Author Topic: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?  (Read 1852 times)

slackmax

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Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« on: September 12, 2018, 03:54:27 PM »
This has been bugging me for a long time. I'll try to keep it concise. Sort of a rant, and advice seeking, together.

I live in a townhome community. My immediate neighbor and I haven't spoken to each other for about 10 years, after she said she wanted to pave over her entire front yard. Our front yards are small, and a driveway takes up just over half of it.

I researched zoning ordinances and even spoke to the zoning officer about it, and found out she is not allowed to pave over her whole yard. Her yard is between her driveway and my driveway. I told her that, 10 years ago, and she was pretty mad about it, since many folks in other townhomes have indeed paved over their whole front yard, in spite of the zoning ordinances, so they don't have to mow it, and can park on it, but it stopped her from doing so, thank God.  It's just too much pavement, makes everything look so inner-city and commercial.  I guess some folks think it looks OK. Not me.

Fast forward 10 years to 2018.

She hasn't paved her driveway and it has deep ruts in it. (But it doesn't bother me) She recently had some work done to one side of her driveway and it is full of gravel. I'm guessing she is going to repave her driveway soon. I'm also guessing she will only be repaving the existing driveway, since she hasn't forgotten the zoning laws I told her about.

Sometimes I feel like going over and asking her what she plans to do with her driveway, like "you're just repaving the existing driveway, right?" as though there were another possibility, but then I think no, just leave it alone. She knows what she can and can't do, according to zoning rules. I did ring her bell twice one day when I knew she was home, and she didn't come to the door. Actually sort of a relief. 

A blue line showed up 3 weeks ago, going from the water access plate on my sidewalk, to the street, and there was another blue line on the neighbor's sidewalk too.   I wondered why my sidewalk needed a blue line if my property wasn't going to be involved. Shortly thereafter she had the work done on the side of her driveway, which involved some excavating. Nowhere near my property though, so why the blue line? 

I'm really curious to know what she's up to. And anxious about it too. And he thought of talking to her is very stressful. I get the feeling it would just make things worse, if anything. 

Maybe I'll be calling the cops, or the zoning officer on her, depending what she does.  That would be pretty awful.

By the way, it's not a question of having the nerve to talk to her. I've talked to her before about outdoor projects she had going on, and it turned out OK, but that was before we were no longer speaking.   

Advice?

Signed,

Wallowing in anxiety and not sure how to make the situation better.




 
« Last Edit: September 12, 2018, 04:01:41 PM by slackmax »

Kris

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2018, 04:24:39 PM »
Do you have anything resembling an HOA in your community? If so, I'd talk to the president about it and ask them to follow up. If not, can you talk to the zoning officer, or someone else "official" who can check on this?

It's worrisome that she's avoiding you. Makes me feel like she's planning an "it's better to ask for forgiveness than for permission" coup.

slackmax

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2018, 07:49:08 PM »
Kris,

Thanks for your reply.

No HOA.

Yes, she is avoiding me, but has been for years. And I've been avoiding her. 

I did talk to the zoning officer the last time my neighbor was talking about paving her front yard (8 years ago). They said it was not allowed, and since then have added an even more restrictive ordinance preventing it (can't have more than half a front yard used for parking.) Although I guess someone could pave the whole front yard and only use half of it for parking.

In any case, there is an ordinance stating that any driveway must leave at least  a 2.5 foot buffer of vegetation between itself and an abutting property line. 

I remember the zoning officer asked me if I got along with her and I said no. She then recommended I not say anything to the neighbor even if she did something not allowed, which I thought was strange.  I asked what I should do if I came home one day and they were paving over her front yard, and darn it, I can't remember what she said. Must have suggested I call zoning and have an officer come out to stop it and reverse it.

I hate all this drama.   Guess I have to go see the zoning officer again, and rehash everything. Ugh...     

If the neighbor approached me and asked nicely if she could to do x, y, or z maybe I would say OK, depending what it was, but that's just not going to happen, probably.

