Author Topic: Words/phrases I wish would go away  (Read 88520 times)

Mississippi Mudstache

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #800 on: January 10, 2019, 12:46:09 PM »
Saying old aunt Ida "passed". I have a lot of family members that use this as a pleasant (?) way to say died. For some reason it just really annoys me. I work in cancer care and see lot of sick people who will die, and saying passed doesn't sugar coat it. They died!
They died and now they're dead. I especially hate it when they pronounce "passed" as "past", as in "Uncle George past last night. Ugh!

How would you pronounce "passed" such that it does not sound like "past"? I've never heard them pronounced differently.
Uh, one has a hard "t" sound at the end of it and one doesn't?

This one has me scratching my head, too. I hear/say "past" and "passed" the same way. Same as "last," only the sound of the first letter is different, of course. Dicey, I think you're from the US, right? So am I, and I'm trying to think of a time when I've heard these words pronounced the way you mentioned. Maybe it's a very specific region?
Yes, I am US based. Passed has two esssses and ends with a softer "d". Past has one ess and ends with a crisp "t", so it has a harder sound. Try saying "Pass the potatoes" vs. "Past the potatoes." Then say "At dinner, the potatoes were passed around the table." If you say "past around the table", then you know exactly what I'm talking about.

Another one is yes-ti-day instead of yes-ter-day. Ugh, just sounds gross.

I would love you hear you say the two words to see if I could tell a difference. My tongue is incapable of following an "s" with a soft "d". I think you'd be sorely disappointed by the way the word "passed" is pronounced by the entire population of the Southeastern U.S.

mrmoonymartian

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #801 on: January 10, 2019, 02:30:27 PM »
Don't know if this has been mentioned yet, but "Have a good one."

Have a good what?????
Day.

Dabnasty

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #802 on: January 10, 2019, 02:41:14 PM »
Don't know if this has been mentioned yet, but "Have a good one."

Have a good what?????
Day.
Life?

marble_faun

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #803 on: January 10, 2019, 02:45:57 PM »
Saying old aunt Ida "passed". I have a lot of family members that use this as a pleasant (?) way to say died. For some reason it just really annoys me. I work in cancer care and see lot of sick people who will die, and saying passed doesn't sugar coat it. They died!
They died and now they're dead. I especially hate it when they pronounce "passed" as "past", as in "Uncle George past last night. Ugh!

How would you pronounce "passed" such that it does not sound like "past"? I've never heard them pronounced differently.
Uh, one has a hard "t" sound at the end of it and one doesn't?

This one has me scratching my head, too. I hear/say "past" and "passed" the same way. Same as "last," only the sound of the first letter is different, of course. Dicey, I think you're from the US, right? So am I, and I'm trying to think of a time when I've heard these words pronounced the way you mentioned. Maybe it's a very specific region?
Yes, I am US based. Passed has two esssses and ends with a softer "d". Past has one ess and ends with a crisp "t", so it has a harder sound. Try saying "Pass the potatoes" vs. "Past the potatoes." Then say "At dinner, the potatoes were passed around the table." If you say "past around the table", then you know exactly what I'm talking about.

Another one is yes-ti-day instead of yes-ter-day. Ugh, just sounds gross.

I would love you hear you say the two words to see if I could tell a difference. My tongue is incapable of following an "s" with a soft "d". I think you'd be sorely disappointed by the way the word "passed" is pronounced by the entire population of the Southeastern U.S.

Same here. I say "passed" and "past" the same way, as I thought everyone did, and can't hear a difference in those examples. 

The OED gives the same exact pronunciation for both: /pæst/ (or /pɑːst/ for Brits).

Miss Piggy

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #804 on: January 10, 2019, 06:12:09 PM »
Same here. I say "passed" and "past" the same way, as I thought everyone did, and can't hear a difference in those examples. 

Same here. I have NEVER heard any difference at all in the way those two words are pronounced.

Dabnasty

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #805 on: January 10, 2019, 06:40:12 PM »
They died and now they're dead. I especially hate it when they pronounce "passed" as "past", as in "Uncle George past last night. Ugh!

