Author Topic: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...  (Read 52093 times)

Travis

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #550 on: October 25, 2017, 08:20:08 PM »
"Tree fifty" ($3.50) and the human-sized dinosaur costume that seems to be everywhere.  They seem quite pervasive in pop culture.  What do these things mean?
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Free Spirit

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remizidae

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #552 on: October 25, 2017, 08:58:20 PM »
Quote
Active Wear

I think it's weird, and i get the comfort issue but to me it's still like "gross, did you shower before you came here after your workout?"


If it makes you feel better, just assume everyone you see is on their way to the gym, rather than coming from. Probably a 50% chance that's true.

remizidae

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #553 on: October 25, 2017, 08:59:23 PM »

I often wonder about that. For years, I found it very hard to get shorts that fell just above my knee when standing up. My pet theory is that shorts turned into baggy not-shorts because people in general have gotten fatter, and old-style shorts just expose more fat.

Meanwhile women's shorts are getting shorter and shorter. I can barely find running shorts that cover my ass.

Cromacster

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #554 on: October 26, 2017, 07:05:58 AM »
"Tree fifty" ($3.50) and the human-sized dinosaur costume that seems to be everywhere.  They seem quite pervasive in pop culture.  What do these things mean?

I aint giving you no tree fiddy you god damn lochness monster! bahaha

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Cromacster

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #555 on: October 26, 2017, 07:12:13 AM »
...just tossing this out there becuase it's getting confounded with sloppy use of acronyms/abbreviations; a large cruise ship can indeed burn between 100-250 tons of fuel per day while cruising (that's up to 80,000 US Gallons).  But that's not 20MPG/person; that is 20 gallons per person per day (big difference!) - assuming 4,000 passengers and assuming crew doesn't count because they're employees. Is that a lot?  Depends on your view; Two people driving an RV can easily burn 40 gallons of fuel per day.
On a per-mile-traveled basis it is quite a bit, as most daily legs are on the range of 50-150 nautical miles (so at the high end the ship is getting only 7.5 miles per person per gallon) - the primary reason its so low is because the weight of the passengers is negligible.  On a per-ton basis cruise ships are wildly efficient, but do we really *need* to move a water park, shopping mall and movie theatres across international borders? 

Also worth noting that ships burn considerably less when anchored or in port, so that per-person fuel consumption may be just 1-2 gallons on those days of your vacation. It's primarily a power generation station at that point, so pretty similar to what you might consume on land in a hotel room.

I was being very specific with my acronyms.  I looked up the mpg per person and thatís what I reported.  I donít consider total fuel burn per day to be a useful metric.  You can quibble about the exact number but the order of magnitude is right.

Surprised they donít have shore power in port.. Iím pretty sure the engines were off at least some of the time

I don't know much about the fuel efficiency of cruise ships, I just know you don't want to be anywhere near them when they leave a port and dump all of their shit in the ocean.
Mustachians are not the sort of people who sit around moaning about how the government is keeping them down.  Weíre the people who look at what we got, figure out what we donít like, and fix it.
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A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #556 on: October 26, 2017, 09:31:48 AM »
A general gripe-

SEAL worship.  Light infantry with a demonstrated capability to swim for a long time in cold water.  BFD sez I.

I'm with you, and would even expand that to include worship of the American military in general. Sure, some of them have made sacrifices to "serve" the country, and some have even paid the ultimate price with their lives. But let's not go overboard for f's sake. I mean, they're not ALL HEROES. People seem to forget that military people are, well, humans like the rest of us, which means a substantial number are decidedly not heroic. Among those "heroes" are thousands of murderers, rapists, thieves, treasonous spies, drug dealers, and a whole bunch of regular folks who were just looking to get a job where they could, or liked the benefits the military offered. Yet I guess I'm supposed to walk up to every one of them and say, "Thank you for your service." Yeah, I'll pass unless I know specifically what that person has done to deserve it, if anything.

Old message but I'm drawn to add: worship of Generals and Admirals. Were these guys really the big heros or was it the regular guy drawn into the way - perhaps against his will - and sent to fight and kill at the battlefront. Meanwhile the big wigs have all the comforts and advantages of living far from combat. Best food, best living quarters, best drink and a myriad of assistants to do their menial tasks.

Those generals and admirals really were big heroes. They have a vision and execution that other people cannot match. Whoever is in charge matters, which is why Ulysses S Grant was able to beat the Confederacy and George McClellan was not.

Poor execution and poor planning means all those drafted guys get killed. Good execution and good planning means the other side's drafted guys get killed.

