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Other => Off Topic => Topic started by: blackomen on December 27, 2018, 02:06:09 PM

Title: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: blackomen on December 27, 2018, 02:06:09 PM
Should I be worried?  My wife was freaking out at the time but quickly found out it's a common scam shortly after.

Several weeks ago, my wife received a call from someone who claims to be the police and they said they had definite proof that she's committed some serious fraud and she should be expected to go to jail for several years.  And they started probing some information.  My wife didn't give out any highly private personal information on the call but was disturbed at how much the callers knew, including every single one of our addresses from over the past 10 or so years which spanned multiple states and dozens of cities.  Although they failed to extract anything useful from us, I'm a little disturbed how much personal information they know of us.  Is it easy to get a person's address history through public records?

After they hung up, she called the same number back via caller id and got the police department, and the (real) police there said this is a common scam and she should ignore those lowlifes.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Lookilu on December 27, 2018, 02:21:06 PM
It isn't difficult to find a lot of personal information--including previous addresses and telephone numbers--online. Genealogy sites will often have a huge amount of information. I find it quite alarming. Check out FamilyTreeNow: https://www.familytreenow.com/ (https://www.familytreenow.com/)
They at least allow you to opt out. (Click on 'Contact Us' at the bottom of the home page to start the process.)
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Johnez on December 27, 2018, 02:30:49 PM
I imagine anyone performing a credit check would have this info at their fingers....
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: cchrissyy on December 27, 2018, 02:58:59 PM
I just typed my own phone number in google and the 1st page results include multiple home addresses fully printed out. so anybody who knows what phone number they just called could possibly have your address history and family member names on hand.  try that on yourself. the sites I saw are mylife.com beenverified.com  and similar
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: tralfamadorian on December 27, 2018, 03:01:26 PM
All that info would be available for free at fastpeoplesearch.com or similar.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Frankies Girl on December 27, 2018, 04:23:05 PM
Information is so easy to come by now. It's not private any more. Your name, previous addresses, employers, shoe size, name of your elementary school... easy as pie.


I'd be slightly concerned for about 5 minutes that I was being specifically targeted for someone to have taken the 15 minutes to google around and find all that info on myself but other than making sure to be aware of my surroundings going out and about, and not answering/continuing any calls that I don't recognize or initiate myself, I'd just chalk it up to scammers working new and exciting angles.

And spoofing numbers is really, laughably easy now. Caller ID is useless when it comes to scam calls. They can program it to say your mom, your best friend, hell even your own cell number if they wanted... it's too easy now to fake. NEVER call back any number on caller id because it might be a perfectly innocent person/business that the scammer faked, never assume the number showing is the actual caller's number, and just tell them you'll do your research and call them back (at a number you locate through actual looking up on your end, not any number they provide) if you think it might remotely be a legit caller.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: marty998 on December 27, 2018, 04:29:20 PM
The common scam here is that the tax office calls up saying you owe money and they are taking you to court. They usually get you to pay them in iTunes gift cards. Scary how many people fall for it.

And spoofing numbers is really, laughably easy now. Caller ID is useless when it comes to scam calls. They can program it to say your mom, your best friend, hell even your own cell number if they wanted... it's too easy now to fake. NEVER call back any number on caller id because it might be a perfectly innocent person/business that the scammer faked, never assume the number showing is the actual caller's number, and just tell them you'll do your research and call them back (at a number you locate through actual looking up on your end, not any number they provide) if you think it might remotely be a legit caller.

If Governments can pass laws requiring phone companies to hand over caller records to the spy agencies, then they should pass laws requiring telco companies to ban/block spoofing.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: DreamFIRE on December 27, 2018, 05:20:48 PM

It surprises me people still answer calls from unknown numbers (not in my phone contacts).  I never answer calls from numbers that aren't identified as someone I know, and that includes unknown local exchange prefix numbers (more local than an area code).  They are spoofed.

While it's possible that a scammer could spoof the number of someone that you know, I've never actually had that happen.  The scammers always call using unknown numbers, although many of them have the same exchange prefix.   And even if they did spoof the number of someone I know, I would instantly recognize it was not who they spoofed themselves to be, and would hang up.  That's yet to happen.  Rarely do these scammers leave voicemails for me, either.

You can setup your cell to only ring for contacts if you get too many annoying scammers.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: blackomen on December 27, 2018, 06:45:35 PM

It surprises me people still answer calls from unknown numbers (not in my phone contacts).  I never answer calls from numbers that aren't identified as someone I know, and that includes unknown local exchange prefix numbers (more local than an area code).  They are spoofed.

While it's possible that a scammer could spoof the number of someone that you know, I've never actually had that happen.  The scammers always call using unknown numbers, although many of them have the same exchange prefix.   And even if they did spoof the number of someone I know, I would instantly recognize it was not who they spoofed themselves to be, and would hang up.  That's yet to happen.  Rarely do these scammers leave voicemails for me, either.

You can setup your cell to only ring for contacts if you get too many annoying scammers.

Yeah, neither of us usually answer calls from unknown numbers but for some reason, that number had come up as something like the "Austin Police Department" and she thought it was something serious so it got answered.  We later learned that it was spoofed.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: gooki on December 28, 2018, 12:26:32 AM
Quote
If Governments can pass laws requiring phone companies to hand over caller records to the spy agencies, then they should pass laws requiring telco companies to ban/block spoofing.

Damn straight, enabling spoofing is moronic. Like who didnít think that would get abused?

