanding them and condemn everything else not labeled in this manner.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Samuel on August 14, 2017, 10:10:04 AM
Adulting
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: jambongris on August 14, 2017, 10:19:05 AM
Update: the NYT style guide says:

Quote
Use apostrophes for plurals of abbreviations that have capital letters and periods: M.D.'s, C.P.A.'s. Also use apostrophes for plurals formed from single letters: He received A's and B's on his report card. Mind your p's and q's.

But do not use apostrophe's for plurals of abbreviations without periods, or for plurals formed from figures: TVs, PCs, DVDs; 1990s, 747s, size 7s.

So it depends, but "IRA's" is indeed incorrect. Now I know.

More thoughts on topic: I HATE "on accident," and I wish people would stop talking about "toxins" in food as opposed to in snake bites.

Wouldn't "IRA's" still be wrong according to the NYT Style Guide because it doesn't have both capital letters and periods? I think "I.R.A.'s" would be correct if it were ever written that way.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: wenchsenior on August 14, 2017, 10:48:59 AM
Update: the NYT style guide says:

Quote
Use apostrophes for plurals of abbreviations that have capital letters and periods: M.D.'s, C.P.A.'s. Also use apostrophes for plurals formed from single letters: He received A's and B's on his report card. Mind your p's and q's.

But do not use apostrophe's for plurals of abbreviations without periods, or for plurals formed from figures: TVs, PCs, DVDs; 1990s, 747s, size 7s.

So it depends, but "IRA's" is indeed incorrect. Now I know.

More thoughts on topic: I HATE "on accident," and I wish people would stop talking about "toxins" in food as opposed to in snake bites.

Wouldn't "IRA's" still be wrong according to the NYT Style Guide because it doesn't have both capital letters and periods? I think "I.R.A.'s" would be correct if it were ever written that way.

I think you missed the "incorrect" part.  I also misread it late at night as "correct" and I was SO CONFUSED.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on August 14, 2017, 11:09:48 AM
The real question is thus: when is it acceptable to spell acronyms with periods?

https://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/74099/where-are-the-periods-in-acronyms

The plot thickens.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 14, 2017, 12:15:29 PM
Organic
Grass Fed
Farm Raised

These labels have created a bunch of food snobs that really don't know much about where there food came from, yet they see these labels not fully understanding them and condemn everything else not labeled in this manner.

Organic is supposed to mean something that is alive.  It describes an organism.  We turned it into some description of a particular way of growing food (which even then is still vague). I was at the store yesterday and in the organic produce aisle they had a couple crates marked in English and French. The French word used to substitute organic food is apparently "biologique."  To me this confirms how misused "organic" is in our culture that the French couldn't think of a better word to use for the translation.  I imagine if a French speaker looked at a crate of food that was marked "biologique" they'd think "well, no shit. Of course it's alive."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 14, 2017, 12:19:46 PM
Lol this thread is full of middle aged people hating on millennials I love it. That being said I hate the word "millennials" because it actually describes so few of us.


I've never understood why "millennial" somehow goes all the way back to people born in 1980.  I was born that year. I'm creeping up on 40 years old, I have a salaried career, long-since completed my education, but the mass media wants to lump me in with folks who just graduated high school.  Some of my friends who are the same age as me have kids in high school, but they're of this same "millennial" generation?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on August 14, 2017, 12:50:53 PM
Well, that at least explains why I don't understand 'on fleek', then - don't use Vine, not planning to.

That's good, since it doesn't exist anymore.

With respect to using and/or pioneering new words...I guess I will never be Shakespeare, lol.

I mean, I thought most scholarly understanding held that words Shakespeare "invented" were really just use of slang that wasn't recorded anywhere else. His audience obviously understood him, which is a little difficult if you just start inventing words out of thin air - they have to be culturally popularized first.

A word or phrase should not "evolve" to mean precisely the opposite of what it was originally meant to.

So "peruse" and "nonplussed" must really frustrate you.

Peruse:
1. to examine or consider with attention and in detail :  study
2. to look over or through in a casual or cursory manner

Nonplussed:
1. surprised and confused
2. not disconcerted; unperturbed

Language is crazy but that makes it fun, I think. For word nerds, a list of contronyms (words that are their own opposite): http://mentalfloss.com/article/49834/14-words-are-their-own-opposites (http://mentalfloss.com/article/49834/14-words-are-their-own-opposites)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: caffeine on August 14, 2017, 01:00:11 PM
I hate sensationalism and click-bait news. I'm seriously thinking about subscribing to WSJ or NYT or something.

Anything with SLAMS or DESTORYS in the headline makes me irrationally upset unless it is summing up WWE's Royal Rumble.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Laura33 on August 14, 2017, 01:23:13 PM
Well, that at least explains why I don't understand 'on fleek', then - don't use Vine, not planning to.

That's good, since it doesn't exist anymore.

With respect to using and/or pioneering new words...I guess I will never be Shakespeare, lol.

I mean, I thought most scholarly understanding held that words Shakespeare "invented" were really just use of slang that wasn't recorded anywhere else. His audience obviously understood him, which is a little difficult if you just start inventing words out of thin air - they have to be culturally popularized first.

A word or phrase should not "evolve" to mean precisely the opposite of what it was originally meant to.

So "peruse" and "nonplussed" must really frustrate you.

Peruse:
1. to examine or consider with attention and in detail :  study
2. to look over or through in a casual or cursory manner

Nonplussed:
1. surprised and confused
2. not disconcerted; unperturbed

Language is crazy but that makes it fun, I think. For word nerds, a list of contronyms (words that are their own opposite): http://mentalfloss.com/article/49834/14-words-are-their-own-opposites (http://mentalfloss.com/article/49834/14-words-are-their-own-opposites)

The one that gets me is "scan," which nowadays invariably seems used to mean "skim."  I didn't even realize the other two had alternate meanings now.  :-)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 14, 2017, 01:37:36 PM
Slight sidebar, feeding off earlier comments, about words that mean the opposite of what people think they do.
They're good words. I don't want them to go away, except that last one, I just wish people would use them correctly, gah!

Spendthrift
Penultimate
Nadir
Hoi polloi
Nonplussed
Inflammable
Irregardless

Of course, on this site, spendthrift is my favorite misused word, for what I hope is an obvious reason.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: stackorstarve on August 14, 2017, 02:23:55 PM


Slight sidebar, feeding off earlier comments....
...

Another thing that gets me is using "off" instead of "on" in idiomatic phrases. (i.e. based on, feeding on, going on, etc.)

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on August 14, 2017, 02:28:49 PM


Slight sidebar, feeding off earlier comments....
...

Another thing that gets me is using "off" instead of "on" in idiomatic phrases. (i.e. based on, feeding on, going on, etc.)

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

I figured that it was a simple omission typo.  'Feeding off of previous comments' makes as much sense as 'feeding on'.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tralfamadorian on August 14, 2017, 02:30:03 PM
I've never understood why "millennial" somehow goes all the way back to people born in 1980. 

I've heard it explained as those who graduated from high school in 2000 or later. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: NoraLenderbee on August 14, 2017, 03:15:50 PM

“on a daily basis”. We have a word that efficiently summarizes that phrase. It’s “daily.”
Likewise on a monthly/weekly/yearly/regular/periodic basis.

“In the event of [something happening]”. How about “If [something] happens,” “In case of [something]”?

The addition of unnecessary "of" to adverbs and prepositions. Feeding off of. Outside of. Getting off of.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 14, 2017, 03:25:42 PM


Slight sidebar, feeding off earlier comments....
...

Another thing that gets me is using "off" instead of "on" in idiomatic phrases. (i.e. based on, feeding on, going on, etc.)

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

I figured that it was a simple omission typo.  'Feeding off of previous comments' makes as much sense as 'feeding on'.
Well, shit, I was going to fix it, but now I don't know what to do. I do say "based on", but when the feeding is kind of an act of extraction or removal, "feeding off" seems more logical than "feeding on". Is only "on" correct?

GuitarStv, thinking it's a typo coming from me is pretty darn accurate, lol!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: stackorstarve on August 14, 2017, 03:54:52 PM


Slight sidebar, feeding off earlier comments....
...

Another thing that gets me is using "off" instead of "on" in idiomatic phrases. (i.e. based on, feeding on, going on, etc.)

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

I figured that it was a simple omission typo.  'Feeding off of previous comments' makes as much sense as 'feeding on'.
Well, shit, I was going to fix it, but now I don't know what to do. I do say "based on", but when the feeding is kind of an act of extraction or removal, "feeding off" seems more logical than "feeding on". Is only "on" correct?

GuitarStv, thinking it's a typo coming from me is pretty darn accurate, lol!
"off of" is also formally wrong but used conversationally in the US. This one doesn't bother me as much as other stuff though

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on August 14, 2017, 04:04:45 PM
All acronyms and then managerial buzzwords like "synergistic", "empower", and "team player."

On a sidenote, this reminds me of Weird Al's "Word Crimes."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 14, 2017, 04:05:00 PM
When I went through my mid-career school as an Army officer (exchange student at a USMC course) at age 28 we had to take a writing test before we showed up. After arriving we were separated into two groups for before-class English writing taught by some university professors.  There was enough feedback from the fleet that their field grade officers sucked at writing enough that everyone going through this course pretty much had to repeat 12th grade English.  Even though I received one of the higher scores on the writing sample I still had to go. The things we learned were never covered in my public school education.  Fast forward a few years to grad school where those lessons paid off.  After learning to write properly finally I noticed how half of my grad school classmates were writing at the 10th grade level using many of the improper, but conversationally accurate words we've listed.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on August 14, 2017, 04:15:33 PM


Slight sidebar, feeding off earlier comments....
...

Another thing that gets me is using "off" instead of "on" in idiomatic phrases. (i.e. based on, feeding on, going on, etc.)

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

I figured that it was a simple omission typo.  'Feeding off of previous comments' makes as much sense as 'feeding on'.
Well, shit, I was going to fix it, but now I don't know what to do. I do say "based on", but when the feeding is kind of an act of extraction or removal, "feeding off" seems more logical than "feeding on". Is only "on" correct?

GuitarStv, thinking it's a typo coming from me is pretty darn accurate, lol!
"off of" is also formally wrong but used conversationally in the US. This one doesn't bother me as much as other stuff though

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

Could be some regional preferences at play here. I lived in one place where people said they had to " be to" somewhere as in " I have to be to work by nine" instead of " be at work"  or "go to work" Drove me crazy.

In the place I live now people use the word"feel" when discussing facts they are not completely sure of as in " I feel like the conversion from fahrenheit to Celsius is five ninths minus thirty two". Sounds really non-committal. They also use this expression as a polite way of correcting someone.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on August 14, 2017, 04:31:13 PM
baby bump is OK, being descriptive. In Australia we sometimes use ‘preggers’   Take your choice.

I detest 'preggers'.

And 'hubby'.

And 'hubs'.

And 'wifey'.

And 'work husband'/'work wife'.

And 'the boyfriend'. As in, Look what the boyfriend bought me.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 14, 2017, 05:39:05 PM
baby bump is OK, being descriptive. In Australia we sometimes use ‘preggers’   Take your choice.

I detest 'preggers'.

And 'hubby'.

And 'hubs'.

And 'wifey'.

And 'work husband'/'work wife'.

And 'the boyfriend'. As in, Look what the boyfriend bought me.

I am so with you! "Hubby" and "Wifey" are so….1955. "The wife" sounds like the person in question is describing a household appliance.
"Hubs" is just ugh.

May I add to the list:

* Push Present (because every woman needs jewelry or an SUV after giving birth, and then needs to share that information)

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on August 14, 2017, 06:38:27 PM
influencers

toxic people

Breaking. Up. Sentences. Like. This.

self-care

amirite?

"I just NOPED right out of there."

"bad skin" or "good skin" [If it's keeping your organs from falling out of your body, it's doing its job!]

****

I don't have logical, well-thought-out reasons for disliking most of these. I'm just weary of them. Weary of the realms of internet where they tend appear in the wild.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on August 14, 2017, 06:58:21 PM
Kiddos. Can't stand that "word."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on August 14, 2017, 09:16:26 PM
Oh, this Reddit thread just reminded me of another.

https://www.reddit.com/r/MealPrepSunday/comments/6tol88/baby_due_in_2_weeks_prepped_my_ass_off_today/

Quote
OP: Luckily grandma and great grandma live nearby and I have a feeling they will be more than generous food-wise.
Quote
Commenter: How lucky are you to still have your great grandmother alive. Really cool!
Quote
Commenter 2: I mean, they could still be alive, but I think it more probable she is speaking on behalf the pending baby. OP?
Quote
OP: Baby's great grandma aka my grandma. Baby will be the first great grandchild on both sides of the family!

Kid's not even here yet! Stop promoting your relatives and expecting the rest of us to follow along.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 15, 2017, 12:51:17 AM
baby bump is OK, being descriptive. In Australia we sometimes use ‘preggers’   Take your choice.

I detest 'preggers'.

And 'hubby'.

And 'hubs'.

And 'wifey'.

And 'work husband'/'work wife'.

And 'the boyfriend'. As in, Look what the boyfriend bought me.
I love your hate list!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on August 15, 2017, 12:53:37 AM
baby bump is OK, being descriptive. In Australia we sometimes use ‘preggers’   Take your choice.

I detest 'preggers'.

And 'hubby'.

And 'hubs'.

And 'wifey'.

And 'work husband'/'work wife'.

And 'the boyfriend'. As in, Look what the boyfriend bought me.
I love your hate list!

Spread the love!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on August 15, 2017, 03:10:12 AM
The real question is thus: when is it acceptable to spell acronyms with periods?

https://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/74099/where-are-the-periods-in-acronyms

The plot thickens.
MORE THICKENING:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/14/business/dealbook/merck-trump-charlottesville-ceos.html?&moduleDetail=section-news-1&action=click&contentCollection=Business%20Day&region=Footer&module=MoreInSection&version=WhatsNext&contentID=WhatsNext&pgtype=article

The NYTimes (at least the business section) doesn't even respect its own guidelines! It's using C.E.O.s, even though there are periods in the acronym.

Death to apostrophes. Death to periodical acronyms.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GenXbiker on August 15, 2017, 06:20:55 AM
Very common on this forum:

loosing instead of losing
loose instead of lose
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on August 15, 2017, 07:46:57 AM
I hate sensationalism and click-bait news. I'm seriously thinking about subscribing to WSJ or NYT or something.

Anything with SLAMS or DESTORYS in the headline makes me irrationally upset unless it is summing up WWE's Royal Rumble.

This!

"White guy DESTROYS black lives matter in 30 seconds!!!"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on August 15, 2017, 10:23:29 AM
I don't know what "woke" means, and I don't intend to find out.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on August 15, 2017, 11:13:21 AM
Another one for me is when adults use the word "yummy" when there are no kids involved. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 15, 2017, 12:30:23 PM
"Payed" instead of "Paid". I do not get where that one even comes from.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 15, 2017, 08:12:47 PM
"Payed" instead of "Paid". I do not get where that one even comes from.

It would be understandable spelling for someone new to the English language, but when you see it used by those who claim to have a college education, it baffles.

"Anyways" always grates with me. But apparently it is not entirely incorrect:

http://www.differencebetween.net/language/difference-between-anyway-and-anyways/
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on August 15, 2017, 08:14:40 PM
Preventative. Please, just say preventive. Same with orientated; just say oriented.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GenXbiker on August 15, 2017, 09:11:35 PM
Here's another very common one on this forum:

your instead of you're
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 15, 2017, 10:36:27 PM
Here's another very common one on this forum:

your instead of you're

And there instead of their. Fourth graders know this.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: nnls on August 15, 2017, 10:55:42 PM
Preventative. Please, just say preventive. Same with orientated; just say oriented.

isn't this a difference between American English and British English though?

I don't think here in Australia I have ever heard anyone use oriented or preventive though maybe I am just hanging out with the wrong people
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MightyMauler on August 18, 2017, 08:46:59 AM
I’m getting pretty sick of hearing/reading “hack” as in:

Life hack
Money hack
Food hack
Beauty hack

I was a bit surprised this hadn’t already made the list. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on August 18, 2017, 08:58:12 AM
Preventative. Please, just say preventive. Same with orientated; just say oriented.

isn't this a difference between American English and British English though?

I don't think here in Australia I have ever heard anyone use oriented or preventive though maybe I am just hanging out with the wrong people
It is. Orientated is perfectly valid.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 18, 2017, 09:48:05 AM
From Grammar Girl's "Quick and Dirty Tips". The original had charts, which I eliminated. If you like charts, goog will give them to you. I'm adding this quote to the discussion because of the interesting explanation I bolded below.

"We often make new words by adding suffixes. For example, we got the word syndication by adding the -ion suffix to the end of the verb syndicate. But the process can also work in reverse: we can make new words by dropping suffixes. For example, we got the verb edit by dropping the suffix from editor. That’s called back formation, and it’s how lexicographers think we got the word orientate—by dropping the -ion suffix from orientation.

Orient and orientate are both acceptable English verbs, but orient has become the preferred form in American English, whereas orientate coexists more strongly with orient in British English. If you’re writing for Americans, you’d write about family-oriented activities; but for a British audience, you may write about family-orientated activities.

Although the Verb Orient Is Still More Common Than Orientate in British English, Orientate Is More Common in British English Than It Is in American English. [This bit was between the omitted charts, which may explain the wonky caps.]

To sum up*, in both cases there’s a preferred form in American English—the shorter form: preventive and orient—but in both cases the other word isn’t wrong either."

* Dicey here from the Department of Redundancy Department. Does anyone sum down? Just wondering ;-)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on August 18, 2017, 10:07:16 AM
I thought of another one: relevancy. Again, what's with the extra syllable? Just say relevance.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cache_Stash on August 18, 2017, 10:52:02 AM
Prolly

I can't even describe the emotions that "word" evokes in my soul.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: teen persuasion on August 18, 2017, 09:35:15 PM
Prolly

I can't even describe the emotions that "word" evokes in my soul.

Is this a regional contraction?  I've seen it multiple times on forums, but I've never ever heard it said.  In my area probably is commonly shortened to prob'ly.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 18, 2017, 11:29:25 PM
I've been tempted to use "prolly" for "probably" when I'm texting. I stop myself every time, but it's a slippery slope.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cache_Stash on August 19, 2017, 05:22:21 AM
Prolly

I can't even describe the emotions that "word" evokes in my soul.

Is this a regional contraction?  I've seen it multiple times on forums, but I've never ever heard it said.  In my area probably is commonly shortened to prob'ly.

I frequent a forum that ha a global participation and I only see prolly.  I really dislike the use of that fake word
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Leisured on August 19, 2017, 06:51:26 AM
utilize     should be   use    Thanks MrsWolfeRN

on a daily basis     daily    thanks NoraLenderBe
and ...
at this point in time          now

obligated     obliged.   'Obligation' is a noun from the verb 'oblige', so we see a new verb 'obligated' formed from the noun 'obligation'.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 19, 2017, 08:02:37 AM
This was a fun read.  You all do know that there is a Grammar Nazi thread that has already aired these and more?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on August 19, 2017, 08:08:07 AM
This was a fun read.  You all do know that there is a Grammar Nazi thread that has already aired these and more?
People need to be reminded we're here, watching, judging.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 19, 2017, 08:13:28 AM
This was a fun read.  You all do know that there is a Grammar Nazi thread that has already aired these and more?
People need to be reminded we're here, watching, judging.

When I taught College and University, I was amazed at the range of writing skills.  Some students were great.  Some needed 4 re-writes to get to the point that their work was comprehensible.  Not good, mind you, just starting to be clear.

I blame spell check for the your/you're, there/their, to/two/too issues.  People get complacent and don't proof-read.

We even have "Weird forum choices" spelled as Weird fourm choices" in Off Topic.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: iris lily on August 19, 2017, 08:26:09 AM
This was a fun read.  You all do know that there is a Grammar Nazi thread that has already aired these and more?
People need to be reminded we're here, watching, judging.
ok, that made me laugh!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 19, 2017, 10:23:46 AM
This was a fun read.  You all do know that there is a Grammar Nazi thread that has already aired these and more?
People need to be reminded we're here, watching, judging.
ok, that made me laugh!

So did this:

We even have "Weird forum choices" spelled as Weird fourm choices" in Off Topic.

Oh, my kingdom for a better MMM Forum search engine! There are so many new threads started when a perfectly useful one is currently in existence, but not easily located.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: squirrel on August 20, 2017, 10:12:54 AM
This thread is great!

I'd like to add "needs <done>" where people miss out the "to be" part, e.g. a car needs moved / this needs done by Friday / the room needs cleaned.

Also, management-speak in my workplace, where you can tell who is in the top inner circle by their excessive use of the phrase "the reality is..." right before giving an excuse for why things aren't better.



Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on August 20, 2017, 10:22:27 AM
I'd like to add "needs <done>" where people miss out the "to be" part, e.g. a car needs moved / this needs done by Friday / the room needs cleaned.

On a related note, I'll add "because <reason>" where people leave out the "of." For example, "I need to move my car because hailstorm." Or, "Our kitchen is in a shambles because remodeling."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 21, 2017, 05:54:40 PM
I'd like to add "needs <done>" where people miss out the "to be" part, e.g. a car needs moved / this needs done by Friday / the room needs cleaned.

On a related note, I'll add "because <reason>" where people leave out the "of." For example, "I need to move my car because hailstorm." Or, "Our kitchen is in a shambles because remodeling."


The first example might be a regional thing. West Virginia/Pennsylvania and perhaps other places. I agree, it sounds odd.

Second example is because hipster-speak. Or because irony.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: wenchsenior on August 22, 2017, 07:46:41 AM
I'd like to add "needs <done>" where people miss out the "to be" part, e.g. a car needs moved / this needs done by Friday / the room needs cleaned.

On a related note, I'll add "because <reason>" where people leave out the "of." For example, "I need to move my car because hailstorm." Or, "Our kitchen is in a shambles because remodeling."


The first example might be a regional thing. West Virginia/Pennsylvania and perhaps other places. I agree, it sounds odd.

Second example is because hipster-speak. Or because irony.

Yes, I suspect the "needs washed" etc. construction might be regional.  My husband used this and didn't realize it was incorrect until he was an adult in graduate school...years later, he still sometimes pauses and self-checks his grammar to see that he's constructing the sentence correctly.   I'm not sure if he picked it up from family or from the Pacific NW region where he grew up.  However, the only other person I've heard regularly using it (a podcaster) was also from the PNW, so...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on August 22, 2017, 10:30:55 AM
I'd like to add "needs <done>" where people miss out the "to be" part, e.g. a car needs moved / this needs done by Friday / the room needs cleaned.

On a related note, I'll add "because <reason>" where people leave out the "of." For example, "I need to move my car because hailstorm." Or, "Our kitchen is in a shambles because remodeling."


The first example might be a regional thing. West Virginia/Pennsylvania and perhaps other places. I agree, it sounds odd.

Second example is because hipster-speak. Or because irony.

Yes, I suspect the "needs washed" etc. construction might be regional.  My husband used this and didn't realize it was incorrect until he was an adult in graduate school...years later, he still sometimes pauses and self-checks his grammar to see that he's constructing the sentence correctly.   I'm not sure if he picked it up from family or from the Pacific NW region where he grew up.  However, the only other person I've heard regularly using it (a podcaster) was also from the PNW, so...

The first example is definitely a Pennsylvania thing, and it may have come from Pennsylvania Dutch.  The second one I've never heard of. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: pbkmaine on August 22, 2017, 10:41:17 AM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on August 22, 2017, 10:59:07 AM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 22, 2017, 11:07:55 AM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on August 22, 2017, 11:22:11 AM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness.

Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on August 22, 2017, 11:47:16 AM
Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.
As opposed to a soft grammar Nazi? Gah! Weren't you listening?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Samuel on August 22, 2017, 11:57:26 AM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness.

Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.

Or a fan of the West Wing. Thanks, Bartlet.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on August 22, 2017, 12:08:40 PM
Preventative. Please, just say preventive. Same with orientated; just say oriented.

I have never heard the word "preventive" in my life. I did not know that an alternative to "preventative" existed.

Contrarily, I only started hearing "orientated" a few years ago. It's like nails on a chalkboard. I will remain "oriented" for life, bro-dawgs.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on August 22, 2017, 03:16:36 PM
"Trial" as a verb. Ugh. Heard it again at a work meeting today. "We are trialing a new product " Why can't we just try it? Or conduct a trial of the product?

I grew up in the Midwest hearing "needs washed" and similar. I knew it was not correct usage, but thought of it as a harmless abbreviation that people use in speech but not writing.

While we are on odd regionalisms I have noticed that people in the north use the word "yet" very strangely. I am used to the "are we there yet" sort of usage to imply something that has not already happened. People here sometimes use in place of "still" to talk about something that is happening already. For example "do you live in Iowa yet?" meaning "do you still live in Iowa?". I find this confusing.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on August 22, 2017, 04:03:22 PM
"Trial" as a verb. Ugh. Heard it again at a work meeting today. "We are trialing a new product " Why can't we just try it? Or conduct a trial of the product?

I grew up in the Midwest hearing "needs washed" and similar. I knew it was not correct usage, but thought of it as a harmless abbreviation that people use in speech but not writing.

While we are on odd regionalisms I have noticed that people in the north use the word "yet" very strangely. I am used to the "are we there yet" sort of usage to imply something that has not already happened. People here sometimes use in place of "still" to talk about something that is happening already. For example "do you live in Iowa yet?" meaning "do you still live in Iowa?". I find this confusing.

Wasn't "yet" used like that a few centuries ago?  The dictionary still has that meaning.  It does sound odd though.  All the old uses I've seen put the "yet" before the verb like "Dost thou yet live in Iowa?"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 22, 2017, 06:36:19 PM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness.

Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.

Or a fan of the West Wing. Thanks, Bartlet.

I remember that episode now that you mention it, but no, my grammar issues stem from being taught proper grammar at age 28 then putting it to use in grad school where most of my classmates couldn't write to save their lives.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 22, 2017, 07:13:14 PM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness.

Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.

There are lots of us in the wild, we are not unique, we are legion.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: iris lily on August 22, 2017, 07:50:53 PM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness.


Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.

No, it bothers me, too.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on August 23, 2017, 06:13:45 AM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness.


Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.

No, it bothers me, too.

Then you've chosen your side.

(http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/520/073/eb9.jpg)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on August 23, 2017, 10:50:29 AM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness.

Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.

There are lots of us in the wild, we are not unique, we are legion.

Commas instead of periods/semicolons, irony?  I can't tell.

There are degrees of unique.  You can have a unique shade of green, or you can just have a unique color altogether.  A unique color is more unique than a new different shade of green.   If you have a bunch of 4's in a row, a 5 is unique.  An tilde is much more unique. 

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 23, 2017, 11:08:00 AM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness.

Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.

There are lots of us in the wild, we are not unique, we are legion.

Commas instead of periods/semicolons, irony?  I can't tell.

There are degrees of unique.  You can have a unique shade of green, or you can just have a unique color altogether.  A unique color is more unique than a new different shade of green.   If you have a bunch of 4's in a row, a 5 is unique.  An tilde is much more unique.

Those aren't degrees. Those are absolutes in their own right.  You can have a unique shade of green (grammatically, though a shade amongst thousands I wouldn't consider special), but that shade can't be more unique than something else, nor can it be very unique. Something is one of a kind or it isn't. If it isn't, then you need to pick another adjective.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cache_Stash on August 23, 2017, 11:21:04 AM
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/needs-washed

Ok, that makes sense.  DH grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country, but his Mom is from a small town near Pittsburgh.  Pittsburghese is very unique.

Sorry to use you as an example, but this one bugs the hell out of me. Unique means one of a kind.  You can't have degrees of uniqueness.

Wow, you have to be a hardcore grammar Nazi for that one to bother you.

There are lots of us in the wild, we are not unique, we are legion.

Commas instead of periods/semicolons, irony?  I can't tell.

There are degrees of unique.  You can have a unique shade of green, or you can just have a unique color altogether.  A unique color is more unique than a new different shade of green.   If you have a bunch of 4's in a row, a 5 is unique.  An tilde is much more unique.

Those aren't degrees. Those are absolutes in their own right.  You can have a unique shade of green (grammatically, though a shade amongst thousands I wouldn't consider special), but that shade can't be more unique than something else, nor can it be very unique. Something is one of a kind or it isn't. If it isn't, then you need to pick another adjective.

Agreed.

Unique is a binary word.  It either is or isn't;  on or off;  black or white;  yes or no.  Any word that is binary or absolute should never have an adjective describing how much or to what degree.

In the world of chaos, though, every person has a different truth.  If I were to show a picture of a table, some might think it is only a 7 on a scale of one to 10 on it's "table-ness".  Some might think it is more a 10.  If it were an end-table, the viewpoints would probably change.  A dining room table might be considered more of a table than a cocktail table.  So, are the different degrees of how unique something may be? 

In some ways I think it may be argued otherwise. 

I would say the word "Unique" is about a 9 on a scale of one to ten as far as being a binary word.  Therefore, I would probably argue it is close enough and does not need additional help from the word "very".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on August 24, 2017, 06:02:00 AM
I would say the word "Unique" is about a 9 on a scale of one to ten as far as being a binary word.  Therefore, I would probably argue it is close enough and does not need additional help from the word "very".

I find it fascinating that you don't seem to have any difficulty in ascribing a scale of 1-10 for degrees of "binary-ness", yet you seem rather certain that there cannot be varying degrees of uniqueness. It would appear that you consider the word "binary" to be non-binary. If you don't hear from me again, my head probably exploded from the irony.

Bonus thought: Why aren't irony and steely synonyms?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: FrugalToque on August 24, 2017, 06:17:45 AM
"Prolly" has to go.  I agree with that.

"Seriously?" should come to an end, as well.  It's the current generation's "Totally, totally ..."

Toque.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 24, 2017, 07:28:13 AM
Calling toques "beanies" has to go as well.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on August 24, 2017, 10:22:07 AM
Calling toques "beanies" has to go as well.

Today I learned that "toque" is a real English word.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 24, 2017, 10:52:21 AM
"Prolly" has to go.  I agree with that.

"Seriously?" should come to an end, as well.  It's the current generation's "Totally, totally ..."

Toque.

My 8 year old nephew shouts "Seriously!?" to anything that surprises him or requires an emotional response.  He also just spams whatever he knows will annoy the adults in the room.  The last time I saw him everything was "Epic!" He also has no sense of volume control which in all honesty casts a shadow over anything that comes out of his mouth.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cache_Stash on August 24, 2017, 11:23:00 AM
"Prolly" has to go.  I agree with that.

"Seriously?" should come to an end, as well.  It's the current generation's "Totally, totally ..."

Toque.

Totally!

Seriously.

+1
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cache_Stash on August 24, 2017, 11:34:27 AM
I would say the word "Unique" is about a 9 on a scale of one to ten as far as being a binary word.  Therefore, I would probably argue it is close enough and does not need additional help from the word "very".

I find it fascinating that you don't seem to have any difficulty in ascribing a scale of 1-10 for degrees of "binary-ness", yet you seem rather certain that there cannot be varying degrees of uniqueness. It would appear that you consider the word "binary" to be non-binary. If you don't hear from me again, my head probably exploded from the irony.

Bonus thought: Why aren't irony and steely synonyms?

My point was truth could be in the eye of the beholder.  I was proposing another POV. 

Was the Pacer more unique than the Thing?  I would say they were both unique.  To what degree?  Only the beholder determines his own truth and may think the Pacer is not unique but the Thing is unique. Others may think the one is "more" unique than the other.

http://www.eyeontheparanormal.com/head_explode.jpg

To be clear.  I was only proposing other POVs.  I don't care for people using modifiers on binary terms.  It is unnecessary and not needed.  :)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 25, 2017, 09:09:04 AM
Calling toques "beanies" has to go as well.

Today I learned that "toque" is a real English word.

Well, it is a borrowed word.  But English is full of borrowed words.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 25, 2017, 09:47:06 AM
Calling toques "beanies" has to go as well.

Today I learned that "toque" is a real English word.

Well, it is a borrowed word.  But English is full of borrowed words.

The pesky Normans...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: acroy on August 25, 2017, 09:50:33 AM
headlines starting with Yes or No

i.e.

"No, (opinion other than mine) is not okay"

alrighty then, now I'm convinced!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on August 25, 2017, 09:56:29 AM
This is mostly on social media, but people who CAPITALIZE THEIR MAIN POINTS and use an excess of EXCLAMATIONS as if it helps make their emotional, irrational, and/or illogical argument any more valid!!!! Because this is SERIOUS!! And important to them!!! How DARE you have a different opinion on this matter!!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on August 25, 2017, 05:15:49 PM
I thought of another one: relevancy. Again, what's with the extra syllable? Just say relevance.

Any kind of extra words or syllables:

I am wanting to (I want to)
I am looking to (I want to)
I've got to or I have got to (I have to)


And also, for no particular reason:
Artisanal. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mac_MacGyver on August 25, 2017, 08:11:34 PM
Aioli. Seems to mean crappy burger, salad, mayonnaise etc.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 25, 2017, 10:49:15 PM
* Go Big or Go Home *

What does that really mean? Take the tail pipes off the Harley? Drink all the booze? Spend all the money? It is just so stupid.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on August 26, 2017, 11:40:48 AM
"have a blessed day".

I'm not religious and I fricking hate when people foist their religions on me. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: kissthesky on August 26, 2017, 01:07:38 PM
"I could care less"

+1! When people say "I could care less" I think most people mean "I couldn't care less"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: wenchsenior on August 26, 2017, 03:39:18 PM
"have a blessed day".

I'm not religious and I fricking hate when people foist their religions on me.

Be glad you don't live here.  Everyone from check out clerks to grocery baggers to auto mechanics say that here. Not to mention that a significant fraction of the doctors at the University hospital will end your appointment by asking if they can pray with/over you.  I usually tell them to do so for themselves if it makes the feel good, but honestly? It makes my skin CRAWL.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: daverobev on August 26, 2017, 06:26:24 PM
Kids. That is a juvenile goat. The correct word is children.

(Gasp! Oh, no, wait, I'm British, living in Canada. Nobody says child/children).

2.0. 3.0.

No, it's just 2, or 3. 2.1? Sure. 2.174? Ok. 2.0000000000? No. You don't need to (always, every time) say "two point oh!".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 27, 2017, 12:54:16 AM
"have a blessed day".

I'm not religious and I fricking hate when people foist their religions on me.
Oh, but which pronunciation do you hate more?

Bless-said
  - or -
Blest?

Ugh!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mc6 on August 27, 2017, 05:04:49 AM
I wish most of the overused words in my workplace would go away.  Collaborative!  Forward-leaning! The overuse of the semi colon!  In day to day life, the words smoothie, beanie, sweetie... 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GenXbiker on August 27, 2017, 09:38:46 AM
melting pot
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cache_Stash on August 29, 2017, 03:16:32 PM
beotch

Ranks right up there with Prolly
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on August 30, 2017, 06:11:52 AM
"have a blessed day".

I'm not religious and I fricking hate when people foist their religions on me.
Oh, but which pronunciation do you hate more?

Bless-said
  - or -
Blest?

Ugh!

Oh, I hate that one as well. I never heard it until I moved to Mississippi. EVERYONE said it there. I've since lived in Florida and Georgia, and I will occasionally hear someone say it here, but very rarely.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: davisgang90 on August 30, 2017, 06:44:03 AM
Calling toques "beanies" has to go as well.

Today I learned that "toque" is a real English word.
Everything I've learned about Canada is from Bob and Doug McKenzie, including toque.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marielle on August 30, 2017, 07:21:58 AM
"Adulting" was already mentioned but I particularly get annoyed by it when someone says they're "adulting" after they accomplished...nothing. For example, buying a car on credit. You can get a loan for a car with absolutely no credit history, no money down, and low income. Kid at work makes $12 an hour and got approved for a used truck that will cost him $36k by the end of the loan. He had no credit beforehand.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: simonsez on August 30, 2017, 07:25:34 AM
melting pot

Same here!  You can splurge and have the fondue meal of a lifetime at home for less than 1/5th the price of that ripoff restaurant.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: iluvzbeach on August 30, 2017, 07:59:45 AM
I love this thread.

The addition of "up" when it's not needed.

Examples:

Print up vs. print
Mix up [ingredients] vs. mix

When did "gift" become a verb? The list goes on and on.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on August 30, 2017, 08:20:07 AM
When did "gift" become a verb? The list goes on and on.

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=gift&allowed_in_frame=0), the use of "gift" as a verb dates to at least the 16th century. I've certainly known "gift" as a verb for as long as I've been aware of what a verb is.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 30, 2017, 09:44:48 AM
I wish most of the overused words in my workplace would go away.  Collaborative!  Forward-leaning! The overuse of the semi colon!  In day to day life, the words smoothie, beanie, sweetie...
I agree with your workplace words and beanie. I realize that sweetie has to be used judiciously, but I'm not sure about smoothie. Since a smoothie is a real thing, what word would you use instead?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on August 30, 2017, 09:57:16 AM
"Adulting" was already mentioned but I particularly get annoyed by it when someone says they're "adulting" after they accomplished...nothing. For example, buying a car on credit. You can get a loan for a car with absolutely no credit history, no money down, and low income. Kid at work makes $12 an hour and got approved for a used truck that will cost him $36k by the end of the loan. He had no credit beforehand.

This one actually started several years back as a play on words from one blog ("How To Adult") with genuinely decent advice, but as it's entered mainstream usage it gets more and more grating.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 31, 2017, 06:09:00 AM
Calling toques "beanies" has to go as well.

Today I learned that "toque" is a real English word.
Everything I've learned about Canada is from Bob and Doug McKenzie, including toque.