There are a few guys that stand out, head and shoulders above their peers. Rommel, Zhukov, Napoleon, Horatio Nelson, the Duke of Wellington are all good examples. An ancient example would be Hannibal (though he was fighting an ultimately unwinnable war).

The basic idea behind a General or Admiral having a personal retinue is so that they can focus their time on making those big decisions.  If an General Officer with a field command is doing his job he's close enough to the front to know what's going on and can see for himself if he needs to, but not so close that he's easily killed.  An 18 year old rifleman or even a staff officer like me are much easier to replace than someone with a lifetime of experience who are responsible for the lives of tens or hundreds of thousands.  Do senior officers abuse their perks? Sometimes. It's bound to happen amongst any group of individuals. Unfortunately it's difficult to tell if that officer is going to be the WWI "chateau officer" of WWI myth and legend who commanded from another city or officers like Moore, Hackworth, Mattis, or Patton who endured some of their troops' hardships and were close enough to see the enemy themselves until they're placed in those situations.
I don't think you need to be on the front line of battle to be a heroic figure (though it certainly helps). Alan Turing should probably be remembered as a hero even though his only contribution was helping to break Enigma: no one else could have done it as efficiently.

Travis

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #557 on: October 26, 2017, 10:06:45 AM »
A general gripe-

SEAL worship.  Light infantry with a demonstrated capability to swim for a long time in cold water.  BFD sez I.

I'm with you, and would even expand that to include worship of the American military in general. Sure, some of them have made sacrifices to "serve" the country, and some have even paid the ultimate price with their lives. But let's not go overboard for f's sake. I mean, they're not ALL HEROES. People seem to forget that military people are, well, humans like the rest of us, which means a substantial number are decidedly not heroic. Among those "heroes" are thousands of murderers, rapists, thieves, treasonous spies, drug dealers, and a whole bunch of regular folks who were just looking to get a job where they could, or liked the benefits the military offered. Yet I guess I'm supposed to walk up to every one of them and say, "Thank you for your service." Yeah, I'll pass unless I know specifically what that person has done to deserve it, if anything.

Old message but I'm drawn to add: worship of Generals and Admirals. Were these guys really the big heros or was it the regular guy drawn into the way - perhaps against his will - and sent to fight and kill at the battlefront. Meanwhile the big wigs have all the comforts and advantages of living far from combat. Best food, best living quarters, best drink and a myriad of assistants to do their menial tasks.

Those generals and admirals really were big heroes. They have a vision and execution that other people cannot match. Whoever is in charge matters, which is why Ulysses S Grant was able to beat the Confederacy and George McClellan was not.

Poor execution and poor planning means all those drafted guys get killed. Good execution and good planning means the other side's drafted guys get killed.

There are a few guys that stand out, head and shoulders above their peers. Rommel, Zhukov, Napoleon, Horatio Nelson, the Duke of Wellington are all good examples. An ancient example would be Hannibal (though he was fighting an ultimately unwinnable war).

The basic idea behind a General or Admiral having a personal retinue is so that they can focus their time on making those big decisions.  If an General Officer with a field command is doing his job he's close enough to the front to know what's going on and can see for himself if he needs to, but not so close that he's easily killed.  An 18 year old rifleman or even a staff officer like me are much easier to replace than someone with a lifetime of experience who are responsible for the lives of tens or hundreds of thousands.  Do senior officers abuse their perks? Sometimes. It's bound to happen amongst any group of individuals. Unfortunately it's difficult to tell if that officer is going to be the WWI "chateau officer" of WWI myth and legend who commanded from another city or officers like Moore, Hackworth, Mattis, or Patton who endured some of their troops' hardships and were close enough to see the enemy themselves until they're placed in those situations.
I don't think you need to be on the front line of battle to be a heroic figure (though it certainly helps). Alan Turing should probably be remembered as a hero even though his only contribution was helping to break Enigma: no one else could have done it as efficiently.

It's unfortunate (but was necessary) the folks at Bletchley Park and other similar facilities didn't get their due recognition until after they died or were damn close because they saved the lives of millions.
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Just Joe

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #558 on: October 26, 2017, 10:09:31 AM »
The stories of the big brains figuring out cryptography or radar or jet engines have always fascinated me as an engineer.

GuitarStv

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #559 on: October 26, 2017, 11:35:50 AM »
A general gripe-

SEAL worship.  Light infantry with a demonstrated capability to swim for a long time in cold water.  BFD sez I.