I donít mind hiding ones number, but people should have the option to block all calls with private numbers.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Paul der Krake on December 28, 2018, 12:36:06 AM
Isn't the legitimate use case for spoofing to allow organizations to present one unified phone number, regardless of which associate calls you? That's actually quite consumer-friendly, in a way.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: katsiki on December 28, 2018, 08:22:06 AM
Isn't the legitimate use case for spoofing to allow organizations to present one unified phone number, regardless of which associate calls you? That's actually quite consumer-friendly, in a way.

I think so in part.  It is also a byproduct of VOIP design.  Like email, it can be abused due to its "openness".
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Loren Ver on December 30, 2018, 02:45:10 PM
My number got spoofed and called some kids cell phone hundreds of times.  The mom called me, really angry that I called her kid so many times and she didn't know me.  That was an awkward conversation, glad DH took it since I was driving :). 

Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Travis on December 30, 2018, 05:24:42 PM
Isn't the legitimate use case for spoofing to allow organizations to present one unified phone number, regardless of which associate calls you? That's actually quite consumer-friendly, in a way.

I think so in part.  It is also a byproduct of VOIP design.  Like email, it can be abused due to its "openness".

I got a call from a time share marketer from a spoofed local number who stated it's meant to make the recipient more comfortable.  He got caught because he said something that implied he wasn't calling from the same state as his phone number.  On the other hand, I also receive scam calls that are clearly from a call center in China, but the caller ID always says Denver.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Imma on December 31, 2018, 01:59:55 AM

It surprises me people still answer calls from unknown numbers (not in my phone contacts).  I never answer calls from numbers that aren't identified as someone I know, and that includes unknown local exchange prefix numbers (more local than an area code).  They are spoofed.



I wish I could choose not to pick up calls from unknown nummers, but there are many legitimate callers that use unknown numbers, like every single doctor I've ever had.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: driftwood on December 31, 2018, 07:57:00 AM
It's scary how many people are getting scammed.

Remember common sense... if the police are going after you to throw you in jail, they'll politely show up for a house call or get you on a traffic stop. No phone contact needed.

If the IRS is going after you for tax issues, they will start with mail and really the end result of breaking tax laws goes back to warrants and the police. So yet again, ignore the calls and let the nice policemen come over, give you some nice bracelets, and uber you to their hotel.

If these calls frustrate you, find a way to have fun with it. In this case it would've been funny to start pretending that you're telling your SO to pack your suitcases because you have to make a run from the law yet again. Then offer them bribes to leave you alone like a 2 for 1 chipotle coupon.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Fomerly known as something on January 02, 2019, 12:31:07 PM

It surprises me people still answer calls from unknown numbers (not in my phone contacts).  I never answer calls from numbers that aren't identified as someone I know, and that includes unknown local exchange prefix numbers (more local than an area code).  They are spoofed.



I wish I could choose not to pick up calls from unknown nummers, but there are many legitimate callers that use unknown numbers, like every single doctor I've ever had.

Yes but at least in the states, the doctor will leave a voicemail stating you should call back.  I have to call references for job applicants.  I am actually surprised when I don't have to leave a voicemail first and the reference answers the call.  (And this is when generally the reference is told by the applicant to expect a call from me.)
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Imma on January 05, 2019, 02:09:06 PM
My doctor is too busy to wait for my phone call. If I don't pick up when he calls I can make a new appointment in 6 weeks. Our tax authorities also work strictly on a 'don't call us, we call you'-basis. It's really annoying. I only pick up calls from blocked numbers when I expect a call like this.
Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: Paul der Krake on January 05, 2019, 02:28:05 PM
My doctor is too busy to wait for my phone call. If I don't pick up when he calls I can make a new appointment in 6 weeks. Our tax authorities also work strictly on a 'don't call us, we call you'-basis. It's really annoying. I only pick up calls from blocked numbers when I expect a call like this.
Ha! But you see, that would be way too simple. The way you interact with your doctor in America goes something like this.

Step 0: you obtain medical insurance based on a variety of factors that are too complicated to get into, but let's just say it requires mucho mucho comparison shopping
Step 1: you find the doctor you want to see. Because of consolidation, that doctor probably works at one of the larger groups in your city, which may have 2 or 3 of those
Step 2: you call said large group, to ensure they will take your insurance. If they don't, go back to step 1. If they do, they either are able to book you an appointment on the spot, or need to transfer you to the actual clinic where that doctor works.
Step 3: Arrive at clinic for appointment. Talk to receptionist who will make you fill some forms explaining your problems and some medical history. They will also check your insurance.
Step 4: a physician's assistant calls you in and does a bunch of largely useless vitals meant to catch really really sick patients who somehow stumbled into an appointment for something completely unrelated. You are asked whether you fell recently, and they'll take your blood pressure
Step 5: the doctor comes in, and asks you what's going on, more or less verifying the info you've been giving all the previous people you've talked to so far
Step 7: you go back to this clinic reception's to coordinate the doctor's orders. If drugs, there's a whole new flowchart for pharmacies. If you need additional tests, go back to step 2.

For every doctor, there are 3-5 people in support mode their lives on the phone tracking people down, all in the name of efficiency.

Title: Re: Wife received a scam call from someone who knew all of my old addresses
Post by: dang1 on January 05, 2019, 07:57:23 PM
for Kaiser Permanente HMO, great option of online communication though their website with the family doctor, and making appointments for medical care, that all happens in one building - routine exams, emergency rooms, surgeries, eye exams, lab tests, immunizations, etc. It's a big building, can get lost. lol

Actually communicated through Facebook Messenger with the California Highway Patrol in the Quincy office about conditions in some obscure road- prompt and informative. Did the same with Bank of America not too long ago-

I dont have a home landline, and do my calls mostly through Facebook Messenger. Norton Mobile blocks calls that are not in my contact list, and calls without No Caller ID.