How would you pronounce "passed" such that it does not sound like "past"? I've never heard them pronounced differently.
Uh, one has a hard "t" sound at the end of it and one doesn't?

This one has me scratching my head, too. I hear/say "past" and "passed" the same way. Same as "last," only the sound of the first letter is different, of course. Dicey, I think you're from the US, right? So am I, and I'm trying to think of a time when I've heard these words pronounced the way you mentioned. Maybe it's a very specific region?
Yes, I am US based. Passed has two esssses and ends with a softer "d". Past has one ess and ends with a crisp "t", so it has a harder sound. Try saying "Pass the potatoes" vs. "Past the potatoes." Then say "At dinner, the potatoes were passed around the table." If you say "past around the table", then you know exactly what I'm talking about.

Another one is yes-ti-day instead of yes-ter-day. Ugh, just sounds gross.

I would love you hear you say the two words to see if I could tell a difference. My tongue is incapable of following an "s" with a soft "d". I think you'd be sorely disappointed by the way the word "passed" is pronounced by the entire population of the Southeastern U.S.

I've said each word out loud in several different sentences each and trying my best to enunciate I can tell a difference but just barely. I can't imagine noticing the difference in conversation. Maybe if someone was using a microphone and I was standing close to the speakers I could tell?


Dicey

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #806 on: January 10, 2019, 06:43:42 PM »
Don't know if this has been mentioned yet, but "Have a good one."

Have a good what?????
I kind of like the ambiguity of that one. I always consider tone in deciding if the speaker is being friendly-ish or wants me to FOAD.


Another one is yes-ti-day instead of yes-ter-day. Ugh, just sounds gross.

I'm so glad I haven't heard that one!  What about pronouncing "mischievous" mis-CHEE-vee-us?  I feel like that's the most common pronunciation, although there is clearly no i or ee after the v. It's so common, I'm halfway used to it, but still notice (and judge!) when someone pronounces it that way.

OTOH, I'm no saint, as I don't pronounce Wednesday Wed-nes-day. Don't we all just basically say, "Wends-day" (or maybe "Wens-Day")? I just did a bit of googling and see articles about how the d became silent, but I don't think that really covers it, because most people also don't pronounce the e between the n and the s (like that would be "Wen-es-day"?).  It's a more significant departure from the spelling than just one silent letter.

Ooh, you totally got me on that one! I've been mis-reading it all my life. So how is it correctly pronounced? Nevermind, google is my friend. Mind blown.

As for the pronunciation of that day in the middle of the week, who cares? Once you've FIRE, all you need is "today", "tomorrow", and "yesterday".
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 01:09:50 AM by Dicey »

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #807 on: January 11, 2019, 07:11:50 AM »
I'm so glad I haven't heard that one!  What about pronouncing "mischievous" mis-CHEE-vee-us?  I feel like that's the most common pronunciation, although there is clearly no i or ee after the v. It's so common, I'm halfway used to it, but still notice (and judge!) when someone pronounces it that way.
As a kid, I always mispronounced mischievous the incorrect way.  As an adult, I say it correctly, but I still think the wrong way sounds better.  Perhaps it's because the wrong pronunciation rhymes with "devious," and those two words go so well with each other.

ketchup

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #808 on: January 11, 2019, 10:02:42 AM »
Don't know if this has been mentioned yet, but "Have a good one."

Have a good what?????
I kind of like the ambiguity of that one. I always consider tone in deciding if the speaker is being friendly-ish or wants me to FOAD.
I used it when I worked the Drive-thru of a Dairy Queen in high school.  I meant I could build the habit instead of always having to remember to say morning, day, or night (my schedule was not consistent).  Saying "Have a good night." to people at 10am by mistake got old really fast.