I don't like to tell people what they can do  with their own property, but some things are just too much, and you have to say something, IMO, to prevent it if you can.

 

Radagast

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2018, 08:00:28 PM »
A blue line showed up 3 weeks ago, going from the water access plate on my sidewalk, to the street, and there was another blue line on the neighbor's sidewalk too.   I wondered why my sidewalk needed a blue line if my property wasn't going to be involved. Shortly thereafter she had the work done on the side of her driveway, which involved some excavating. Nowhere near my property though, so why the blue line? 
No advice, but it is quite likely that whoever came to paint blue lines just painted everything in the area for liability reasons with no knowledge of what work would be done later. Better than if a guy with a backhoe destroyed your water service because it was in an unexpected spot and wasn't marked.

waltworks

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2018, 09:27:07 PM »
The yard is, like, tiny, right? Offer to mow it for her.

Otherwise, STFU. You live in an urban area, obviously. Go to the park if you want to play in the grass.

-W

GuitarStv

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2018, 07:18:40 AM »
I'd wait and see.  You already discussed it with her,so she knows where you stand on it.  If she starts to pave it over, call the city and they'll resolve the problem as per city ordinance.

matchewed

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2018, 07:24:26 AM »
For someone who hates all this drama you seem to be getting heavily involved in someone else's decision regarding their property.

I get that she may be violating some zoning restriction or ordinance or whatever. But don't anticipate it. If she is going to do it then you can contact the appropriate authority when she has done it.

Secret Stache

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2018, 07:57:34 AM »
Mind your business. Live happily ever after.

PDXTabs

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2018, 09:13:59 AM »
It's entirely appropriate to insist that the city enforce their zoning ordinances, just like any other law. But until your neighbor actually violates them, I would try to enjoy life and not worry about it.

sequoia

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2018, 10:28:57 AM »

Maybe I'll be calling the cops, or the zoning officer on her, depending what she does.  That would be pretty awful.


It's entirely appropriate to insist that the city enforce their zoning ordinances, just like any other law. But until your neighbor actually violates them, I would try to enjoy life and not worry about it.

+1. You can not do anything until she does something. If what she does violate the city zoning ordinance, then you can call the ordinance officer so they can enforce it. Nothing awful about reporting a violation.

She should know what she can/can not do within the ordinance. If she did not check before getting the work done, that is her fault and not your fault.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2018, 11:09:53 AM by sequoia »

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2018, 10:30:35 AM »
Put in a row of tall plants in pots on your edge of the property. Then you can't see whatever she chooses to do, and you still get some green.

JLee

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2018, 10:31:55 AM »
Blue lines are utility markings that get done so no workers break stuff.

You sound awfully stressed out about something that is 1) none of your business and 2) out of your control.  Live and let live...

craiglepaige

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2018, 05:44:24 PM »
So your neighbor wanted to do something to HER property and because you didn't like it, plus you found out it was against ordinance, although others have done it, you decided to become the townhouse sheriff?

Life's too short to be worried about a driveway.

As posted above, locate the property line and plant some tall bushes/brush to separate your lands. Stop worrying what the neighbors do in their property.

neophyte

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2018, 08:12:31 PM »
The yard is, like, tiny, right? Offer to mow it for her.

Otherwise, STFU. You live in an urban area, obviously. Go to the park if you want to play in the grass.

-W

This. I wish I had offered to do this for landlord of the house next door. Instead, he paved it before I got a chance. I bet he'd have been happy to have me take care of it instead though, and I'd have been happy for a few more square feet of garden space.

FallenTimber

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2018, 06:50:21 AM »
It sounds like you might be so wrapped up in your worries that youíve lost some perspective over the past 10 years. The amount of stress that this seems to have added to your life is certainly unhealthy, so my advice is meant to help you put this in the past, where it belongs.