Oh dear.  Oh.  Ouch.

Mind you, 2-4 is a valid term.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 31, 2017, 11:00:50 AM
Needless to say and then the talker/poster goes on a mind-numbingly long rant about what was needless to say.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: wenchsenior on August 31, 2017, 04:45:49 PM
I don't know what "woke" means, and I don't intend to find out.

Even more horrible is "woke bae."  The first few times I heard it I thought it was a foreign phrase.  Eventually, I realized it was some kind of slang that a whole bunch of podcasters AND pundits started saying to be either cool or ironic or both.  So then I had to go look it up.  WHAT A STUPID FUCKING PHRASE.  Why would people want to sound mentally impaired when they speak?

What's even funnier is that 'bae' apparently is actually the Danish word for 'shit'.  I wonder if most of the 'hip' crowd realize this? 

In other news, I will try to cut down on my use of 'adulting,' based on this thread.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Adventine on August 31, 2017, 08:46:34 PM
I remembered a few more!

"As per my previous email..."
"As per checking..."
"Greetings!"

Sigh.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 31, 2017, 10:43:06 PM
I shuttered, but it didn't phase me.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on August 31, 2017, 11:55:22 PM
I shuttered, but it didn't phase me.

This was physically painful to read. I hope you're happy.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: davisgang90 on September 01, 2017, 05:19:17 AM
I shuttered, but it didn't phase me.
Don't phase me Bro!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GenXbiker on September 03, 2017, 02:22:33 PM
"undocumented immigrant" instead of illegal alien or illegal immigrant.   Don't downplay it - call it like it is.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on September 03, 2017, 03:53:10 PM
"undocumented immigrant" instead of illegal alien or illegal immigrant.   Don't downplay it - call it like it is.
Some would say that your words are the ones that attach judgment to the status of a person, so your description would be "up-playing it" in your parlance.  Most people agree that human beings aren't "illegal".  But their status may be documented or undocumented. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GenXbiker on September 03, 2017, 04:04:12 PM
"undocumented immigrant" instead of illegal alien or illegal immigrant.   Don't downplay it - call it like it is.
Some would say that your words are the ones that attach judgment to the status of a person, so your description would be "up-playing it" in your parlance.  Most people agree that human beings aren't "illegal".  But their status may be documented or undocumented.

"They" would be wrong to say that those humans aren't illegal.  This is direct from government documentation:

"Illegal Alien
Also known as an "Undocumented Alien," is an alien who has entered the United States illegally and is deportable if apprehended, or an alien who entered the United States legally but who has fallen "out of status" and is deportable."

https://www.irs.gov/individuals/international-taxpayers/immigration-terms-and-definitions-involving-aliens

Also, see:

http://www.heritage.org/immigration/commentary/sorry-the-accurate-legal-term-illegal-alien
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: iris lily on September 03, 2017, 10:55:40 PM
"undocumented immigrant" instead of illegal alien or illegal immigrant.   Don't downplay it - call it like it is.
Some would say that your words are the ones that attach judgment to the status of a person, so your description would be "up-playing it" in your parlance.  Most people agree that human beings aren't "illegal".  But their status may be documented or undocumented.
Would  we be allowed to say "he is here illegally? " We can say " he has a gun illegally."

Or should I say " he is an undocmented gun owner" to indicate he has no permit?

Anyway.

I hate this new custom of cutting off part of the word " invitation" and saying   "I received an invite to Jessie's party."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on September 04, 2017, 06:12:30 AM
It is one thing to turn a noun into a verb if there is no appropriate verb, but when there is an appropriate verb, stop!!  I rant because I just saw an article about someone wearing her "hand-loomed" shawl.  Ack.  It is a hand-woven shawl, we have the vocabulary, people.  A loom is a structure on which cloth is woven, not loomed. Weave, weaving, woven, not loom, looming, loomed.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on September 04, 2017, 12:57:39 PM
It is one thing to turn a noun into a verb if there is no appropriate verb, but when there is an appropriate verb, stop!!  I rant because I just saw an article about someone wearing her "hand-loomed" shawl.  Ack.  It is a hand-woven shawl, we have the vocabulary, people.  A loom is a structure on which cloth is woven, not loomed. Weave, weaving, woven, not loom, looming, loomed.

They probably just meant that a large, floating hand perpetually looms over the shawl.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on September 04, 2017, 02:21:20 PM
It is one thing to turn a noun into a verb if there is no appropriate verb, but when there is an appropriate verb, stop!!  I rant because I just saw an article about someone wearing her "hand-loomed" shawl.  Ack.  It is a hand-woven shawl, we have the vocabulary, people.  A loom is a structure on which cloth is woven, not loomed. Weave, weaving, woven, not loom, looming, loomed.

They probably just meant that a large, floating hand perpetually looms over the shawl.

Ooooh, I want to see that.   ;-)  It would be correct usage, almost.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GenXbiker on September 05, 2017, 09:23:11 AM
"undocumented immigrant" instead of illegal alien or illegal immigrant.   Don't downplay it - call it like it is.
Some would say that your words are the ones that attach judgment to the status of a person, so your description would be "up-playing it" in your parlance.  Most people agree that human beings aren't "illegal".  But their status may be documented or undocumented.

"They" would be wrong to say that those humans aren't illegal.  This is direct from government documentation:

"Illegal Alien
Also known as an "Undocumented Alien," is an alien who has entered the United States illegally and is deportable if apprehended, or an alien who entered the United States legally but who has fallen "out of status" and is deportable."

https://www.irs.gov/individuals/international-taxpayers/immigration-terms-and-definitions-involving-aliens

Also, see:

http://www.heritage.org/immigration/commentary/sorry-the-accurate-legal-term-illegal-alien

And on the same topic, in light of the latest news, how about "dreamers?"   Please!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on September 05, 2017, 09:57:55 AM
"undocumented immigrant" instead of illegal alien or illegal immigrant.   Don't downplay it - call it like it is.
Some would say that your words are the ones that attach judgment to the status of a person, so your description would be "up-playing it" in your parlance.  Most people agree that human beings aren't "illegal".  But their status may be documented or undocumented.

"They" would be wrong to say that those humans aren't illegal.  This is direct from government documentation:

"Illegal Alien - Also known as an "Undocumented Alien," is an alien who has entered the United States illegally and is deportable if apprehended, or an alien who entered the United States legally but who has fallen "out of status" and is deportable."

https://www.irs.gov/individuals/international-taxpayers/immigration-terms-and-definitions-involving-aliens

Also, see:

http://www.heritage.org/immigration/commentary/sorry-the-accurate-legal-term-illegal-alien

It's weird that you feel the need to use the term 'Illegal Alien' while referencing a website that indicates the equivalency of 'Illegal' and 'Undocumented' while referencing the term.

Even stranger given that your ancestry is not native and you are a multi-generational anchor baby who descended from illegal alien stock.

Mod Note: Please rephrase this, there's a better way to make your point in a less offensive manner.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GenXbiker on September 05, 2017, 10:10:27 AM
"undocumented immigrant" instead of illegal alien or illegal immigrant.   Don't downplay it - call it like it is.
Some would say that your words are the ones that attach judgment to the status of a person, so your description would be "up-playing it" in your parlance.  Most people agree that human beings aren't "illegal".  But their status may be documented or undocumented.

"They" would be wrong to say that those humans aren't illegal.  This is direct from government documentation:

"Illegal Alien - Also known as an "Undocumented Alien," is an alien who has entered the United States illegally and is deportable if apprehended, or an alien who entered the United States legally but who has fallen "out of status" and is deportable."

https://www.irs.gov/individuals/international-taxpayers/immigration-terms-and-definitions-involving-aliens

Also, see:

http://www.heritage.org/immigration/commentary/sorry-the-accurate-legal-term-illegal-alien

It's weird that you feel the need to use the term 'Illegal Alien' while referencing a website that indicates the equivalency of 'Illegal' and 'Undocumented' while referencing the term.

Both websites specifically state "illegal alien" as a government term.  If you read the comments prior to yours, you will see that I was responding to someone that didn't think humans could actually be illegal.   So I linked to the government documentation that specifically defines "illegal alien" while mentioning "undocumented alien" as an alternative.   If you look at my very first comment on the topic, you will see that the terminology I would like to go away is "undocumented immigrant."   I guess, I'm not sure what is so difficult to understand about that or why I should even have to explain it.   People having been posting some pretty minor things that they would like to see go away, and this is one of mine.  You don't have to agree with it, despite the government definition.

Quote
Even stranger given that your ancestry is not native and you are a multi-generational anchor baby who descended from illegal alien stock.

I'm a multi-generation American and legal through and through.  Did you see me complain about anchor babies being considered illegal?  They are actually considered citizens, as crazy as that might sound.  Although, I don't see what that has to do with me posting about terminology I would like to see go away.   Are you confused or trying to confuse others?  Are you going to complain about any other posts here?  I find it strange that you are singling me out.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on September 05, 2017, 01:40:14 PM
"undocumented immigrant" instead of illegal alien or illegal immigrant.   Don't downplay it - call it like it is.
Some would say that your words are the ones that attach judgment to the status of a person, so your description would be "up-playing it" in your parlance.  Most people agree that human beings aren't "illegal".  But their status may be documented or undocumented.

"They" would be wrong to say that those humans aren't illegal.  This is direct from government documentation:

"Illegal Alien - Also known as an "Undocumented Alien," is an alien who has entered the United States illegally and is deportable if apprehended, or an alien who entered the United States legally but who has fallen "out of status" and is deportable."

https://www.irs.gov/individuals/international-taxpayers/immigration-terms-and-definitions-involving-aliens

Also, see:

http://www.heritage.org/immigration/commentary/sorry-the-accurate-legal-term-illegal-alien

It's weird that you feel the need to use the term 'Illegal Alien' while referencing a website that indicates the equivalency of 'Illegal' and 'Undocumented' while referencing the term.

Both websites specifically state "illegal alien" as a government term.  If you read the comments prior to yours, you will see that I was responding to someone that didn't think humans could actually be illegal.   So I linked to the government documentation that specifically defines "illegal alien" while mentioning "undocumented alien" as an alternative.   If you look at my very first comment on the topic, you will see that the terminology I would like to go away is "undocumented immigrant."   I guess, I'm not sure what is so difficult to understand about that or why I should even have to explain it.   People having been posting some pretty minor things that they would like to see go away, and this is one of mine.  You don't have to agree with it, despite the government definition.

Quote
Even stranger given that your ancestry is not native and you are a multi-generational anchor baby who descended from illegal alien stock.

I'm a multi-generation American and legal through and through.  Did you see me complain about anchor babies being considered illegal?  They are actually considered citizens, as crazy as that might sound.  Although, I don't see what that has to do with me posting about terminology I would like to see go away.   Are you confused or trying to confuse others?  Are you going to complain about any other posts here?  I find it strange that you are singling me out.

(Emphasis is mine). 
You're right...you can write any word/phrase you like...that's the point of this thread.   Today especially is difficult because of the political atmosphere we're in and this morning's announcement to end DACA. 
I would have said the same thing though if you had written something about epileptics or schizophrenics.  Yes, we used to apply labels to people to dehumanize them.  The politically correct terms these days are "people with epilepsy/schizophrenia".  The point is to put the person first, and then the descriptor because no person is defined by only one trait.  I do stand by my earlier statement though that people cannot be illegal, even though their status may be.  You must understand that those government definitions were created by people who politicize issues.  Surely you see that a person is not legal or illegal...their immigration status is.  So rather than just fighting for what you want to call it, think about how you would feel if someone were to tell you that your entire existence were invalid, rather than that you crossed a border without permission. 

*I'm sorry in advance if you don't like having to be "politically correct".  That's just another way to say "sensitive to the subject you're talking about".    There is nothing wrong with being sensitive to other people.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: haflander on September 05, 2017, 10:52:51 PM
Sorry if someone mentioned this; I didn't feel like scanning the whole thread.

I hate when someone says they or someone else "gave 110%/120%/150%/200%." It is literally impossible to give more than 100%. You cannot give more than you have. The ONLY people who are allowed to be described as giving MORE than 100% are those who died in the process...like a soldier or a first responder or something. Even giving 100% would result in passing out due to exhaustion or some other similar serious physical response. Therefore, I think the amount of effort that should be considered commendable is maybe 75-80%. I think this unfortunate trend can be traced to the rise in political correctness, participation trophies/awards, etc. Saying someone gave "110%" makes the person feel way better than saying they "tried really hard."

Rant over.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Leisured on September 06, 2017, 01:04:27 AM
Ratchet up, rather than rise.
Kick start, rather then start.
Is dependent on rather than depends on.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on September 06, 2017, 08:29:37 AM
Sorry if someone mentioned this; I didn't feel like scanning the whole thread.

I hate when someone says they or someone else "gave 110%/120%/150%/200%." It is literally impossible to give more than 100%. You cannot give more than you have. The ONLY people who are allowed to be described as giving MORE than 100% are those who died in the process...like a soldier or a first responder or something. Even giving 100% would result in passing out due to exhaustion or some other similar serious physical response. Therefore, I think the amount of effort that should be considered commendable is maybe 75-80%. I think this unfortunate trend can be traced to the rise in political correctness, participation trophies/awards, etc. Saying someone gave "110%" makes the person feel way better than saying they "tried really hard."

Rant over.

This depends.

With resource allocating typically 8 hours is 100% of a day.  If someone is working 12 hour days for a week to get something done, he's actually giving 150% (from a resource allocation point of view).  When people are working more than 100% it's an indication that hiring new people is necessary.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on September 06, 2017, 09:27:49 AM
I get irritated when people misuse "myself." Which they do all the time.

"Rachel and myself went to the park."

"He sent a gift to Rachel and myself."

Grr... I think it's because people feel that more syllables make them sound smarter.

Myself is a REFLEXIVE. You only use it when you're talking about something you do TO yourself. (I can hear the off-color jokes coming...)

Rachel and I went to the park. While I was there, I pushed MYSELF on the swing.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on September 06, 2017, 09:35:41 AM
I get irritated when people misused "myself." Which they do all the time.

"Rachel and myself went to the park."

"He sent a gift to Rachel and myself."

Grr... I think it's because people feel that more syllables make them sound smarter.

Myself is a REFLEXIVE. You only use it when you're talking about something you do TO yourself. (I can hear the off-color jokes coming...)

Rachel and I went to the park. While I was there, I pushed MYSELF on the swing.
YES
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: haflander on September 06, 2017, 12:40:02 PM
This depends.

With resource allocating typically 8 hours is 100% of a day.  If someone is working 12 hour days for a week to get something done, he's actually giving 150% (from a resource allocation point of view).  When people are working more than 100% it's an indication that hiring new people is necessary.

I get what you're saying. But your bolded statement is arguable; it's your opinion. I'm sure some people would say that working 12 hours is normal. Everyone has different standards for what's hard work. Maybe that's the root of why this bothers me...When complainypants people say they gave "150%," a mustachian could give same amount of effort and describe it as only a 75% effort in his world of badassity.

However, I have never heard of resource allocation...so I'm out of my realm here and probably shouldn't have replied :)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tyort1 on September 06, 2017, 01:11:32 PM
"It is what it is". 

No shit.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: NoraLenderbee on September 06, 2017, 01:35:33 PM
I get irritated when people misused "myself." Which they do all the time.

"Rachel and myself went to the park."

"He sent a gift to Rachel and myself."

Grr... I think it's because people feel that more syllables make them sound smarter.

Myself is a REFLEXIVE. You only use it when you're talking about something you do TO yourself. (I can hear the off-color jokes coming...)

Rachel and I went to the park. While I was there, I pushed MYSELF on the swing.
YES

Double YES. I think sometimes this comes from people trying to avoid using "me" for fear of making an error ("Him and me went to the park"). Other people do it to sound smart.

I know someone who would say, when she wanted your opinion about her clothes, "Does this look well?" instead of "Does this look good." She was trying to sound klassy. I finally told her it was not only wrong, it made her sound like an idiot (more politely). She doesn't say it around me any longer, but I'm not sure she's given it up completely.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on September 07, 2017, 04:19:24 PM
I get irritated when people misuse "myself." Which they do all the time.

"Rachel and myself went to the park."

"He sent a gift to Rachel and myself."

Grr... I think it's because people feel that more syllables make them sound smarter.

Myself is a REFLEXIVE. You only use it when you're talking about something you do TO yourself. (I can hear the off-color jokes coming...)

Rachel and I went to the park. While I was there, I pushed MYSELF on the swing.

The rule I was taught with this one was this: if you can separate the two subjects into their own sentences and it is still correct, then that's what you use. For example, "He sent a gift to myself" is not correct, but "He sent a gift to me" is.  The happens a lot with "The main subject of this sentence and me are off to do a random verb thing."  You wouldn't say "Me am off to do a thing" you'd say "I am off to do a thing," therefore, "The main subject of this sentence and I are off to do a random verb thing" is correct.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on September 08, 2017, 07:00:30 AM
I know someone who would say, when she wanted your opinion about her clothes, "Does this look well?" instead of "Does this look good." She was trying to sound klassy.

Let's not jump to conclusions here. Is it possible she was inquiring about the acuity of her garments' eyesight?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on September 08, 2017, 11:11:14 AM
I know someone who would say, when she wanted your opinion about her clothes, "Does this look well?" instead of "Does this look good." She was trying to sound klassy.

Let's not jump to conclusions here. Is it possible she was inquiring about the acuity of her garments' eyesight?

There has been a running gag in Game of Thrones where people keep confusing "less" and "fewer," much to stick-up-his-butt Stannis Baratheon's annoyance.  After he died his right hand man picked up the mantle of policing that mistake.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: NoraLenderbee on September 08, 2017, 11:19:17 AM
I know someone who would say, when she wanted your opinion about her clothes, "Does this look well?" instead of "Does this look good." She was trying to sound klassy.

Let's not jump to conclusions here. Is it possible she was inquiring about the acuity of her garments' eyesight?

Or their health?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on September 10, 2017, 03:16:35 PM
"Why," as in "What's your why?" or "Know your why!" Often directed at entrepreneurs or people who are trying to start a new good habit. What's wrong with the word "reason"? And why is this a new concept, this idea that it's helpful to have a reason for doing something before you do it?

Also...

"Wow. Just wow." (At least half the time, these people go on to say more, so it's not "just" wow.)

"I know, right?"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on September 10, 2017, 10:43:17 PM
PIN number
ATM machine
VIN number
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on September 11, 2017, 12:23:36 PM
Sorry if someone mentioned this; I didn't feel like scanning the whole thread.

I hate when someone says they or someone else "gave 110%/120%/150%/200%." It is literally impossible to give more than 100%. You cannot give more than you have. The ONLY people who are allowed to be described as giving MORE than 100% are those who died in the process...like a soldier or a first responder or something. Even giving 100% would result in passing out due to exhaustion or some other similar serious physical response. Therefore, I think the amount of effort that should be considered commendable is maybe 75-80%. I think this unfortunate trend can be traced to the rise in political correctness, participation trophies/awards, etc. Saying someone gave "110%" makes the person feel way better than saying they "tried really hard."

Rant over.
I agree 200%
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on September 11, 2017, 12:25:28 PM
I get irritated when people misuse "myself." Which they do all the time.

"Rachel and myself went to the park."

"He sent a gift to Rachel and myself."

Grr... I think it's because people feel that more syllables make them sound smarter.

Myself is a REFLEXIVE. You only use it when you're talking about something you do TO yourself. (I can hear the off-color jokes coming...)

Rachel and I went to the park. While I was there, I pushed MYSELF on the swing.
"...please call george or myself".  I hate that too!  How did that ever become so common?
I also hate when I can hear the "t" in often. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marielle on September 11, 2017, 12:27:24 PM
I also hate when I can hear the "t" in often.

Wait, really? Isn't that just how you say it?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on September 11, 2017, 12:34:13 PM
I get irritated when people misuse "myself." Which they do all the time.

"Rachel and myself went to the park."

"He sent a gift to Rachel and myself."

Grr... I think it's because people feel that more syllables make them sound smarter.

Myself is a REFLEXIVE. You only use it when you're talking about something you do TO yourself. (I can hear the off-color jokes coming...)

Rachel and I went to the park. While I was there, I pushed MYSELF on the swing.
"...please call george or myself".  I hate that too!  How did that ever become so common?
I also hate when I can hear the "t" in often.

That's always irritated me, too, though it's an "acceptable" pronunciation. Whenever someone I'm talking to pronounces the "T," I get distracted by it and basically don't hear the rest of their sentence because my brain has seized up at the word "often," lol.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on September 11, 2017, 01:29:03 PM
PIN number
ATM machine
VIN number

I get why some folks might be bothered by this, but in my line of work we eat, drink, and breath acronyms.  Some of them are so similar that sometimes they need to have something to distinguish them.  I have a personal beef with this as well. I met a colonel in Iraq a couple years ago who decided to be a jerk about this. I asked her "We need to [coordinate some military stuff] our ABCS systems (Army Battle Command Systems)."  She then lectured me for five minutes why I was being redundant and incorrect, and by the end of her lecture never actually answered my original question.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on September 11, 2017, 01:54:11 PM
I also hate when I can hear the "t" in often.

Wait, really? Isn't that just how you say it?

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/correct-pronunciation-of-often
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: soccerluvof4 on September 11, 2017, 02:13:58 PM
Unlucky..! that term seems to be the answer to every kid when he screws up or things don,t go right in Soccer by every coach now. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marielle on September 11, 2017, 02:16:13 PM
I also hate when I can hear the "t" in often.

Wait, really? Isn't that just how you say it?

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/correct-pronunciation-of-often

Maybe it has something to do with English not being my first language. (Or even second, if a language I forgot counts)

Not really something I can change at this point. "Offen" just sounds...wrong.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on September 11, 2017, 02:32:11 PM
"Where's it at?" instead of "Where is it?" Why add an extraneous word AND force the sentence to end with a preposition? My guess is that people start by using the contraction "where's" and then the sentence seems weird if they just end it with "it," so they tack on an extra word. I have a friend who likes to answer, "Behind the at."

(No, I don't think the preposition thing should be a hard and fast rule. I'm familiar with Winston Churchill's "That is a stupid rule, up with which I shall not put," but why re-create a perfectly good sentence to break a rule?!)

Also, +1 for unique being a word that is not modifiable. Something either is or is not unique.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on September 11, 2017, 03:32:46 PM
I'm sick of stupid-ass internet abbreviations:

DH
DW
DS
DD

But for some reason, I'm totally okay with FIL and MIL. I think it's the "Dear" part of the previous list that really bugs me.

Also sick of "hella."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on September 11, 2017, 08:58:45 PM
I'm sick of stupid-ass internet abbreviations:

DH
DW
DS
DD

But for some reason, I'm totally okay with FIL and MIL. I think it's the "Dear" part of the previous list that really bugs me.

Also sick of "hella."

Yes!

I never use DH, but do use FiL, MiL, BiL.

How do you feel about SO? I don't object to it as strongly as DH/DH, but still think that partner suffices.

(Are we about to be blacklisted by darling militants?)

Oh, I also object to the premature promotion a boyfriend/girlfriend to 'partner'.

You're 22, not living together and you've been dating for five weeks!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on September 12, 2017, 07:44:48 AM
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I get why some folks might be bothered by this, but in my line of work we eat, drink, and breath acronyms.  Some of them are so similar that sometimes they need to have something to distinguish them.  I have a personal beef with this as well. I met a colonel in Iraq a couple years ago who decided to be a jerk about this. I asked her "We need to [coordinate some military stuff] our ABCS systems (Army Battle Command Systems)."  She then lectured me for five minutes why I was being redundant and incorrect, and by the end of her lecture never actually answered my original question.

If it was spoken as described, she may not have answered your original question because there was no question asked.  :P
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on September 12, 2017, 08:15:35 AM
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I get why some folks might be bothered by this, but in my line of work we eat, drink, and breath acronyms.  Some of them are so similar that sometimes they need to have something to distinguish them.  I have a personal beef with this as well. I met a colonel in Iraq a couple years ago who decided to be a jerk about this. I asked her "We need to [coordinate some military stuff] our ABCS systems (Army Battle Command Systems)."  She then lectured me for five minutes why I was being redundant and incorrect, and by the end of her lecture never actually answered my original question.

If it was spoken as described, she may not have answered your original question because there was no question asked.  :P

Well, after working with her for a few weeks and learning her level of competence it wouldn't have made much difference.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ncornilsen on September 12, 2017, 02:17:27 PM
I'm sick of stupid-ass internet abbreviations:

DH
DW
DS
DD

But for some reason, I'm totally okay with FIL and MIL. I think it's the "Dear" part of the previous list that really bugs me.

Also sick of "hella."

(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/36/bf/ea/36bfea67e397921b010e75ea7b89c920.gif)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on September 12, 2017, 11:00:49 PM
I'm sick of stupid-ass internet abbreviations:

DH
DW
DS
DD


I hear you, but have to say I do like the straightforwardness of DH/DW/DS/DD, etc. I'll take that any day over the internet adorableness of things like "The FrugalTimbersFamily!" Mrs. FrugalTimbers. BabyTimbers. TheTimbersHound. And so on. College educated adults coming up with monikers like these. My disdain of such things probably started from reading a blog years ago when the author nicknamed her offspring Rock and HardPlace. Please.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on September 13, 2017, 05:25:06 AM
I'm sick of stupid-ass internet abbreviations:

DH
DW
DS
DD


I hear you, but have to say I do like the straightforwardness of DH/DW/DS/DD, etc. I'll take that any day over the internet adorableness of things like "The FrugalTimbersFamily!" Mrs. FrugalTimbers. BabyTimbers. TheTimbersHound. And so on. College educated adults coming up with monikers like these. My disdain of such things probably started from reading a blog years ago when the author nicknamed her offspring Rock and HardPlace. Please.

Yeah, those are twee as fuck.

Thank goodness there is another option apart from those and the D-suite.

When I refer to my husband on here, I say "my husband". Fairly straightforward but I think it could catch on.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on September 13, 2017, 11:19:13 AM
I heard one yesterday that gets under my skin.  It makes me cringe when people talk about "DNA" for something that's not biological.  I guess it's in their corporate DNA to latch on to the latest buzzwords. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on September 13, 2017, 02:15:45 PM
I gotta disagree on DH, DW, DS, DD--I think they're handy shortcuts.  Depending on your current point of view, the 'D' could stand for positive or negative descriptors:  "dear", "darling", "darn" "(edited)", etc.

I agree that the term "adult" as a verb is annoying, especially the way I see a lot of people use it on social media, but it *is* a handy alternative to "put on my big boy underwear and acted like a responsible adult, even though it's hard."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: hoosier on September 13, 2017, 02:27:40 PM
Triggered and safe space really annoy me, mostly because I just don't care about your feelings.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on September 13, 2017, 04:49:16 PM
Depending on your current point of view, the 'D' could stand for positive or negative descriptors:  "dear", "darling", "darn" "(edited)", etc.

... dickhead.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on September 15, 2017, 09:26:50 AM
I gotta disagree on DH, DW, DS, DD--I think they're handy shortcuts.  Depending on your current point of view, the 'D' could stand for positive or negative descriptors:  "dear", "darling", "darn" "(edited)", etc.
... dickhead.

I'm in the fan club for these acronyms. I would never say them aloud, but they're quite handy in my forum writing.

I never use DH, but do use FiL, MiL, BiL.

And I, in turn, hate MiL, BiL, etc. with the lower case "i". It's harder to type and twee as fuck. Use all caps, please. It's an acronym, FFS.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on September 15, 2017, 09:29:04 AM
It's harder to type and twee as fuck.

Twee. That's been said a couple of times in this thread, but I've never seen it before. I'll have to look that one up, but I suspect it'll end on on my "list of words I wish would go away."  :)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on September 15, 2017, 09:51:16 AM
I'm sick of stupid-ass internet abbreviations:

DH
DW
DS
DD

But for some reason, I'm totally okay with FIL and MIL. I think it's the "Dear" part of the previous list that really bugs me.

Also sick of "hella."

Yes!

I never use DH, but do use FiL, MiL, BiL.

How do you feel about SO? I don't object to it as strongly as DH/DH, but still think that partner suffices.

(Are we about to be blacklisted by darling militants?)

Oh, I also object to the premature promotion a boyfriend/girlfriend to 'partner'.

You're 22, not living together and you've been dating for five weeks!
I'm definitely also opposed to DH/DW/etc, but not passionately so.  I don't mind SO or MIL/FIL/MIL.  Wifey and hubby make my skin crawl (wifey is worse for some reason).

"Partner" definitely shouldn't be applied too soon, but it can definitely be a boyfriend/girlfriend.  My girlfriend is my "partner" and we've been together for six years (I'm 26 and she's 25) and living together for five (and own two houses together, with our first paid-off and turned into a rental).

"Adulting" makes me think the person is anything but adult if doing something that responsible adults do is considered out of the ordinary enough to be noteworthy.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on September 15, 2017, 11:01:29 AM
"Adulting" makes me think the person is anything but adult if doing something that responsible adults do is considered out of the ordinary enough to be noteworthy.

I think that's the point, linguistically. Using it as a verb indicates that you are acting as an adult in a specific situation, even if you feel you're not embodying the term in your life overall.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on September 15, 2017, 11:06:46 AM
"Adulting" makes me think the person is anything but adult if doing something that responsible adults do is considered out of the ordinary enough to be noteworthy.

I think that's the point, linguistically. Using it as a verb indicates that you are acting as an adult in a specific situation, even if you feel you're not embodying the term in your life overall.
I could understand an 18-year-old being "proud" of "adulting" but I tend to see the term used by those in their 20s and 30s... you know, actual full-time should-be adults.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on September 15, 2017, 11:33:51 AM
"Adulting" makes me think the person is anything but adult if doing something that responsible adults do is considered out of the ordinary enough to be noteworthy.

I think that's the point, linguistically. Using it as a verb indicates that you are acting as an adult in a specific situation, even if you feel you're not embodying the term in your life overall.
I could understand an 18-year-old being "proud" of "adulting" but I tend to see the term used by those in their 20s and 30s... you know, actual full-time should-be adults.

And then there is my age group.  We are so tired of being adults, we just want to have fun and be irresponsible (and not have to cook dinner again), so there are times we use "adulting" ironically.  Forget second childhood, I want a second teenagerhood, I was much too responsible the first time around.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on September 15, 2017, 12:37:59 PM
I have a hard time with boyfriend/girlfriend when it's people of a certain age, say above 40. It just sounds weird, so I default to partner.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: daverobev on September 21, 2017, 10:55:00 AM
I also hate when I can hear the "t" in often.

Wait, really? Isn't that just how you say it?

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/correct-pronunciation-of-often

Weird. I say often with the 't', and hasten as well. I would say that most in the South East of the UK would pronounce the 't'.

I'm racking my brain for the rest of the UK. I've basically lost my firm footing on pronunciation from home now - I have to think whether I would say 'kilo-meter' or 'kilometter', now (the former, I believe).
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on September 21, 2017, 11:12:08 AM

Weird. I say often with the 't', and hasten as well. I would say that most in the South East of the UK would pronounce the 't'.

I'm racking my brain for the rest of the UK. I've basically lost my firm footing on pronunciation from home now - I have to think whether I would say 'kilo-meter' or 'kilometter', now (the former, I believe).

You'll start sounding like a Canadian one of these decades.  ;-)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Not Your Monkey on September 21, 2017, 11:20:49 AM
mansplaining
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: daverobev on September 21, 2017, 02:04:29 PM

Weird. I say often with the 't', and hasten as well. I would say that most in the South East of the UK would pronounce the 't'.

I'm racking my brain for the rest of the UK. I've basically lost my firm footing on pronunciation from home now - I have to think whether I would say 'kilo-meter' or 'kilometter', now (the former, I believe).

You'll start sounding like a Canadian one of these decades.  ;-)

Ha... maybe. Not this decade though. I refuse to call petrol "gas" when it is *clearly* a liquid :P
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BoonDogle on September 21, 2017, 03:12:52 PM
"+100"
"+1000"

Almost like a competition to see who can add the most zeros.  I get it.  You strongly agree.  "+1" or "agreed" works.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on September 21, 2017, 05:40:03 PM

Weird. I say often with the 't', and hasten as well. I would say that most in the South East of the UK would pronounce the 't'.

I'm racking my brain for the rest of the UK. I've basically lost my firm footing on pronunciation from home now - I have to think whether I would say 'kilo-meter' or 'kilometter', now (the former, I believe).

You'll start sounding like a Canadian one of these decades.  ;-)

Ha... maybe. Not this decade though. I refuse to call petrol "gas" when it is *clearly* a liquid :P

Well that is just us being lazy - it is gasoline.  You know, gasoline, benzene, kerosene, . . . .  At least doughnuts (at Tim's) are still doughnuts, not donuts.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on September 21, 2017, 08:43:39 PM

Weird. I say often with the 't', and hasten as well. I would say that most in the South East of the UK would pronounce the 't'.

I'm racking my brain for the rest of the UK. I've basically lost my firm footing on pronunciation from home now - I have to think whether I would say 'kilo-meter' or 'kilometter', now (the former, I believe).

You'll start sounding like a Canadian one of these decades.  ;-)

Ha... maybe. Not this decade though. I refuse to call petrol "gas" when it is *clearly* a liquid :P

Well that is just us being lazy - it is gasoline.  You know, gasoline, benzene, kerosene, . . . .  At least doughnuts (at Tim's) are still doughnuts, not donuts.

But not gasolene?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on September 22, 2017, 07:52:35 AM
Another phrase I recently found out makes me angry

Any sentence that begins with "As a" to mean when someone identifies with a particular subject.

"As a college student who earns minimum wage..."
"As a public service worker...."
"As a recent homeowner...."

This is becoming just so overused. Like you HAVE to bring your own personal experience to have an opinion about something?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: solon on September 22, 2017, 09:40:39 AM
Another phrase I recently found out makes me angry

Any sentence that begins with "As a" to mean when someone identifies with a particular subject.

"As a college student who earns minimum wage..."
"As a public service worker...."
"As a recent homeowner...."

This is becoming just so overused. Like you HAVE to bring your own personal experience to have an opinion about something?

You wouldn't make it very far as an agile developer. We use that phrase all the time in our user stories.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on September 22, 2017, 09:58:15 AM

Weird. I say often with the 't', and hasten as well. I would say that most in the South East of the UK would pronounce the 't'.

I'm racking my brain for the rest of the UK. I've basically lost my firm footing on pronunciation from home now - I have to think whether I would say 'kilo-meter' or 'kilometter', now (the former, I believe).

You'll start sounding like a Canadian one of these decades.  ;-)

Ha... maybe. Not this decade though. I refuse to call petrol "gas" when it is *clearly* a liquid :P

Well that is just us being lazy - it is gasoline.  You know, gasoline, benzene, kerosene, . . . .  At least doughnuts (at Tim's) are still doughnuts, not donuts.

But not gasolene?

No.  That would be silly.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tyort1 on September 22, 2017, 10:24:16 AM
"I know, right?"

Grrr.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: littleweedontheprairie on September 23, 2017, 01:35:03 PM
"We are pregnant" - I find that one slightly gross. Only one of you is pregnant. Only one of you has been impregnated. You could say you are both expecting a child. Somehow I always imagine the man stuffing his sweater with water balloons when saying that.
"Breeders" when referring to people having children. Often used by people treating their animals with inordinate amounts of attention. In the same category: pet owners who refer themselves as "parents" and call their pets their "babies/children".
"Truly blessed", and I am actually religious but I really cannot stand that one. It seems to be used mostly as a humblebragging tool for social media in Christian circles. " We live in such a big house that I can't keep up with the cleaning, but thankfully my children are so helpful! Of course it helps that I can stay home to teach them right! Truly blessed to have a husband who provides for our family!" ... yuck.
"Clean food", "clean eating" - really you just mean "cooked from scratch. Also "farm grown" whatever - there is no such thing as factory grown vegetables or meat. I promise, it all comes from a farm!
This is a fun thread. Thanks for starting it!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dave1442397 on September 23, 2017, 01:48:37 PM
First come, first serve. Unless you're playing tennis, just no.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on September 23, 2017, 02:34:46 PM
"Clean food", "clean eating" - really you just mean "cooked from scratch.

I've always taken clean eating to mean no garbage and lots of veggies.  I can cook a mean grilled cheese or breaded fish n' chips from scratch but wouldn't say either is an example of clean eating.  :P
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on September 23, 2017, 02:42:49 PM
Oh man, the "we are pregnant" gets me too. Unless you are a lesbian couple each carrying one, it's not a shared attribute. If you insist on including the non-fetus-carrying partner, just say "we are expecting a child".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on September 23, 2017, 08:42:59 PM
"Clean food", "clean eating" - really you just mean "cooked from scratch.

I've always taken clean eating to mean no garbage and lots of veggies.  I can cook a mean grilled cheese or breaded fish n' chips from scratch but wouldn't say either is an example of clean eating.  :P

I always see "eating clean" in the same discussions as cross-fit and "paleo" dieting, but I haven't found a good definition of what "clean" food is.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Free Spirit on September 23, 2017, 08:53:54 PM
Speaking of eating, I get irritated when people say they are going to "do" their chosen food.

[person ordering food] "I'll do the steak and baked potato, then for dessert I'll do the apple pie."