GuitarStv

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #809 on: January 11, 2019, 10:51:28 AM »

shelivesthedream

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #810 on: January 11, 2019, 12:17:36 PM »
I saw "warp and woof" in an actual printed book yesterday.

frugalnacho

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #811 on: January 11, 2019, 12:26:26 PM »
I have been reading various blogs that have pictures that can be enlarged.  When did "Click to biggify" replace "Click to enlarge"?  Biggify?  Really?

Hah. My husband is a software developer and started his career in the early 80s. He and his friends almost always say "embiggen."

I just ignore it. :D

Why? It's a perfectly cromulent word.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #812 on: January 11, 2019, 03:46:41 PM »
I saw "warp and woof" in an actual printed book yesterday.

"woof" is an equivalent to "weft", so warp and woof = warp and weft -> weaving

Was it a book on weaving?

shelivesthedream

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #813 on: January 12, 2019, 02:39:55 AM »
I saw "warp and woof" in an actual printed book yesterday.

"woof" is an equivalent to "weft", so warp and woof = warp and weft -> weaving

Was it a book on weaving?

No, it was being used metaphorically. Is woof seriously a legitimate alternative to weft? I have read several books in which actual weaving features and have never heard it. I assumed it was an eggcorn.

soccerluvof4

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #814 on: January 12, 2019, 04:04:36 AM »
Saying old aunt Ida "passed". I have a lot of family members that use this as a pleasant (?) way to say died. For some reason it just really annoys me. I work in cancer care and see lot of sick people who will die, and saying passed doesn't sugar coat it. They died!
They died and now they're dead. I especially hate it when they pronounce "passed" as "past", as in "Uncle George past last night. Ugh!

How would you pronounce "passed" such that it does not sound like "past"? I've never heard them pronounced differently.
Uh, one has a hard "t" sound at the end of it and one doesn't?

This one has me scratching my head, too. I hear/say "past" and "passed" the same way. Same as "last," only the sound of the first letter is different, of course. Dicey, I think you're from the US, right? So am I, and I'm trying to think of a time when I've heard these words pronounced the way you mentioned. Maybe it's a very specific region?
Yes, I am US based. Passed has two esssses and ends with a softer "d". Past has one ess and ends with a crisp "t", so it has a harder sound. Try saying "Pass the potatoes" vs. "Past the potatoes." Then say "At dinner, the potatoes were passed around the table." If you say "past around the table", then you know exactly what I'm talking about.

Another one is yes-ti-day instead of yes-ter-day. Ugh, just sounds gross.

I would love you hear you say the two words to see if I could tell a difference. My tongue is incapable of following an "s" with a soft "d". I think you'd be sorely disappointed by the way the word "passed" is pronounced by the entire population of the Southeastern U.S.

Same here. I say "passed" and "past" the same way, as I thought everyone did, and can't hear a difference in those examples. 

The OED gives the same exact pronunciation for both: /pæst/ (or /pɑːst/ for Brits).



I am with you on this one. !

RetiredAt63

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #815 on: January 12, 2019, 07:15:53 AM »
I saw "warp and woof" in an actual printed book yesterday.

"woof" is an equivalent to "weft", so warp and woof = warp and weft -> weaving

Was it a book on weaving?

No, it was being used metaphorically. Is woof seriously a legitimate alternative to weft? I have read several books in which actual weaving features and have never heard it. I assumed it was an eggcorn.

It is an old usage, but yes.  It probably dates back to when English spelling was wildly variable and so were accents.

Ah, Google gives us an answer
https://www.dailywritingtips.com/woof-or-weft/

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #816 on: January 13, 2019, 08:08:18 PM »
Quote from: RetiredAt63
It is an old usage, but yes.  It probably dates back to when English spelling was wildly variable and so were accents.
ah, so little has changed then... :)

LilyFleur

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #817 on: January 14, 2019, 01:04:42 AM »
Cali.
Just, no.
I live in an uber-cool California city, and no one I know (from age 13 to 80), says "Cali."

Freckles

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Re: Words/phrases I wish would go away
« Reply #818 on: January 14, 2019, 10:55:16 PM »
But LL Cool J is cool! I know, because it says so right in his name. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdizL4on-Rc