First of all, forget about the driveway. Forget about the blue lines (standard protocol for a utility locate). You canít control everything that everyone else does. Youíll be miserable trying. This has already bothered you for 10 years. Donít let it bother you for another single day.

Instead, challenge yourself. Youíve let a driveway destroy a relationship with this neighbor that could have otherwise been a great relationship. Spend some time and effort rekindling the relationship. Drop off some flowers. Bake some fresh bread. Apologize for ever putting your nose in her business. Invite her over for dinner. Get to know her. Turn this sad situation into a great friendship. Not only will your stress levels drop, youíll have built a relationship that brings you joy every time you see her.

Thatís my advice. Be the bigger person and challenge yourself to grow. You might be surprised by the result.

slackmax

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2018, 07:24:58 AM »
It's entirely appropriate to insist that the city enforce their zoning ordinances, just like any other law. But until your neighbor actually violates them, I would try to enjoy life and not worry about it.

Thanks for the replies!

I'm getting way too frothed up over this front yard situation, as some have noted. I admit it. That's why I posted here, in an attempt to find some way to reduce my stress.

After reading these responses, I plan to say nothing to the neighbor at this point, wait to see what happens, and if she does something I don't like that also violates a zoning ordinance, then call zoning.

Less stressed already.


Bracken_Joy

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #16 on: September 14, 2018, 07:44:30 AM »
It's entirely appropriate to insist that the city enforce their zoning ordinances, just like any other law. But until your neighbor actually violates them, I would try to enjoy life and not worry about it.

Thanks for the replies!

I'm getting way too frothed up over this front yard situation, as some have noted. I admit it. That's why I posted here, in an attempt to find some way to reduce my stress.

After reading these responses, I plan to say nothing to the neighbor at this point, wait to see what happens, and if she does something I don't like that also violates a zoning ordinance, then call zoning.

Less stressed already.

Sometimes just making the choice can help =)

erutio

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2018, 08:07:15 AM »
Even if she were to pave her front yard, how does this materially or even immaterially affect you? 

It shouldn't.  If you don't like the look of it, look at your own front lawn.  You even said the ruts don't bother you, how does some more concrete bother you?  Even calling the zoning officer on her is a little out of bounds.

Please note, the above is not written to be argumentative, rather to promote thinking and maybe help you come to peace with this situation.

Another way to think about it is from her perspective.  Why do you think she wanted to pave her front yard?  Wanting to pave it certainly wasn't to spite you. Is she elderly? Does she live alone?  Is maintaining a lawn a hardship for her?  Is she worried about the environment? Does she not want to waste water? 
You have lived with 10 years of mental anguish over this, how do you think she feels?  Could she be feeling trapped and feeling oppressed from 10 years of someone hawking over her?  Could she be feeling frustrated with not being able to do what she wants with her own home?  Again, just things to think about.


GuitarStv

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #18 on: September 14, 2018, 08:30:00 AM »
Even if she were to pave her front yard, how does this materially or even immaterially affect you? 

This argument has been raised several times, and I kinda get it.  It's somebody else's property - why do you care.  The thing is, there are reasons why bylaws exist.  If it's like the one limiting the amount of a yard that can be paved that we have in Toronto, it's because our sewer and wastewater drainage system depends upon a certain percentage of the surface of the city being green grass and dirt . . . this absorbs rainwater and eases stresses on the sewers.  If enough people pave over their driveway, then the drainage system will not cope with heavy rains . . . meaning it starts to back up and dump waste water into people's basements.

So, reporting someone who paves over their entire front yard can help prevent tens of thousands of dollars of flood damage to you, or other people in your city.  That's a pretty big material impact, right?

JLee

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #19 on: September 14, 2018, 08:52:15 AM »
Even if she were to pave her front yard, how does this materially or even immaterially affect you? 