I want to say, please describe to us in great detail exactly how you're going to "do" those foods... ;p
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: littleweedontheprairie on September 23, 2017, 09:43:18 PM
Yes! And also when the waiter/waitress feels compelled to comment on what the customer ended up "doing" with their order: "oh, you did a great job on that"; or worse: "are we still working on that?", like a nurse asking about a bowel movememt...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on September 23, 2017, 11:12:19 PM
From Betty Bowers, America's Best Christian:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=babB7_WJZQw
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Poundwise on September 26, 2017, 03:08:50 PM
In the same category: pet owners who refer themselves as "parents" and call their pets their "babies/children".
"Truly blessed", and I am actually religious but I really cannot stand that one. It seems to be used mostly as a humblebragging tool for social media in Christian circles. " We live in such a big house that I can't keep up with the cleaning, but thankfully my children are so helpful! Of course it helps that I can stay home to teach them right! Truly blessed to have a husband who provides for our family!" ... yuck. 
On target!

Has anybody mentioned "furbabies"? I know that many people love their pets more than their children or other people's children, but still...

"Hero" is a word that I used to like because it referred to a person who had shown great, unusual, bravery in accomplishing a selfless and significant goal.  Now it is used on the most trivial occasions.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on September 26, 2017, 03:47:05 PM
Has anybody mentioned "furbabies"? I know that many people love their pets more than their children or other people's children, but still...
I think the "fur baby" thing has come about thanks to pet stores in malls that sell $1000 <insert today's breed fad> puppies.  It's a super smart business idea--the target market is right there.

Sadly, I know a family that bought two of those puppies.  Spent $4k by the time they had all the shots/supplies/gear/etc.  They're a year into it, and regret their decision.  But now they're stuck for the next 10+ years.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dividendman on September 26, 2017, 07:41:27 PM
hahaha.... this thread is funny.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dividendman on September 26, 2017, 08:45:33 PM
2.0. 3.0.

No, it's just 2, or 3. 2.1? Sure. 2.174? Ok. 2.0000000000? No. You don't need to (always, every time) say "two point oh!".

Perhaps they wish to convey the precision of the result i.e. 2 is less precise than 2.0 (or more properly 2.0 x 10^0).
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on September 27, 2017, 07:42:31 AM
2.0. 3.0.

No, it's just 2, or 3. 2.1? Sure. 2.174? Ok. 2.0000000000? No. You don't need to (always, every time) say "two point oh!".

Perhaps they wish to convey the precision of the result i.e. 2 is less precise than 2.0 (or more properly 2.0 x 10^0).

Or in the case of software to indicate that it's not really done, and you should be expecting a 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4 beta shortly.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on September 27, 2017, 08:26:52 AM
2.0. 3.0.

No, it's just 2, or 3. 2.1? Sure. 2.174? Ok. 2.0000000000? No. You don't need to (always, every time) say "two point oh!".

Perhaps they wish to convey the precision of the result i.e. 2 is less precise than 2.0 (or more properly 2.0 x 10^0).

Or in the case of software to indicate that it's not really done, and you should be expecting a 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4 beta shortly.
I'm more a fan of keeping my software at 0.9.x for multiple years until management has figured out that the numbers my program spits out are not magic and actually have to be determined in some way.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: chaskavitch on October 09, 2017, 08:03:31 AM
I heard one yesterday that gets under my skin.  It makes me cringe when people talk about "DNA" for something that's not biological.  I guess it's in their corporate DNA to latch on to the latest buzzwords.

Oh, thank you.  I did a lot of bacterial/viral genetic work in college, and this really bothers me too.  Every time I hear it, my inner Inigo Montoya says, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 09, 2017, 08:26:53 AM
I heard one yesterday that gets under my skin.  It makes me cringe when people talk about "DNA" for something that's not biological.  I guess it's in their corporate DNA to latch on to the latest buzzwords.

Oh, thank you.  I did a lot of bacterial/viral genetic work in college, and this really bothers me too.  Every time I hear it, my inner Inigo Montoya says, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

Yes thank you.  DNA = deoxyribose nucleic acid, and no I did not have to Google it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Laura33 on October 09, 2017, 09:02:31 AM
"Would of."  I've seen it here a number of times, and it just makes my teeth hurt.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 09, 2017, 09:08:15 AM
"Would of."  I've seen it here a number of times, and it just makes my teeth hurt.

Words that we slur while talking don't really need to be spelled that way - "I'm gonna", etc.  "Would of" would be OK as "would've", because it is "would have".  But typed out "would of", ugh.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on October 09, 2017, 09:09:07 AM
"Would of."  I've seen it here a number of times, and it just makes my teeth hurt.

Oh, man, I hate that.

Makes me think of something that a (former*) Facebook friend used to write all the time that was mind-bogglingly worse:

"kindave."

As in, "I'm kindave tired right now."


*"Former," because she, a Trump supporter because of her environment, unfriended me. Why? Because her abusive shitpile of a husband (literally physically abusive) would go through her Facebook profile and make her unfriend anyone he didn't approve of.



Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: daverobev on October 09, 2017, 12:48:01 PM
I heard one yesterday that gets under my skin.  It makes me cringe when people talk about "DNA" for something that's not biological.  I guess it's in their corporate DNA to latch on to the latest buzzwords.

Oh, thank you.  I did a lot of bacterial/viral genetic work in college, and this really bothers me too.  Every time I hear it, my inner Inigo Montoya says, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

Yes thank you.  DNA = deoxyribose nucleic acid, and no I did not have to Google it.

Deoxyribonucleic acid.

Should've checked in a search engine of your choice. Har.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on October 09, 2017, 12:55:21 PM
"... in any way, shape, or form." Argh. So overused and not at all helpful in making one's point.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Free Spirit on October 09, 2017, 01:20:43 PM
I heard one yesterday that gets under my skin.  It makes me cringe when people talk about "DNA" for something that's not biological.  I guess it's in their corporate DNA to latch on to the latest buzzwords.

Oh, thank you.  I did a lot of bacterial/viral genetic work in college, and this really bothers me too.  Every time I hear it, my inner Inigo Montoya says, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

Yes thank you.  DNA = deoxyribose nucleic acid, and no I did not have to Google it.

Deoxyribonucleic acid.

Should've checked in a search engine of your choice. Har.

I believe you are both correct. In the first paper (1953) it is referred to as "Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid" but in subsequent papers it is written as "Deoxyribonucleic Acid".

http://www.nature.com/nature/dna50/archive.html?foxtrotcallback=true
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: daverobev on October 09, 2017, 01:25:05 PM
I heard one yesterday that gets under my skin.  It makes me cringe when people talk about "DNA" for something that's not biological.  I guess it's in their corporate DNA to latch on to the latest buzzwords.

Oh, thank you.  I did a lot of bacterial/viral genetic work in college, and this really bothers me too.  Every time I hear it, my inner Inigo Montoya says, "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

Yes thank you.  DNA = deoxyribose nucleic acid, and no I did not have to Google it.

Deoxyribonucleic acid.

Should've checked in a search engine of your choice. Har.

I believe you are both correct. In the first paper (1953) it is referred to as "Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid" but in subsequent papers it is written as "Deoxyribonucleic Acid".

http://www.nature.com/nature/dna50/archive.html?foxtrotcallback=true

Huh, well, every day you learn something new isn't a day wasted, right? I stand (sit) corrected.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Step37 on October 09, 2017, 01:25:55 PM
Sammich/sammy.

It makes my skin crawl when grown adults say this instead of sandwich. It sounds like baby talk and I want to yell, “it’s a fucking SANDWICH,” but I don’t because that would be crazy. Inside voice only...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Acastus on October 10, 2017, 11:38:38 AM
"It is what it is."

Sub in
* I don't have time to fix it.
* I don't have to use it, so I don't care.
* We are stuck with it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Step37 on October 10, 2017, 04:44:15 PM
Yes! And also when the waiter/waitress feels compelled to comment on what the customer ended up "doing" with their order: "oh, you did a great job on that"; or worse: "are we still working on that?", like a nurse asking about a bowel movememt...

THIS! “We” instead of “you”.

“And how are we doing today?” I don’t know about you, but I want to punch you in the throat...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on October 10, 2017, 04:57:25 PM
Middle aged women who talk about "gettin' some awesomesauce time with my peeps" in a sad effort to sound young and hip.

Hint: they don't
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsStubble on October 10, 2017, 07:09:56 PM
Functionality

I hate hearing people say that word at work.  "what's the functionality of this feature?"   

The function of something is its function.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on October 10, 2017, 07:19:53 PM
Functionality

I hate hearing people say that word at work.  "what's the functionality of this feature?"   

The function of something is its function.

OMG, yes!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: paddedhat on October 11, 2017, 05:53:46 PM
I'd like to add "needs <done>" where people miss out the "to be" part, e.g. a car needs moved / this needs done by Friday / the room needs cleaned.

On a related note, I'll add "because <reason>" where people leave out the "of." For example, "I need to move my car because hailstorm." Or, "Our kitchen is in a shambles because remodeling."


The first example might be a regional thing. West Virginia/Pennsylvania and perhaps other places. I agree, it sounds odd.

Second example is because hipster-speak. Or because irony.

Yes, I suspect the "needs washed" etc. construction might be regional.  My husband used this and didn't realize it was incorrect until he was an adult in graduate school...years later, he still sometimes pauses and self-checks his grammar to see that he's constructing the sentence correctly.   I'm not sure if he picked it up from family or from the Pacific NW region where he grew up.  However, the only other person I've heard regularly using it (a podcaster) was also from the PNW, so...

The first example is definitely a Pennsylvania thing, and it may have come from Pennsylvania Dutch.  The second one I've never heard of.

Damn Dougules, you amaze me. I was raised by a Pa. Dutch step father. His parents had him as a very late in life Catholic accident. By the time I met them they looked about old enough to be God's parents. His parents only spoke Pa. Dutch in the house and his mom only read it, and not English. As I was reading this post I knew exactly where it came from, but certainly didn't expect to have an Alabama resident confirm it. English speakers from a Pa. Dutch background can be really tough to understand. Early in my home building career I had a lot of older "dutchy" subcontractors. When they called the house, my wife would ask them to hold on, and hand me the phone. They were speaking English, sort of, but the wife had no clue as to what they were saying. Being raised with it, I never missed a single crazy word of their fast speech and jumbled sentence structure, but God help you if it was your first time trying to talk with a dutchy.

One I never forget happened when a buddy of mine bought a farm field, deep in Pa. Dutch country. One day he got a call from a local farmer. The guy identified himself by his last name only. He then said, "do you want me to come make your fields off?" My buddy asked him what he was saying. The farmer repeated the same thing again. My buddy politely tells him that he still doesn't understand. The farmer then lets out an "Achk" which is a dutchy grunt of frustration, and says, while talking out loud to himself, "how do I say it in English?" he then says, "would you like me to come and cut your grass" 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: paddedhat on October 11, 2017, 06:02:25 PM
Here is one that I don't understand in that it appears to be a relatively new trend, at least to my ears. I only hear it from females, and they look and/or sound to be in the under 30 YO group.  It involves a pronunciation tic that takes a multi-syllable word ending in N and dropping the last syllable, replacing it with a hard N.  Example would be Mountain, or certain. I don't know if it's regional or trendy, but it irritates the hell out of me.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on October 11, 2017, 07:17:47 PM
Here is one that I don't understand in that it appears to be a relatively new trend, at least to my ears. I only hear it from females, and they look and/or sound to be in the under 30 YO group.  It involves a pronunciation tic that takes a multi-syllable word ending in N and dropping the last syllable, replacing it with a hard N.  Example would be Mountain, or certain. I don't know if it's regional or trendy, but it irritates the hell out of me.

So skipping the "ai" or accentuating the "n?"

Mountn or MountaiN?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: paddedhat on October 11, 2017, 07:30:03 PM
No, more like skipping the ai, and going for a soft n. My wife thinks it's sort of sounds like ending the word, by cutting it short and wrapping it up with with an odd, soft grunt.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: pbkmaine on October 11, 2017, 07:42:09 PM
No, more like skipping the ai, and going for a soft n. My wife thinks it's sort of sounds like ending the word, by cutting it short and wrapping it up with with an odd, soft grunt.

It’s a glottal stop:

http://www.linguisticsnetwork.com/a-closer-look-at-flaps-and-glottal-stops-in-standard-american-english/
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on October 11, 2017, 07:47:46 PM
No, more like skipping the ai, and going for a soft n. My wife thinks it's sort of sounds like ending the word, by cutting it short and wrapping it up with with an odd, soft grunt.

It’s a glottal stop:

http://www.linguisticsnetwork.com/a-closer-look-at-flaps-and-glottal-stops-in-standard-american-english/

I see that in the Army. Sergeant gets pronounced "Sarnt" quite often. It seems to be a combination of regional dialect and rushed/lazy speech.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: paddedhat on October 11, 2017, 08:27:43 PM
No, more like skipping the ai, and going for a soft n. My wife thinks it's sort of sounds like ending the word, by cutting it short and wrapping it up with with an odd, soft grunt.

It’s a glottal stop:

http://www.linguisticsnetwork.com/a-closer-look-at-flaps-and-glottal-stops-in-standard-american-english/

I know I'm not the sharpest knife in the drawer, but FFS, that could of been posted in Russian, and it would be just as useful to me, LOL.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: pbkmaine on October 12, 2017, 01:14:55 AM
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on October 16, 2017, 11:27:08 AM
I'd like to add "needs <done>" where people miss out the "to be" part, e.g. a car needs moved / this needs done by Friday / the room needs cleaned.

On a related note, I'll add "because <reason>" where people leave out the "of." For example, "I need to move my car because hailstorm." Or, "Our kitchen is in a shambles because remodeling."


The first example might be a regional thing. West Virginia/Pennsylvania and perhaps other places. I agree, it sounds odd.

Second example is because hipster-speak. Or because irony.

Yes, I suspect the "needs washed" etc. construction might be regional.  My husband used this and didn't realize it was incorrect until he was an adult in graduate school...years later, he still sometimes pauses and self-checks his grammar to see that he's constructing the sentence correctly.   I'm not sure if he picked it up from family or from the Pacific NW region where he grew up.  However, the only other person I've heard regularly using it (a podcaster) was also from the PNW, so...

The first example is definitely a Pennsylvania thing, and it may have come from Pennsylvania Dutch.  The second one I've never heard of.

Damn Dougules, you amaze me. I was raised by a Pa. Dutch step father. His parents had him as a very late in life Catholic accident. By the time I met them they looked about old enough to be God's parents. His parents only spoke Pa. Dutch in the house and his mom only read it, and not English. As I was reading this post I knew exactly where it came from, but certainly didn't expect to have an Alabama resident confirm it. English speakers from a Pa. Dutch background can be really tough to understand. Early in my home building career I had a lot of older "dutchy" subcontractors. When they called the house, my wife would ask them to hold on, and hand me the phone. They were speaking English, sort of, but the wife had no clue as to what they were saying. Being raised with it, I never missed a single crazy word of their fast speech and jumbled sentence structure, but God help you if it was your first time trying to talk with a dutchy.

One I never forget happened when a buddy of mine bought a farm field, deep in Pa. Dutch country. One day he got a call from a local farmer. The guy identified himself by his last name only. He then said, "do you want me to come make your fields off?" My buddy asked him what he was saying. The farmer repeated the same thing again. My buddy politely tells him that he still doesn't understand. The farmer then lets out an "Achk" which is a dutchy grunt of frustration, and says, while talking out loud to himself, "how do I say it in English?" he then says, "would you like me to come and cut your grass"

DH (haha) is from Pa. Dutch country, so he will point out "Dutchy" things people say there.  I was told by a lady in his home town that English was the second language for most folks in the area 100 years ago. 

DH's family is from Western Pa., though, so I occasionally get confused on which things are "Dutchy" and which things are Pittsburghese.   Throw in Alabamanese, and it gets crazy. 

On top of that, I was raised Mormon, so I instantly recognized the moun'ain glottal stop that's also in this thread as a Utah thing.  They have their own set of weird regionalisms, but what is funny is that they don't realize they have their own accent. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Louisville on October 16, 2017, 11:43:20 AM
"Female" instead of "woman" or "girl". Sounds like you're talking about animals. And, I never hear someone who uses "female" like that use "male" the same way.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on October 16, 2017, 02:12:34 PM
"You look tired!" (Gee, thanks.)

"Where's your smile today?" "Did you forget your smile?" "C'mon, smile!" (I'm not generally a frowny or unpleasant person, but no one smiles 24/7. It seems like anytime a stranger (always male) catches me NOT smiling, one of these tired phrases is trotted out. I actually asked a TSA security officer once if he ever asks men that question. Airport security seemed like an odd place to expect everyone to be grinning anyway.)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on October 17, 2017, 11:17:58 AM
Another one that bothers me is when Canadians say "North America" when you can tell they're not trying to include Mexico. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 17, 2017, 05:31:09 PM
Another one that bothers me is when Canadians say "North America" when you can tell they're not trying to include Mexico.

Since North America includes a lot more land south of Mexico (exactly how far seems to depend on where Central America is considered to start), maybe they are shortening it from "parts of North America that speak mostly English"?  I say mostly to allow for the large amount of French and Spanish spoken in various places.

I suppose this goes along with the USians who call themselves Americans, without including everyone else from Chile to Canada.  And yes, I realise the full name of the country lends itself to this.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on October 17, 2017, 07:07:17 PM
Another one that bothers me is when Canadians say "North America" when you can tell they're not trying to include Mexico.

Since North America includes a lot more land south of Mexico (exactly how far seems to depend on where Central America is considered to start), maybe they are shortening it from "parts of North America that speak mostly English"?  I say mostly to allow for the large amount of French and Spanish spoken in various places.

I suppose this goes along with the USians who call themselves Americans, without including everyone else from Chile to Canada.  And yes, I realise the full name of the country lends itself to this.

You're right about using "Americans." I personally actually generally go out of my way to rephrase so I don't call myself American to non-US people from the Americas.  In Spanish I always use "estadounidense."  And it's just as bad for Canadians to use "North Americans" if they don't include Mexicans and maybe Nicaraguans and Cubans, too. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on October 17, 2017, 08:58:06 PM
Before the United States of America became the USA, the British referred to the area as the American colonies. Things from there came to be known as American.

If speakers of other languages want to use "American" to mean other things, they are free to, but it frankly the boat has sailed as far as English is concerned.

"USian" just looks and sounds awful. That would be one of my own Words/Phrases I Wish Would Go Away!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on October 17, 2017, 09:36:44 PM
North America usually denotes just the US and Canada because they are the large , hyper developed, culturally homogeneous block. Not what technically constitutes the geographical continent that also includes Guatemala and Honduras. I mean, when you read of an international corporation looking to expand to North America, it's understood that they really just want a phone number with a +1 dialing code.

Notable exception: the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) does include Mexico.

Language is full of shortcuts and approximations. When asked my weight by a medical professional, I don't answer in Newtons or school them on the technically proper physical terms (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_versus_weight).
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on October 18, 2017, 09:53:28 AM
"USian" just looks and sounds awful. That would be one of my own Words/Phrases I Wish Would Go Away!
In Spanish I always use "estadounidense."
Estadounidense means United-States-ian, but in a way that doesn't sound awful (we need an English equivalent). :)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on October 18, 2017, 11:09:07 AM
Before the United States of America became the USA, the British referred to the area as the American colonies. Things from there came to be known as American.

If speakers of other languages want to use "American" to mean other things, they are free to, but it frankly the boat has sailed as far as English is concerned.

"USian" just looks and sounds awful. That would be one of my own Words/Phrases I Wish Would Go Away!

Amerigo Vespucci was an Italian who was employed by the Spanish. 


North America usually denotes just the US and Canada because they are the large , hyper developed, culturally homogeneous block. Not what technically constitutes the geographical continent that also includes Guatemala and Honduras. I mean, when you read of an international corporation looking to expand to North America, it's understood that they really just want a phone number with a +1 dialing code.

Notable exception: the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) does include Mexico.

Language is full of shortcuts and approximations. When asked my weight by a medical professional, I don't answer in Newtons or school them on the technically proper physical terms (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_versus_weight).

In general I would agree about shortcuts and approximations, but it's grating when it's a subtle put-down to our neighbors to the south.  Why not just say "The US and Canada?"  It's only two more syllables.

And I'd like to know if we could get any Quebecois to chime in about whether they're part of a culturally homogenous block with Anglo-North America.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on October 18, 2017, 11:12:09 AM
"USian" just looks and sounds awful. That would be one of my own Words/Phrases I Wish Would Go Away!
In Spanish I always use "estadounidense."
Estadounidense means United-States-ian, but in a way that doesn't sound awful (we need an English equivalent). :)

Yes, we do. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ZiziPB on October 18, 2017, 11:33:55 AM
The word "journey", especially when used by any contestant on the Bachelor/Bachelorette.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ponyboy on October 18, 2017, 12:58:53 PM
The word "REALLY" seems to have vanished for the most part.  Its no longer used as a one word sentence.  YOu know what I mean...when the word "really" is used in disgust.  Like if you do something stupid and someone goes..."REALLY!?" 

Another hip word to say now is "RIGHT."  That replaced the "really" word above.  Again...used as some sort of matter of fact statement/one word sentence crap. 

Why are people so retarded?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 18, 2017, 05:39:31 PM

And I'd like to know if we could get any Quebecois to chime in about whether they're part of a culturally homogenous block with Anglo-North America.

Snort.  ;-)

A lot of English Canadians would disagree too.  Especially when it comes to religion, politics and guns.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: FrugalSaver on October 18, 2017, 09:30:28 PM
"I could care less"

NO. THINK ABOUT IT.

I know, right?

I know r..

Oh. Sorry.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on October 19, 2017, 12:49:41 AM
Why are people so retarded?
Sorry ponyboy, that is one expression that needs to go away completely. Please, just stop using it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cache_Stash on October 19, 2017, 05:33:07 AM
Why are people so retarded?
Sorry ponyboy, that is one expression that needs to go away completely. Please, just stop using it.

The term is now minimally exceptional.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ponyboy on October 19, 2017, 08:33:09 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Laura33 on October 19, 2017, 09:08:00 AM
The word "REALLY" seems to have vanished for the most part.  Its no longer used as a one word sentence.  YOu know what I mean...when the word "really" is used in disgust.  Like if you do something stupid and someone goes..."REALLY!?" 

Another hip word to say now is "RIGHT."  That replaced the "really" word above.  Again...used as some sort of matter of fact statement/one word sentence crap. 

Why are people so retarded?

I blame Bill Cosby.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bputeFGXEjA
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on October 19, 2017, 09:27:34 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.

I imagine you're fond of the N word, too?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on October 19, 2017, 09:47:00 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.

"Snowflakes" as applied to people.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ponyboy on October 19, 2017, 11:15:06 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.

I imagine you're fond of the N word, too?

I dont use it daily but theres no reason it should be banished.  Its not illegal to say words.  If anyone says that now and is on camera its pretty much a death sentence in terms of career, public image, etc etc. 

Funny you should say that...the other day we had a black girl and guy in our apartment complex trying to get people to sign up for electric service to their provider.  I walked past the dude and he kept saying sir, sir...I ignored him then he called me racist even though I didnt say a single word.  I then told them to f*cking leave and they started calling me racist.  Went and got the property manager...he told them to leave...as they were leaving she told the property manager the only reason he was taking by side is because im a "cracker."  Then she called property manager a "white f*ggot."  But thats ok...no big deal...shes just misunderstood im sure.

I have it all on video...I thought about uploading it to youtube but was worried about repercussions.  In the state it was recorded video is ok in public I believe but audio is a problem unless you have consent...minus if you're a police officer...they can always be recorded.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ponyboy on October 19, 2017, 11:18:01 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.

"Snowflakes" as applied to people.

Its easier than saying "overly sensitive humanoids that havent been woke yet."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on October 19, 2017, 10:35:12 PM
Before the United States of America became the USA, the British referred to the area as the American colonies. Things from there came to be known as American.

If speakers of other languages want to use "American" to mean other things, they are free to, but it frankly the boat has sailed as far as English is concerned.

"USian" just looks and sounds awful. That would be one of my own Words/Phrases I Wish Would Go Away!

Amerigo Vespucci was an Italian who was employed by the Spanish. 

Well yeah. Not sure how that changes anything, unless you mean people should stop referring to themselves as American, because only this one Italian man is the true "America."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on October 19, 2017, 11:34:49 PM
Middle aged women who talk about "gettin' some awesomesauce time with my peeps" in a sad effort to sound young and hip.

Hint: they don't

My BiL referred to Facebook as "Facey" for about three weeks nine years ago and my MiL still calls it that in an attempt to sound young.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on October 20, 2017, 08:24:14 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.

"Snowflakes" as applied to people.

Its easier than saying "overly sensitive humanoids that havent been woke yet."
But in reality it's used to refer to anyone who doesn't agree with your political views

Oh yeah, and the term "woke". Just sounds silly



Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on October 20, 2017, 09:29:16 AM
"But in reality it's used to refer to anyone who doesn't agree with your political views."

In a very dismissive way. Definitely as an insult.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on October 20, 2017, 10:07:20 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.
Consider this - You're having a conversation with a friend and you refer to him as "retarded". He's not offended, he's your friend and he knows your just giving him a hard time. But the guy with down syndrome who happens to be walking doesn't understand that it's just a joke. And if he does that may be worse because he knows that his existence is the basis for a putdown. Your friend said something stupid and so you compared your friend to him.

This scenario may seem unlikely to you but not everyone with a mental handicap is obvious from appearance and more relevant to your usage here, anyone can read anything written on the internet.

People with mental handicaps have enough obstacles in life, can't you just use a less offensive putdown - like fucking dumbass?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on October 20, 2017, 10:09:07 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.
Consider this - You're having a conversation with a friend and you refer to him as "retarded". He's not offended, he's your friend and he knows your just giving him a hard time. But the guy with down syndrome who happens to be walking doesn't understand that it's just a joke. And if he does that may be worse because he knows that his existence is the basis for a putdown. Your friend said something stupid and so you compared your friend to him.

This scenario may seem unlikely to you but not everyone with a mental handicap is obvious from appearance and more relevant to your usage here, anyone can read anything written on the internet.

People with mental handicaps have enough obstacles in life, can't you just use a less offensive putdown - like fucking dumbass?

Ponyboy doesn't care. It's "alpha" to be mean and offensive to people.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on October 20, 2017, 10:16:27 AM
Before the United States of America became the USA, the British referred to the area as the American colonies. Things from there came to be known as American.

If speakers of other languages want to use "American" to mean other things, they are free to, but it frankly the boat has sailed as far as English is concerned.

"USian" just looks and sounds awful. That would be one of my own Words/Phrases I Wish Would Go Away!

Amerigo Vespucci was an Italian who was employed by the Spanish. 

Well yeah. Not sure how that changes anything, unless you mean people should stop referring to themselves as American, because only this one Italian man is the true "America."

My point was that the term "America" was for Latin America first.  People from the USA are Americans, but so are Canadians, Mexicans, and Brazilians. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ponyboy on October 20, 2017, 10:27:26 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.
Consider this - You're having a conversation with a friend and you refer to him as "retarded". He's not offended, he's your friend and he knows your just giving him a hard time. But the guy with down syndrome who happens to be walking doesn't understand that it's just a joke. And if he does that may be worse because he knows that his existence is the basis for a putdown. Your friend said something stupid and so you compared your friend to him.

This scenario may seem unlikely to you but not everyone with a mental handicap is obvious from appearance and more relevant to your usage here, anyone can read anything written on the internet.

People with mental handicaps have enough obstacles in life, can't you just use a less offensive putdown - like fucking dumbass?

Retard means slow, delayed.  I guess it depends on what context you use the word retard.  Should I rearrange my limited vocabulary so I never offend anyone?

I heard a great saying once...this isnt verbatim but close..."when someone says they're offended they want the rest of the world to adjust their points of views to fit theirs."  something like that...im sure i can find it but you get the point.  Some people need to grow a spine.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on October 20, 2017, 10:35:29 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.
Consider this - You're having a conversation with a friend and you refer to him as "retarded". He's not offended, he's your friend and he knows your just giving him a hard time. But the guy with down syndrome who happens to be walking doesn't understand that it's just a joke. And if he does that may be worse because he knows that his existence is the basis for a putdown. Your friend said something stupid and so you compared your friend to him.

This scenario may seem unlikely to you but not everyone with a mental handicap is obvious from appearance and more relevant to your usage here, anyone can read anything written on the internet.

People with mental handicaps have enough obstacles in life, can't you just use a less offensive putdown - like fucking dumbass?

Retard means slow, delayed.  I guess it depends on what context you use the word retard.  Should I rearrange my limited vocabulary so I never offend anyone?

I heard a great saying once...this isnt verbatim but close..."when someone says they're offended they want the rest of the world to adjust their points of views to fit theirs."  something like that...im sure i can find it but you get the point.  Some people need to grow a spine.

See? Mentally handicapped people just need to grow a spine.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on October 20, 2017, 10:47:04 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.
Consider this - You're having a conversation with a friend and you refer to him as "retarded". He's not offended, he's your friend and he knows your just giving him a hard time. But the guy with down syndrome who happens to be walking doesn't understand that it's just a joke. And if he does that may be worse because he knows that his existence is the basis for a putdown. Your friend said something stupid and so you compared your friend to him.

This scenario may seem unlikely to you but not everyone with a mental handicap is obvious from appearance and more relevant to your usage here, anyone can read anything written on the internet.

People with mental handicaps have enough obstacles in life, can't you just use a less offensive putdown - like fucking dumbass?

Retard means slow, delayed.  I guess it depends on what context you use the word retard.  Should I rearrange my limited vocabulary so I never offend anyone?

I heard a great saying once...this isnt verbatim but close..."when someone says they're offended they want the rest of the world to adjust their points of views to fit theirs."  something like that...im sure i can find it but you get the point.  Some people need to grow a spine.
You're right, it depends on context. So when you asked "Why are people so retarded?" you were referring to people being slow. Which is the origin of the term mental retardation, people who think or develop more slowly than normal. Which means you were comparing people who use a word you don't like to people with a mental disability.

Exactly how limited is your vocabulary? This might help http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/stupid (http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/stupid)

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on October 20, 2017, 11:08:41 AM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.
Consider this - You're having a conversation with a friend and you refer to him as "retarded". He's not offended, he's your friend and he knows your just giving him a hard time. But the guy with down syndrome who happens to be walking doesn't understand that it's just a joke. And if he does that may be worse because he knows that his existence is the basis for a putdown. Your friend said something stupid and so you compared your friend to him.

This scenario may seem unlikely to you but not everyone with a mental handicap is obvious from appearance and more relevant to your usage here, anyone can read anything written on the internet.

People with mental handicaps have enough obstacles in life, can't you just use a less offensive putdown - like fucking dumbass?

Retard means slow, delayed.  I guess it depends on what context you use the word retard.  Should I rearrange my limited vocabulary so I never offend anyone?

I heard a great saying once...this isnt verbatim but close..."when someone says they're offended they want the rest of the world to adjust their points of views to fit theirs."  something like that...im sure i can find it but you get the point.  Some people need to grow a spine.
Some people could benefit from developing a little more compassion for others less fortunate through no fault of their own. These people are not "snowflakes", pronounced in a disparaging manner. They just got handed a different card than you did in the great genetic lottery of life. "Retard" used as a verb, as in fire retardant, is just fine. "Retard/Retarded" used as a noun to describe another human being is just plain rude and insensitive. There are plenty of other words you can use.

BTW, the example of the solicitors in an apartment complex is completely irrelevant to your use of the word "retarded" to describe another person. Oh, no wait - the relevance is perhaps the way you felt in that situation might be something like what someone with developmental issues might feel like when hearing your unkind words. What does it cost you personally just to select another word? Why not create a habit of not denigrating others of any ability?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on October 20, 2017, 11:24:52 AM
Retard means slow, delayed.

Knowing the linguistic origin of the word doesn't erase its decades-long history of labeling disabled people for institutionalization. Sure, in French you can feel free to continue using the phrase "en retard," because it means "late" and nothing else. In English the word has a specific disparaging meaning. If you're going to be a dick about it at least own up to it instead of hiding behind pseudo-intellectual excuses.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on October 20, 2017, 11:31:30 AM
Another one that bothers me is when Canadians say "North America" when you can tell they're not trying to include Mexico.

Guilty as charged.  For some reason my brain refuses to register Mexico as part of North America . . . It's automatically packaged with all those Spanish speaking countries a little further down.  Weird, I will try to fix that in the future.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on October 20, 2017, 12:35:41 PM
Another one that bothers me is when Canadians say "North America" when you can tell they're not trying to include Mexico.

Guilty as charged.  For some reason my brain refuses to register Mexico as part of North America . . . It's automatically packaged with all those Spanish speaking countries a little further down.  Weird, I will try to fix that in the future.

So is that just a Canadian thing? I definitely include Mexico in my immediate mental image of North America. It's hard to imagine doing otherwise.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dividendman on October 20, 2017, 12:36:52 PM
For the folks offended by various words and phrases and stereotypes etc. What do you think of stand up comedy or vulgar comedic movies?

Serious question. Do you just not ever go or you think it's OK in that context to offend or what?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ponyboy on October 20, 2017, 01:34:23 PM
For the folks offended by various words and phrases and stereotypes etc. What do you think of stand up comedy or vulgar comedic movies?

Serious question. Do you just not ever go or you think it's OK in that context to offend or what?

The comedians are making jokes yet people are still offended.  You'll never change some.  Everyone else is supposed to change to conform to what they think is correct.  Another reason why history is being erased.  If its not politically correct its gotta go.  Strange times we live in.  Its a nerf'd society.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ixtap on October 20, 2017, 01:37:34 PM
For the folks offended by various words and phrases and stereotypes etc. What do you think of stand up comedy or vulgar comedic movies?

Serious question. Do you just not ever go or you think it's OK in that context to offend or what?

The comedians are making jokes yet people are still offended.  You'll never change some.  Everyone else is supposed to change to conform to what they think is correct.  Another reason why history is being erased.  If its not politically correct its gotta go.  Strange times we live in.  Its a nerf'd society.

What history is being erased?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on October 20, 2017, 02:45:14 PM
"Blood thinner". I see nurses and doctors use this all the time to mean "anticoagulant" and it is just plain wrong. Anticoagulants inhibit various clotting factors. They do absolutely nothing to the viscosity of the blood.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Jouer on October 20, 2017, 03:21:42 PM
influencers

toxic people

Breaking. Up. Sentences. Like. This.

self-care

amirite?

"I just NOPED right out of there."

"bad skin" or "good skin" [If it's keeping your organs from falling out of your body, it's doing its job!]

****

I don't have logical, well-thought-out reasons for disliking most of these. I'm just weary of them. Weary of the realms of internet where they tend appear in the wild.

I've never heard of "I just noped right out of there" but I love it! I'm totally adopting it but I'll drop an F-bomb in there to punch it up a little.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on October 23, 2017, 01:35:46 PM
"Female" instead of "woman" or "girl". Sounds like you're talking about animals. And, I never hear someone who uses "female" like that use "male" the same way.
Yes.  1000 times Yes! 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on October 23, 2017, 01:42:18 PM
24/7/365

It's redundant!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on October 23, 2017, 01:58:36 PM
24/7/365

It's redundant!
24 hours in one day, every day
7 days in a week, every week
365 days in a year, most years

I don't quite get how that's redundant, exactly. Repetitive, certainly. Cumulative too, but redundant? I don't know...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on October 23, 2017, 02:21:47 PM
I'd much rather be referred to as "female" than "girl" because I am not a child. It's a bit of a pet peeve of mine, like "Girls Night out." We're in our forties and we're the mothers of actual girls. We're not the girls anymore, that ship has sailed.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on October 23, 2017, 02:46:25 PM
I'd much rather be referred to as "female" than "girl" because I am not a child. It's a bit of a pet peeve of mine, like "Girls Night out." We're in our forties and we're the mothers of actual girls. We're not the girls anymore, that ship has sailed.

I guess I have mixed feelings about this one. My grandmother, even in her 80s, used to talk about meeting "the girls" for lunch or whatever. It was cute at her age. But when it's a group of 40-somethings who are trying to deny that they are not "young" anymore, it's not so cute. I'm not sure at what age the line should be drawn.

"Female" is definitely horrible. Makes me think of rappers and lyrics that talk about women like occasionally-useful objects.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on October 23, 2017, 03:19:48 PM
I'd much rather be referred to as "female" than "girl" because I am not a child. It's a bit of a pet peeve of mine, like "Girls Night out." We're in our forties and we're the mothers of actual girls. We're not the girls anymore, that ship has sailed.

Interesting how we all get hung up on different things. "Girls" never bothered me, but plenty of other random stuff does!

Here's my word of the day from yesterday: Pronunciate. Please...just...no.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on October 23, 2017, 05:41:52 PM
24/7/365

It's redundant!
24 hours in one day, every day
7 days in a week, every week
365 days in a year, most years

I don't quite get how that's redundant, exactly. Repetitive, certainly. Cumulative too, but redundant? I don't know...

There are two instances of days.   So to say 7 days a week and 365 days a year...yes it's redundant.  Now if someone wanted to say 24/7/52(weeks in a year), then I guess that would be okay. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on October 23, 2017, 10:40:55 PM
24/7/365

It's redundant!
24 hours in one day, every day
7 days in a week, every week
365 days in a year, most years

I don't quite get how that's redundant, exactly. Repetitive, certainly. Cumulative too, but redundant? I don't know...

There are two instances of days.   So to say 7 days a week and 365 days a year...yes it's redundant.  Now if someone wanted to say 24/7/52(weeks in a year), then I guess that would be okay.
I think I see what you're getting at. Is it the asymmetry that bugs you?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: gerardc on October 23, 2017, 10:52:46 PM
I think I see what you're getting at. Is it the asymmetry that bugs you?

It's the redundancy, like he said. 365 days a year implies 7 days a week, no need to specify 7 days a week. Now, 52 weeks a year doesn't imply anything as to the number of days per week, so you'd need to specify the 7.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on October 25, 2017, 08:56:29 AM
I'd much rather be referred to as "female" than "girl" because I am not a child. It's a bit of a pet peeve of mine, like "Girls Night out." We're in our forties and we're the mothers of actual girls. We're not the girls anymore, that ship has sailed.