I'm with you, and would even expand that to include worship of the American military in general. Sure, some of them have made sacrifices to "serve" the country, and some have even paid the ultimate price with their lives. But let's not go overboard for f's sake. I mean, they're not ALL HEROES. People seem to forget that military people are, well, humans like the rest of us, which means a substantial number are decidedly not heroic. Among those "heroes" are thousands of murderers, rapists, thieves, treasonous spies, drug dealers, and a whole bunch of regular folks who were just looking to get a job where they could, or liked the benefits the military offered. Yet I guess I'm supposed to walk up to every one of them and say, "Thank you for your service." Yeah, I'll pass unless I know specifically what that person has done to deserve it, if anything.

Old message but I'm drawn to add: worship of Generals and Admirals. Were these guys really the big heros or was it the regular guy drawn into the way - perhaps against his will - and sent to fight and kill at the battlefront. Meanwhile the big wigs have all the comforts and advantages of living far from combat. Best food, best living quarters, best drink and a myriad of assistants to do their menial tasks.

Those generals and admirals really were big heroes. They have a vision and execution that other people cannot match. Whoever is in charge matters, which is why Ulysses S Grant was able to beat the Confederacy and George McClellan was not.

Poor execution and poor planning means all those drafted guys get killed. Good execution and good planning means the other side's drafted guys get killed.

There are a few guys that stand out, head and shoulders above their peers. Rommel, Zhukov, Napoleon, Horatio Nelson, the Duke of Wellington are all good examples. An ancient example would be Hannibal (though he was fighting an ultimately unwinnable war).

The basic idea behind a General or Admiral having a personal retinue is so that they can focus their time on making those big decisions.  If an General Officer with a field command is doing his job he's close enough to the front to know what's going on and can see for himself if he needs to, but not so close that he's easily killed.  An 18 year old rifleman or even a staff officer like me are much easier to replace than someone with a lifetime of experience who are responsible for the lives of tens or hundreds of thousands.  Do senior officers abuse their perks? Sometimes. It's bound to happen amongst any group of individuals. Unfortunately it's difficult to tell if that officer is going to be the WWI "chateau officer" of WWI myth and legend who commanded from another city or officers like Moore, Hackworth, Mattis, or Patton who endured some of their troops' hardships and were close enough to see the enemy themselves until they're placed in those situations.
I don't think you need to be on the front line of battle to be a heroic figure (though it certainly helps). Alan Turing should probably be remembered as a hero even though his only contribution was helping to break Enigma: no one else could have done it as efficiently.

It's unfortunate (but was necessary) the folks at Bletchley Park and other similar facilities didn't get their due recognition until after they died or were damn close because they saved the lives of millions.

I think the necessity of that decision can be debated.  Particularly the silence from the government when he was arrested and driven to suicide for the crime of being gay.

Travis

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #560 on: October 26, 2017, 11:37:48 AM »
A general gripe-

SEAL worship.  Light infantry with a demonstrated capability to swim for a long time in cold water.  BFD sez I.

I'm with you, and would even expand that to include worship of the American military in general. Sure, some of them have made sacrifices to "serve" the country, and some have even paid the ultimate price with their lives. But let's not go overboard for f's sake. I mean, they're not ALL HEROES. People seem to forget that military people are, well, humans like the rest of us, which means a substantial number are decidedly not heroic. Among those "heroes" are thousands of murderers, rapists, thieves, treasonous spies, drug dealers, and a whole bunch of regular folks who were just looking to get a job where they could, or liked the benefits the military offered. Yet I guess I'm supposed to walk up to every one of them and say, "Thank you for your service." Yeah, I'll pass unless I know specifically what that person has done to deserve it, if anything.

Old message but I'm drawn to add: worship of Generals and Admirals. Were these guys really the big heros or was it the regular guy drawn into the way - perhaps against his will - and sent to fight and kill at the battlefront. Meanwhile the big wigs have all the comforts and advantages of living far from combat. Best food, best living quarters, best drink and a myriad of assistants to do their menial tasks.

Those generals and admirals really were big heroes. They have a vision and execution that other people cannot match. Whoever is in charge matters, which is why Ulysses S Grant was able to beat the Confederacy and George McClellan was not.

Poor execution and poor planning means all those drafted guys get killed. Good execution and good planning means the other side's drafted guys get killed.

There are a few guys that stand out, head and shoulders above their peers. Rommel, Zhukov, Napoleon, Horatio Nelson, the Duke of Wellington are all good examples. An ancient example would be Hannibal (though he was fighting an ultimately unwinnable war).