This argument has been raised several times, and I kinda get it.  It's somebody else's property - why do you care.  The thing is, there are reasons why bylaws exist.  If it's like the one limiting the amount of a yard that can be paved that we have in Toronto, it's because our sewer and wastewater drainage system depends upon a certain percentage of the surface of the city being green grass and dirt . . . this absorbs rainwater and eases stresses on the sewers.  If enough people pave over their driveway, then the drainage system will not cope with heavy rains . . . meaning it starts to back up and dump waste water into people's basements.

So, reporting someone who paves over their entire front yard can help prevent tens of thousands of dollars of flood damage to you, or other people in your city.  That's a pretty big material impact, right?

My guess is that one person paving over their front yard is not going to be the make or break to the entire neighborhood flooding due to lack of drainage. Stressing out over one house seems ridiculous.

thd7t

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2018, 09:00:30 AM »
Even if she were to pave her front yard, how does this materially or even immaterially affect you? 

This argument has been raised several times, and I kinda get it.  It's somebody else's property - why do you care.  The thing is, there are reasons why bylaws exist.  If it's like the one limiting the amount of a yard that can be paved that we have in Toronto, it's because our sewer and wastewater drainage system depends upon a certain percentage of the surface of the city being green grass and dirt . . . this absorbs rainwater and eases stresses on the sewers.  If enough people pave over their driveway, then the drainage system will not cope with heavy rains . . . meaning it starts to back up and dump waste water into people's basements.

So, reporting someone who paves over their entire front yard can help prevent tens of thousands of dollars of flood damage to you, or other people in your city.  That's a pretty big material impact, right?

My guess is that one person paving over their front yard is not going to be the make or break to the entire neighborhood flooding due to lack of drainage. Stressing out over one house seems ridiculous.
Well, I don't agree with interfering with someone else's property, but materially, paving the front yard could have a significant heat island effect and increase cooling costs for OP.  A small driveway on the southwest side of my house increases the heat on that side of the house substantially.  There really is a potential for material effect.  Regarding immaterial effect, OP was clear about how they "feel" about paved yards.

PDXTabs

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2018, 09:01:28 AM »
Besides being ugly and hampering drainage, pavement is also a big heat island. If you don't believe in zoning laws, go move next to a commercial chicken farm.

JLee

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2018, 09:17:34 AM »
Even if she were to pave her front yard, how does this materially or even immaterially affect you? 

This argument has been raised several times, and I kinda get it.  It's somebody else's property - why do you care.  The thing is, there are reasons why bylaws exist.  If it's like the one limiting the amount of a yard that can be paved that we have in Toronto, it's because our sewer and wastewater drainage system depends upon a certain percentage of the surface of the city being green grass and dirt . . . this absorbs rainwater and eases stresses on the sewers.  If enough people pave over their driveway, then the drainage system will not cope with heavy rains . . . meaning it starts to back up and dump waste water into people's basements.

So, reporting someone who paves over their entire front yard can help prevent tens of thousands of dollars of flood damage to you, or other people in your city.  That's a pretty big material impact, right?

My guess is that one person paving over their front yard is not going to be the make or break to the entire neighborhood flooding due to lack of drainage. Stressing out over one house seems ridiculous.
Well, I don't agree with interfering with someone else's property, but materially, paving the front yard could have a significant heat island effect and increase cooling costs for OP.  A small driveway on the southwest side of my house increases the heat on that side of the house substantially.  There really is a potential for material effect.  Regarding immaterial effect, OP was clear about how they "feel" about paved yards.

Does the driveway on the southwest side of your house increase the heat on your neighbor's house substantially?

I would be absolutely stunned if a neighbor paving their tiny front yard (remember this is smaller than the driveway that's already there) would have any noticeable effect on the OP's cooling costs.  You already have a whole street and sidewalk outside, not to mention your own driveway that's presumably adjacent to the house.

Besides being ugly and hampering drainage, pavement is also a big heat island. If you don't believe in zoning laws, go move next to a commercial chicken farm.

Are you going to collect all the logical fallacies, or stop at straw man?