Interesting how we all get hung up on different things. "Girls" never bothered me, but plenty of other random stuff does!

Me too.  "Girls" has never bothered me, but I have always hated the term "Gal".  I can trace it back to my first office job during High School.  "The men" got the serious jobs and "the gals" got to type their letters, make coffee, open mail, and answer the phones.  I worked there after school thru high school and when I went away to college I was told I might be the first "gal" on the sales team after I graduated.  What an honor!  Fat chance! 
The people were incredibly nice and supportive, but they were a small company and just didn't have enough examples of how to treat women fairly and equally.  I didn't want to be their test case and I certainly didn't want anyone thinking they were doing me any favors for allowing me to do the same work as anyone else. 

whew. rant over.   
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on October 25, 2017, 09:36:49 AM
For the folks offended by various words and phrases and stereotypes etc. What do you think of stand up comedy or vulgar comedic movies?

Serious question. Do you just not ever go or you think it's OK in that context to offend or what?
That's a really tough question. I did at one time feel like it's just words and in the context of a comedy they don't mean anything by it. I've noticed as I get older and more importantly as I've been exposed to more people who live a very different life than I do, whether it be because they are gay, disabled, another race etc., I feel like there is (almost) no place for jokes that stereotype groups of people. Even if the person making the jokes has no ill will towards said group, saying certain things out loud can influence feelings in small incremental ways that most people don't even notice. More importantly, even if a comedian and some of their audience have the exposure to recognize a joke for what it is, many other viewers assume there is more truth in the jokes than there really is.

As an example, growing up I saw lots of jokes relating gay men to certain behaviors. I still think these jokes can be funny and lots of gay men even partake in these types of jokes, they aren't all negative stereotypes. However, the more I realize how many gay men don't fit these stereotypes I can see how the assumption that all gay men behave this way may make them less likely to come out. I worked for someone part time for a while, a gay man from Kentucky who ran an agricultural breeding program and therefore worked around lots of conservative farmers. Obviously he was not hiding it but if he had been, there would have been little indication. He was a big burly guy with a gut who dipped Copenhagen all day - He did like to bake though :)

Long story short I think stereotyping in comedy can almost always be damaging to society. Does that mean we should never make these jokes? That's still a really tough question.

ETA: I still didn't really answer the question. Third option. I don't think it's good to make certain jokes but I watch plenty of offensive movies and laugh at the jokes anyways. Being offended by something doesn't mean you don't find it funny. Generally when I'm offended it's on someone else's behalf, not because I have a weak constitution and my pretty little ears can't take it. I think that's one of the big misconceptions that come from the "it's just a joke" crowd. Ya, I know what a joke is but the joke itself isn't always the problem. The problem is that jokes influence opinions and opinions lead to actions like making laws that ban people from specific countries or make it so certain people don't enjoy the same freedoms that I do. In other cases it is the joke. For example, using the word retard doesn't hurt my feelings but it does hurt the feelings of people who may not even have the mental capacity to understand that it's just a joke.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on October 25, 2017, 10:35:28 AM
Long story short I think stereotyping in comedy can almost always be damaging to society. Does that mean we should never make these jokes? That's still a really tough question.

It is a tough question, and something I've been thinking about lately. Most people seem to think that it's okay to poke fun at your own unique qualities, including your own race/national origin. Most people also seem to think it's okay to make fun of white people regardless of your own race. But does a minority who makes fun of him/herself maybe give other people the idea that it's okay to make fun of others in the same way? And when someday the majority of the US population is no longer white, will it still be okay to make fun of white people?

As a white person, I obviously have zero first-hand knowledge of the experiences of people from other backgrounds. But when I consider the fact that it doesn't feel good to be called a "basic white girl" or a "cracker," I can only imagine the pain that insults directed at other races must inflict, even if they are meant to be somehow friendly and funny.

I think we should all be able to laugh at ourselves for our stupid mistakes, our big nose, our funny-looking feet, etc. And with close friends, sure, we should be able to exchange friendly banter about each other's differences. But given the fact that there's so much horrible history associated with treating people differently for their race, maybe it's best to stay away from that area.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Laura33 on October 26, 2017, 06:32:51 AM
For the folks offended by various words and phrases and stereotypes etc. What do you think of stand up comedy or vulgar comedic movies?

Serious question. Do you just not ever go or you think it's OK in that context to offend or what?

It's not hard conceptually, it's just subtle.  Fundamentally, it is about power.  Making fun of people "below" you in the social hierarchy is bullying and so not funny; making fun of people above you in the social hierarchy is subversive and so can be funny.  And making fun of yourself or your own group falls into the subversive/funny category.

The other aspect is that comedy has to be unexpected.  Jokes based on stereotypes aren't funny because there is nothing unexpected about them -- like, really, that's the best you've got?  OTOH, flipping stereotypes is unexpected.  The best jokes reveal a truth that the audience never noticed before -- think of Chris Rock on the difference between "rich" and "wealthy."

Best example I can think of is "Blazing Saddles" (one of the funniest movies ever made).  Plentiful use of the word "nigger," but used to mock the idiocy of the people who would call a powerful black man a "nigger."

To my mind, I don't personally care much about hurtful words, because it says more about the speaker than about the person/group he is referring to.  Hell, I am foul-mouthed and detest euphemisms myself; there are no sensitive ears here that require protection.  But I do object to disparaging words when deployed by people with power against people without, who cannot defend themselves or strike back -- like, say, the boss calling his underlings "gals" and expecting them to get coffee (flashback to "9 to 5" here).  In many instances, it's just largely cluelessness (that particular boss was probably trying to avoid saying "girls" because he knew that was bad, but thought "women" sounded too formal and so chose "gals" thinking it was the most comparable to "guys).  In that case, I'm most likely to respond along the lines of "dude, you know what that sounds like, right?" 

OTOH, someone who is well aware that a particular word hurts but insists on continuing to use it is just a bully and an asshole.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on October 26, 2017, 08:39:25 AM
For the folks offended by various words and phrases and stereotypes etc. What do you think of stand up comedy or vulgar comedic movies?

Serious question. Do you just not ever go or you think it's OK in that context to offend or what?

It's not hard conceptually, it's just subtle.  Fundamentally, it is about power.  Making fun of people "below" you in the social hierarchy is bullying and so not funny; making fun of people above you in the social hierarchy is subversive and so can be funny.  And making fun of yourself or your own group falls into the subversive/funny category.

The other aspect is that comedy has to be unexpected.  Jokes based on stereotypes aren't funny because there is nothing unexpected about them -- like, really, that's the best you've got?  OTOH, flipping stereotypes is unexpected.  The best jokes reveal a truth that the audience never noticed before -- think of Chris Rock on the difference between "rich" and "wealthy."

Best example I can think of is "Blazing Saddles" (one of the funniest movies ever made).  Plentiful use of the word "nigger," but used to mock the idiocy of the people who would call a powerful black man a "nigger."

To my mind, I don't personally care much about hurtful words, because it says more about the speaker than about the person/group he is referring to.  Hell, I am foul-mouthed and detest euphemisms myself; there are no sensitive ears here that require protection.  But I do object to disparaging words when deployed by people with power against people without, who cannot defend themselves or strike back -- like, say, the boss calling his underlings "gals" and expecting them to get coffee (flashback to "9 to 5" here).  In many instances, it's just largely cluelessness (that particular boss was probably trying to avoid saying "girls" because he knew that was bad, but thought "women" sounded too formal and so chose "gals" thinking it was the most comparable to "guys).  In that case, I'm most likely to respond along the lines of "dude, you know what that sounds like, right?" 

OTOH, someone who is well aware that a particular word hurts but insists on continuing to use it is just a bully and an asshole.

Agreed.  The best comedy tends to use stereotypes and stereotypical situations to highlight things that don't make sense, to make us question beliefs, convention, and societal norms.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on October 26, 2017, 10:31:09 AM
OTOH, someone who is well aware that a particular word hurts but insists on continuing to use it is just a bully and an asshole.

I agree with this statement and would like to add my $0.02.  Anyone who uses the word "snowflake" to denigrate another person's feelings, is a bully. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on October 26, 2017, 01:33:51 PM
Ooh, I thought of another.

On pregnancy forums, you'll find all kinds of cutesy acronyms and euphemisms, and by the far the worst is...

BABY DANCING (or "BD")

which means "sex." 


It's just too, too horrible!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on October 26, 2017, 01:52:21 PM
Ooh, I thought of another.

On pregnancy forums, you'll find all kinds of cutesy acronyms and euphemisms, and by the far the worst is...

BABY DANCING (or "BD")

which means "sex." 


It's just too, too horrible!

This one wins. Hands down.

We're done here, people.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on October 26, 2017, 03:33:55 PM
Ooh, I thought of another.

On pregnancy forums, you'll find all kinds of cutesy acronyms and euphemisms, and by the far the worst is...

BABY DANCING (or "BD")

which means "sex." 


It's just too, too horrible!

This one wins. Hands down.

We're done here, people.
That's definitely the worst.  Wow.  Why not just call it something less offensive, like "fucking"?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on October 26, 2017, 04:24:54 PM
Ooh, I thought of another.

On pregnancy forums, you'll find all kinds of cutesy acronyms and euphemisms, and by the far the worst is...

BABY DANCING (or "BD")

which means "sex." 


It's just too, too horrible!

This one wins. Hands down.

We're done here, people.
That's definitely the worst.  Wow.  Why not just call it something less offensive, like "fucking"?

OMG. I wish I could un-see that. I agree. There can't possibly be a worse phrase.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on October 27, 2017, 07:24:11 AM
Ooh, I thought of another.

On pregnancy forums, you'll find all kinds of cutesy acronyms and euphemisms, and by the far the worst is...

BABY DANCING (or "BD")

which means "sex." 


It's just too, too horrible!

This one wins. Hands down.

We're done here, people.
That's definitely the worst.  Wow.  Why not just call it something less offensive, like "fucking"?

OMG. I wish I could un-see that. I agree. There can't possibly be a worse phrase.
I would be just as revolted by this as everyone else if it wasn't for the fact that I keep picturing the Ally McBeal dancing baby.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dividendman on October 27, 2017, 09:56:08 AM
I wish people would stop saying anniversary for less than 1 year intervals.

It's a 2 week anniversary!

We had our 6 month anniversary!

Say what? That makes no sense.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on October 27, 2017, 01:49:54 PM
I wish people would stop saying anniversary for less than 1 year intervals.

It's a 2 week anniversary!

We had our 6 month anniversary!

Say what? That makes no sense.
Ya, it's a septiversary and mensiversary. get it right people.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: nnls on October 27, 2017, 11:56:19 PM
I wish people would stop saying anniversary for less than 1 year intervals.

It's a 2 week anniversary!

We had our 6 month anniversary!

Say what? That makes no sense.

I hate this! a family friend recently celebrated her 28 month anniversary with her fiance. It is ridiculous.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on October 28, 2017, 01:20:53 AM
Ooh, I thought of another.

On pregnancy forums, you'll find all kinds of cutesy acronyms and euphemisms, and by the far the worst is...

BABY DANCING (or "BD")

which means "sex." 


It's just too, too horrible!

Jesus fucking christ, this is a new one for me.

Makes my skin crawl!

That's definitely the worst.  Wow.  Why not just call it something less offensive, like "fucking"?

I like you.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsTuxedocat on October 28, 2017, 01:32:12 AM
Okay, I'll join --in. I hate, hate being called a girl -- I'm not a girl, I am freakin adult.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 29, 2017, 06:12:34 AM
Okay, I'll join --in. I hate, hate being called a girl -- I'm not a girl, I am freakin adult.
Definitely.  People should flip this - would you call a man of any age a boy?  If he is not a boy, then she is not a girl, she is a woman.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwMOC5i2eRk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwMOC5i2eRk)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on October 30, 2017, 11:09:13 AM
Ooh, I thought of another.

On pregnancy forums, you'll find all kinds of cutesy acronyms and euphemisms, and by the far the worst is...

BABY DANCING (or "BD")

which means "sex." 


It's just too, too horrible!

This one wins. Hands down.

We're done here, people.
That's definitely the worst.  Wow.  Why not just call it something less offensive, like "fucking"?

I prefer "playing poke the baby" to BD.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: EMMoneY on November 10, 2017, 06:34:45 PM
"Throw shade"
"Prezzie" (a gift / present) a 60+ yr old blogger uses that and I keep wondering if she's regressed to toddlerhood
"radonkadonk" and any other word used where 'ridiculous' will suffice
"Boo" when used to mean one's significant other

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: nnls on November 10, 2017, 08:10:53 PM
"Throw shade"
"Prezzie" (a gift / present) a 60+ yr old blogger uses that and I keep wondering if she's regressed to toddlerhood
"radonkadonk" and any other word used where 'ridiculous' will suffice
"Boo" when used to mean one's significant other

I think prezzie is pretty common in Australia. Is the blogger Australian?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on November 10, 2017, 10:04:02 PM
Ooh, I thought of another.

On pregnancy forums, you'll find all kinds of cutesy acronyms and euphemisms, and by the far the worst is...

BABY DANCING (or "BD")

which means "sex." 


It's just too, too horrible!

This one wins. Hands down.

We're done here, people.
That's definitely the worst.  Wow.  Why not just call it something less offensive, like "fucking"?

I prefer "playing poke the baby" to BD.

Is this something that occurs during the Baby Moon? in order to get a classier/more expensive Push Present?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: EMMoneY on November 11, 2017, 08:33:25 PM

I think prezzie is pretty common in Australia. Is the blogger Australian?

No, she's from the western U.S.  She also uses "a little sumptin' sumptin'" to describe gifts.  I had to stop reading her blog, I nearly wanted to tear my hair out reading a grandmother posting like a tween.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: NoraLenderbee on November 13, 2017, 05:38:23 PM
No No...im keeping the word retard in my vocabulary.  So many snowflakes want it banished and its not going to happen.

Interestingly, "retarded" was originally considered a more polite and sensitive way to refer to the mentally handicapped. It replaced terms such as "mentally deficient."

Now we're introducing "developmentally delayed" as a euphemism for a euphemism.

I strongly disagree that "retarded" is equivalent to a racial slur. It is a neutral descriptive word just like "delayed" or "handicapped." People will always find ways to call each other stupid, and whatever new euphemism is introduced, someone will soon start using it as an insult. It's an endless arms race. Remember the words idiot, imbecile, and moron? They were originally introduced as scientific, non-derogatory terms for degrees of mental deficiency.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on November 14, 2017, 01:03:33 AM
RE: "female" and "male" - the only people I have ever seen using these words equitably are the police. "We are looking for a white male..." "A female was found today by the towpath..."

Re: offensive comedy - I avoid vulgar films and comedians that I think might offend me. I don't always get it right, but I don't want to be sitting there listening to stuff I won't find funny or clever. That said, I grew up in a very Jewish and Indian school where it was normal for these groups to poke fun at themselves. There was even an ongoing thing about "Brown Town" - "Everywhere else, you get 99% and your mum is so pleased she buys you a cake. In Brown Town, she's so angry about the 1% that you get grounded." That kind of thing. I think we even did a skit about Brown Town in assembly once. Anyway, I tend to find Jew jokes and Indian jokes by Jewish and Indian comedians funny, but the same jokes by white comedians would make me uncomfortable. I think it is an in-group vs making fun of thing. I suppose so think of myself as "in" with the Indians so it's like hearing a joke from a peer, and I get a lot of the references. Hearing "some white person" joking about Indians is not like hearing it from a peer (even though I am white) so I would avoid someone I knew to make such jokes. Now I live in a predominantly black area I am coming to appreciate Chris Rock.

For example: I always switch off Jimmy Carr. I'm just not going to enjoy it. But I find David Mitchell hilarious because he pokes fun at himself and he is so like me (awkward white middle class intellectual). I can nod along and say "So true!"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on November 14, 2017, 02:31:58 PM
I strongly disagree that "retarded" is equivalent to a racial slur. It is a neutral descriptive word just like "delayed" or "handicapped." People will always find ways to call each other stupid, and whatever new euphemism is introduced, someone will soon start using it as an insult. It's an endless arms race. Remember the words idiot, imbecile, and moron? They were originally introduced as scientific, non-derogatory terms for degrees of mental deficiency.

I'm not arguing that it's equivalent to a racial slur, but what you call an arms race is just the natural evolution of language. None of us can control how our words are heard by others, but we can all choose which words we use. And words are only useful as long as we all agree on what they mean. The tide has shifted on the meaning of the word retarded; I don't use it because it no longer means what it meant a century ago when it was introduced. Similarly to how I use the word "pants" even though it used to be considered vulgar. (And similar to how I reconsider my usage of the word pants around British people, since they use it to refer to what I would call underwear...)

No amount of repeating what the word used to mean is going to change its connotation in the minds of the people it targets. And it's not much effort for me to shift my vocabulary. I don't see any point in bemoaning the way language changes over time; my being upset by it certainly won't stop it from happening.

I'll try to quit showing up in this thread to comment on this single topic now.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on November 15, 2017, 09:42:22 AM
I strongly disagree that "retarded" is equivalent to a racial slur. It is a neutral descriptive word just like "delayed" or "handicapped." People will always find ways to call each other stupid, and whatever new euphemism is introduced, someone will soon start using it as an insult. It's an endless arms race. Remember the words idiot, imbecile, and moron? They were originally introduced as scientific, non-derogatory terms for degrees of mental deficiency.

I'm not arguing that it's equivalent to a racial slur, but what you call an arms race is just the natural evolution of language. None of us can control how our words are heard by others, but we can all choose which words we use. And words are only useful as long as we all agree on what they mean.

^This. You can argue all you want about the absurdity of the euphemism treadmill, but you don't get to choose how your words are interpreted by others, so choose them wisely unless you specifically aim to offend. I have a son who is in a wheelchair, and would be offended if people started to call him "lame", even though that was, at one time, an appropriate term for his disability. (lame -> crippled -> handicapped -> disabled -> person with a disability). I don't call things that I don't like "lame", just like I don't call people with whom I disagree "retarded". I don't get worked up over people who used the term "handicapped", because that's not really used as a pejorative term. Some people are offended by it, so I try to use language that I know is unlikely to hurt any feelings. It's really not much of an imposition.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on November 15, 2017, 11:07:44 AM
I don't get worked up over people who used the term "handicapped", because that's not really used as a pejorative term. Some people are offended by it, so I try to use language that I know is unlikely to hurt any feelings. It's really not much of an imposition.

Yikes, I think it is over here. Makes me cringe every time I hear it. "Disabled" is the accepted norm in Britain.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on November 15, 2017, 11:33:42 AM
I don't get worked up over people who used the term "handicapped", because that's not really used as a pejorative term. Some people are offended by it, so I try to use language that I know is unlikely to hurt any feelings. It's really not much of an imposition.

Yikes, I think it is over here. Makes me cringe every time I hear it. "Disabled" is the accepted norm in Britain.

Like I said, I don't use it, but it doesn't offend me. I can't recall a single instance of someone using it as an insult.

Edit to add: Typically, the only time I ever hear someone use the term "handicapped" is in reference to a parking spot. Actually, now that I think about it, I'm pretty sure that's the term I use myself. "Disabled parking" or "disabled persons' parking" sounds weird. The commonly-used term here is "handicapped parking". Language is weird.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on November 15, 2017, 12:11:41 PM
Just a thought on the "acceptable word treadmill" - It seems words that were used legitimately long ago such as idiot, imbecile but are now used exclusively as insults are ok to use as insults but not to describe a person with a mental disability. New words used to describe an actual condition are ok to use in context but not as an insult (that's how they get on the treadmill). Words that began as legitimate terms for a condition but have been used as an insult long enough that they are commonly recognized as an insult should not be used for their original purpose or as an insult. After enough time has passed to disconnect the word from it's original usage it may be acceptable to use as an insult.

Another thought this time on why people are resistant to these changes - Some people's response of "too much work, don't be so sensitive" is not because it really is too much work but rather because they don't like being corrected. No one likes being corrected and to be fair there are some word police who will correct you in a not so nice way. If I slip up and use a term that is offensive but debatably so or maybe I didn't even know that it was offensive, It sucks when somebody jumps on me and acts like I'm a dick for saying it. My immediate reaction might be "fuck you, I say what I want" not because I want to hurt people's feelings by using the word but because I'm being spiteful. In short I'd say a lot of people who are resistant to the evolution of words act that way because they don't like people correcting them.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MustachioedPistachio on November 15, 2017, 12:49:49 PM
In parts of the southeastern US, you'll hear "I'm fixin' to go to the store" or some other variant. My favorite: "I'm fixin' to get ready to go..."

The first phrase is technically correct (https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/27391/etymology-of-fixing-to), while the second is redundant. :)

The misuse of "lose" and "loose" is especially grating to me.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: WootWoot on November 15, 2017, 02:06:05 PM
Baby daddy
Baby bump
Amazing

I mean, come on: How many things are truly "amazing"?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 15, 2017, 03:12:12 PM
Just a thought on the "acceptable word treadmill" - It seems words that were used legitimately long ago such as idiot, imbecile but are now used exclusively as insults are ok to use as insults but not to describe a person with a mental disability. New words used to describe an actual condition are ok to use in context but not as an insult (that's how they get on the treadmill). Words that began as legitimate terms for a condition but have been used as an insult long enough that they are commonly recognized as an insult should not be used for their original purpose or as an insult. After enough time has passed to disconnect the word from it's original usage it may be acceptable to use as an insult.

Another thought this time on why people are resistant to these changes - Some people's response of "too much work, don't be so sensitive" is not because it really is too much work but rather because they don't like being corrected. No one likes being corrected and to be fair there are some word police who will correct you in a not so nice way. If I slip up and use a term that is offensive but debatably so or maybe I didn't even know that it was offensive, It sucks when somebody jumps on me and acts like I'm a dick for saying it. My immediate reaction might be "fuck you, I say what I want" not because I want to hurt people's feelings by using the word but because I'm being spiteful. In short I'd say a lot of people who are resistant to the evolution of words act that way because they don't like people correcting them.

I still miss the word "gay" in the sense of its use in South Pacific; somehow light-hearted does't quite convey the same meaning.  But it is gone from my vocabulary now, because meanings shifted.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: EMMoneY on November 15, 2017, 06:27:43 PM
"Broke" his/her "silence" - as used in entertainment media.  "Lulabelle broke her silence on Lulabub's affair."  Particularly when paired with "finally" - when it turns out the alleged silence was broken after a mere 4 hours of discovery.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on November 16, 2017, 11:32:57 AM
In parts of the southeastern US, you'll hear "I'm fixin' to go to the store" or some other variant. My favorite: "I'm fixin' to get ready to go..."

The first phrase is technically correct (https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/27391/etymology-of-fixing-to), while the second is redundant. :)

The misuse of "lose" and "loose" is especially grating to me.

"Going" doesn't really make any sense.  You be sitting on the couch with your laptop and be "going" to turn on your computer even though you don't plan to leave the couch.  No travel involved. 

One sense of the word "Fix" in the dictionary, on the other hand, is "prepare."  You can be preparing to get ready (meta-preparation), so fixing to get ready makes complete sense.  "Going to keep sitting on the couch" and "Going to go to the store" make none if you think about it. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: WootWoot on November 16, 2017, 03:21:36 PM
I still hear kids saying "Oh, that's so gay" sometimes. I don't know if they mean it as a homophobic putdown but I suspect they do. I doubt they mean "queer" as in "peculiar."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on November 16, 2017, 03:49:44 PM
I still hear kids saying "Oh, that's so gay" sometimes. I don't know if they mean it as a homophobic putdown but I suspect they do. I doubt they mean "queer" as in "peculiar."

I called a kid out on it one time.  He got really apologetic. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on November 17, 2017, 05:18:01 AM
"shitting out babies" - what a hideous, hideous turn of phrase.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on November 17, 2017, 11:16:18 AM
"shitting out babies" - what a hideous, hideous turn of phrase.

What?  Fortunately I've never heard that before.  Is that a British thing?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on November 17, 2017, 11:38:00 AM
"shitting out babies" - what a hideous, hideous turn of phrase.

What?  Fortunately I've never heard that before.  Is that a British thing?

Absolutely not! I have never ever heard or read it in real life but have read it lots of times on this (largely American) forum.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: NoraLenderbee on November 17, 2017, 12:38:48 PM
I strongly disagree that "retarded" is equivalent to a racial slur. It is a neutral descriptive word just like "delayed" or "handicapped." People will always find ways to call each other stupid, and whatever new euphemism is introduced, someone will soon start using it as an insult. It's an endless arms race. Remember the words idiot, imbecile, and moron? They were originally introduced as scientific, non-derogatory terms for degrees of mental deficiency.

I'm not arguing that it's equivalent to a racial slur, but what you call an arms race is just the natural evolution of language. None of us can control how our words are heard by others, but we can all choose which words we use. And words are only useful as long as we all agree on what they mean.

^This. You can argue all you want about the absurdity of the euphemism treadmill, but you don't get to choose how your words are interpreted by others, so choose them wisely unless you specifically aim to offend.

This thread is about words we wish would go away, not words we insist on using in spite of their effect on other people. I don't need to be lectured, thanks.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Boll weevil on November 17, 2017, 01:38:12 PM
The words and terms I really don't like are
-"perfect storm"
-"laser focused"
-Adding "-gate" to any scandal
-"honestly"

I'm getting tired of "fake news", and think the speakers/authors should get better at distinguishing between "fake news" (also known as lies) and "real gossip / information that doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things".

I also think "hero" and "evil" are overused.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on November 17, 2017, 02:16:18 PM
"shitting out babies" - what a hideous, hideous turn of phrase.

Ugh. I hate that too. Just a needlessly crude way of describing someone's family and the arrival of tiny, new human beings.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tyort1 on November 17, 2017, 05:05:58 PM
The words and terms I really don't like are
-"perfect storm"
-"laser focused"
-Adding "-gate" to any scandal
-"honestly"

I'm getting tired of "fake news", and think the speakers/authors should get better at distinguishing between "fake news" (also known as lies) and "real gossip / information that doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things".

I also think "hero" and "evil" are overused.

I have to say, you're my hero for pointing out all these evil phrases :-)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on November 17, 2017, 07:36:11 PM
Forgive me if this has been mentioned already. I've read the whole thread, but I don't remember!

The very last time I ever met with my financial advisor, before quietly firing him and moving my funds to Vanguard, thanks to this forum, I counted the number of times he said "at the end of the day" while yammering on and on at me for half an hour about random market/investment junk. It was the only way I could stay focused and appear to be politely listening. He used that phrase 30-something times.

That said, even before that experience, I've always hated "at the end of the day," unless you're literally talking about something that will occur at the end of the day.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Chesleygirl on November 20, 2017, 07:12:17 AM
I hate it when someone posts "RIP" with regard to someone's death, particularly if it was someone they knew. I find it somewhat disrespectful to not spell it out, as it doesn't take that long to type "Rest in Peace".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on November 20, 2017, 10:55:29 AM
I hate it when someone posts "RIP" with regard to someone's death, particularly if it was someone they knew. I find it somewhat disrespectful to not spell it out, as it doesn't take that long to type "Rest in Peace".

Yes! And the same for HBD (Happy Birthday). If you can't be bothered to type or write 2-3 words, you probably don't care very much. (And HBD doesn't even make sense. Shouldn't it be just HB?)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on November 20, 2017, 11:35:23 AM
Forgive me if this has been mentioned already. I've read the whole thread, but I don't remember!

The very last time I ever met with my financial advisor, before quietly firing him and moving my funds to Vanguard, thanks to this forum, I counted the number of times he said "at the end of the day" while yammering on and on at me for half an hour about random market/investment junk. It was the only way I could stay focused and appear to be politely listening. He used that phrase 30-something times.

That said, even before that experience, I've always hated "at the end of the day," unless you're literally talking about something that will occur at the end of the day.
The only exception is if you happen to be cast in "Les Miserables". Full props to you if you have that kind of vocal ability.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: C-note on November 20, 2017, 11:42:52 AM
Kiddo(s) - especially in the setting of a job interview.  kiddos this - or kiddos that - or my kiddos - kiddos, kiddos, kiddos.  Ugh.  Stop already! 

You lose some professional points on my non-scientific interview scale and I actually tally the number of times the candidate uses "kiddo(s)" during an interview.

"Peeps" was another of my fingernails-on-a-chalkboard words but it appears to be dying a natural death. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on November 20, 2017, 01:03:23 PM
Kiddo(s) - especially in the setting of a job interview.  kiddos this - or kiddos that - or my kiddos - kiddos, kiddos, kiddos.  Ugh.  Stop already! 

You lose some professional points on my non-scientific interview scale and I actually tally the number of times the candidate uses "kiddo(s)" during an interview.

"Peeps" was another of my fingernails-on-a-chalkboard words but it appears to be dying a natural death.

I think I might have brought up "peeps" in an earlier post on this thread. I'd love to see that one disappear altogether. The only time it should be used is in reference to that horrible, yet tastelessly funny, Easter treat.

+1 on "kiddos". Can we add "littles" to the list? Why do people need to use that one when referring to younger children?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Step37 on November 20, 2017, 08:01:41 PM
Forgive me if this has been mentioned already. I've read the whole thread, but I don't remember!

The very last time I ever met with my financial advisor, before quietly firing him and moving my funds to Vanguard, thanks to this forum, I counted the number of times he said "at the end of the day" while yammering on and on at me for half an hour about random market/investment junk. It was the only way I could stay focused and appear to be politely listening. He used that phrase 30-something times.

That said, even before that experience, I've always hated "at the end of the day," unless you're literally talking about something that will occur at the end of the day.
The only exception is if you happen to be cast in "Les Miserables". Full props to you if you have that kind of vocal ability.

Hahahaha! Yes (to both of you)!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on November 20, 2017, 08:32:30 PM
Kiddo(s) - especially in the setting of a job interview.  kiddos this - or kiddos that - or my kiddos - kiddos, kiddos, kiddos.  Ugh.  Stop already! 

... how would that come up in a job interview?

"Yes, I have a Working With Children check which means I'm cleared to work with kiddos."
"I'm married but don't have any kiddos."
"I was let go from my previous role for persistent use of the word kiddos."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: C-note on November 21, 2017, 08:20:14 AM
Kiddo(s) - especially in the setting of a job interview.  kiddos this - or kiddos that - or my kiddos - kiddos, kiddos, kiddos.  Ugh.  Stop already! 

... how would that come up in a job interview?

"Yes, I have a Working With Children check which means I'm cleared to work with kiddos."
"I'm married but don't have any kiddos."
"I was let go from my previous role for persistent use of the word kiddos."

I work in district administration for public school.  In our interview questions, there may be scenarios or "Tell us a time when . . . " questions which typically involves children in the responses.  Candidates will replace "children" or "students" with "kiddos" throughout their entire interview. 

And a resounding "YES!" @calimom on including "littles" along with "kiddos" on the list.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on November 22, 2017, 06:14:05 AM
Kiddo(s) - especially in the setting of a job interview.  kiddos this - or kiddos that - or my kiddos - kiddos, kiddos, kiddos.  Ugh.  Stop already! 

... how would that come up in a job interview?

"Yes, I have a Working With Children check which means I'm cleared to work with kiddos."
"I'm married but don't have any kiddos."
"I was let go from my previous role for persistent use of the word kiddos."

I work in district administration for public school.  In our interview questions, there may be scenarios or "Tell us a time when . . . " questions which typically involves children in the responses.  Candidates will replace "children" or "students" with "kiddos" throughout their entire interview. 

And a resounding "YES!" @calimom on including "littles" along with "kiddos" on the list.
DW and I actually use "littles" when referring to our younger children (we have 6), but only to distinguish them as a group from the older kids, and not as an attempt to be cute. E.g. "I'll take the littles with me and leave the others at home."  It's a useful term, although it *does* only save a single syllable over "younger kids."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: WootWoot on November 30, 2017, 12:26:09 PM
Just thought of one that bugs my DH too:

"go-to"

As in, "Bob is my go-to guy when I have computer problems."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on November 30, 2017, 12:50:12 PM
I have a particular dislike of simple words or phrases from other languages that have been intentionally or unintentionally mangled.

Two examples:

"No problemo."

"Boocoo (beaucoup) bucks."

Ugh.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 30, 2017, 03:15:11 PM
I have a particular dislike of simple words or phrases from other languages that have been intentionally or unintentionally mangled.

Two examples:

"No problemo."

"Boocoo (beaucoup) bucks."

Ugh.

If you ever visit Montreal you will be chatting with a lot of people who switch languages in the middle of a sentence.  Not to mention the Anglos who have anglicized a bunch of French words.  I didn't know what a 7-11 (corner store) was until University out-of-province, it was the depanneur ("I'm going to the dep, anyone want to come?").  We make bilingual jokes too - in Montreal people take the BMW to work - that is BusMetroWalk.

And at least bocoo bucks says beaucoup right, I hate walla for voila.  There is a v in voila.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on November 30, 2017, 03:38:55 PM
I have a particular dislike of simple words or phrases from other languages that have been intentionally or unintentionally mangled.

Two examples:

"No problemo."

"Boocoo (beaucoup) bucks."

Ugh.

If you ever visit Montreal you will be chatting with a lot of people who switch languages in the middle of a sentence.  Not to mention the Anglos who have anglicized a bunch of French words.  I didn't know what a 7-11 (corner store) was until University out-of-province, it was the depanneur ("I'm going to the dep, anyone want to come?").  We make bilingual jokes too - in Montreal people take the BMW to work - that is BusMetroWalk.

And at least bocoo bucks says beaucoup right, I hate walla for voila.  There is a v in voila.

Yeah, I know. I'm a former French professor. I'm well acquainted with Montreal.

My problem is with using the words completely incorrectly.

The word "problemo" doesn't exist in Spanish. For example.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 30, 2017, 05:25:40 PM
I have a particular dislike of simple words or phrases from other languages that have been intentionally or unintentionally mangled.

Two examples:

"No problemo."

"Boocoo (beaucoup) bucks."

Ugh.

If you ever visit Montreal you will be chatting with a lot of people who switch languages in the middle of a sentence.  Not to mention the Anglos who have anglicized a bunch of French words.  I didn't know what a 7-11 (corner store) was until University out-of-province, it was the depanneur ("I'm going to the dep, anyone want to come?").  We make bilingual jokes too - in Montreal people take the BMW to work - that is BusMetroWalk.

And at least bocoo bucks says beaucoup right, I hate walla for voila.  There is a v in voila.

Yeah, I know. I'm a former French professor. I'm well acquainted with Montreal.

My problem is with using the words completely incorrectly.

The word "problemo" doesn't exist in Spanish. For example.

Using them incorrectly would annoy me too.  I looked more at the beaucoup because I do know (well, used to know, I am an example of don't use it, you lose it) French, but no Spanish.  Plus "mangled" is not quite the same as "used incorrectly". 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on November 30, 2017, 05:48:54 PM
I have a particular dislike of simple words or phrases from other languages that have been intentionally or unintentionally mangled.

Two examples:

"No problemo."

"Boocoo (beaucoup) bucks."

Ugh.

If you ever visit Montreal you will be chatting with a lot of people who switch languages in the middle of a sentence.  Not to mention the Anglos who have anglicized a bunch of French words.  I didn't know what a 7-11 (corner store) was until University out-of-province, it was the depanneur ("I'm going to the dep, anyone want to come?").  We make bilingual jokes too - in Montreal people take the BMW to work - that is BusMetroWalk.

And at least bocoo bucks says beaucoup right, I hate walla for voila.  There is a v in voila.

Yeah, I know. I'm a former French professor. I'm well acquainted with Montreal.

My problem is with using the words completely incorrectly.

The word "problemo" doesn't exist in Spanish. For example.

Using them incorrectly would annoy me too.  I looked more at the beaucoup because I do know (well, used to know, I am an example of don't use it, you lose it) French, but no Spanish.  Plus "mangled" is not quite the same as "used incorrectly".

"Mangled" refers to the fact that "problemo" is a mangled version of "problema."

And that "boocoo bucks" is a mangled form of, at minimum, Beau-coo d'argent. "Beaucoo bux," even if you were pronouncing beaucoup correctly, is basically saying "many money."

And then there's the hospital where I was born. Buena Vista Hospital, in Buena Vista county, Iowa. Pronounced "BYOO-nuh vista."

I was probably irritated by this even at birth.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on December 01, 2017, 02:18:15 AM
I think "voila" should be banned because so many people mangle it. Walla and viola. ARGH.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mies on December 01, 2017, 05:01:19 AM
Shit ton. That one grates on me for some reason.

I’m also not a fan of the DH, DW, DD, DS shortenings for husband, wife, daughter, and son. I think it’s because when I read it, in my head, I’m still hearing “dear (however you are related to me)” and pretty much nobody ever says that out loud or writes that in full.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mrbeardedbigbucks on December 01, 2017, 05:19:02 AM
"Living the dream"
and
"Happy wife, happy life"

I constantly hear these phrases around the office from a bunch of uptight conservative white guys.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on December 01, 2017, 08:07:59 AM
Shit ton. That one grates on me for some reason.

I’m also not a fan of the DH, DW, DD, DS shortenings for husband, wife, daughter, and son. I think it’s because when I read it, in my head, I’m still hearing “dear (however you are related to me)” and pretty much nobody ever says that out loud or writes that in full.

Especially since so many people (Mumsnetters, I'm looking at you!) use it while complaining about what a total waster their DH is. I know the D can allegedly stand for different things, but that's just a retrospective justification.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on December 01, 2017, 10:59:20 AM
I have a particular dislike of simple words or phrases from other languages that have been intentionally or unintentionally mangled.