The basic idea behind a General or Admiral having a personal retinue is so that they can focus their time on making those big decisions.  If an General Officer with a field command is doing his job he's close enough to the front to know what's going on and can see for himself if he needs to, but not so close that he's easily killed.  An 18 year old rifleman or even a staff officer like me are much easier to replace than someone with a lifetime of experience who are responsible for the lives of tens or hundreds of thousands.  Do senior officers abuse their perks? Sometimes. It's bound to happen amongst any group of individuals. Unfortunately it's difficult to tell if that officer is going to be the WWI "chateau officer" of WWI myth and legend who commanded from another city or officers like Moore, Hackworth, Mattis, or Patton who endured some of their troops' hardships and were close enough to see the enemy themselves until they're placed in those situations.
I don't think you need to be on the front line of battle to be a heroic figure (though it certainly helps). Alan Turing should probably be remembered as a hero even though his only contribution was helping to break Enigma: no one else could have done it as efficiently.

It's unfortunate (but was necessary) the folks at Bletchley Park and other similar facilities didn't get their due recognition until after they died or were damn close because they saved the lives of millions.

I think the necessity of that decision can be debated.  Particularly the silence from the government when he was arrested and driven to suicide for the crime of being gay.

Well the necessity of not announcing that we broke German and Japanese codes since we still used the technology post-war.  Agree about the rest though.
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A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #561 on: October 26, 2017, 02:01:38 PM »
Probably was necessary, especially since we were telling everyone it couldn't be broken so we could read their mail. Plus, it's not until the 1970s that we have better cryptography anyways. The difference between the 1940s and 1980s cryptography (thanks to computers and some better theory), is larger than the difference between pig-latin and Enigma.

TheMCP

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Re: The MMM I Don't Get It thread...
« Reply #562 on: October 29, 2017, 03:19:06 PM »
Cruises... there seem to be a lot of threads on them.

I get that they are a relatively inexpensive way to travel / vacation... but a large cruise ship can burn 80,000 gallons of fuel in a single day, easily more than a lifetime of driving for a normal person. 

I'm not trying to change you mind, but consider that cruise ships get around 20 MPG per person.  It's not the most efficient means of transportation, but there's no way a single cruise is gonna use up my lifetime allotment of driving.  Just basic commonsense says that my $150/day cruise isn't going to consume a lifetimes worth of fuel.

If I bike to work and groceries, I can easily "bank" my carbon quota for air and cruise travel.  Again, that's worse than zero personals emissions, but offsetting emissions is still better than nothing.

Right, obviously there is more than one person on the boat... and again I don't fault anyone for going on them, I'm being honest and just making an observation.  If someone knows the deal and wants to sign up anyway, I don't begrudge them.  80,000 gallons is still 80,000 gallons though.  I'm not even some kind of environmental crusader... I own an F350 (it tows what will be my future home once my current house sells).  I just think it's interesting... that MPG figure isn't that far off my F350s fuel mileage when unloaded (It will get 17, anyway).  I can only imagine what it'd be like if someone started a thread that they were joining a convoy of 8000 or so F350s to drive around the country non stop for a week or two because it was a cheap good time.  Against the backdrop of everything else, it just seems weird to me.

Yeah but a city bus gets only 2.5MPG.  A 747 gets one mile per 5 gallons. You gotta look at fuel per person.

And itís not a daily driver, just a one-way trip.  Like if I rented an RV for a road trip, would you complain about fuel efficiency or cal it a mustahoan way to travel without renting hotel rooms?  I donít care if you include staff in the number or not, my basic point was only that the mpg per person is generally the order of a fuel inefficient car, which is not great, but not catastrophic for a single trip.

As I mentioned I own an RV, and not a small one, so I can answer your question from my own perspective.

My answer to the question is that I wouldn't complain about anything.  People should do what they want, as long as they are honest about the repercussions.  I get about 9mpg when towing.  I simply accept that as what it takes to travel (and eventually live) the way that I want to.  I completely understand that some people might see it as inefficient, environmentally unfriendly, etc.  I don't even disagree, I just accept responsibility for the choice I make when I tow it somewhere and try to do my best to minimize the impact by not being cavalier about it.  I understand the concerns, and I'm comfortable with my choices.

What I would not do is argue that it's actually 20mpg because my wife and dogs are with me in the truck.  That would strike me as rationalizing to make me feel better about something I knew really wasn't so great.

City buses take people places they need to go, like work or the store. MPG per passenger seems like a reasonable metric in that context.  If there is a better way to move people places that they need to go, that's an entirely different thread.  Cruises are a floating luxury party, and a big part of the reason they appear so cheap is because they circumvent environmental, labor, and tax regulations.  Those are facts that one can be ok with or not, but they're still facts.  How many mpg you get per passenger is really beside the point I was making.