Regardless, none of that is relevant anyway. You all are forgetting that NONE OF THIS HAS HAPPENED. The OP has been paranoid FOR A DECADE about something that HAS NOT HAPPENED.

Worry about it if it actually happens.  The yard gets paved?  Report it.  Otherwise, mind your own life.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 09:20:26 AM by JLee »

GuitarStv

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #23 on: September 14, 2018, 09:22:37 AM »
Even if she were to pave her front yard, how does this materially or even immaterially affect you? 

This argument has been raised several times, and I kinda get it.  It's somebody else's property - why do you care.  The thing is, there are reasons why bylaws exist.  If it's like the one limiting the amount of a yard that can be paved that we have in Toronto, it's because our sewer and wastewater drainage system depends upon a certain percentage of the surface of the city being green grass and dirt . . . this absorbs rainwater and eases stresses on the sewers.  If enough people pave over their driveway, then the drainage system will not cope with heavy rains . . . meaning it starts to back up and dump waste water into people's basements.

So, reporting someone who paves over their entire front yard can help prevent tens of thousands of dollars of flood damage to you, or other people in your city.  That's a pretty big material impact, right?

My guess is that one person paving over their front yard is not going to be the make or break to the entire neighborhood flooding due to lack of drainage. Stressing out over one house seems ridiculous.


My guess is that losing 100$ isn't going to make the slightest difference to your life . . . you're rich enough to consider early retirement.  If you lost a hundred dollar bill, would you search the house for it or just write it off as unimportant?

PDXTabs

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #24 on: September 14, 2018, 09:22:56 AM »
[
Besides being ugly and hampering drainage, pavement is also a big heat island. If you don't believe in zoning laws, go move next to a commercial chicken farm.

Are you going to collect all the logical fallacies, or stop at straw man?

Regardless, none of that is relevant anyway. You all are forgetting that NONE OF THIS HAS HAPPENED. The OP has been paranoid FOR A DECADE about something that HAS NOT HAPPENED.

Worry about it if it actually happens.  The yard gets paved?  Report it.  Otherwise, mind your own life.

Isn't that what I just said?

It's entirely appropriate to insist that the city enforce their zoning ordinances, just like any other law. But until your neighbor actually violates them, I would try to enjoy life and not worry about it.

JLee

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #25 on: September 14, 2018, 09:35:07 AM »
[
Besides being ugly and hampering drainage, pavement is also a big heat island. If you don't believe in zoning laws, go move next to a commercial chicken farm.

Are you going to collect all the logical fallacies, or stop at straw man?

Regardless, none of that is relevant anyway. You all are forgetting that NONE OF THIS HAS HAPPENED. The OP has been paranoid FOR A DECADE about something that HAS NOT HAPPENED.

Worry about it if it actually happens.  The yard gets paved?  Report it.  Otherwise, mind your own life.

Isn't that what I just said?

It's entirely appropriate to insist that the city enforce their zoning ordinances, just like any other law. But until your neighbor actually violates them, I would try to enjoy life and not worry about it.

Yeah, and then you went on to build your straw man about how I "don't believe in zoning laws."

JLee

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #26 on: September 14, 2018, 09:36:29 AM »
Even if she were to pave her front yard, how does this materially or even immaterially affect you? 

This argument has been raised several times, and I kinda get it.  It's somebody else's property - why do you care.  The thing is, there are reasons why bylaws exist.  If it's like the one limiting the amount of a yard that can be paved that we have in Toronto, it's because our sewer and wastewater drainage system depends upon a certain percentage of the surface of the city being green grass and dirt . . . this absorbs rainwater and eases stresses on the sewers.  If enough people pave over their driveway, then the drainage system will not cope with heavy rains . . . meaning it starts to back up and dump waste water into people's basements.

So, reporting someone who paves over their entire front yard can help prevent tens of thousands of dollars of flood damage to you, or other people in your city.  That's a pretty big material impact, right?