Two examples:

"No problemo."

"Boocoo (beaucoup) bucks."

Ugh.


Say La Vee.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dougules on December 01, 2017, 11:20:59 AM
I have a particular dislike of simple words or phrases from other languages that have been intentionally or unintentionally mangled.

Two examples:

"No problemo."

"Boocoo (beaucoup) bucks."

Ugh.


Say La Vee.

The whole English language is basically words or phrases from other languages that have been intentionally or unintentionally mangled.   
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: jinga nation on December 01, 2017, 01:50:59 PM
Experts
Subject Matter Experts (SME)
<topic> Guru, e.g. Cloud Guru
VP of <bullshit department>
Associate VP (you're just a glorified bank teller)
Senior VP (you're just the damn branch manager)

tastes like piss. (as if speaker has tasted it)
like so... like like.. stfu and say what you mean in a concise statement
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on December 01, 2017, 02:07:01 PM
tastes like piss. (as if speaker has tasted it)

Is the speaker a parent of a male child?  Let's just say that sometimes late night diaper changes go horribly wrong. . .
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on December 01, 2017, 03:29:23 PM
And to add to the piss foam, basswood is sometimes called piss wood because when it burns it can smell like someone peed on the fire.  Dandelion is also called pis-en-lit en Français because it can have a diuretic effect. Et voila*, beaucoup des mots intéressants. Or as my students used to say, pas de problème.

*Voila - from voir - look at and la the thing to look at.  In other words, look at that.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on December 02, 2017, 10:06:13 AM
I’m also not a fan of the DH, DW, DD, DS shortenings for husband, wife, daughter, and son. I think it’s because when I read it, in my head, I’m still hearing “dear (however you are related to me)” and pretty much nobody ever says that out loud or writes that in full.
These got me at first, but I'm used to it now, mostly thanks to time spent on this forum. In my head, the  "D" is shorthand for "person for whom I have great affection, even if they occasionally annoy the shit out of me." That's a lot of punch for two little letters. Given that this is an anonymous forum, we need a way to readily identify the other characters in the stories of our lives. The letters you listed convey meaning quite effectively. Also, DSD and DSS, because a lot of us have blended families.

There are plenty of words that one uses more in written communication than in casual conversation. There's an idea for a new thread...

And now, one of my one peeves, courtesy of "Hamilton". Rise up. Is there any other direction to rise?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mies on December 02, 2017, 11:01:43 AM
I’m also not a fan of the DH, DW, DD, DS shortenings for husband, wife, daughter, and son. I think it’s because when I read it, in my head, I’m still hearing “dear (however you are related to me)” and pretty much nobody ever says that out loud or writes that in full.
These got me at first, but I'm used to it now, mostly thanks to time spent on this forum. In my head, the  "D" is shorthand for "person for whom I have great affection, even if they occasionally annoy the shit out of me." That's a lot of punch for two little letters. Given that this is an anonymous forum, we need a way to readily identify the other characters in the stories of our lives. The letters you listed convey meaning quite effectively. Also, DSD and DSS, because a lot of us have blended families.

There are plenty of words that one uses more in written communication than in casual conversation. There's an idea for a new thread...

And now, one of my one peeves, courtesy of "Hamilton". Rise up. Is there any other direction to rise?

I figured out what they mean pretty quickly. I don't like the cutesy pie nature of it. I know it's not going away. I am taking a stand and typing out wife every time I need to reference my wife in a post :)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on December 02, 2017, 11:11:33 AM
I’m also not a fan of the DH, DW, DD, DS shortenings for husband, wife, daughter, and son. I think it’s because when I read it, in my head, I’m still hearing “dear (however you are related to me)” and pretty much nobody ever says that out loud or writes that in full.
These got me at first, but I'm used to it now, mostly thanks to time spent on this forum. In my head, the  "D" is shorthand for "person for whom I have great affection, even if they occasionally annoy the shit out of me." That's a lot of punch for two little letters. Given that this is an anonymous forum, we need a way to readily identify the other characters in the stories of our lives. The letters you listed convey meaning quite effectively. Also, DSD and DSS, because a lot of us have blended families.

There are plenty of words that one uses more in written communication than in casual conversation. There's an idea for a new thread...

And now, one of my one peeves, courtesy of "Hamilton". Rise up. Is there any other direction to rise?

I figured out what they mean pretty quickly. I don't like the cutesy pie nature of it. I know it's not going away. I am taking a stand and typing out wife every time I need to reference my wife in a post :)
Hmm, that's interesting, because while it probably originally had the cutesy connotation, those abbreviations have long since (at least to me) shed that feeling, and are now simply a shorthand way of saying "my wife", etc.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on December 03, 2017, 12:33:41 AM
"butt-hurt."

In fact any use of the word "butt" by adults is questionable to me. The word sounds childish and awkward. Not polite, but not satisfyingly vulgar either.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: WootWoot on December 05, 2017, 12:38:10 PM
The term "rape" when it does not apply to sexual assault.

Example: Joe really got raped on the price of that house he bought.

UGH
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: jinga nation on December 05, 2017, 12:39:35 PM
"butt-hurt."

In fact any use of the word "butt" by adults is questionable to me. The word sounds childish and awkward. Not polite, but not satisfyingly vulgar either.
do you prefer "ass pain"?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: FrugalToque on December 05, 2017, 01:31:09 PM
The term "rape" when it does not apply to sexual assault.

Example: Joe really got raped on the price of that house he bought.

UGH

Yeah.  That one's a no-no around here.  We put it in the Forum Rules.

Toque.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: WootWoot on December 05, 2017, 03:30:27 PM
And rightly so!!


The term "rape" when it does not apply to sexual assault.

Example: Joe really got raped on the price of that house he bought.

UGH

Yeah.  That one's a no-no around here.  We put it in the Forum Rules.

Toque.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on December 06, 2017, 09:14:07 AM
The term "rape" when it does not apply to sexual assault.

Example: Joe really got raped on the price of that house he bought.

UGH
I wish I knew how to do away with this one. It's absurdly overused in the business world, at least in my experience but it's so ingrained I don't think you could even explain why it's a problem to some people. Whenever I hear it I feel sick thinking that someone who's been effected by sexual assault might overhear.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Laura33 on December 06, 2017, 09:31:14 AM
I’m also not a fan of the DH, DW, DD, DS shortenings for husband, wife, daughter, and son. I think it’s because when I read it, in my head, I’m still hearing “dear (however you are related to me)” and pretty much nobody ever says that out loud or writes that in full.
These got me at first, but I'm used to it now, mostly thanks to time spent on this forum. In my head, the  "D" is shorthand for "person for whom I have great affection, even if they occasionally annoy the shit out of me." That's a lot of punch for two little letters.

I figured out what they mean pretty quickly. I don't like the cutesy pie nature of it. I know it's not going away. I am taking a stand and typing out wife every time I need to reference my wife in a post :)
Hmm, that's interesting, because while it probably originally had the cutesy connotation, those abbreviations have long since (at least to me) shed that feeling, and are now simply a shorthand way of saying "my wife", etc.

Personally, I am quite attached to the "DH" label, because it conveys the precise meaning Dicey provides.  I love the ambiguity (i.e., am I saying it straight, or with an implied irony font?).  It is pretty rare to find two little letters that can convey so varied a meaning depending on the context.

Besides, typing out "husband" all the time is 75% more inefficient than typing "wife," and 250% more inefficient than "DH."  And this board is all about efficiency.  ;-)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Spiritual_Lobotomy on December 06, 2017, 09:44:44 AM
the absurd use of the word "like"  (ex.  "Oh yeah, I haven't been there for like 5 years") And I'm Like totally serious....



and the present participle or past tense overuse of the word "fuck"  (ex.  "Can We All Stop This Fucking Complaining About our Government?") to quote MMM
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueMR2 on December 11, 2017, 04:47:26 PM
Totally agree with "laser focused" as mentioned half a page above.  I just finished reading a couple post mortems laced with "laser focused" and I wanted to reach into the screen and slap the people that wrote them.

I'm also going to add "team".  I'm so tired if getting e-mails that start off with "Team, " that one of these days I'm going to stand up and scream right in the middle of cubeland at work...  I can't even stand it when the news reports on "sports teams" anymore because of how abused and overused "team" has become!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Laura33 on December 12, 2017, 06:24:26 AM
I'm going to nominate "fun," when used to describe a component of interior design.  A/k/a "these tiles with the giant neon-blue-and-orange geometric pattern are so fun!" 

Just say what you mean:  "These tiles are bat-shit crazy loud.  But your all-white kitchen is boring and sterile and needs some personality.  Unfortunately, you don't have any, so let's see if we can fool people into thinking you do by installing something completely insane."

Also, "a pop of color."  Ugh. 

Yes, I am far too fond of home shows. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on December 12, 2017, 08:09:38 AM
I'm going to nominate "fun," when used to describe a component of interior design.  A/k/a "these tiles with the giant neon-blue-and-orange geometric pattern are so fun!" 

Just say what you mean:  "These tiles are bat-shit crazy loud.  But your all-white kitchen is boring and sterile and needs some personality.  Unfortunately, you don't have any, so let's see if we can fool people into thinking you do by installing something completely insane."

Also, "a pop of color."  Ugh. 

Yes, I am far too fond of home shows.
I used to watch more of those, but they tend to focus more on the finishes and decoration, rather than the structure and quality, so I quickly get bored.  Not to mention the outrageously overpriced (and ugly!) decor they choose.  Seriously, it seems like attractiveness is negatively correlated with price.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on December 12, 2017, 05:48:36 PM
I'm going to nominate "fun," when used to describe a component of interior design.  A/k/a "these tiles with the giant neon-blue-and-orange geometric pattern are so fun!" 

Just say what you mean:  "These tiles are bat-shit crazy loud.  But your all-white kitchen is boring and sterile and needs some personality.  Unfortunately, you don't have any, so let's see if we can fool people into thinking you do by installing something completely insane."

Also, "a pop of color."  Ugh. 

Yes, I am far too fond of home shows.
I used to watch more of those, but they tend to focus more on the finishes and decoration, rather than the structure and quality, so I quickly get bored.  Not to mention the outrageously overpriced (and ugly!) decor they choose.  Seriously, it seems like attractiveness is negatively correlated with price.
I hate "a pop of color", "put our stamp on it", with "high-end finishes", because the old, perfectly suitable stuff is "not our style". Ugh, gag. I also hate all decor that exists just because it "stands out" because "buyers are gonna love it". And don't get me started on mid-century modern. Nonetheless, we watch that stuff way too much.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on December 12, 2017, 09:10:29 PM
I'm going to nominate "fun," when used to describe a component of interior design.  A/k/a "these tiles with the giant neon-blue-and-orange geometric pattern are so fun!" 

Just say what you mean:  "These tiles are bat-shit crazy loud.  But your all-white kitchen is boring and sterile and needs some personality.  Unfortunately, you don't have any, so let's see if we can fool people into thinking you do by installing something completely insane."

Also, "a pop of color."  Ugh. 

Yes, I am far too fond of home shows.

I don't blame you, you obviously really enjoy them. :P
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: FIRE Artist on December 13, 2017, 10:34:54 AM
9 pages of annoying phrases, is the world getting more annoying, or are we just easily annoyed?

I will throw mine into the mix. I hate the current use of the word “Maker” to describe anyone and everyone who crafts or builds anything at all.  It had a slow build up for me, but just this week the scales tipped when someone described a bunch of engineering students doing their engineering student design competition type things as “Makers”.  Ugh. Like nails on a chalkboard.

Curated Pop Up Holiday Maker Market is the new pretentious way to say Juried Christmas Craft Fair.   

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on December 13, 2017, 11:21:11 AM
That reminds me, one magazine in particular that I read always says "made this photograph" rather than "took this photograph." I guess they're trying to emphasize the fact that there's more work/talent involved in photography than just pushing a button, and I totally get that, but it sounds awfully pretentious to me. Is anyone else seeing this?

Also, I thought of the conversation above regarding the word "retarded" when I listened to a podcast in which a person of (I think) Indian descent referred to herself and other non-whites repeatedly as a "person of color." But "colored people" is definitely not okay to say. That's fine, I'm happy to use whatever term people feel comfortable with and do my best to avoid those that are offensive, but the English language is so weird. Does this sort of thing happen in other languages?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on December 13, 2017, 12:42:38 PM
That reminds me, one magazine in particular that I read always says "made this photograph" rather than "took this photograph." I guess they're trying to emphasize the fact that there's more work/talent involved in photography than just pushing a button, and I totally get that, but it sounds awfully pretentious to me. Is anyone else seeing this?
I've never heard such a thing, and my GF is a pro photographer.  It does sound pretentious as hell.  Photographers and "photographers" can be an interesting breed.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: kamille on December 17, 2017, 12:57:38 AM
Diversity
Vulnerable
Entitlement
Fetus
Transgender
Evidence-based
Science-based


Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on December 17, 2017, 11:39:26 AM
Diversity
Vulnerable
Entitlement
Fetus
Transgender
Evidence-based
Science-based
I had no idea The Donald hung out around here!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on December 17, 2017, 12:22:57 PM
My first reaction was being surprised that "global warming" and "climate change" didn't make the list.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on December 17, 2017, 01:07:37 PM
My first reaction was being surprised that "global warming" and "climate change" didn't make the list.

That’s because it’s the CDC.

“Climate change” was banned last March.

https://www.politico.com/story/2017/03/energy-department-climate-change-phrases-banned-236655
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on December 18, 2017, 09:22:16 AM
I'm still in favor of "fetus" being replaced with "post-embryonic cell mass" instead of "unborn child" like they probably are fishing for.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: soccerluvof4 on December 19, 2017, 04:47:13 AM
"I've got it figure out now"- Teenage phrase meaning they screwed up and going forward things will be better but they don't.





Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on December 19, 2017, 08:24:04 AM
"She text me and said she wanted to meet for lunch." Instead of "texted."

I can see how this might be spoken rapidly so that the "ed" is sort of skipped over (Maybe. Even that is a stretch.), but I've even seen people write it this way!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marielle on December 19, 2017, 09:28:45 AM
"She text me and said she wanted to meet for lunch." Instead of "texted."

I can see how this might be spoken rapidly so that the "ed" is sort of skipped over (Maybe. Even that is a stretch.), but I've even seen people write it this way!

Sounds like AAVE, which is just as legitimate as any other language/dialect and has consistent grammar rules.

Unless it was a white person saying it then...not cool.

https://www.hawaii.edu/satocenter/langnet/definitions/aave.html

Quote
The verb in AAVE is often used without any ending. As is the case with the English creoles, there are some separate words that come before the verb which show when or how something happens. These are called "tense/aspect markers".

Past tense:

Past tense may be conveyed by the surrounding discourse (with the help of adverbials such as, for example, "last night", "three years ago", "back in them days", etc., or by the use of conjunctions which convey a sequence of actions (e.g. "then"), or by the use of an ending as in standard English. The frequency with which the -ed ending occurs depends on a number of factors including the sounds which follow it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: jinga nation on December 19, 2017, 10:22:17 AM
I will throw mine into the mix. I hate the current use of the word “Maker” to describe anyone and everyone who crafts or builds anything at all.  It had a slow build up for me, but just this week the scales tipped when someone described a bunch of engineering students doing their engineering student design competition type things as “Makers”.  Ugh. Like nails on a chalkboard.

Curated Pop Up Holiday Maker Market is the new pretentious way to say Juried Christmas Craft Fair.   
As an engineer, I look at this from a historical perspective. Looking back a few decades, a larger percentage of the US population worked in industries, small to large, to make things. Those people had profession names e.g carpenter, or were labelled "factory workers". A lot of that manufacturing is gone and we have a service/gig economy. So those who make are "makers" and those who spend unnecessarily are "idiots".

But yes, the term "maker" is ludicrous.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on December 19, 2017, 10:29:54 AM
"She text me and said she wanted to meet for lunch." Instead of "texted."

I can see how this might be spoken rapidly so that the "ed" is sort of skipped over (Maybe. Even that is a stretch.), but I've even seen people write it this way!

Sounds like AAVE, which is just as legitimate as any other language/dialect and has consistent grammar rules.

Unless it was a white person saying it then...not cool.

https://www.hawaii.edu/satocenter/langnet/definitions/aave.html

Quote
The verb in AAVE is often used without any ending. As is the case with the English creoles, there are some separate words that come before the verb which show when or how something happens. These are called "tense/aspect markers".

Past tense:

Past tense may be conveyed by the surrounding discourse (with the help of adverbials such as, for example, "last night", "three years ago", "back in them days", etc., or by the use of conjunctions which convey a sequence of actions (e.g. "then"), or by the use of an ending as in standard English. The frequency with which the -ed ending occurs depends on a number of factors including the sounds which follow it.


The only times I've heard/read it, it's been said/written by a white person.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on December 19, 2017, 10:31:48 AM
Makers gonna make you haterzzz

#disruptallthethings
#sorrynotsorry
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on December 19, 2017, 10:39:22 AM
"She text me and said she wanted to meet for lunch." Instead of "texted."

I can see how this might be spoken rapidly so that the "ed" is sort of skipped over (Maybe. Even that is a stretch.), but I've even seen people write it this way!

Sounds like AAVE, which is just as legitimate as any other language/dialect and has consistent grammar rules.

Unless it was a white person saying it then...not cool.

https://www.hawaii.edu/satocenter/langnet/definitions/aave.html

Quote
The verb in AAVE is often used without any ending. As is the case with the English creoles, there are some separate words that come before the verb which show when or how something happens. These are called "tense/aspect markers".

Past tense:

Past tense may be conveyed by the surrounding discourse (with the help of adverbials such as, for example, "last night", "three years ago", "back in them days", etc., or by the use of conjunctions which convey a sequence of actions (e.g. "then"), or by the use of an ending as in standard English. The frequency with which the -ed ending occurs depends on a number of factors including the sounds which follow it.


The only times I've heard/read it, it's been said/written by a white person.

Most of the time, me too, though I have seen a few black friends use it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on December 19, 2017, 06:00:01 PM
"To be honest with you..."

"To tell you the truth..."

Were you planning on doing otherwise in this conversation?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: pegleglolita on December 20, 2017, 01:37:05 PM
Anything used incorrectly:

Your/You're
Their/They're
Its/It's
and FFS stop using apostrophes when you are making a word plural!  God, its one of the thing's that make's me want to claw my eye's out. :D
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on December 20, 2017, 03:14:38 PM
Anything used incorrectly:

Your/You're
Their/They're
Its/It's
and FFS stop using apostrophes when you are making a word plural!  God, its one of the thing's that make's me want to claw my eye's out. :D

Especially fucking egregious during the holiday season, when one starts to receive Christmas cards from the Johnson's, the Smith's, etc... *head explodes*
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: SmokeySnow on December 21, 2017, 01:42:59 AM
don't know if it has already been mentioned, but 'deep-dive', used in the corporate world, is one of my nominations!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: EricL on December 21, 2017, 01:51:23 AM
Anything used incorrectly:

Your/You're
Their/They're
Its/It's
and FFS stop using apostrophes when you are making a word plural!  God, its one of the thing's that make's me want to claw my eye's out. :D

Especially fucking egregious during the holiday season, when one starts to receive Christmas cards from the Johnson's, the Smith's, etc... *head explodes*

I'm probably guilty of this a lot due to iPhone autocorrect.  And it annoys me as much as it annoys anyone if I go over something I wrote.  That said, this, though already posted, could be the medicine people on this thread need:

https://markmanson.net/not-giving-a-fuck (https://markmanson.net/not-giving-a-fuck)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: pegleglolita on December 21, 2017, 04:35:47 PM
Also, can we put a stake through the dark heart of letters addressed to "Mr. and Mrs. (Man's first and last name)".  For the love of Hera, what frilling year is this.  Caveat: if you are over the age of 75, I will forgive your sins.   
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on December 21, 2017, 04:41:13 PM
Also, can we put a stake through the dark heart of letters addressed to "Mr. and Mrs. (Man's first and last name)".  For the love of Hera, what frilling year is this.  Caveat: if you are over the age of 75, I will forgive your sins.   

Lol yeah, my mother-in-law still does this (of course). I cringe and try to keep my eyes from rolling out of their sockets.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: FIRE Artist on December 21, 2017, 04:42:29 PM
Also, can we put a stake through the dark heart of letters addressed to "Mr. and Mrs. (Man's first and last name)".  For the love of Hera, what frilling year is this.  Caveat: if you are over the age of 75, I will forgive your sins.   

I remember my mom commenting on how terribly dismissive a practice this was back when I was a kid, and she is 75 today, so I would raise that age limit a bit.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on December 21, 2017, 04:45:39 PM
Also, can we put a stake through the dark heart of letters addressed to "Mr. and Mrs. (Man's first and last name)".  For the love of Hera, what frilling year is this.  Caveat: if you are over the age of 75, I will forgive your sins.   

I remember my mom commenting on how terribly dismissive a practice this was back when I was a kid, and she is 75 today, so I would raise that age limit a bit.

Yeah, you might be right. I remember my mom doing it when I was little, and then stopping sometime maybe in my early teens. She would be 75 today.

Also, my MIL is a Jehovah's Witness, so...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on December 22, 2017, 01:20:05 AM
Also, can we put a stake through the dark heart of letters addressed to "Mr. and Mrs. (Man's first and last name)".  For the love of Hera, what frilling year is this.  Caveat: if you are over the age of 75, I will forgive your sins.   

This is profoundly annoying, but the only person I know who does it (also the only person who regularly writes me letters!) is my 90-year-old grandmother. The thing that exacerbates it is that nine times out of ten, the letter inside is to "Dear MyFirstName" and is solely written to me, perhaps with a "Give my love to HusbandsFirstName" as a P.S. If the letter is FOR me, why not just ADDRESS it to me?!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marielle on December 22, 2017, 06:42:59 AM
Also, can we put a stake through the dark heart of letters addressed to "Mr. and Mrs. (Man's first and last name)".  For the love of Hera, what frilling year is this.  Caveat: if you are over the age of 75, I will forgive your sins.   

I remember my mom commenting on how terribly dismissive a practice this was back when I was a kid, and she is 75 today, so I would raise that age limit a bit.

I know a couple in their 20s, maybe early 30s that just got married and their wedding invitation said "Mr. and Mrs. John Smith". It did have their full names somewhere else at least. It also had the parent's names. I thought it was pretty weird, but maybe it's the norm if you're having a religious ceremony. They are Catholic.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on December 22, 2017, 06:56:08 AM
Also, can we put a stake through the dark heart of letters addressed to "Mr. and Mrs. (Man's first and last name)".  For the love of Hera, what frilling year is this.  Caveat: if you are over the age of 75, I will forgive your sins.   

I remember my mom commenting on how terribly dismissive a practice this was back when I was a kid, and she is 75 today, so I would raise that age limit a bit.

I know a couple in their 20s, maybe early 30s that just got married and their wedding invitation said "Mr. and Mrs. John Smith". It did have their full names somewhere else at least. It also had the parent's names. I thought it was pretty weird, but maybe it's the norm if you're having a religious ceremony. They are Catholic.
The last wedding I went to was very Catholic and churchy to the extreme, and the wedding invitation actually said "[bride first name] and [groom first name]" in that order and that's it.  I wouldn't chalk it up solely as a religious thing.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on December 22, 2017, 01:26:43 PM
I don't have strong feelings either way on the Mr. and Mrs. Dudes First + Last Name.  It is just a nonsensical societal norm . . . like a woman wearing a dress at a wedding instead of pants, or a man wearing a tux instead of a skirt.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Erick on December 22, 2017, 07:17:24 PM
The word "Hustle" makes me physically gag.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on December 23, 2017, 08:11:40 PM
The word "Hustle" makes me physically gag.

As in "side hustle", taking advantage of someone through misdirection, moving quickly, other?

Or do you mean you just don't like the word in any context?

Also, I'm not a big fan of scrumptious.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: 2Birds1Stone on December 24, 2017, 01:44:46 AM
*Dilly Dilly*
Title: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 26, 2017, 08:18:48 AM
HUGE
In your wheelhouse
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: PlainsWalker on December 26, 2017, 01:05:58 PM
I find it terribly distracting when contrapositive, inverse, and converse are used in non-standard ways. In propositional logic the statement p->q is logically equivalent to its contraposition !q->!p. The inverse (!p->!q) and converse (q->p) have a truth value that is not dependent on the truth value of the original proposition. The converse is a contraposition of the inverse so the two are logically equivalent.

In a conference call recently the speaker said p->q and then to illustrate their point said "conversely" and then stated the contrapositive !q->!p. The two propositions were meant to be logically equivalent so they meant contrapositively instead of conversely. They just lost part of their audience while I squared up what they said with what they meant.

Math nerd problems.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on January 02, 2018, 01:39:01 AM
Also, can we put a stake through the dark heart of letters addressed to "Mr. and Mrs. (Man's first and last name)".  For the love of Hera, what frilling year is this.  Caveat: if you are over the age of 75, I will forgive your sins.   

This is profoundly annoying, but the only person I know who does it (also the only person who regularly writes me letters!) is my 90-year-old grandmother. The thing that exacerbates it is that nine times out of ten, the letter inside is to "Dear MyFirstName" and is solely written to me, perhaps with a "Give my love to HusbandsFirstName" as a P.S. If the letter is FOR me, why not just ADDRESS it to me?!

My grandmother is 86 and this is her all over.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: soccerluvof4 on January 02, 2018, 04:11:43 AM
Lately " I'm just kidding" .  Feel like some people spew out whatever they want and if it doesn't go over right they respond with that.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dave1442397 on January 02, 2018, 05:33:31 AM
Anything used incorrectly:

Your/You're
Their/They're
Its/It's
and FFS stop using apostrophes when you are making a word plural!  God, its one of the thing's that make's me want to claw my eye's out. :D

Especially fucking egregious during the holiday season, when one starts to receive Christmas cards from the Johnson's, the Smith's, etc... *head explodes*

Yes! We get a couple of those cards every year, and it makes me want to pick up the phone and yell at them.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on January 02, 2018, 07:07:47 AM
*Dilly Dilly*
What does this mean? Dilly-dally, perhaps?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on January 02, 2018, 07:11:45 AM
*Dilly Dilly*
What does this mean? Dilly-dally, perhaps?

Google is your friend here.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tralfamadorian on January 02, 2018, 07:14:03 AM
I had to google it too.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on January 02, 2018, 08:11:34 AM
I had to google it too.

They play the commercial during sportball games. I would never have seen it except my husband likes watching football.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on January 02, 2018, 08:55:45 AM
I had to google it too.

They play the commercial during sportball games. I would never have seen it except my husband likes watching football.
Thank you for your helpful responses. If it's in reference to a television commercial, that explains why I have no idea what it is. I think I'll keep it that way.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Stachey on January 06, 2018, 12:53:42 PM
Watched a tv series recently and the main character kept saying "JK".
He meant it as a short form of "Just kidding."

I didn't think I could hate the expression 'just kidding' anymore than I already did.  I was wrong.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: soccerluvof4 on January 07, 2018, 06:43:37 AM
Were gonna "make it our own"  in remodeling shows. Or " we need to have a space because we entertain alot"   Ever notice everyone on those shows entertains alot? I love those shows but they are really unrealistic in so many ways especially what they get some of those projects done for.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on January 08, 2018, 09:21:47 AM
Were gonna "make it our own"  in remodeling shows. Or " we need to have a space because we entertain alot"   Ever notice everyone on those shows entertains alot? I love those shows but they are really unrealistic in so many ways especially what they get some of those projects done for.
My favorite was watching one of those shows (years ago, no idea which one) and they kept saying things like "This would be a great place to sit and drink lemonade."  Always lemonade.  Are they not allowed to talk about alcohol?  Or do all these people really like lemonade that much?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on January 08, 2018, 01:07:05 PM
Were gonna "make it our own"  in remodeling shows. Or " we need to have a space because we entertain alot"   Ever notice everyone on those shows entertains alot? I love those shows but they are really unrealistic in so many ways especially what they get some of those projects done for.
My favorite was watching one of those shows (years ago, no idea which one) and they kept saying things like "This would be a great place to sit and drink lemonade."  Always lemonade.  Are they not allowed to talk about alcohol?  Or do all these people really like lemonade that much?

"I need a north-facing bedroom so the morning sun doesn't interfere with my hangovers" doesn't translate well on Home & Garden Television.

I'm tired of hearing about people's housing "non-negotiables" and "must-haves."  Either the producers force them to come up with a few or none of them have any idea that you can't house-hunt off of a menu. Compromise and negotiation is part of the process.  Especially when you're operating within a tight budget.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on January 08, 2018, 02:01:36 PM
Were gonna "make it our own"  in remodeling shows. Or " we need to have a space because we entertain alot"   Ever notice everyone on those shows entertains alot? I love those shows but they are really unrealistic in so many ways especially what they get some of those projects done for.
My favorite was watching one of those shows (years ago, no idea which one) and they kept saying things like "This would be a great place to sit and drink lemonade."  Always lemonade.  Are they not allowed to talk about alcohol?  Or do all these people really like lemonade that much?

"I need a north-facing bedroom so the morning sun doesn't interfere with my hangovers" doesn't translate well on Home & Garden Television.

I'm tired of hearing about people's housing "non-negotiables" and "must-haves."  Either the producers force them to come up with a few or none of them have any idea that you can't house-hunt off of a menu. Compromise and negotiation is part of the process.  Especially when you're operating within a tight budget.
I love when they talk about the couple being on a "tight budget" and then $700,000 flashes across the screen...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on January 08, 2018, 02:30:01 PM
Were gonna "make it our own"  in remodeling shows. Or " we need to have a space because we entertain alot"   Ever notice everyone on those shows entertains alot? I love those shows but they are really unrealistic in so many ways especially what they get some of those projects done for.
My favorite was watching one of those shows (years ago, no idea which one) and they kept saying things like "This would be a great place to sit and drink lemonade."  Always lemonade.  Are they not allowed to talk about alcohol?  Or do all these people really like lemonade that much?

"I need a north-facing bedroom so the morning sun doesn't interfere with my hangovers" doesn't translate well on Home & Garden Television.

I'm tired of hearing about people's housing "non-negotiables" and "must-haves."  Either the producers force them to come up with a few or none of them have any idea that you can't house-hunt off of a menu. Compromise and negotiation is part of the process.  Especially when you're operating within a tight budget.
I love when they talk about the couple being on a "tight budget" and then $700,000 flashes across the screen...

One of them "must have" all granite countertops while the other "must have" their "following their dreams" workspace plus room for their big screen TV, three vehicles, and they're DINKs with a combined $60k/year in a neighborhood where $250k is the starting price for that much square footage.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: soccerluvof4 on January 10, 2018, 01:42:47 PM
Were gonna "make it our own"  in remodeling shows. Or " we need to have a space because we entertain alot"   Ever notice everyone on those shows entertains alot? I love those shows but they are really unrealistic in so many ways especially what they get some of those projects done for.
My favorite was watching one of those shows (years ago, no idea which one) and they kept saying things like "This would be a great place to sit and drink lemonade."  Always lemonade.  Are they not allowed to talk about alcohol?  Or do all these people really like lemonade that much?

"I need a north-facing bedroom so the morning sun doesn't interfere with my hangovers" doesn't translate well on Home & Garden Television.

I'm tired of hearing about people's housing "non-negotiables" and "must-haves."  Either the producers force them to come up with a few or none of them have any idea that you can't house-hunt off of a menu. Compromise and negotiation is part of the process.  Especially when you're operating within a tight budget.
I love when they talk about the couple being on a "tight budget" and then $700,000 flashes across the screen...

One of them "must have" all granite countertops while the other "must have" their "following their dreams" workspace plus room for their big screen TV, three vehicles, and they're DINKs with a combined $60k/year in a neighborhood where $250k is the starting price for that much square footage.


haha....And ten acres fenced in for our dogs to run.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: LaineyAZ on January 20, 2018, 02:03:33 PM
Heard "emerg" for emergency room.  From a TV journalist reporting on a celebrity who overdosed and he had to go to  the emerg.
Dumbing down communication to make texting faster is one thing, but when professionals start talking like this?  Ugh.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on January 20, 2018, 11:29:29 PM
Heard "emerg" for emergency room.  From a TV journalist presenter reporting on a celebrity who overdosed and he had to go to  the emerg.
Dumbing down communication to make texting faster is one thing, but when professionals start talking like this?  Ugh.

FTFY
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: WootWoot on February 01, 2018, 11:50:37 AM
Here's one. My brother frequently says "at this point in time". Every damn time, my wacko brain says, "What about this point in space?" Then my brain links "What about time?" and "What about space?" and the next thing you know the theme song from an obscure one-season TV show called "It's About Time" starts playing in my head.

"It's about time
It's about space
About two men in the strangest place"

The funny thing about that is that we all used to sing it as:

"It's about time
It's about space
It's about time to slap your face"

Maybe my brain is smarter (and funnier) than I give it credit for.

Here's a link for you, but don't say I didn't warn you. It's pure drivel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1G-TsdNWGg

My husband sings that ditty every now and then. He says that show was really awful! LOL

Here are the words I could live without:

adulting

Netflix and chill (Like, how did this become a euphemism for sex? How?!)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Jouer on February 01, 2018, 01:10:23 PM
Yea I hate when people say adulting as well. Sounds so juvenile.

But Netlix and Chill. *snickers* So much fun.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on February 01, 2018, 04:00:05 PM
Netflix and chill (Like, how did this become a euphemism for sex? How?!)

Teenagers.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: deek on February 02, 2018, 03:42:33 PM
- "Woke"
- When attention hungry people on social media say, "I did a thing"
- "Snowflake"
- "AF"
- "Savage"
- "Fire"
- "Unpack" when analyzing something complex

And basically everything someone under 23 says on a daily basis (generalizing of course), but you catch my drift


Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on February 02, 2018, 04:10:35 PM
In your WHEELHOUSE
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mac_MacGyver on February 02, 2018, 05:46:09 PM
Probably already said but with everyone's help we can end "totes" and "Cray cray"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: fuzzy math on February 02, 2018, 06:59:32 PM
Moist

Eckspecially (how my coworker pronounces especially)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on February 02, 2018, 08:18:33 PM
"Sad Panda"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on February 02, 2018, 09:51:07 PM
- "Woke"
- When attention hungry people on social media say, "I did a thing"
- "Snowflake"
- "AF"
- "Savage"
- "Fire"
- "Unpack" when analyzing something complex
(emphasis mine) Um, you *do* realize what sort of forum you're visiting here, right? :P
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on February 03, 2018, 10:51:39 AM
Adorable when a 5 year old refers to a very close friend:     "my bestie"

Ridiculous when a 55 year old refers to a very close friend: "my bestie"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: a-scho on February 03, 2018, 11:06:18 PM
probably mentioned earlier, but:

woke
sammie(i like it as a name, not as "sandwich")
anyhoo
bruh
prolly

i did not know "netflix and chill" really meant "sex". reminds me how, starting in my twenties, I had no clue that "wanna come in for a drink?" really meant "sex". Everytime, I was honestly surprised when they would lunge at me once I was in their apartment. I'm now in my forties and just figured out, like, last year, :)  what they were really offering.  Guess I took things way too literally. Apparently, I still do. :/
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: WootWoot on February 04, 2018, 02:43:04 PM
Oh dear. My best friend calls me her bestie (on social media). I call her my BFF.


Adorable when a 5 year old refers to a very close friend:     "my bestie"

Ridiculous when a 55 year old refers to a very close friend: "my bestie"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on February 05, 2018, 02:44:12 PM
Oh dear. My best friend calls me her bestie (on social media). I call her my BFF.


Adorable when a 5 year old refers to a very close friend:     "my bestie"

Ridiculous when a 55 year old refers to a very close friend: "my bestie"

How old is she, @WootWoot? I'd be inclined to give her a break on this so long as she doesn't use "peeps" or "posse" when suggesting a group get together at a TGIF for happy hour. She'd have to be cited.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on February 05, 2018, 10:16:09 PM
I kinda like "peeps." *runs away*
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: WootWoot on February 08, 2018, 04:09:08 PM
Oh dear. My best friend calls me her bestie (on social media). I call her my BFF.


Adorable when a 5 year old refers to a very close friend:     "my bestie"

Ridiculous when a 55 year old refers to a very close friend: "my bestie"

How old is she, @WootWoot? I'd be inclined to give her a break on this so long as she doesn't use "peeps" or "posse" when suggesting a group get together at a TGIF for happy hour. She'd have to be cited.

Umm...we're both in our early 50s.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: NoraLenderbee on February 12, 2018, 03:02:15 PM
"emergent" as a back-formation from "emergency." The word "emergent" already HAS a meaning.
"It is an emergent illness." The illness is popping up from a hole in the ground?
"The patient's condition is emergent." Oh, the patient is coming out of the closet?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on February 13, 2018, 02:19:03 AM
"Legitimately" used as some kind of intensifier, I think. "I legitimately cannot think of a reason why anyone would do this." Presumably it's some kind of workaround for all the hatred incurred by words like "literally"?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on February 13, 2018, 06:25:35 AM
"Legitimately" used as some kind of intensifier, I think. "I legitimately cannot think of a reason why anyone would do this." Presumably it's some kind of workaround for all the hatred incurred by words like "literally"?

Sounds weird but I'm ok with it as long as people stop using 'literally' when they mean THE EXACT OPPOSITE OF LITERALLY.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on February 13, 2018, 07:32:50 AM
1. At the end of the day...

2. When a male athlete is talking to a  female reporter, and says, "Man, I just..."  Dude, she is not a man.  She's right in front of you.  It's actually gotten worse.  Now the female athletes are doing it, too.

You know when people say something like. "Aw, man. That sucks" It's that kind of "Man"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ncornilsen on February 13, 2018, 10:07:03 PM
After watching the olympics figure skating, i could go a lifetime without hearing 'the feels' ever again.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on February 14, 2018, 10:29:04 AM
After watching the olympics figure skating, i could go a lifetime without hearing 'the feels' ever again.

For reals.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on February 14, 2018, 01:10:15 PM
After watching the olympics figure skating, i could go a lifetime without hearing 'the feels' ever again.

What does that mean or refer to???
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ncornilsen on February 14, 2018, 01:39:52 PM
After watching the olympics figure skating, i could go a lifetime without hearing 'the feels' ever again.

What does that mean or refer to???

One of the commenters kept using that phrase over and over again about how "emotional" or whatever a particular routine was.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sixup on February 18, 2018, 06:38:48 AM
"Not for nothing, but..."

I've developed a strong hate for this phrase. It's a weird east coast thing. Makes no sense, and makes me cringe when I hear it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: WootWoot on February 18, 2018, 10:08:34 AM
Phrases like "haters gonna hate."

I got an email from a company selling daily planners and the subject line was "Planners gonna plan."

<barf>
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on February 18, 2018, 10:51:30 AM
"Not for nothing, but..."

I've developed a strong hate for this phrase. It's a weird east coast thing. Makes no sense, and makes me cringe when I hear it.

Interesting. I live in the Midwest, and I have never heard this phrase. I would hate it, too!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on February 18, 2018, 01:11:28 PM
"Not for nothing, but..."

I've developed a strong hate for this phrase. It's a weird east coast thing. Makes no sense, and makes me cringe when I hear it.

Yeah. The first person I ever heard say this, says it ALL THE FREAKING TIME. It doesn't help that this is someone I have grown to strongly dislike.

And yeah. It makes no sense at all.

Ugh.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: iris lily on February 19, 2018, 08:12:03 AM
After watching the olympics figure skating, i could go a lifetime without hearing 'the feels' ever again.

What does that mean or refer to???

One of the commenters kept using that phrase over and over again about how "emotional" or whatever a particular routine was.

Is this from johnny and tara?

I stopped wTching ice skating seriously about the time tara Lipinsky was winning. She was everyones darling, a little jumping bean, but I dont care about the jumps. There wete teenage skaters who could pull off gorgeous, lyrical routines but she wasnt one if them.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ncornilsen on February 19, 2018, 09:07:16 AM
After watching the olympics figure skating, i could go a lifetime without hearing 'the feels' ever again.

What does that mean or refer to???

One of the commenters kept using that phrase over and over again about how "emotional" or whatever a particular routine was.

Is this from johnny and tara?

I stopped wTching ice skating seriously about the time tara Lipinsky was winning. She was everyones darling, a little jumping bean, but I dont care about the jumps. There wete teenage skaters who could pull off gorgeous, lyrical routines but she wasnt one if them.

Yes, that is who I'm referring to. I don't particulary follow ice skating, it just happened to be what was on for the 45 minutes I watcvh TV in a day. When I first saw tara and johnny, I thought I'd tuned into a hunger games sequel.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on February 26, 2018, 10:22:37 AM
"Not for nothing, but..."

I've developed a strong hate for this phrase. It's a weird east coast thing. Makes no sense, and makes me cringe when I hear it.

I grew up in NJ.  It was always an Italian thing there.  Picture Rocky saying it.  Or Tony Soprano. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on February 26, 2018, 10:25:34 AM
"Technically", when used to describe something just being the way it is.   No loophole or anything. 

Last night I saw Jennifer Lawrence say that she doesn't "technically" have a GED or High School Diploma.  Nothing technical about it.  She dropped out at 14 and never finished. 
I think this started to bother me when a co-worker started saying it whenever he made an error. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sixup on March 01, 2018, 04:56:25 AM
"Not for nothing, but..."

I've developed a strong hate for this phrase. It's a weird east coast thing. Makes no sense, and makes me cringe when I hear it.

I grew up in NJ.  It was always an Italian thing there.  Picture Rocky saying it.  Or Tony Soprano.

I just heard the CBS new york morning news anchor say it. kill me.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: solon on March 01, 2018, 09:58:19 AM
"Not for nothing, but..."

I've developed a strong hate for this phrase. It's a weird east coast thing. Makes no sense, and makes me cringe when I hear it.

I grew up in NJ.  It was always an Italian thing there.  Picture Rocky saying it.  Or Tony Soprano.

I just heard the CBS new york morning news anchor say it. kill me.

What does "not for nothing" mean? I'm not from the east coast so having trouble figuring it out, beyond just the literal meaning.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sixup on March 01, 2018, 06:07:47 PM
It's kind of like saying..."no offense, but..."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on March 02, 2018, 06:41:50 AM
What does "not for nothing" mean? I'm not from the east coast so having trouble figuring it out, beyond just the literal meaning.

I've never heard it, either.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: FIRE Artist on March 02, 2018, 08:56:57 AM
What does "not for nothing" mean? I'm not from the east coast so having trouble figuring it out, beyond just the literal meaning.

I've never heard it, either.

I have only ever heard it used once, and it was from an American friend who works at the White House.  She used it when describing how she dropped bad news to her parents - "Not for nothing, but, I have breast cancer..."

I think it is a lead in to brace someone against something that is bad news, or possibly offensive/insulting.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mrbeardedbigbucks on March 03, 2018, 04:03:49 AM
Maybe this has already been said but I'll throw it out there anyway.

I work in an office with a bunch of stiff old white guys who's world revolves around their careers and making children. Whenever one asks how the other is doing a very common response is:

"Living the Dream"

or

"No complaints but if I had any no one would listen anyway"

It's like man, think of something original at least. One time this dude I work closely with threw out the "living the dream" at me and I responded "your dream is my nightmare" and we both got a good laugh although now he doesn't talk to me as much anymore. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mies on March 03, 2018, 07:43:57 AM
Maybe this has already been said but I'll throw it out there anyway.

I work in an office with a bunch of stiff old white guys who's world revolves around their careers and making children. Whenever one asks how the other is doing a very common response is:

"Living the Dream"

or

"No complaints but if I had any no one would listen anyway"

It's like man, think of something original at least. One time this dude I work closely with threw out the "living the dream" at me and I responded "your dream is my nightmare" and we both got a good laugh although now he doesn't talk to me as much anymore.

You're my hero :D I hate that defeatist "everything sucks" attitude of guys that use "Living the dream".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mrbeardedbigbucks on March 05, 2018, 04:20:42 AM
Maybe this has already been said but I'll throw it out there anyway.

I work in an office with a bunch of stiff old white guys who's world revolves around their careers and making children. Whenever one asks how the other is doing a very common response is:

"Living the Dream"

or

"No complaints but if I had any no one would listen anyway"

It's like man, think of something original at least. One time this dude I work closely with threw out the "living the dream" at me and I responded "your dream is my nightmare" and we both got a good laugh although now he doesn't talk to me as much anymore.

You're my hero :D I hate that defeatist "everything sucks" attitude of guys that use "Living the dream".

If I'm your hero I must be "living the dream".

I'd also like to add "Happy wife, Happy life" to this list. Another common phrase thrown around the office. Just terrible.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on March 06, 2018, 02:32:15 PM


You're my hero :D I hate that defeatist "everything sucks" attitude of guys that use "Living the dream".

???

I use "Living the dream" in a way that says Life is good.  I do know it's origin in office space, but I don't use this phrase in a sarcastic way at all.  I Love my life, I've never been happier, and I really am living the american dream.  Not defeatist at all.

I also like to say "another day in paradise".  Because I am not original at all, and I think some people prefer to hear something other than "fine thank you?  How are you?"  Which is what I would otherwise say.  Every. Day. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on March 06, 2018, 02:50:49 PM


You're my hero :D I hate that defeatist "everything sucks" attitude of guys that use "Living the dream".

???

I use "Living the dream" in a way that says Life is good.  I do know it's origin in office space, but I don't use this phrase in a sarcastic way at all.  I Love my life, I've never been happier, and I really am living the american dream.  Not defeatist at all.

I also like to say "another day in paradise".  Because I am not original at all, and I think some people prefer to hear something other than "fine thank you?  How are you?"  Which is what I would otherwise say.  Every. Day.

I don't think I've ever heard either of those sayings in a non-ironic way.  They've always been said by someone who was so "blah" about their day they had nothing articulate or positive to say to describe it or they were thumbing their nose at the motivation they were supposed to be feeling.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mies on March 06, 2018, 03:16:48 PM


You're my hero :D I hate that defeatist "everything sucks" attitude of guys that use "Living the dream".

???

I use "Living the dream" in a way that says Life is good.  I do know it's origin in office space, but I don't use this phrase in a sarcastic way at all.  I Love my life, I've never been happier, and I really am living the american dream.  Not defeatist at all.

I also like to say "another day in paradise".  Because I am not original at all, and I think some people prefer to hear something other than "fine thank you?  How are you?"  Which is what I would otherwise say.  Every. Day.

Well, you are definitely in the minority with using it in a non-sarcastic way. Every time I've heard someone say "Living the dream...", they are using it exactly the way Mrbeardedbigbucks described it. You might want to be careful how you use that phrase, because I think most people are going to see it as you being negative, even if you don't mean it that way.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on March 06, 2018, 06:42:20 PM
Maybe the real problem here is people constantly asking each other how they are, even when they don't know each other and will never see each other again (grocery store cashier, etc.). Does anyone ever expect anything other than a short, positive answer? Is this a silly American thing, or does it happen elsewhere, too? The whole exchange is just a waste of time, so while I think answers like a sarcastic "living the dream" are stupid, I can understand a person's desire to say something, anything, that's different from "Fine, how are you?" Seems like we could just say hello and leave it at that, or move on to more interesting conversation.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sixup on March 07, 2018, 01:51:32 PM
"a lot to unpack..."

"There's a lot unpack there... blah blah blah"

I've heard it a lot on podcasts. Just seems like a trite, marketing-speak filler phrase.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: soccerluvof4 on March 07, 2018, 03:26:25 PM
My Bad... ! like it makes it ok.  Dont need to point out when you make a mistake we all know it just move on.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on March 07, 2018, 06:53:02 PM
My Bad... ! like it makes it ok.  Dont need to point out when you make a mistake we all know it just move on.

Considering the number of people I've known in my life whose first words after a mistake/accident are "Not my fault!" I enjoy it when somebody owns up to them.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mrbeardedbigbucks on March 08, 2018, 04:34:45 AM


You're my hero :D I hate that defeatist "everything sucks" attitude of guys that use "Living the dream".

???

I use "Living the dream" in a way that says Life is good.  I do know it's origin in office space, but I don't use this phrase in a sarcastic way at all.  I Love my life, I've never been happier, and I really am living the american dream.  Not defeatist at all.

I also like to say "another day in paradise".  Because I am not original at all, and I think some people prefer to hear something other than "fine thank you?  How are you?"  Which is what I would otherwise say.  Every. Day.

Well, you are definitely in the minority with using it in a non-sarcastic way. Every time I've heard someone say "Living the dream...", they are using it exactly the way Mrbeardedbigbucks described it. You might want to be careful how you use that phrase, because I think most people are going to see it as you being negative, even if you don't mean it that way.

I agree. Even if you are really 'living the dream' and you're very satisfied with your situation in life, when you say that phrase to someone else, usually it's interpreted as sarcastic and you're not that satisfied with the way things are going.

I suppose it could depend on the inflection in your voice and how descriptive you are,  like if you headline it with "you know what? I really am living the dream, no complaints at all" but if you just respond with a typical "living the dream man, how about you?", many people will think your life is kind of crappy right now.

I am happy for you bye the way. It's great that you are living your own dream. I think a better response would be an enthusiastic- "I'm friggin' awesome, things couldn't be better, for real"  Use that on your next response to someone asking you how you're doing and see what happens.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on March 08, 2018, 05:25:16 AM
"Living the dream" has an even more cringe worthy offshoot: "teamwork makes the dream work" . Just no.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mrbeardedbigbucks on March 08, 2018, 09:04:33 AM
"Living the dream" has an even more cringe worthy offshoot: "teamwork makes the dream work" . Just no.

I’ve never heard that phrase before and if I ever do, I’ll immediately jump out the nearest window.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on March 08, 2018, 10:13:13 AM
"Living the dream" has an even more cringe worthy offshoot: "teamwork makes the dream work" . Just no.

I’ve never heard that phrase before and if I ever do, I’ll immediately jump out the nearest window.

"There's no I in team!"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on March 08, 2018, 12:04:06 PM
My Bad... ! like it makes it ok.  Dont need to point out when you make a mistake we all know it just move on.

Considering the number of people I've known in my life whose first words after a mistake/accident are "Not my fault!" I enjoy it when somebody owns up to them.
Totally agree! It seems to show somewhat more ownership than just an apology.

ETA - It's also useful when you want to own something, but not necessarily apologize.  I like the ambiguity, if that makes any sense at all. I've even used it sarcastically, when someone is overreacting to something that isn't my fault at all.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on March 08, 2018, 12:09:00 PM
"Living the dream" has an even more cringe worthy offshoot: "teamwork makes the dream work" . Just no.

I’ve never heard that phrase before and if I ever do, I’ll immediately jump out the nearest window.

"There's no I in team!"
Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on March 08, 2018, 01:10:03 PM
Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Also, if you look real hard, there *is* a me in "team".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on March 08, 2018, 02:08:30 PM
Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Also, if you look real hard, there *is* a me in "team".
Ooh, I like this! If I wasn't FIRE, I'd totally use this on my boss. Mustachian People Problem, I guess.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on March 08, 2018, 02:33:12 PM
Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Also, if you look real hard, there *is* a me in "team".

Good point!

Reminds me of something my husband loves to say in situations like that:

"It makes sense, if you don't think about it." :D
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on March 08, 2018, 02:47:28 PM
Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Also, if you look real hard, there *is* a me in "team".

Good point!

Reminds me of something my husband loves to say in situations like that:

"It makes sense, if you don't think about it." :D
Love it!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on March 12, 2018, 03:12:07 PM
Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Also, if you look real hard, there *is* a me in "team".
But there is an I in pie, and there's an I in meat pie.  Meat is an anagram for team.
(https://www.premierguitar.com/ext/resources/images/content/2103_08/Blogs/Shaun-of-the-Dead---Meat-Pie_WEB.jpg)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on March 13, 2018, 01:20:51 AM
Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Also, if you look real hard, there *is* a me in "team".
But there is an I in pie, and there's an I in meat pie.  Meat is an anagram for team.
(https://www.premierguitar.com/ext/resources/images/content/2103_08/Blogs/Shaun-of-the-Dead---Meat-Pie_WEB.jpg)

Or should that be ‘gh’ for pie?

If GH can stand for P as in ‘hiccough’,
If OUGH can stand for O as in ‘dough’,
if PHTH can stand for T as in ‘phthisis’,
if EIGH can stand for A as in ‘neighbour’,
if TTE can stand for T as in ‘gazette’,
if EAU can stand for O as in ‘plateau’,


…then the correct way to spell potato would be:

GHOUGHPHTHEIGHTTEEAU


(via Grammarly and half my uni lecturers)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: albireo13 on March 13, 2018, 07:42:33 AM
paradigm shift
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on March 13, 2018, 08:00:26 AM
Something I see on the forum a lot: using gift/gifted as a verb instead of give/gave/given. E.g. "I was gifted a house", or "how to gift money to minors " Can someone give (gift?) me a logical reason for this? Maybe it is regional or something because I have never heard it IRL.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on March 13, 2018, 08:12:20 AM
"There's no I in team!"

(https://i.imgur.com/F6mGA.jpg)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on March 13, 2018, 08:20:56 AM
Something I see on the forum a lot: using gift/gifted as a verb instead of give/gave/given. E.g. "I was gifted a house", or "how to gift money to minors " Can someone give (gift?) me a logical reason for this? Maybe it is regional or something because I have never heard it IRL.
I think the idea is that "to gift" is a more specific term than "to give."  IOW, "to gift" means "to give as a gift" as opposed to other possible connotations.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on March 13, 2018, 12:31:10 PM
Something I see on the forum a lot: using gift/gifted as a verb instead of give/gave/given. E.g. "I was gifted a house", or "how to gift money to minors " Can someone give (gift?) me a logical reason for this? Maybe it is regional or something because I have never heard it IRL.
I think the idea is that "to gift" is a more specific term than "to give."  IOW, "to gift" means "to give as a gift" as opposed to other possible connotations.
LOL, I just looked this up, and it seems as if the use of "gift" as a verb became much more popular after the Seinfeld episode about the regifted label maker! 
https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/is-gifting-a-word?page=1 (https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/is-gifting-a-word?page=1)
In older days, it seems to be more of a reciprocal agreement used for tax purposes.

I guess I see zolotiyeruki's point because you wouldn't say that you gifted someone with Chicken Pox. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on March 13, 2018, 05:31:49 PM
Something I see on the forum a lot: using gift/gifted as a verb instead of give/gave/given. E.g. "I was gifted a house", or "how to gift money to minors " Can someone give (gift?) me a logical reason for this? Maybe it is regional or something because I have never heard it IRL.
I think the idea is that "to gift" is a more specific term than "to give."  IOW, "to gift" means "to give as a gift" as opposed to other possible connotations.
LOL, I just looked this up, and it seems as if the use of "gift" as a verb became much more popular after the Seinfeld episode about the regifted label maker! 
https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/is-gifting-a-word?page=1 (https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/is-gifting-a-word?page=1)
In older days, it seems to be more of a reciprocal agreement used for tax purposes.

I guess I see zolotiyeruki's point because you wouldn't say that you gifted someone with Chicken Pox.

I see the logic but I still just don't like it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on March 14, 2018, 02:38:31 AM
I can't find the article (blame the empty glass next to me) but I saw a news report this week about new words being added to the dictionary (Macquarie? OED?).

They included 'shero' (female hero) and 'GOAT' (greatest of all time).

GOAT is common knowledge, and if not, that's what Urban Dictionary is for.

Shero is downright odious.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marty998 on March 14, 2018, 04:49:28 AM

Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Also, if you look real hard, there *is* a me in "team".
But there is an I in pie, and there's an I in meat pie.  Meat is an anagram for team.

There's no I in Team, but there's a U in Cun....(I'm so getting banned for this)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on March 14, 2018, 04:52:09 AM

Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Also, if you look real hard, there *is* a me in "team".
But there is an I in pie, and there's an I in meat pie.  Meat is an anagram for team.

There's no I in Team, but there's a U in Cun....(I'm so getting banned for this)

I would hope U would be in one...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on March 14, 2018, 05:06:37 AM
I can't find the article (blame the empty glass next to me) but I saw a news report this week about new words being added to the dictionary (Macquarie? OED?).

They included 'shero' (female hero) and 'GOAT' (greatest of all time).

GOAT is common knowledge, and if not, that's what Urban Dictionary is for.

Shero is downright odious.

ETA: Oops...my keyboard wouldn't work earlier and I accidentally submitted an "empty" reply. Anyway, what I was going to say is this: I have NEVER seen the GOAT acronym, but I hear shero every once in a while.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on March 14, 2018, 07:59:36 AM

Was it Shaq who added, "...but there is one in win"?
Also, if you look real hard, there *is* a me in "team".
But there is an I in pie, and there's an I in meat pie.  Meat is an anagram for team.

There's no I in Team, but there's a U in Cun....(I'm so getting banned for this)
Country-music-loving lady?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: solon on March 14, 2018, 08:33:55 AM
I'm genuinely confused. On this forum we can say shit, hell, and fuck, but we self-censor cunt. That word must be a lot stronger than it seems to me.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on March 14, 2018, 10:23:28 AM
Yes, it is.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Bearblastbeats on March 14, 2018, 01:31:23 PM
When people use the word though at the end of an already complete sentence.

I.e. These new mocha choca dunka latte chinos though.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: chaskavitch on March 14, 2018, 01:50:20 PM
When people use the word though at the end of an already complete sentence.

I.e. These new mocha choca dunka latte chinos though.

So, you're not a fan of Chantho from Doctor Who, then?  :)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Boll weevil on March 14, 2018, 03:02:26 PM
I've got some more:

- passion when referring to anything other than human relationships (as in "my job is my passion"
- "it is what it is"
- anytime somebody says they're going to give more than 100% effort

And these aren't words, but
- that fistbump-explosion thing
- putting hands together to make a heart (fingertips in, thumbs down)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: mustachepungoeshere on March 14, 2018, 03:06:25 PM
I can't find the article (blame the empty glass next to me) but I saw a news report this week about new words being added to the dictionary (Macquarie? OED?).

They included 'shero' (female hero) and 'GOAT' (greatest of all time).

GOAT is common knowledge, and if not, that's what Urban Dictionary is for.

Shero is downright odious.

Well said.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on March 14, 2018, 03:11:22 PM
I've got some more:

- passion when referring to anything other than human relationships (as in "my job is my passion"


I watched an episode of Shark Tank where the panel collectively sighed/laughed when the presenter mentioned their passion for their project having value. I think it was Mark Cuban who said sarcastically "yeah, we've never heard that here before."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MissNancyPryor on March 14, 2018, 03:12:56 PM
Starting a sentence with"so", as in "so, I said him...."

ENDING every sentence with “so” and the implied ellipses that follow. 

Apologies if this was already submitted, so...

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on March 14, 2018, 03:20:29 PM
When people use the word though at the end of an already complete sentence.

I.e. These new mocha choca dunka latte chinos though.

So, you're not a fan of Chantho from Doctor Who, then?  :)

Her lab partner murdered her citing her speech patterns as a reason...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: chaskavitch on March 14, 2018, 03:54:48 PM
When people use the word though at the end of an already complete sentence.

I.e. These new mocha choca dunka latte chinos though.

So, you're not a fan of Chantho from Doctor Who, then?  :)

Her lab partner murdered her citing her speech patterns as a reason...

You make a very good point.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on March 14, 2018, 06:24:08 PM
"Resurface" - apparently as in "Oh, you didn't get the email I sent last week? Let me resurface it for you." This from a friend who works at a start-up that anyone with college debt will have heard of. She has a new eye-roller every time I see her.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on March 14, 2018, 06:47:34 PM
"Resurface" - apparently as in "Oh, you didn't get the email I sent last week? Let me resurface it for you." This from a friend who works at a start-up that anyone with college debt will have heard of. She has a new eye-roller every time I see her.

That could be filed under the "when good words go bad" department.

"Pivot" gets overused now. I read an update from the Board President of an organization I'm connected to. She used it twice in a 3 paragraph message.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on March 14, 2018, 07:19:04 PM
"Resurface" - apparently as in "Oh, you didn't get the email I sent last week? Let me resurface it for you." This from a friend who works at a start-up that anyone with college debt will have heard of. She has a new eye-roller every time I see her.

That could be filed under the "when good words go bad" department.

"Pivot" gets overused now. I read an update from the Board President of an organization I'm connected to. She used it twice in a 3 paragraph message.
You'll have to blame Obama for that one :P
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: FIRE Artist on March 16, 2018, 10:17:37 AM
giving another shout out for "adulting".  Makes me cringe every time I hear it, even more so when someone over 25 says it. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on March 16, 2018, 10:20:25 AM
"Resurface" - apparently as in "Oh, you didn't get the email I sent last week? Let me resurface it for you." This from a friend who works at a start-up that anyone with college debt will have heard of. She has a new eye-roller every time I see her.

Oh my god.

I’ve never heard that. Infuriating.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on March 16, 2018, 10:40:35 AM
"Resurface" - apparently as in "Oh, you didn't get the email I sent last week? Let me resurface it for you." This from a friend who works at a start-up that anyone with college debt will have heard of. She has a new eye-roller every time I see her.
Oh my god.

I’ve never heard that. Infuriating.
Maybe we should replace it with "exhume"!

I'll admit at first that I took "resurface" to mean "repave," and was very confused...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on March 17, 2018, 08:46:05 AM
"Resurface" - apparently as in "Oh, you didn't get the email I sent last week? Let me resurface it for you." This from a friend who works at a start-up that anyone with college debt will have heard of. She has a new eye-roller every time I see her.
Oh my god.

I’ve never heard that. Infuriating.
Maybe we should replace it with "exhume"!

I'll admit at first that I took "resurface" to mean "repave," and was very confused...

Resurface is repave, but only the surface - to me repaving means going deeper.

Old emails - they could be re-sent maybe?  Or if really old, dug out and re-sent?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on March 17, 2018, 09:09:33 AM
"Resurface" - apparently as in "Oh, you didn't get the email I sent last week? Let me resurface it for you." This from a friend who works at a start-up that anyone with college debt will have heard of. She has a new eye-roller every time I see her.
Oh my god.

I’ve never heard that. Infuriating.
Maybe we should replace it with "exhume"!

I'll admit at first that I took "resurface" to mean "repave," and was very confused...
The term resurface made me think of all the things you cite and more.

A good chunk of my career was spent in the flooring industry. There is a huge annual trade show in Vegas called "Surfaces". From that marathon, thank God, I have been freed. DH is a Specialty Surfaces Specialist. He resurfaces million gallon reservoirs, among other things. The parking lot at the library needs to be resurfaced and the county says there's no money to pay for it.

What a bunch of pantywaists, pretending that searching for an email is actual physical labor.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: solon on April 10, 2018, 01:37:54 PM
"That said,..."

It's all over this forum.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on April 10, 2018, 04:50:22 PM
Did someone already post this?  It's so on point it actually stops being funny  https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/im-going-to-close-this-deal-using-business-words-ive-heard-men-yell-in-airports
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: NoraLenderbee on April 13, 2018, 02:34:31 PM
Something I see on the forum a lot: using gift/gifted as a verb instead of give/gave/given. E.g. "I was gifted a house", or "how to gift money to minors " Can someone give (gift?) me a logical reason for this? Maybe it is regional or something because I have never heard it IRL.
I think the idea is that "to gift" is a more specific term than "to give."  IOW, "to gift" means "to give as a gift" as opposed to other possible connotations.
LOL, I just looked this up, and it seems as if the use of "gift" as a verb became much more popular after the Seinfeld episode about the regifted label maker! 
https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/is-gifting-a-word?page=1 (https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/is-gifting-a-word?page=1)
In older days, it seems to be more of a reciprocal agreement used for tax purposes.

I guess I see zolotiyeruki's point because you wouldn't say that you gifted someone with Chicken Pox.

I see the logic but I still just don't like it.

It's used to make "give" sound more glamorous. It's stupid and I hate it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on April 13, 2018, 03:07:50 PM
I absolutely hate this phrase: "Top is in"

There. I said it. I feel so much better now.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on April 13, 2018, 03:20:27 PM
I absolutely hate this phrase: "Top is in"

There. I said it. I feel so much better now.

What does this even mean?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on April 13, 2018, 04:04:48 PM
I absolutely hate this phrase: "Top is in"

There. I said it. I feel so much better now.

What does this even mean?

I want to know, too. I googled it and I still have no idea what it means.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: solon on April 13, 2018, 04:17:21 PM
Who are you people? Do you know what forum you're on?

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/investor-alley/top-is-in/
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on April 13, 2018, 04:19:41 PM
Who are you people? Do you know what forum you're on?

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/investor-alley/top-is-in/

Yeah, when I googled, that was the top result. And I STILL don't get it.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on April 13, 2018, 04:30:21 PM
So glad to see I'm not the only one.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Tass on April 13, 2018, 07:35:42 PM
By my understanding it's a prediction that the stock market has hit the "top" and it's time to sell everything and wait greedily for the crash.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Miss Piggy on April 13, 2018, 08:32:17 PM
Yes, that is my understanding as well. Doesn't matter. I still hate the phrase. It makes no sense.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on April 13, 2018, 09:03:49 PM
Who are you people? Do you know what forum you're on?

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/investor-alley/top-is-in/

The bottom is out
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: solon on June 05, 2018, 11:14:37 AM
I think there is enough in here for everyone to be upset about...

https://pueblo.craigslist.org/cto/d/2000-range-rover-land-rover/6602179372.html
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on June 05, 2018, 11:38:46 AM
I think there is enough in here for everyone to be upset about...

https://pueblo.craigslist.org/cto/d/2000-range-rover-land-rover/6602179372.html

Ouch. Where's my red pen.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on June 05, 2018, 02:16:06 PM
"the little woman." UGH UGH UGH
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on June 05, 2018, 02:31:31 PM
"the little woman." UGH UGH UGH

Grammar, spelling, choice of words. It's got everything.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on June 06, 2018, 12:01:15 AM
"the little woman." UGH UGH UGH
"The ball and chain" DITTO
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on June 06, 2018, 12:39:52 PM
"the little woman." UGH UGH UGH

Grammar, spelling, choice of words. It's got everything.

Cringe.  I regret looking at it.  Not an advertisement for whatever schools the seller attended.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on June 11, 2018, 10:23:12 PM
"the little woman." UGH UGH UGH

Grammar, spelling, choice of words. It's got everything.

Cringe.  I regret looking at it.  Not an advertisement for whatever schools the seller attended.

Along with hubs, hubby, wifey lil mommy, lil daddy, et al.. Do people really need to refer to their spouses this way?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on June 18, 2018, 06:43:04 AM
I have a new pet peeve. I hate reading a library book where a previous reader has decided to be the editor and "fixed" all the "mistakes".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: chaskavitch on June 18, 2018, 07:02:50 AM
I have a new pet peeve. I hate reading a library book where a previous reader has decided to be the editor and "fixed" all the "mistakes".

People DO that?!?!?  That's terrible, and terribly annoying. 


And now "terrible" looks like some weird mix of "tribble" and "terrier" and it's just some yippy fluffy dog that reproduces every 10 hours. /sigh
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on June 18, 2018, 07:03:31 AM
"the little woman." UGH UGH UGH

Grammar, spelling, choice of words. It's got everything.

Cringe.  I regret looking at it.  Not an advertisement for whatever schools the seller attended.

Along with hubs, hubby, wifey lil mommy, lil daddy, et al.. Do people really need to refer to their spouses this way?

Sorry, but when I am referring to my Other Half I refer to him as The Hub. I only do it on websites when referring to him. Not in public.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ender on June 18, 2018, 07:15:24 AM
For some reason, I have an irrational dislike of DH/DW/DD/DS and all their variants.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on June 18, 2018, 09:47:05 AM
For some reason, I have an irrational dislike of DH/DW/DD/DS and all their variants.
Me too!  I thought I was the only one...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Nicholas Carter on June 18, 2018, 09:54:50 AM
Netflix and chill (Like, how did this become a euphemism for sex? How?!)
So what happens is, you invite someone over to see a movie, and while they are there, "maybe" one of you will initiate sex with the other. In much the same mold as "Would you like to come up and see my records?"

"Not for nothing, but..."

I've developed a strong hate for this phrase. It's a weird east coast thing. Makes no sense, and makes me cringe when I hear it.

What does "not for nothing" mean? I'm not from the east coast so having trouble figuring it out, beyond just the literal meaning.
In my experience, it means something like "I don't expect this to work" or "I don't think you're going to listen to me." or "I'm just saying." So:
"Not for nothing, but I think this project is pointless."
"Not for nothing, but that's the worst possible dress you could have come to this party in."
Apparently the original source is a poem, in which the meaning is literal "I am not doing this for nothing, attend to my reasoning. It's a good reason." and its common use is somewhat sarcastic, in light of the fact that if you have to tell someone "For a good reason, don't date that guy." instead of just "Don't date that guy." then they're probably not going to listen to begin with.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Rogue on June 18, 2018, 10:01:04 AM
I was sitting in on a vendor demo for work and one of the reps started a sentence with "Ultimately..." at least two dozen times over the course of an hour.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on June 18, 2018, 10:11:01 AM
I also have an irrational negative reaction to this new thing everyone is doing in emails where they say "I'm moving Jim to BCC to save his inbox."  I was telling my BF about it, and he was like, "that's so clever, I might start doing that now!" and I was rankled even more.  I actually understand and agree, and see the efficiency of it, but somehow there's just something very...I can't find the right word, but sycophantic or showy or something about it, the way it is phrased vs. the efficiency of the technique.  I think I'm going overboard with it, but I still shudder at it the way a lot of people shudder at the word "moist."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on June 18, 2018, 11:40:41 AM
I also have an irrational negative reaction to this new thing everyone is doing in emails where they say "I'm moving Jim to BCC to save his inbox."  I was telling my BF about it, and he was like, "that's so clever, I might start doing that now!" and I was rankled even more.  I actually understand and agree, and see the efficiency of it, but somehow there's just something very...I can't find the right word, but sycophantic or showy or something about it, the way it is phrased vs. the efficiency of the technique.  I think I'm going overboard with it, but I still shudder at it the way a lot of people shudder at the word "moist."

I don't understand how this works or what this means. Please would you explain? (I do know what BCC is.)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on June 18, 2018, 11:53:13 AM
I also have an irrational negative reaction to this new thing everyone is doing in emails where they say "I'm moving Jim to BCC to save his inbox."  I was telling my BF about it, and he was like, "that's so clever, I might start doing that now!" and I was rankled even more.  I actually understand and agree, and see the efficiency of it, but somehow there's just something very...I can't find the right word, but sycophantic or showy or something about it, the way it is phrased vs. the efficiency of the technique.  I think I'm going overboard with it, but I still shudder at it the way a lot of people shudder at the word "moist."

I don't understand how this works or what this means. Please would you explain? (I do know what BCC is.)
BCC is the same as blind copy.  It's an option, in addition to the cc field, on an email.  And sorry if this is going into even too much detail, but it lets you send a copy of a message to someone (in the bcc field) without anyone in the To or cc field knowing.  One of the important things to note when using the bcc field is that if any of the people in the To or cc field reply to your email (where you bcc'd someone else), the person you bcc'd will not be included (which makes total sense).

So sometimes there are a ton of people on an email, and it's going back and forth, continuing to copy everybody and their mother, when really only like two or three of the people need to be continuing to be connected to the conversation.  So, mostly as a courtesy to those that don't need to be on the email but keep getting pinged and having to spend time seeing if they need to pay attention to it, someone says, "I'm going to move Jim (and everybody else and their mothers) to BCC to save his inbox."  This lets Jim know what's happening without suddenly cutting him out (which could be a good idea in certain situations) as well as everyone else, and is a courtesy for Jim since he won't get anymore emails on this topic that is irrelevant to him (because when anyone else replies again, he won't be included since he was blind copied on the last one).

Both my work and volunteer lives are like this - with anywhere between 5 and 30 people on an email and a chain gets specific enough that most don't need to be on it anymore.  I mean, it makes a ton of sense to do it, actually.  It's just that somehow the phrasing of it feels gross to me.  Something about the "to save his inbox" that I am having an allergic reaction to.  And I swear I get this multiple times per day now, starting only like a month ago.  It became a THING so fast and everyone's using it as much as possible!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on June 20, 2018, 12:00:18 AM
Quote
(because when anyone else replies again, he won't be included since he was blind copied on the last one)

Aha! I get it now! This is the bit that hadn't occurred to me. Agreed that it is clever but "to save his inbox" is really ew. It strikes me as slightly infantilising for some reason. Like, "Who's a poor widdle inbox then, eh?". It also ticks me off a bit that people would just do it without asking Jim first. Maybe he likes knowing what's going on in the thread!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: LaineyAZ on June 22, 2018, 08:51:15 AM
Adding "right?" at the end of sentences.  I was listening to the radio where a guest was describing some factual events, and every few sentences she added the word right as a question.  Not sure whether she was gauging whether her host agreed with her, or was following what she was saying, or what. 
I just dislike that wishy washy way of talking - just say what you want to say.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on June 22, 2018, 09:43:00 AM
Adding "right?" at the end of sentences.  I was listening to the radio where a guest was describing some factual events, and every few sentences she added the word right as a question.  Not sure whether she was gauging whether her host agreed with her, or was following what she was saying, or what. 
I just dislike that wishy washy way of talking - just say what you want to say.
It could be a regional thing.  My sister-in-law spent a year in Australia and came back adding "yeah?" onto the end of half her statements in the same way.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on June 22, 2018, 10:03:59 AM
Adding "right?" at the end of sentences.  I was listening to the radio where a guest was describing some factual events, and every few sentences she added the word right as a question.  Not sure whether she was gauging whether her host agreed with her, or was following what she was saying, or what. 
I just dislike that wishy washy way of talking - just say what you want to say.
It could be a regional thing.  My sister-in-law spent a year in Australia and came back adding "yeah?" onto the end of half her statements in the same way.

Either of those are much more forgivable than "you know what I mean?". If you're really asking the question as in "this is a complex explanation, do you understand it" that's fine, but as a way to end a sentence it's just painful. Are you actually asking me to respond yes or no every time?

Funny thing is the few people I've know to talk like this I disagreed with on a lot of lifestyle choices so no, I often did not know what they meant.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on June 22, 2018, 10:13:03 AM
Adding "right?" at the end of sentences.  I was listening to the radio where a guest was describing some factual events, and every few sentences she added the word right as a question.  Not sure whether she was gauging whether her host agreed with her, or was following what she was saying, or what. 
I just dislike that wishy washy way of talking - just say what you want to say.
It could be a regional thing.  My sister-in-law spent a year in Australia and came back adding "yeah?" onto the end of half her statements in the same way.

In Canada it is "eh"- it's a bonding thing, eh?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on June 22, 2018, 10:13:37 AM
These type of sentence enders are similar to raising the pitch at the end, to make it sound like a question. It does make the speaker sound immature or indecisive.

One more thing: I get annoyed when people say that babies are "flirting" when they smile or make eye contact. There has to be another word for this.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on June 22, 2018, 10:33:02 AM
These type of sentence enders are similar to raising the pitch at the end, to make it sound like a question. It does make the speaker sound immature or indecisive.

One more thing: I get annoyed when people say that babies are "flirting" when they smile or make eye contact. There has to be another word for this.


I've never heard that before. Ew.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dave1442397 on June 22, 2018, 11:20:28 AM
I had to listen to the CEO and some VPs on a video conference, and what was driving me crazy was that they kept saying they were "sort of" doing things.

"We're sort of changing how we deal with our customers." Well, are you changing it, or not?

I ended up muting one guy, he said it so often.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: solon on June 22, 2018, 11:26:50 AM
I had to listen to the CEO and some VPs on a video conference, and what was driving me crazy was that they kept saying they were "sort of" doing things.

"We're sort of changing how we deal with our customers." Well, are you changing it, or not?

I ended up muting one guy, he said it so often.

Yeah, this one bugs me too. I hear it a lot in podcast interviews. I think it might serve a softening function. For example, we're going to do X, but X sounds very harsh, so we say we're sort of Xing.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on June 22, 2018, 11:36:37 AM
I had to listen to the CEO and some VPs on a video conference, and what was driving me crazy was that they kept saying they were "sort of" doing things.

"We're sort of changing how we deal with our customers." Well, are you changing it, or not?

I ended up muting one guy, he said it so often.

"If you don't stop talking like that I'm sort of, gonna like, punch you in the face. You know what I mean, right?"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: nnls on June 22, 2018, 04:58:23 PM
These type of sentence enders are similar to raising the pitch at the end, to make it sound like a question. It does make the speaker sound immature or indecisive.

One more thing: I get annoyed when people say that babies are "flirting" when they smile or make eye contact. There has to be another word for this.

Adding "right?" at the end of sentences.  I was listening to the radio where a guest was describing some factual events, and every few sentences she added the word right as a question.  Not sure whether she was gauging whether her host agreed with her, or was following what she was saying, or what. 
I just dislike that wishy washy way of talking - just say what you want to say.
It could be a regional thing.  My sister-in-law spent a year in Australia and came back adding "yeah?" onto the end of half her statements in the same way.

I have been told by multiple people when I have been travelling that Australians always sound like we are asking a question because of our inflection at the end of our sentences. Ive never noticed us saying "yeah?" but I will listen out for it today at work.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on June 22, 2018, 06:14:51 PM
I had to listen to the CEO and some VPs on a video conference, and what was driving me crazy was that they kept saying they were "sort of" doing things.

"We're sort of changing how we deal with our customers." Well, are you changing it, or not?

I ended up muting one guy, he said it so often.

This make me think of "very kind of," as in, "The movie was good, but it was very kind of dark." Well, was it very or was it kind of? It can't be both! (I also often hear "very sort of.")
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: LaineyAZ on June 23, 2018, 10:18:51 AM
"very unique."   A phrase heard a lot on HGTV decorator shows.  If it's actually unique meaning one of a kind, then okay, but it can't be "a little unique" or "somewhat unique" or "very unique." 

And add my name to those who dislike the phrase "sort of" that we're hearing everywhere.  Seems like it's used by those who are unsure of their facts and so use that phrase to weasel out if they find out what they said is not accurate  - "well, I said 'sort of' !"   
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MissNancyPryor on June 23, 2018, 07:00:32 PM
There seems to be an increasing use of the word "whenever" instead of "when". 

As in, "Whenever I got back to the house, I realized I forgot my key." 

Not sure if this is a regional thing.  It is pretty distracting.   
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on June 23, 2018, 07:10:13 PM
There seems to be an increasing use of the word "whenever" instead of "when". 

As in, "Whenever I got back to the house, I realized I forgot my key." 

Not sure if this is a regional thing.  It is pretty distracting.

This is regional, also sort of low class. I used to live in Central IL and people said that a lot.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on June 24, 2018, 09:20:48 AM
There seems to be an increasing use of the word "whenever" instead of "when". 

As in, "Whenever I got back to the house, I realized I forgot my key." 

Not sure if this is a regional thing.  It is pretty distracting.

This is regional, also sort of low class. I used to live in Central IL and people said that a lot.

I hear it in the Southwest, too, so I'm not sure it's regional, but it does seem to be lower class. And I find it distracting as well.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Nicholas Carter on June 25, 2018, 07:58:16 AM
Adding "right?" at the end of sentences.  I was listening to the radio where a guest was describing some factual events, and every few sentences she added the word right as a question.  Not sure whether she was gauging whether her host agreed with her, or was following what she was saying, or what. 
I just dislike that wishy washy way of talking - just say what you want to say.
It could be a regional thing.  My sister-in-law spent a year in Australia and came back adding "yeah?" onto the end of half her statements in the same way.

Either of those are much more forgivable than "you know what I mean?". If you're really asking the question as in "this is a complex explanation, do you understand it" that's fine, but as a way to end a sentence it's just painful. Are you actually asking me to respond yes or no every time?

Funny thing is the few people I've know to talk like this I disagreed with on a lot of lifestyle choices so no, I often did not know what they meant.
You know how, when you're listening to someone talking, you make eye contact and nod a little bit and go "yeah, okay" every know and then, just so the person talking gets a signal that you're attending to them? This is, at least in part, that in return. Signalling from the speaker to the listener that the speaker is attending to them: Giving them a chance to take the floor, prompting them for a nod or an "okay", and just sort of running juice through the connection. Think of it as a network ping.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Travis on June 26, 2018, 07:09:02 PM
Adding "right?" at the end of sentences.  I was listening to the radio where a guest was describing some factual events, and every few sentences she added the word right as a question.  Not sure whether she was gauging whether her host agreed with her, or was following what she was saying, or what. 
I just dislike that wishy washy way of talking - just say what you want to say.
It could be a regional thing.  My sister-in-law spent a year in Australia and came back adding "yeah?" onto the end of half her statements in the same way.

Either of those are much more forgivable than "you know what I mean?". If you're really asking the question as in "this is a complex explanation, do you understand it" that's fine, but as a way to end a sentence it's just painful. Are you actually asking me to respond yes or no every time?

Funny thing is the few people I've know to talk like this I disagreed with on a lot of lifestyle choices so no, I often did not know what they meant.
You know how, when you're listening to someone talking, you make eye contact and nod a little bit and go "yeah, okay" every know and then, just so the person talking gets a signal that you're attending to them? This is, at least in part, that in return. Signalling from the speaker to the listener that the speaker is attending to them: Giving them a chance to take the floor, prompting them for a nod or an "okay", and just sort of running juice through the connection. Think of it as a network ping.

I find myself saying "okay" a lot during phone calls while the other person is talking.  I'd prefer to just keep my mouth shut and let them get it all out, but every time I do that they'll stop and check that I'm still on the line as if NOT interrupting them with a bunch of "okays" is rude.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Nicholas Carter on June 27, 2018, 05:47:06 AM
Adding "right?" at the end of sentences.  I was listening to the radio where a guest was describing some factual events, and every few sentences she added the word right as a question.  Not sure whether she was gauging whether her host agreed with her, or was following what she was saying, or what. 
I just dislike that wishy washy way of talking - just say what you want to say.
It could be a regional thing.  My sister-in-law spent a year in Australia and came back adding "yeah?" onto the end of half her statements in the same way.

Either of those are much more forgivable than "you know what I mean?". If you're really asking the question as in "this is a complex explanation, do you understand it" that's fine, but as a way to end a sentence it's just painful. Are you actually asking me to respond yes or no every time?

Funny thing is the few people I've know to talk like this I disagreed with on a lot of lifestyle choices so no, I often did not know what they meant.
You know how, when you're listening to someone talking, you make eye contact and nod a little bit and go "yeah, okay" every know and then, just so the person talking gets a signal that you're attending to them? This is, at least in part, that in return. Signalling from the speaker to the listener that the speaker is attending to them: Giving them a chance to take the floor, prompting them for a nod or an "okay", and just sort of running juice through the connection. Think of it as a network ping.

I find myself saying "okay" a lot during phone calls while the other person is talking.  I'd prefer to just keep my mouth shut and let them get it all out, but every time I do that they'll stop and check that I'm still on the line as if NOT interrupting them with a bunch of "okays" is rude.
Well, it is.
You're supposed to be giving continuous, low content feedback for the whole conversation. Makes people feel like you're participating, even if you're not really adding any content to the conversation. Not giving that feedback is a low-level non-verbal signal that the other person should stop talking: Because they're boring you, upsetting you, confusing you, etc.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on July 25, 2018, 04:14:38 PM
I have been reading various blogs that have pictures that can be enlarged.  When did "Click to biggify" replace "Click to enlarge"?  Biggify?  Really?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on July 25, 2018, 04:18:19 PM
I have been reading various blogs that have pictures that can be enlarged.  When did "Click to biggify" replace "Click to enlarge"?  Biggify?  Really?

Hah. My husband is a software developer and started his career in the early 80s. He and his friends almost always say "embiggen."

I just ignore it. :D
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on July 25, 2018, 04:28:40 PM
I have been reading various blogs that have pictures that can be enlarged.  When did "Click to biggify" replace "Click to enlarge"?  Biggify?  Really?

Hah. My husband is a software developer and started his career in the early 80s. He and his friends almost always say "embiggen."

I just ignore it. :D

It's a reference to Dungeons & Dragons.  :-)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Kris on July 25, 2018, 04:29:46 PM
I have been reading various blogs that have pictures that can be enlarged.  When did "Click to biggify" replace "Click to enlarge"?  Biggify?  Really?

Hah. My husband is a software developer and started his career in the early 80s. He and his friends almost always say "embiggen."

I just ignore it. :D

It's a reference to Dungeons & Dragons.  :-)

Embiggen is? Funny, my husband has never played D&D. I guess he got it through osmosis!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on July 25, 2018, 04:35:05 PM
And they get to inflict this on the rest of us why?  Keep shoptalk in the shop.  Do I go around referring to your children as your F1s?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: chaskavitch on July 25, 2018, 04:38:49 PM
And they get to inflict this on the rest of us why?  Keep shoptalk in the shop.  Do I go around referring to your children as your F1s?

Ha!  I never thought of that, and I quite enjoy it.  I'm not going to actually use it, but it will make me laugh silently in my head sometimes :)  Thanks.

PS: I also say embiggen occasionally, and I didn't know it was a D&D reference, but I'm pretty sure I got it from my husband, in which case a D&D origin makes sense.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tyort1 on July 25, 2018, 05:25:30 PM
Adding "right?" at the end of sentences.  I was listening to the radio where a guest was describing some factual events, and every few sentences she added the word right as a question.  Not sure whether she was gauging whether her host agreed with her, or was following what she was saying, or what. 
I just dislike that wishy washy way of talking - just say what you want to say.

I know, right?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on July 25, 2018, 06:37:21 PM
I have been reading various blogs that have pictures that can be enlarged.  When did "Click to biggify" replace "Click to enlarge"?  Biggify?  Really?

Hah. My husband is a software developer and started his career in the early 80s. He and his friends almost always say "embiggen."

I just ignore it. :D

It's a reference to Dungeons & Dragons.  :-)

Embiggen is? Funny, my husband has never played D&D. I guess he got it through osmosis!


Correction!

I asked my husband for some etymological clarity:

He says "embiggen" is a term that he and his friends group started using in D&D because the books often used over-complicated words for spells and they thought it was funny.  He says: "'embiggen' sounds better than 'enlarge.' It was a pretentious-sounding Spoonerism." 

Because I learned D&D from them, I thought it was an official term.  My mistake!


EDIT: Oh!  Even more info!  Apparently the word "embiggen" gained popularity starting in 1996, when it was featured as an invented word in the Simpsons! (Thank you, OED!)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on July 25, 2018, 09:54:37 PM
I have been reading various blogs that have pictures that can be enlarged.  When did "Click to biggify" replace "Click to enlarge"?  Biggify?  Really?

Hah. My husband is a software developer and started his career in the early 80s. He and his friends almost always say "embiggen."

I just ignore it. :D

It's a reference to Dungeons & Dragons.  :-)

Embiggen is? Funny, my husband has never played D&D. I guess he got it through osmosis!


Correction!

I asked my husband for some etymological clarity:

He says "embiggen" is a term that he and his friends group started using in D&D because the books often used over-complicated words for spells and they thought it was funny.  He says: "'embiggen' sounds better than 'enlarge.' It was a pretentious-sounding Spoonerism." 

Because I learned D&D from them, I thought it was an official term.  My mistake!


EDIT: Oh!  Even more info!  Apparently the word "embiggen" gained popularity starting in 1996, when it was featured as an invented word in the Simpsons! (Thank you, OED!)

I immediately thought of the Simpsons, it is the only place I have ever heard embiggen. In the opening sequence, the statue of Jebediah Sprint has a quote on the bottom "A noble spirit embiggens the smallest mind".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Raymond Reddington on July 25, 2018, 10:11:55 PM
-bae
-webinar
-uber (specifically when used to refer to a cab, not the company...the brand name should not be synonymous with a cab, especially since lyft is better)
-emoji (seriously...what the hell happened to emoticon?)
-"circle back"
-use of the pronoun "we" to actually mean "you (sing.)"
-any bastardizations of social media names "twitterati" etc.
-selfie
-"turnt up"
-"to 11"
-"GOAT" (instead of just saying greatest of all time)
-"keeping up with the joneses/jones'"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on July 26, 2018, 06:27:47 AM
-bae
-webinar
-uber (specifically when used to refer to a cab, not the company...the brand name should not be synonymous with a cab, especially since lyft is better)
-emoji (seriously...what the hell happened to emoticon?)
-"circle back"
-use of the pronoun "we" to actually mean "you (sing.)"
-any bastardizations of social media names "twitterati" etc.
-selfie
-"turnt up"
-"to 11"
-"GOAT" (instead of just saying greatest of all time)
-"keeping up with the joneses/jones'"

Doesn't emoticon refer to pictures made up of text and symbols whereas emoji is the newer version which is just a picture? If you're going beyond just the word and saying emoticons are better, then I agree.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on July 26, 2018, 09:22:00 AM
And everyone is talking about the origin of enbiggen, but where the hell did biggify come from?

I hate TLAs And FLAs.  Now that they have proliferated, I spend way too much time on the urban slang dictionary. WTH?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BriarRose111 on July 28, 2018, 09:50:08 AM
I find the term "Hot Mess" extremely annoying.   
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: never give up on July 28, 2018, 10:36:51 AM
“Can I ask you a quick question?”

Well you can yes, you just have by the way. Presumably they are phrasing it like this as to suggest they’re not going to be taking much of my time. However surely it’s the length of the answer that will determine how much of my time is taken? If they don’t know the answer to the question, which surely the don’t because they are asking it, how on earth do they know if the answer will be long or short?

 “What’s the meaning of life?” That’s a good example of a quick question, it is only five words, however the answer may take a very long time indeed.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Raymond Reddington on July 28, 2018, 10:41:12 AM
And everyone is talking about the origin of enbiggen, but where the hell did biggify come from?

I hate TLAs And FLAs.  Now that they have proliferated, I spend way too much time on the urban slang dictionary. WTH?

IKR?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on July 28, 2018, 12:02:07 PM
And everyone is talking about the origin of enbiggen, but where the hell did biggify come from?

I hate TLAs And FLAs.  Now that they have proliferated, I spend way too much time on the urban slang dictionary. WTH?

IKR?

That sent me back to the online dictionary.  But, yes.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Exflyboy on July 28, 2018, 12:25:26 PM
"I could care less"

NO. THINK ABOUT IT.

Also, don't put apostrophes for the plural form on acronyms. Tell me about your IRAs, not your IRA's.

Exactly... "Could care less" is an oxymoron..

"Oxymoron"... Thats not even "English"...:)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Raymond Reddington on July 28, 2018, 01:53:57 PM
"loosing"

there is ONE fucking "o" in "losing"

forgot that one earlier
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on July 28, 2018, 02:50:22 PM
"loosing"

there is ONE fucking "o" in "losing"

forgot that one earlier

Well, "loosing" is fine once you remember to add the "en".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on July 28, 2018, 03:57:03 PM
"loosing"

there is ONE fucking "o" in "losing"

forgot that one earlier

Well, "loosing" is fine once you remember to add the "en".

There seem to be a lot of "dinning" tables on Craigslist as well.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on July 28, 2018, 09:47:52 PM
"loosing"

there is ONE fucking "o" in "losing"

forgot that one earlier

Well, "loosing" is fine once you remember to add the "en".

There seem to be a lot of "dinning" tables on Craigslist as well.
Mostly at places that sell pizza's. Argh!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on July 28, 2018, 10:57:09 PM
Pizza’s what?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on July 29, 2018, 12:49:45 AM
Exactly.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Melisande on July 30, 2018, 07:55:01 PM
The two biggies for me:

1) bucket list — blech
2) “peaked” my interest instead of “piqued” my interest.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: jim555 on July 30, 2018, 08:09:48 PM
Side hustle

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: shelivesthedream on July 30, 2018, 08:40:49 PM
Acclimate. A perfectly good word exists already: acclimatise.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Louisville on July 31, 2018, 08:30:35 AM
Acclimate. A perfectly good word exists already: acclimatise.
This may be a "two peoples separated by a common language" issue. In the US, acclimate is the standard, long-standing word for, well... acclimate. Acclimatise sounds stilted to my ear, though I've heard both used.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on July 31, 2018, 08:40:58 AM
Acclimate. A perfectly good word exists already: acclimatise.

Never previously heard the word acclimatise in my life that I'm aware of.

I'll add one along these lines, though. Don't say "conversate" when what you mean is "converse".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on July 31, 2018, 08:56:42 AM
Acclimate. A perfectly good word exists already: acclimatise.

Never previously heard the word acclimatise in my life that I'm aware of.

I'll add one along these lines, though. Don't say "conversate" when what you mean is "converse".

Or "dialogue", another example of a good noun turned bad verb. I'm also getting tired of "drill down"

I think acclimate/acclimatize is just a British/American difference, like aluminum/aluminium. Now my nephew is driving me crazy by adding an extra syllable to the word "tastes".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tyort1 on July 31, 2018, 01:49:46 PM
Acclimate. A perfectly good word exists already: acclimatise.
This may be a "two peoples separated by a common language" issue. In the US, acclimate is the standard, long-standing word for, well... acclimate. Acclimatise sounds stilted to my ear, though I've heard both used.

(https://media.sweatshirtxy.com/styles/large/s3/hoodie-images/psych-movie-zip-hoodie-for-men-ive-heard-it-both-ways-sweatshirt194358.jpg?itok=FWGSEjPc)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on July 31, 2018, 05:56:38 PM
Acclimate. A perfectly good word exists already: acclimatise.

Never previously heard the word acclimatise in my life that I'm aware of.

I'll add one along these lines, though. Don't say "conversate" when what you mean is "converse".

Or "dialogue", another example of a good noun turned bad verb. I'm also getting tired of "drill down"

I think acclimate/acclimatize is just a British/American difference, like aluminum/aluminium. Now my nephew is driving me crazy by adding an extra syllable to the word "tastes".

I'm American and I only ever say acclimatize (but you will notice I spell it with a "z"!).  When I'm using that word for something other than hiking (or whatever) to high elevations, like maybe in reference to just getting used to a new home, or a new set of circumstances, I feel a little like I should use acclimate instead...in my gut.  And it's always bothered me, and I've never stopped to look into it.  But, I think acclimatize/acclimatise is used much more with respect to altitude, regardless of your nationality.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Nicholas Carter on August 07, 2018, 06:20:17 AM
"loosing"

there is ONE fucking "o" in "losing"

forgot that one earlier

Well, "loosing" is fine once you remember to add the "en".
"Loosing" is also fine if you are referring to the act of releasing a bow string to launch an arrow. We often use the word 'fire' in modern speaking, but there's no fire in a bow.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 18, 2018, 07:44:45 PM
The two biggies for me:

1) bucket list — blech
2) “peaked” my interest instead of “piqued” my interest.

Will you be my new best friend?

Regarding "bucket lists": If you want to zip line over the Grand Canyon, learn Swahili or attend the ball drop in New York on New Years, just do those things joyfully. Just don't make them seem like grim boxes you must check off before you die.

And "peaked" or "peeked" my interest. Perhaps while "pouring" over documents before you loose interest.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 18, 2018, 11:04:44 PM
The two biggies for me:

1) bucket list — blech
2) “peaked” my interest instead of “piqued” my interest.

Will you be my new best friend?

Regarding "bucket lists": If you want to zip line over the Grand Canyon, learn Swahili or attend the ball drop in New York on New Years, just do those things joyfully. Just don't make them seem like grim boxes you must check off before you die.

And "peaked" or "peeked" my interest. Perhaps while "pouring" over documents before you loose interest
.
And @calimom, will you be mine ♡♡♡?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on August 19, 2018, 12:13:18 PM
Of course @Dicey !
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Psewer on August 24, 2018, 04:16:57 AM
body positive
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on August 24, 2018, 09:51:49 AM
"loosing"

there is ONE fucking "o" in "losing"

forgot that one earlier

Well, "loosing" is fine once you remember to add the "en".

What about America loosing Trump on the world?  :P
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on August 24, 2018, 10:14:44 AM
The use of the word "literally" incorrectly (which is most of the time).

No, you did not literally drive through a fucking stop sign.

No, that guitar solo did not literally knock your socks off. FIGURATIVELY. IT FIGURATIVELY MADE YOUR HEAD SPIN, FUCKING DAMMIT!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tarheeldan on August 24, 2018, 10:27:35 AM
This one drives me nuts:

Them: "Hey tarheeldan! Are we on for tonight?"
Me: "Absolutely!"
Them: "Be there for six"

(they mean they plan to arrive at 6pm) I sometimes ask: "For six what?"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on August 24, 2018, 12:45:47 PM
"I'll catch you up" -- when the person means, "I'll catch up with you."

To me, "I'll catch you up" means something like, "I'll fill you in."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GreenSheep on August 24, 2018, 04:05:28 PM
This one drives me nuts:

Them: "Hey tarheeldan! Are we on for tonight?"
Me: "Absolutely!"
Them: "Be there for six"

(they mean they plan to arrive at 6pm) I sometimes ask: "For six what?"

I actually kind of like/appreciate this one. I learned it when I lived in New Orleans for a few years, and (there, at least) it means that the person will be there in time to meet you at 6pm, rather than strolling in the door at 6pm on the nose or showing up late. To me it seems courteous that they plan to be there a couple of minutes early so they're ready for [meeting you at] 6pm.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: lollylegs on August 24, 2018, 04:38:26 PM


Onboarding -  what was wrong with induction or orientation?

Offboarding   - I guess it sounds better than saying we fired thousands of people

vagina - it seems that millions of women don't know their own anatomy and refer to their vulva as their vagina - drives me nuts!  - vulva =outside - vagina = inside

millennials  - so many stereotypes with this





Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: rdaneel0 on August 24, 2018, 04:50:11 PM
DISRUPTIVE
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on August 24, 2018, 05:35:37 PM
Offboarding   - I guess it sounds better than saying we fired thousands of people

Similarly: "to sunset."  As in, you're using a web service that you like, but then its makers decide to "sunset" it, and now it's gone forever.  I guess "sunset" sounds nicer than "kill."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tralfamadorian on August 24, 2018, 05:45:29 PM
Deplane in place of disembark.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on August 24, 2018, 11:43:09 PM
This one actually makes sense. Disembark is originally from French desembarquer, which means coming off a small boat (une barque).
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: accolay on August 26, 2018, 10:59:08 PM
Deplane in place of disembark.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tarheeldan on August 27, 2018, 09:29:38 AM
This one drives me nuts:

Them: "Hey tarheeldan! Are we on for tonight?"
Me: "Absolutely!"
Them: "Be there for six"

(they mean they plan to arrive at 6pm) I sometimes ask: "For six what?"


I actually kind of like/appreciate this one. I learned it when I lived in New Orleans for a few years, and (there, at least) it means that the person will be there in time to meet you at 6pm, rather than strolling in the door at 6pm on the nose or showing up late. To me it seems courteous that they plan to be there a couple of minutes early so they're ready for [meeting you at] 6pm.

This is in New England, and they do not mean "I will be there early, in order to be ready for our meeting at 6". They are using "for" in place of "at."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MissNancyPryor on August 27, 2018, 06:21:20 PM
More fad-speak has been happening at work recently.  Lately there has been a proliferation of the following:

Using "ask" as a noun, instead of "request".  As in, "That is a big ask."  Or, "We should meet to clarify what the ask is."

Also, using "heavy lift" instead of "challenge".  As in, "That is a heavy lift for your team, let me know if they need help." 

It is like a disease.  Someone starts it and then pretty soon everyone is mimicking the lingo. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on August 27, 2018, 06:52:07 PM
This one isn't bugging me yet, but I hope it doesn't catch on. It's "copy pasta". I see it a lot on Slack where groups are informally communicating about projects. I think it's meant to be funny, like someone mistyped it and now it's a joke (like spelling "the" "teh").

Given my tangential connection to silicon valley techies, I'm guessing it's a rampant joke amongst them.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on August 27, 2018, 08:02:26 PM
More fad-speak has been happening at work recently.  Lately there has been a proliferation of the following:

Using "ask" as a noun, instead of "request".  As in, "That is a big ask."  Or, "We should meet to clarify what the ask is."

Also, using "heavy lift" instead of "challenge".  As in, "That is a heavy lift for your team, let me know if they need help." 

It is like a disease.  Someone starts it and then pretty soon everyone is mimicking the lingo.

Literally a disease!

*facepalm*
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tralfamadorian on August 27, 2018, 08:09:30 PM
Feel free to be snarky about deplane if you want but I think it's an ugly nasal-sounding word with an odd construction. Ie: the plane is not being disassembled or becoming not a plane, the people on the plane are leaving.

Seems some others share similar views:
https://www.economist.com/johnson/2010/06/25/journalese-blacklist-deplane
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on August 27, 2018, 09:51:27 PM
This one isn't bugging me yet, but I hope it doesn't catch on. It's "copy pasta". I see it a lot on Slack where groups are informally communicating about projects. I think it's meant to be funny, like someone mistyped it and now it's a joke (like spelling "the" "teh").

Given my tangential connection to silicon valley techies, I'm guessing it's a rampant joke amongst them.

Copypasta is longstanding part of internet culture!  It's hard to explain, but imagine memes that are just typed text. The text is is copied and inserted into different online conversations. Often it's a really passionate, strident block of text, or a strange sentence that resonates with people in some way.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tarheeldan on August 28, 2018, 08:14:00 AM
Also, using "heavy lift" instead of "challenge".  As in, "That is a heavy lift for your team, let me know if they need help." 

Gaaa! That one's pretty bad. I've kinda gotten used to "ask"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on August 28, 2018, 07:22:12 PM
I feel like no one would agree with me on this, but I am somehow bothered by the use of the word "folks" in place of "people."  And like, I wouldn't mind it if it was an occasional thing.  But it now feels mandatory and it's somehow made the word "people" feel like I am saying "you people" or something else harsh or inflammatory.  "People" is never allowed.
 

"Folks" to me was my parents' parents (they would always say, "my folks...."). Now I have to call everybody folks (whether using the second or the third person) or else I'm given the side eye like I'm a barbarian or something!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: JanetJackson on August 28, 2018, 07:28:49 PM
“CIRCLE BACK”....
I swear I’m going to... I don’t know... really lose it if this doesn’t fade in the next few years.
“DISRUPT/DISRUPTION” when referring to companies, etc. “so and so is DISRUPTING the RV industry”..... staaaahhhhp.

Here’s another thing... it’s very particular.  Sometimes people over annunciate all of the letters in ‘Important’, especially the center ‘T’. It seems to mostly be upper class white women over 35... but that’s just a total random observation.  There are at least two people on regular podcasts that I listen to who do it and it ruins the whole episode when I hear them over annunciating that ‘T’...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on August 28, 2018, 09:32:04 PM
I am going to start posting daily occurrences of the improper use of "literally" because it makes me so angry. I want other people to get angry with me, it'll feel better. Well, maybe not daily but frequently enough to get some rage going.

Here's a good one:
"I've been soaking up the sun for the past few hours, literally."

Edit: here's another one
"I’ll be happy when I’m done with these antibiotics! Sheesh it’s taking everything out of me #literally"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on August 29, 2018, 12:19:45 AM
I agree about the misuse of literally. It is annoying. I correct my own children about it a lot because I try to do damage control where I can!

And I agree about "folks." I get why it is being used and I don't have a problem with that, I just really don't like the word itself. It doesn't mean to me what it means to most, I guess? It has some other feeling to it that is just not a feeling I like? I don't know, but you're not alone, sui generis.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 29, 2018, 12:28:03 AM
“CIRCLE BACK”....
I swear I’m going to... I don’t know... really lose it if this doesn’t fade in the next few years.
“DISRUPT/DISRUPTION” when referring to companies, etc. “so and so is DISRUPTING the RV industry”..... staaaahhhhp.

Here’s another thing... it’s very particular.  Sometimes people over annunciate all of the letters in ‘Important’, especially the center ‘T’. It seems to mostly be upper class white women over 35... but that’s just a total random observation.  There are at least two people on regular podcasts that I listen to who do it and it ruins the whole episode when I hear them over annunciating that ‘T’...
Uh, hate to say this JanetJ, but I believe the word you want is "enunciate". I think I understand what you mean though. By far the worst abuser of this word is Nancy Grace. Ugh.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on August 29, 2018, 05:22:53 AM
I agree about the misuse of literally. It is annoying. I correct my own children about it a lot because I try to do damage control where I can!

And I agree about "folks." I get why it is being used and I don't have a problem with that, I just really don't like the word itself. It doesn't mean to me what it means to most, I guess? It has some other feeling to it that is just not a feeling I like? I don't know, but you're not alone, sui generis.

In some accents “folks” is easy to mishear as “fucks” so I tend to avoid it.
Maybe the antibiotics were a cathartic experience, literally...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on August 29, 2018, 06:24:12 AM
I am going to start posting daily occurrences of the improper use of "literally" because it makes me so angry. I want other people to get angry with me, it'll feel better. Well, maybe not daily but frequently enough to get some rage going.

Here's a good one:
"I've been soaking up the sun for the past few hours, literally."

Edit: here's another one
"I’ll be happy when I’m done with these antibiotics! Sheesh it’s taking everything out of me #literally"

I've been bothered by this for a long time. One of the worst I've heard was "literally by the skin of my teeth". How could it get more figurative than this, teeth don't have skin. And news casters using it. Come on people, your whole job is talking. I've generally considered this a dealbreaker for relationships too, unless the misuser is willing to hear me out and change their misguided ways.

Also, have you seen the show Archer? You'd like Archer.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 29, 2018, 06:56:01 AM
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on August 29, 2018, 07:54:18 AM
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: By the River on August 29, 2018, 08:11:31 AM
Is ma'am a word that people wish would go away?   I have always thought it was a polite manner to address someone. 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html (https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html)

Is sir also a problem?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on August 29, 2018, 09:14:10 AM
Another few misuses of the literally.

"Sometimes when I catch myself dwelling in the past I literally kick my balls back to reality."

"I love him so much I’m #literally sick without him"

"Voted for the first time ever in person!!! #turnfloridablue #nomoreredtide #LITERALLY"


Please, someone stop this epidemic, FIGURATIVELY speaking. It makes me want to FIGURATIVELY jump off a bridge.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on August 29, 2018, 09:42:43 AM
"I love him so much I’m #literally sick without him"

I'd give this one a "plausible". It's probably not true but you could be literally sick due to emotions.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on August 29, 2018, 12:30:41 PM
Is ma'am a word that people wish would go away?   I have always thought it was a polite manner to address someone. 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html (https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html)

Is sir also a problem?
After graduating from college, we moved to the Houston area, and "sir" and "ma'am" are still in common use.  A lot of kids are taught by their parents to use those words, and I think it's awesome.  Even after moving northward, I try to use it more often, because I think it shows respect for the person with whom you're speaking.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on August 29, 2018, 01:03:13 PM
Is ma'am a word that people wish would go away?   I have always thought it was a polite manner to address someone. 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html (https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html)

Is sir also a problem?
After graduating from college, we moved to the Houston area, and "sir" and "ma'am" are still in common use.  A lot of kids are taught by their parents to use those words, and I think it's awesome.  Even after moving northward, I try to use it more often, because I think it shows respect for the person with whom you're speaking.

Wow, that's crazy. Many children in the South are taught to use the word unfailingly as a sign of respect to their elders. I'd be pissed if my children were punished for saying "sir" or "ma'am". When that's how you learn to speak, it's not exactly easy to stop saying "yes ma'am", because it comes out involuntarily. I had to practice for several years once I was in college to stop calling store clerks and waiters/waitresses "sir" and "ma'am", many of whom were younger than me. But the fact that this story is ridiculous is the only reason it's a story at all.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tralfamadorian on August 29, 2018, 01:17:51 PM
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

+1

Folks is also an easy substitute for y'all for southerns trying to soften their accent.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on August 29, 2018, 01:30:53 PM
Is ma'am a word that people wish would go away?   I have always thought it was a polite manner to address someone. 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html (https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html)

Is sir also a problem?
After graduating from college, we moved to the Houston area, and "sir" and "ma'am" are still in common use.  A lot of kids are taught by their parents to use those words, and I think it's awesome.  Even after moving northward, I try to use it more often, because I think it shows respect for the person with whom you're speaking.

Wow, that's crazy. Many children in the South are taught to use the word unfailingly as a sign of respect to their elders. I'd be pissed if my children were punished for saying "sir" or "ma'am". When that's how you learn to speak, it's not exactly easy to stop saying "yes ma'am", because it comes out involuntarily. I had to practice for several years once I was in college to stop calling store clerks and waiters/waitresses "sir" and "ma'am", many of whom were younger than me. But the fact that this story is ridiculous is the only reason it's a story at all.
"Sir" makes me feel more important than I am (or that I'm being schmoozed by a salespunk), "ma'am" makes GF feel older than she is.  We're in our mid-20s in the midwest.  I grew up here, and she grew up in the southwest.  Just some data points.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: solon on August 29, 2018, 01:34:37 PM
I've noticed that people act better when I call them "sir" or "ma'am". It's almost like, if they sense respect, they stand a little taller, act a little more confident, etc.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on August 29, 2018, 01:46:07 PM
And I agree about "folks." I get why it is being used and I don't have a problem with that, I just really don't like the word itself. It doesn't mean to me what it means to most, I guess? It has some other feeling to it that is just not a feeling I like? I don't know, but you're not alone, sui generis.
ah, so glad I'm not alone!  And yes, I have the same feeling you describe.  It's not something that I can exactly articulate, but it's a feeling inside that just feels wrong in some particular way.

After reading a few other responses, it might just have to do with that attempt at aw-shucks-familiarity. For me at least. I really dislike it when people sorry, ahem folks work hard to seem overly familiar and...humble...or casual? It just feels fake when everybody *only* uses folks.  Especially in the third person!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on August 29, 2018, 02:37:37 PM
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

+1

Folks is also an easy substitute for y'all for southerns trying to soften their accent.

Agreed. I think "folks" is a great word. Eliminates the gender-specification in "you guys" as well.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on August 29, 2018, 02:44:42 PM
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

+1

Folks is also an easy substitute for y'all for southerns trying to soften their accent.

Agreed. I think "folks" is a great word. Eliminates the gender-specification in "you guys" as well.

The Goonies would have been a whole different movie if Sloth said "Hey Folks"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: JanetJackson on August 29, 2018, 03:42:26 PM
Is ma'am a word that people wish would go away?   I have always thought it was a polite manner to address someone. 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html (https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html)

Is sir also a problem?
I saw this article earlier this week and while I think the punishment for a kid that young was far too drastic (I forget, and I'm not reopening the article, but I think the kid was young grade school age?), I do think the issue, or in the very least, issues LIKE this seem/ed to stem from being repeatedly called something you don't want to be called. 
Who knows, that teacher could have been a male, or gender non-conforming. 
 
If I told someone (an adult) my name (which is not Luke) and they called me Luke once, I'd correct them so sweetly and politely it could sweeten a cup of coffee, but if they continued to call me Luke after a few corrections, I'd have to assume it was on purpose and to agitate and disrespect me.
Just my two cents.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MissNancyPryor on August 29, 2018, 05:26:14 PM
Another few misuses of the literally.

"Sometimes when I catch myself dwelling in the past I literally kick my balls back to reality."

"I love him so much I’m #literally sick without him"

"Voted for the first time ever in person!!! #turnfloridablue #nomoreredtide #LITERALLY"


Please, someone stop this epidemic, FIGURATIVELY speaking. It makes me want to FIGURATIVELY jump off a bridge.

It is a verbal crutch.  They want some big sounding word in there to emphasize things.  We should start offering up "utterly" which is the same number of syllables and means what they think they are saying and even ends with that handy -ly thing.  But, the vowel out front is not as smoooove and therefore the idea just won't take.  Too hard to get off the launch pad. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 29, 2018, 05:48:32 PM
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

You people and you folks both sound terrible.  If I am talking to people, "you" works fine.  If I want their attention, "hey, everyone" works well.

I think part of this may be a geography outlook - Canadian versus American English.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: JanetJackson on August 30, 2018, 09:20:01 AM
“CIRCLE BACK”....
I swear I’m going to... I don’t know... really lose it if this doesn’t fade in the next few years.
“DISRUPT/DISRUPTION” when referring to companies, etc. “so and so is DISRUPTING the RV industry”..... staaaahhhhp.

Here’s another thing... it’s very particular.  Sometimes people over annunciate all of the letters in ‘Important’, especially the center ‘T’. It seems to mostly be upper class white women over 35... but that’s just a total random observation.  There are at least two people on regular podcasts that I listen to who do it and it ruins the whole episode when I hear them over annunciating that ‘T’...
Uh, hate to say this JanetJ, but I believe the word you want is "enunciate". I think I understand what you mean though. By far the worst abuser of this word is Nancy Grace. Ugh.

You're right, my mistake! *although, side note: I don't know who Nancy Grace is...  NOTICE HOW I DID NOT SAY "MY BAD' BECAUSE I NEARLY VOMIT ANYTIME SOMEONE SAYS THAT. 
Ha, had to add an additional phrase I'm annoyed by.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Jouer on August 31, 2018, 07:46:37 AM
Is ma'am a word that people wish would go away?   I have always thought it was a polite manner to address someone. 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html (https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html)

Is sir also a problem?
I saw this article earlier this week and while I think the punishment for a kid that young was far too drastic (I forget, and I'm not reopening the article, but I think the kid was young grade school age?), I do think the issue, or in the very least, issues LIKE this seem/ed to stem from being repeatedly called something you don't want to be called. 
Who knows, that teacher could have been a male, or gender non-conforming. 
 
If I told someone (an adult) my name (which is not Luke) and they called me Luke once, I'd correct them so sweetly and politely it could sweeten a cup of coffee, but if they continued to call me Luke after a few corrections, I'd have to assume it was on purpose and to agitate and disrespect me.
Just my two cents.

If someone in my friend group got annoyed about mistakenly being called Luke, that would be their new name forever. Their old name would cease to exist. We'd be singing Lukas With The Lid Off. We'd get your dad to call you and tell you "Luke, I am your father" (even though that's not the correct line from the film). It would be glorious. 
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: teen persuasion on September 03, 2018, 09:48:47 AM
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

You people and you folks both sound terrible.  If I am talking to people, "you" works fine.  If I want their attention, "hey, everyone" works well.

I think part of this may be a geography outlook - Canadian versus American English.

I think it is a geographical issue, but I'd put the border a good bit farther south.  Anyone using "folks" in my area (NY) would be immediately tagging themselves as a transplant.

But the "you guys" mentioned in another post is completely gender neutral here.  I'm reminded of how the nuns in my all-girls HS would object whenever they heard "youse guys", but it was the extraneous "S" sound they objected to, not the male connotations when there wasn't a male in sight.  That was 30+ years ago - I no longer hear "youse", thank goodness.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on September 03, 2018, 11:34:30 AM
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

You people and you folks both sound terrible.  If I am talking to people, "you" works fine.  If I want their attention, "hey, everyone" works well.

I think part of this may be a geography outlook - Canadian versus American English.

I think it is a geographical issue, but I'd put the border a good bit farther south.  Anyone using "folks" in my area (NY) would be immediately tagging themselves as a transplant.

But the "you guys" mentioned in another post is completely gender neutral here.  I'm reminded of how the nuns in my all-girls HS would object whenever they heard "youse guys", but it was the extraneous "S" sound they objected to, not the male connotations when there wasn't a male in sight.  That was 30+ years ago - I no longer hear "youse", thank goodness.

I hear "youse" from one local person here.  It was a surprise the first time I heard it.

"Guys" seems to have become partially gender neutral and "gals" has basically disappeared.  If I said "the guys are working on that" it would be though that they were male, but I could easily see someone say "hey guys, let's head out" when everyone being addressed is female.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on September 03, 2018, 11:44:15 AM
“CIRCLE BACK”....
I swear I’m going to... I don’t know... really lose it if this doesn’t fade in the next few years.
“DISRUPT/DISRUPTION” when referring to companies, etc. “so and so is DISRUPTING the RV industry”..... staaaahhhhp.

Here’s another thing... it’s very particular.  Sometimes people over annunciate all of the letters in ‘Important’, especially the center ‘T’. It seems to mostly be upper class white women over 35... but that’s just a total random observation.  There are at least two people on regular podcasts that I listen to who do it and it ruins the whole episode when I hear them over annunciating that ‘T’...
Uh, hate to say this JanetJ, but I believe the word you want is "enunciate". I think I understand what you mean though. By far the worst abuser of this word is Nancy Grace. Ugh.

You're right, my mistake! *although, side note: I don't know who Nancy Grace is...  NOTICE HOW I DID NOT SAY "MY BAD' BECAUSE I NEARLY VOMIT ANYTIME SOMEONE SAYS THAT. 
Ha, had to add an additional phrase I'm annoyed by.
Re: Nancy Grace - consider yourself lucky. She's a talking head for some cable news show. In my traveling days, one of my regular hotels had a crappy cable package (read: no HGTV) and she was on whatever network I watched instead. She's still around, so someone may chime in to help. I'd Google her, but I don't want her in my retinas.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: nnls on September 03, 2018, 05:47:54 PM
Um, I'm a (Canadian) middle-class white woman over 35, and yes there are 2 t's in important.

"Folks" was more an American than Canadian general usage word  (at least in English Quebec while I was growing up).  I first noticed "folks" replacing "people" with politicians' speeches - I think some wanted to be seen as "just folks" so they used folks instead of people.  Made me think they  were faking it.  But now it is ubiquitous.

And yes I know language changes.  I remember when "gay" meant happy and light-hearted.
"You people" sounds vaguely accusatory, whereas "you folks" sounds friendler. There's also kind of a degree of distance. Close, closer, closest: people, folks, friends.

Just my two cents, folks.

You people and you folks both sound terrible.  If I am talking to people, "you" works fine.  If I want their attention, "hey, everyone" works well.

I think part of this may be a geography outlook - Canadian versus American English.

I think it is a geographical issue, but I'd put the border a good bit farther south.  Anyone using "folks" in my area (NY) would be immediately tagging themselves as a transplant.

But the "you guys" mentioned in another post is completely gender neutral here.  I'm reminded of how the nuns in my all-girls HS would object whenever they heard "youse guys", but it was the extraneous "S" sound they objected to, not the male connotations when there wasn't a male in sight.  That was 30+ years ago - I no longer hear "youse", thank goodness.

I hear "youse" from one local person here.  It was a surprise the first time I heard it.

"Guys" seems to have become partially gender neutral and "gals" has basically disappeared.  If I said "the guys are working on that" it would be though that they were male, but I could easily see someone say "hey guys, let's head out" when everyone being addressed is female.

I hear "youse" a lot in Australia. It annoys me everytime
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dee on September 03, 2018, 08:17:01 PM
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Anon in Alaska on September 04, 2018, 01:43:46 AM
Stop saying "pleaded" when you can say "pled". The defendant has not "pleaded guilty" he has "pled guilty". The previous standard is now archaic and should be scrapped. The longer form is wasteful and adds nothing.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: JanetJackson on September 04, 2018, 06:13:19 AM
Stop saying "pleaded" when you can say "pled". The defendant has not "pleaded guilty" he has "pled guilty". The previous standard is now archaic and should be scrapped. The longer form is wasteful and adds nothing.
I have noticed this A LOT in news articles lately.  To the point where I've wondered if something has changed grammatically, for this to be acceptable.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dandarc on September 11, 2018, 04:34:36 PM
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."
How do you feel about "y'all"?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dee on September 11, 2018, 06:31:19 PM
The mere thought of my mother saying "y'all" is quite amusing. We were from Northern Ontario, where "y'all" is not in common parlance.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on September 11, 2018, 10:28:23 PM
Stop saying "pleaded" when you can say "pled". The defendant has not "pleaded guilty" he has "pled guilty". The previous standard is now archaic and should be scrapped. The longer form is wasteful and adds nothing.
I have noticed this A LOT in news articles lately.  To the point where I've wondered if something has changed grammatically, for this to be acceptable.
In law school, that's how they teach you to say it.  Well, they didn't ever explicitly point out that "it's pleaded, not pled."  But it was definitely everywhere. Pled was not used.  I simply conformed, never asked.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on September 12, 2018, 06:08:02 AM
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."
How do you feel about "y'all"?

I say "y'all" all the time. It's a succinct, gender-neutral solution to the ubiquitous English problem of the absence of a plural second-person personal pronoun. I don't care if it positions me geographically when I say it. I have no problem with the fact that I'm from the South.

Go an hour north of where I live though, and "y'all" becomes "y'uns". That one drives me apeshit.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on September 12, 2018, 08:23:43 PM
Stop saying "pleaded" when you can say "pled". The defendant has not "pleaded guilty" he has "pled guilty". The previous standard is now archaic and should be scrapped. The longer form is wasteful and adds nothing.
I have noticed this A LOT in news articles lately.  To the point where I've wondered if something has changed grammatically, for this to be acceptable.
In law school, that's how they teach you to say it.  Well, they didn't ever explicitly point out that "it's pleaded, not pled."  But it was definitely everywhere. Pled was not used.  I simply conformed, never asked.

Haha, in nursing school, it's "dilatated" and "dilatation" not "dilated" and "dilation" .  IRL midwives don't say these the "proper" way, because it sounds weird.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on September 13, 2018, 11:12:29 AM
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."
How do you feel about "y'all"?

I say "y'all" all the time. It's a succinct, gender-neutral solution to the ubiquitous English problem of the absence of a plural second-person personal pronoun. I don't care if it positions me geographically when I say it. I have no problem with the fact that I'm from the South.

Go an hour north of where I live though, and "y'all" becomes "y'uns". That one drives me apeshit.


Love y'all!  Also from the South.  My accent has smoothed out during my years away from home, but y'all will always remain. That and pronouncing short E like short I, as in Kinny Rogers, not Kehhhnny.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on September 13, 2018, 11:21:12 AM
My mom used to refer to me and my partner as "you people," as in, "what would you people like to eat for dinner?" I thought it was so weird, as though we were a big crowd when there were just the two of us. It took me a while to realize the apt word would have been "both" as in "what would you both like to eat for dinner?" I used to get pretty perplexed and worked up over "you people."
How do you feel about "y'all"?

I say "y'all" all the time. It's a succinct, gender-neutral solution to the ubiquitous English problem of the absence of a plural second-person personal pronoun. I don't care if it positions me geographically when I say it. I have no problem with the fact that I'm from the South.

Go an hour north of where I live though, and "y'all" becomes "y'uns". That one drives me apeshit.


Love y'all!  Also from the South.  My accent has smoothed out during my years away from home, but y'all will always remain. That and pronouncing short E like short I, as in Kinny Rogers, not Kehhhnny.

Ha! My wife does that. Always tough to tell when she's saying "pen" vs. "pin". I never did pick that one up for some reason, even though it was a common pronunciation where I grew up.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tralfamadorian on September 13, 2018, 06:24:14 PM
Love y'all!  Also from the South.  My accent has smoothed out during my years away from home, but y'all will always remain. That and pronouncing short E like short I, as in Kinny Rogers, not Kehhhnny.

Some parts of accents really stick! I'm moderately non-rhotic unless in a really formal situation like a job interview.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on September 13, 2018, 07:15:13 PM
"Alot"is not a word. "A lot" is two words. Do people not have autocorrect?

"Anyways" may or may not be a word. But why add the s?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: tralfamadorian on September 13, 2018, 07:20:23 PM
"Alot"is not a word. "A lot" is two words. Do people not have autocorrect?

"Anyways" may or may not be a word. But why add the s?

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_D_Z-D2tzi14/S8TTPQCPA6I/AAAAAAAACwA/ZHZH-Bi8OmI/s400/ALOT2.png)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Jouer on September 17, 2018, 01:54:08 PM
"Alot"is not a word. "A lot" is two words. Do people not have autocorrect?

"Anyways" may or may not be a word. But why add the s?

I prefer including the S. Certainly in casual emails, posts, texts. It just feels better.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: accolay on September 17, 2018, 09:50:58 PM
I'm tire of "super" unless used with "super duper" "Superman" ""Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" or other preexisting phrase.

Super is out of control! It must be stopped!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: jinga nation on September 26, 2018, 10:52:57 AM
"I'm not racist, but <proceeds to say something borderline/overtly racist>"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: accolay on September 26, 2018, 03:40:35 PM
How about "normalcy" instead of normality?

Damn you Harding.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on September 26, 2018, 07:16:32 PM
How about "normalcy" instead of normality?

Damn you Harding.
"Normality" only ever makes me think of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on September 27, 2018, 09:50:20 AM
How about "normalcy" instead of normality?

Damn you Harding.

I never even noticed that one. Normalcy definitely sounds better to my ear, but normality doesn't sound too off, either.

I've been hearing the word "trickeration" in place of "trickery" on football broadcasts for the last decade or so. Drives me crazy every time I hear it, but it's basically the new normal at this point.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on September 29, 2018, 06:55:18 AM
How about when someone says axed instead of asked?

I axed my kid not to do that. Wow, that must have hurt!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on September 30, 2018, 08:32:42 AM
"Axed" is actually a legitimate pronunciation, apparently. Years ago I listened to an episode of A Way With Words and they did a long piece on the history of it. Apparently it was the dominate pronunciation at times and in certain places hundreds of years ago.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on September 30, 2018, 06:11:43 PM
Meanwhile, "literally" is getting worse by the day. I cringe noticeably every time I hear it used improperly.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dave1442397 on September 30, 2018, 06:17:46 PM
"Axed" is actually a legitimate pronunciation, apparently.

It certainly is if you live in The Bronx/Yonkers.

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dee on September 30, 2018, 07:47:31 PM
I have a friend who has literally taken to using literally several times per sentence. It is literally driving me bonkers.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on September 30, 2018, 07:55:03 PM
I have a friend who has literally taken to using literally several times per sentence. It is literally driving me bonkers.

Wouldn't it figuratively be driving you bonkers though?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on October 01, 2018, 12:09:00 AM
A colleague routinely posts in her blog about the most mundane things that really don't bear reporting. She is quite effusive. An example: "I met with Client in their AMAZING conference room and we had the most AWESOME discussion about their needs. We've come up with an AMAZING solution. Am so grateful and blessed by my AWESOME clients!!"

Just keep it to yourself, hon.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 01, 2018, 04:08:44 AM
A colleague routinely posts in her blog about the most mundane things that really don't bear reporting. She is quite effusive. An example: "I met with Client in their AMAZING conference room and we had the most AWESOME discussion about their needs. We've come up with an AMAZING solution. Am so grateful and blessed by my AWESOME clients!!"

Just keep it to yourself, hon.

Tell her you didn't ax her for that information.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on October 01, 2018, 09:13:09 AM
"Axed" is actually a legitimate pronunciation, apparently. Years ago I listened to an episode of A Way With Words and they did a long piece on the history of it. Apparently it was the dominate pronunciation at times and in certain places hundreds of years ago.
They could also be a Futurama fan. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOz8vYzFiYE (fun fact: in support of that one-line joke in one episode, they continue saying it that way for the entire run of the show)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BTDretire on October 01, 2018, 09:58:18 AM
"Alot"is not a word. "A lot" is two words. Do people not have autocorrect?

"Anyways" may or may not be a word. But why add the s?

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_D_Z-D2tzi14/S8TTPQCPA6I/AAAAAAAACwA/ZHZH-Bi8OmI/s400/ALOT2.png)

Reminds me of a little over 20 years ago, I was making a sales pitch in a Cal Tech Lab.
Taped to a counter over an expensive scale, was a note,

A lot
Alot of you are leaving this area messy, please clean up after yourself.

 Yep someone crossed out Alot and put A lot.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on October 01, 2018, 10:15:16 AM
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: yakamashii on October 01, 2018, 10:23:05 AM
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

Like aks/ask, "homo-genius" is legit:

http://grammarist.com/usage/homogenous-homogeneous/ (http://grammarist.com/usage/homogenous-homogeneous/)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 01, 2018, 12:11:10 PM
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

When I typed "homogenous" into a search engine it gave me homogeneous, and comments that homogenous are a variant that is not a standard accepted spelling. And then the pronunciation is as you said.  So the pronunciation does seem to follow the most common way of spelling the word.

I've learned homogenous in biology, but that term has been supplanted by homologous, which makes more sense - homologous and analogous.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: marble_faun on October 01, 2018, 05:29:10 PM
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

But homogenEous is a word!  According to the OED, homogenEous is the correct, older way and "homogenous" is the "erroneous" version.  (Though of course language evolves and so forth -- it does seem homogenEous has precedent.)

Homogenous is also a real word, but it historically it has been used in biology to describe organisms with a common ancestor.

By the way, I had no idea about this before, and I think I always used the two interchangeably! :-)  Just got curious and looked it up.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: pbkmaine on October 01, 2018, 06:41:11 PM
Is ma'am a word that people wish would go away?   I have always thought it was a polite manner to address someone. 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html (https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/parents-outraged-son-punished-referring-163338274.html)

Is sir also a problem?

Not here in the South.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on October 02, 2018, 11:27:39 AM
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronunciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

But homogenEous is a word!  According to the OED, homogenEous is the correct, older way and "homogenous" is the "erroneous" version.  (Though of course language evolves and so forth -- it does seem homogenEous has precedent.)

Homogenous is also a real word, but it historically it has been used in biology to describe organisms with a common ancestor.

By the way, I had no idea about this before, and I think I always used the two interchangeably! :-)  Just got curious and looked it up.

Fascinating. I had no idea that homogenous and homogeneous were alternate spellings of the same word, much less that homogenous used to be a word with a different meaning altogether.

Here's one I assume we can all agree on: People should stop saying "nukular" when what they mean is "nuclear".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on October 03, 2018, 02:44:46 PM
If they have to give up "nukular" then they need to give up"realator" as well.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 03, 2018, 06:12:20 PM
If they have to give up "nukular" then they need to give up"realator" as well.

Nukular I've heard.  Realator?    Spell check certainly does't like it.  Realtor?  Regulator?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on October 03, 2018, 06:33:07 PM
If they have to give up "nukular" then they need to give up"realator" as well.

Nukular I've heard.  Realator?    Spell check certainly does't like it.  Realtor?  Regulator?

Both of these are common in central IL. The weirdest mispronunciation I have heard was intestines, pronounced with a long I for the second i, so it rhymed with vines. This was an actual doctor who pronounced it that way.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on October 04, 2018, 08:15:52 PM
If they have to give up "nukular" then they need to give up"realator" as well.

Nukular I've heard.  Realator?    Spell check certainly does't like it.  Realtor?  Regulator?

Yes, for realtor. They add in a syllable. Maybe if I spelled it "ree-la-tor."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: teen persuasion on October 05, 2018, 07:19:25 AM
Huh, I've heard "real-a-tor" but not "ree-la-tor".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on October 05, 2018, 07:49:03 AM
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronounciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

But homogenEous is a word!  According to the OED, homogenEous is the correct, older way and "homogenous" is the "erroneous" version.  (Though of course language evolves and so forth -- it does seem homogenEous has precedent.)

Homogenous is also a real word, but it historically it has been used in biology to describe organisms with a common ancestor.

By the way, I had no idea about this before, and I think I always used the two interchangeably! :-)  Just got curious and looked it up.

My world has been rocked to it's core.  :P
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on October 05, 2018, 10:20:41 AM
Its*
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Cwadda on October 06, 2018, 12:36:45 PM
More instances of "literally" being used improperly.

"I literally can't do anything."

"I'm so single it literally hurts."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: GuitarStv on October 06, 2018, 04:57:04 PM
Its*

Well, that's embarrassing.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dabnasty on October 06, 2018, 07:38:01 PM
Its*

Well, that's embarrassing.

Just blame auto-correct, no one has to admit to there mistakes anymore.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 07, 2018, 08:45:29 AM
Its*

Well, that's embarrassing.

Just blame auto-correct, no one has to admit to there mistakes anymore.

I saw what you did their.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dicey on October 07, 2018, 09:31:25 AM
Its*

Well, that's embarrassing.

Just blame auto-correct, no one has to admit to there mistakes anymore.

I saw what you did their.
They're is no there their anymore.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 08, 2018, 05:09:36 AM
People don't seem to know how to use the word to and too.

I went to the store and spent too much money.

NOT

I went to the store and spent to much money.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: sui generis on October 08, 2018, 08:35:27 AM
People don't seem to know how to use the word to and too.

I went to the store and spent too much money.

NOT

I went to the store and spent to much money.
My phone auto corrects all "to"s to "too" nowadays, which is super annoying and I don't catch half the time.  It also auto corrects all "but"s to "butt"s so my phone is basically making me seem like a 12 year old boy with poor grammar skills whenever I text anyone.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on October 08, 2018, 08:44:17 AM
People don't seem to know how to use the word to and too.

I went to the store and spent too much money.

NOT

I went to the store and spent to much money.
My phone auto corrects all "to"s to "too" nowadays, which is super annoying and I don't catch half the time.  It also auto corrects all "but"s to "butt"s so my phone is basically making me seem like a 12 year old boy with poor grammar skills whenever I text anyone.
That's ducking annoying.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: teen persuasion on October 11, 2018, 06:50:20 PM
Lockout, as in "the schools are on lockout due to an armed gunman in the vicinity."  That's the way the news was phrasing the story yesterday.

I could see "lockdown", or "lock-in" (the kids are locked in until everything is clear, but "lockout"?  That reads to me as if the kids are locked out of the buildings.


Maybe it's just counterintuitive to me.  But I'd also like the word to go away because it's beyond ridiculous that the concept is even something I should have to worry about as a parent of students, a parent of a teacher's aide and of a school staff member, and a wife of a teacher/sometimes volunteer first responder.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 11, 2018, 07:01:00 PM
Lockout, as in "the schools are on lockout due to an armed gunman in the vicinity."  That's the way the news was phrasing the story yesterday.

I could see "lockdown", or "lock-in" (the kids are locked in until everything is clear, but "lockout"?  That reads to me as if the kids are locked out of the buildings.


Maybe it's just counterintuitive to me.  But I'd also like the word to go away because it's beyond ridiculous that the concept is even something I should have to worry about as a parent of students, a parent of a teacher's aide and of a school staff member, and a wife of a teacher/sometimes volunteer first responder.

I think they used the wrong word.  Lockout is a labour term - unions go on strike, management does lockouts and brings in scab labour.
 
The schools were on lock-down.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Freckles on October 17, 2018, 03:17:20 PM
Oh, no, this is not a misusage. The terminology is very specific. Lockdown and lockout mean different things and trigger different behaviors on the part of the students and school staff. The staff and the kids are trained on the terminologies and behaviors to follow the specific words. We have videos, posters, drills. It's all rather serious and not talked about flippantly.

(Because god forbid we just have some serious gun control laws and keep our children safe in their schools by keeping guns and murderers out of the schools.)

Here, I just took a picture of the poster on my classroom wall for you.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 17, 2018, 05:49:35 PM
Oh, no, this is not a misusage. The terminology is very specific. Lockdown and lockout mean different things and trigger different behaviors on the part of the students and school staff. The staff and the kids are trained on the terminologies and behaviors to follow the specific words. We have videos, posters, drills. It's all rather serious and not talked about flippantly.

(Because god forbid we just have some serious gun control laws and keep our children safe in their schools by keeping guns and murderers out of the schools.)

Here, I just took a picture of the poster on my classroom wall for you.

I had never heard lockout used this way - holy cow.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 18, 2018, 08:52:15 AM
Using the word 'conversate' instead of conversation. UGH!

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on October 18, 2018, 10:16:53 AM
Using the word 'conversate' instead of conversation. UGH!

Conversation is a noun.
Converse is a verb.
Conversate is bullshit.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: bestname on October 18, 2018, 10:20:21 AM
"commentate" makes me go similarly crazy. Commenting is not good enough, you have to commentate. Fancy!
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: caffeine on October 18, 2018, 10:24:53 AM
When someone starts a sentence with "I mean, …" when it is their first time sharing their thought and haven't been asked or prompt for further clarification, I find it toally unnecessary. I'm not sure how prevalent this is, but I have a group of friends who begin sharing thoughts with "I mean" when no clarification was needed. I've been finding it annoying.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dustinst22 on October 18, 2018, 10:26:53 AM
literally (which is literally used incorrectly most of the time)
Ironic  (also used incorrectly with high frequency)
Irregardless

Annoying phrases
I can't even
It is what it is
Any sentence starting with "honestly"
Just sayin'
Could care less
No offense but
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: MrsWolfeRN on October 18, 2018, 01:10:11 PM
"commentate" makes me go similarly crazy. Commenting is not good enough, you have to commentate. Fancy!
Explicate. I have actually seen this in professional literature. I find it pretentious af.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: bestname on October 18, 2018, 02:23:58 PM
I'm too intellectual to refer to something, I reference it instead.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Mississippi Mudstache on October 19, 2018, 06:47:37 AM
I'm too intellectual to refer to something, I reference it instead.

Actually, this brings up an annoying problem with the English language. We are taught as elementary schoolers that it's improper to end a sentence with a preposition, but then we have copious phrasal verbs consisting of a verb+preposition that are functionally inseparable. For example, "put" does not mean the same thing as "put up" which also does not mean the same thing as "put up with". So, we get fun jokes mocking the stupid rules, such as "The rule which forbids ending a sentence in a preposition is the type of arrant pedantry up with which I will not put."

Your comment reminded me of this problem, because using the word "reference" instead of "refer to" is a handy way of avoiding a phrasal verb altogether. To me, it sounds far more conversational to say "Who did you reference?" vs. "To whom did you refer?", and no on can jump on your case for ending a sentence in a preposition, as they might if you said "Who did you refer to?"
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Paul der Krake on October 19, 2018, 07:30:09 PM
Actually, this brings up an annoying problem with the English language. We are taught as elementary schoolers that it's improper to end a sentence with a preposition, but then we have copious phrasal verbs consisting of a verb+preposition that are functionally inseparable. For example, "put" does not mean the same thing as "put up" which also does not mean the same thing as "put up with". So, we get fun jokes mocking the stupid rules, such as "The rule which forbids ending a sentence in a preposition is the type of arrant pedantry up with which I will not put."
I see we listen to the same podcasts. Carry on, good Sir.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on October 19, 2018, 07:34:37 PM
People just need to loose the attitude. You don't know my life!!

:) :) :)
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 21, 2018, 11:47:08 AM
Was watching a TV show that sells things. The host of the show took a call from a buyer. The host asks "have you bought this item before?" Person on the phone says "Yes, I have botten them before."
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: dustinst22 on October 21, 2018, 12:54:02 PM
Was watching a TV show that sells things. The host of the show took a call from a buyer. The host asks "have you bought this item before?" Person on the phone says "Yes, I have botten them before."

Geesh.  I hope someone corrected his spelling of "boughten".
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on November 02, 2018, 05:44:13 PM
FTFY

I find it insulting when someone modifies what I write, and then implies that I was wrong, instead of that they have a different take on the situation or that they want to be funny.  It's not funny to tell someone that their opinion is wrong. 

cue someone "fixing" something in this statement.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on November 12, 2018, 02:29:19 PM

Many mispronounce "Realtor."

They say "Realator."

I wish their mispronunciation would go away.

What can't they pronounce the word correctly?

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on November 12, 2018, 02:34:37 PM


Many mispronounce "realtor."

They say "realator."

I wish their mispronunciation would go away.

What can't they pronounce the word correctly?

It's a lost cause when those within the industry pronounce it that way! Is it correct to capitalize Realtor? I've seen it that way. We don't really say Lawyer or Crane Operator in written communication.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on November 12, 2018, 02:36:10 PM


 The weirdest mispronunciation I have heard was intestines, pronounced with a long I for the second i, so it rhymed with vines. This was an actual doctor who pronounced it that way.

I have heard this mispronunciation more than once.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on November 12, 2018, 02:40:22 PM
"Needs done" or any variant of that pattern.  "These dogs need walked."  "The grass needs mowed."

Awful.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on November 12, 2018, 02:45:45 PM


Many mispronounce "realtor."

They say "realator."

I wish their mispronunciation would go away.

What can't they pronounce the word correctly?

It's a lost cause when those within the industry pronounce it that way! Is it correct to capitalize Realtor?I've seen it that way. We don't really say Lawyer or Crane Operator in written communication.

Yes.
 I misspelled it.


The stylebook says Realtor is supposed to be capitalized. ... "Realtor: The term real estate agent is preferred. Use Realtor only if there is a reason to indicate that the individual is a member of the National Association of Realtors."

Realtor is a trademark &#8212; that's why it's capitalized - Mail Tribune
mailtribune/news/since.../realtor-is-a-trademark-amp-8212-that-s-why-it-s-capitalize...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on November 12, 2018, 02:50:40 PM
People don't seem to know how to use the word to and too.

I went to the store and spent too much money.

NOT

I went to the store and spent to much money.

I've read too many misuses of "lose" and "loose" and  "effect" and "affect."

Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on November 12, 2018, 03:14:20 PM


Many mispronounce "realtor."

They say "realator."

I wish their mispronunciation would go away.

What can't they pronounce the word correctly?

It's a lost cause when those within the industry pronounce it that way! Is it correct to capitalize Realtor?I've seen it that way. We don't really say Lawyer or Crane Operator in written communication.

Yes.
 I misspelled it.


The stylebook says Realtor is supposed to be capitalized. ... "Realtor: The term real estate agent is preferred. Use Realtor only if there is a reason to indicate that the individual is a member of the National Association of Realtors."

Realtor is a trademark &#8212; that's why it's capitalized - Mail Tribune
mailtribune/news/since.../realtor-is-a-trademark-amp-8212-that-s-why-it-s-capitalize...

Thanks, @John Galt for the clarification. I'd always wondered why it was sometimes capitalized and sometimes not.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ozbeach on November 12, 2018, 04:02:31 PM


 The weirdest mispronunciation I have heard was intestines, pronounced with a long I for the second i, so it rhymed with vines. This was an actual doctor who pronounced it that way.

I have heard this mispronunciation more than once.


That's how we pronounce it in Australia (or at least, how I pronounce it).
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 12, 2018, 07:40:05 PM


 The weirdest mispronunciation I have heard was intestines, pronounced with a long I for the second i, so it rhymed with vines. This was an actual doctor who pronounced it that way.

I have heard this mispronunciation more than once.

Lots of people say it that way.  It may be a regional variation.  All the biologists I know use the hard I at the end.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: zolotiyeruki on November 13, 2018, 01:59:52 AM
My guess is that the Realtor/real-a-tor pronunciation is a result of the same linguistic quirk that brings us nuclear/nu-cue-lar.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dee on November 13, 2018, 06:56:17 PM
The word "tireless" gets to me because I take it too literally. I saw a communication using the word "relentless" today and  I much preferred. Most "tireless" pursuits are not literally tireless -- people get tired but keep at it anyway. Relentlessly.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 14, 2018, 05:52:38 PM
The word "tireless" gets to me because I take it too literally. I saw a communication using the word "relentless" today and  I much preferred. Most "tireless" pursuits are not literally tireless -- people get tired but keep at it anyway. Relentlessly.

Such word precision.  Love it!

And it reminded me - I hate the "give 110%" thing.  You can't give more than 100%.  100 % is everything.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dee on November 14, 2018, 08:33:15 PM
Totally agreed, RetiredAt63. Especially with a number like 110%, unlike, say, 1000% which is clearly hyperbole. The expression giving a 110% is one of my pet peeves.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: EvenSteven on November 14, 2018, 08:53:10 PM
Quote
The word "tireless" gets to me because I take it too literally. I saw a communication using the word "relentless" today and  I much preferred. Most "tireless" pursuits are not literally tireless -- people get tired but keep at it anyway. Relentlessly.

This word substitution is only sometimes appropriate. For instance a kayak is a tireless vehicle, but not necessarily relentless.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Crease on November 15, 2018, 07:34:38 AM
Not a word/phrase, but when I wear my lawyer cap I get a visceral reaction to missing Oxford commas.

Also i.e. and e.g. are not interchangeable.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 15, 2018, 10:50:49 AM
Not a word/phrase, but when I wear my lawyer cap I get a visceral reaction to missing Oxford commas.

Also i.e. and e.g. are not interchangeable.

Ah, Oxford commas.  In the song black magic woman, is the woman black and magic, or is she a woman of unknown colour who practices black magic?

i.e. and e.g., I found this goodie
https://www.grammarly.com/blog/know-your-latin-i-e-vs-e-g/ (https://www.grammarly.com/blog/know-your-latin-i-e-vs-e-g/)

I had to google SWAK.  Personally I like the Spinners and Weavers Association of Korea, for my area it could be Spinners and Weavers Association of Kingston.  ;-)

And of course as a biologist, my gut reaction is that Latin should be italicized, so they are not i.e. and e.g., they are i.e. and e.g.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dee on November 15, 2018, 06:09:06 PM
Good point, EvenSteven. I don't have a problem with tireless objects, I have a problem with humans said to have tirelessly fought for a cause. In most every case, they were relentless in their endeavours despite being tired, even exhausted at times.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 15, 2018, 07:45:59 PM
Good point, EvenSteven. I don't have a problem with tireless objects, I have a problem with humans said to have tirelessly fought for a cause. In most every case, they were relentless in their endeavours despite being tired, even exhausted at times.

He's trying to be funny punny?
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on November 17, 2018, 10:15:25 AM
There's a pronounciation one that has always bothered me:

homogenous


Some people insist in using the pronunciation "homo-genius" rather than ho-mo-gen-us".  This has always bothered me.

But homogenEous is a word!  According to the OED, homogenEous is the correct, older way and "homogenous" is the "erroneous" version.  (Though of course language evolves and so forth -- it does seem homogenEous has precedent.)

Homogenous is also a real word, but it historically it has been used in biology to describe organisms with a common ancestor.

By the way, I had no idea about this before, and I think I always used the two interchangeably! :-)  Just got curious and looked it up.

Fascinating. I had no idea that homogenous and homogeneous were alternate spellings of the same word, much less that homogenous used to be a word with a different meaning altogether.

Here's one I assume we can all agree on: People should stop saying "nukular" when what they mean is "nuclear".


+1
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on November 17, 2018, 10:25:55 AM
I've read a few posts (not on this site) in which the correct word was "tenet" but "tenant" was used instead.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: calimom on November 18, 2018, 12:20:28 PM
I've read a few posts (not on this site) in which the correct word was "tenet" but "tenant" was used instead.

Oh I've seen "MMM tenants" used a number of times here. That spelling is only applicable if one might be a rent paying member  of the MMM HQ.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: BlueHouse on November 19, 2018, 12:41:39 PM

I've read a few posts (not on this site) in which the correct word was "tenet" but "tenant" was used instead.

I live in an urban area where there are unfortunately, way too many murders.  I've seen on more than one occasion, a notice of an upcoming 'Visual" (vigil).   This is what happens when people don't read or see words in written form.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: ketchup on November 19, 2018, 01:15:42 PM

I've read a few posts (not on this site) in which the correct word was "tenet" but "tenant" was used instead.

I live in an urban area where there are unfortunately, way too many murders.  I've seen on more than one occasion, a notice of an upcoming 'Visual" (vigil).   This is what happens when people don't read or see words in written form.
https://www.reddit.com/r/boneappletea
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 19, 2018, 08:06:38 PM

I've read a few posts (not on this site) in which the correct word was "tenet" but "tenant" was used instead.

I live in an urban area where there are unfortunately, way too many murders.  I've seen on more than one occasion, a notice of an upcoming 'Visual" (vigil).   This is what happens when people don't read or see words in written form.
https://www.reddit.com/r/boneappletea

Oh my. I could only take a bit, that is just . . . . . . .
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: lollylegs on November 20, 2018, 01:08:37 AM
a new phrase has started being used at work from management over recent weeks -
 
"we are a 'no surprises' organisation"
"one of our core values is 'no surprises'
"there are 'no surprises' in our team"

I'm over it already...can't stand the corporate BS...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: AnswerIs42 on November 20, 2018, 02:57:29 AM
a new phrase has started being used at work from management over recent weeks -
 
"we are a 'no surprises' organisation"
"one of our core values is 'no surprises'
"there are 'no surprises' in our team"

I'm over it already...can't stand the corporate BS...

"A heart that's full up like a landfill, A job that slowly kills you, Bruises that won't heal"
"I'll take a quiet life, a handshake of carbon monoxide. No alarms and no surprises, please."

I think they're trying to tell you something...
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 20, 2018, 04:27:55 AM
She's trying to 'pin' the baby on me.
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: Dreamer on November 20, 2018, 07:27:37 AM

Here’s another thing... it’s very particular.  Sometimes people over annunciate all of the letters in ‘Important’, especially the center ‘T’. It seems to mostly be upper class white women over 35... but that’s just a total random observation.  There are at least two people on regular podcasts that I listen to who do it and it ruins the whole episode when I hear them over annunciating that ‘T’...

Funny you should say this.  Lately I've found myself pronouncing important this way, and I really have no idea why!  I am over 35 too.  Hmmm.   Although it's not the typcial pronunciation, it is apparently the correct pronunciation, according to the dictionary:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uu9Kb4oN3EQ
Title: Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
Post by: JanetJackson on November 20, 2018, 01:49:34 PM

Here’s another thing... it’s very particular.  Sometimes people over annunciate all of the letters in ‘Important’, especially the center ‘T’. It seems to mostly be upper class white women over 35... but that’s just a total random observation.  There are at least two people on regular podcasts that I listen to who do it and it ruins the whole episode when I hear them over annunciating that ‘T’...

Funny you should say this.  Lately I've found myself pronouncing important this way, and I really have no idea why!  I am over 35 too.  Hmmm.   Although it's not the typcial pronunciation, it is apparently the correct pronunciation, according to the dictionary:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uu9Kb4oN3EQ

Hahahah, it's ok!  It's SUCH a specific and trivial thing for me to be annoyed about.  I am also certain it's the correct pronunciation.
But yikes does it grind my gears.
Chris Guillebeau...however his last name is spelled from the Podcase 'Side Hustle School' does this with almost every single word and although I really enjoy his Podcast, I catch myself flinching every time he does it. 
I think perhaps I am the problem.


I turn 35 in a week or so... we'll see what happens.  I am a lower class white woman... that just might check enough of the boxes to turn me into an over-enunciator!