My guess is that one person paving over their front yard is not going to be the make or break to the entire neighborhood flooding due to lack of drainage. Stressing out over one house seems ridiculous.
My guess is that losing 100$ isn't going to make the slightest difference to your life . . . you're rich enough to consider early retirement.  If you lost a hundred dollar bill, would you search the house for it or just write it off as unimportant?
I certainly wouldn't spend ten years worrying about what would happen if I did lose it, that's for sure.

PDXTabs

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #27 on: September 14, 2018, 09:39:34 AM »
Yeah, and then you went on to build your straw man about how I "don't believe in zoning laws."

If you think that pointing out that zoning law exist for a reason is an intentionally misrepresented proposition that is set up because it is easier to defeat than an opponent's real argument then we aren't going to get along.

JLee

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #28 on: September 14, 2018, 09:45:07 AM »
Yeah, and then you went on to build your straw man about how I "don't believe in zoning laws."

If you think that pointing out that zoning law exist for a reason is an intentionally misrepresented proposition that is set up because it is easier to defeat than an opponent's real argument then we aren't going to get along.

If you mean "zoning laws exist for a reason," perhaps say "zoning laws exist for a reason."  By saying "if you don't believe in zoning laws," it infers that someone does not believe in zoning laws.

If you don't see the difference, then yes -- we are not going to get along.

Cookie78

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #29 on: September 14, 2018, 09:58:52 AM »
Even if she were to pave her front yard, how does this materially or even immaterially affect you? 

This argument has been raised several times, and I kinda get it.  It's somebody else's property - why do you care.  The thing is, there are reasons why bylaws exist.  If it's like the one limiting the amount of a yard that can be paved that we have in Toronto, it's because our sewer and wastewater drainage system depends upon a certain percentage of the surface of the city being green grass and dirt . . . this absorbs rainwater and eases stresses on the sewers.  If enough people pave over their driveway, then the drainage system will not cope with heavy rains . . . meaning it starts to back up and dump waste water into people's basements.

So, reporting someone who paves over their entire front yard can help prevent tens of thousands of dollars of flood damage to you, or other people in your city.  That's a pretty big material impact, right?

This is actually a big enough problem in some communities in Calgary to have gotten as far as my department to map and monitor the problem. Weíve been asked to use aerial photography to detect problem locations and measure the extent of the problem in some communities. Itís a HUGE impact on drainage infrastructure.

Apparently (in Calgary) all it takes is one person to pave over their tiny yard, and suddenly everyone else wants to do it too.

BTDretire

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #30 on: September 14, 2018, 10:02:24 AM »
 Many years ago, in a residential neighborhood with each home having about 60ft of frontage,
I had a neighbor that put in a new driveway.
 The old concrete was busted up into fairly large pieces, 2ft to 4ft across,
and piled up in the front yard. Then he had a big hole dug, maybe 15ft by 20ft
across and 8ft deep. And that's where it stopped. It was like that for a few years.
The plan was to build some decorative concrete tiered structure in the hole.
 At some point I decided to move (unrelated) every prospective buyer wanted to know
about the pile of concrete and the hole in the neighbors front yard. It cost me money
on the sale of my home to have that eyesore next door.
  Fast forward 27 years, I make a trip back home (1000 miles) and go look at all the places
I used to live. No! it is not still there, but I stopped to see if it was the same neighbor, the guy
was out in his nicely landscaped yard. It was not the same owner and I told him I used to lived next door,
and, when I left there was a big hole and concrete piled in his yard. He said, ya, I have had several of the long
time neighbors tell me about that.
 If I had it to do over, I would have complained to the city. The neighbor already knew I wanted it fixed, I even offered to help him.
 btw, this is the same neighbor that knew we were savers and once told me it was his duty to spend to keep the economy in good shape. Ya, right!
 

AccidentalMiser

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #31 on: September 14, 2018, 10:24:53 AM »
Blue lines are utility markings that get done so no workers break stuff.

You sound awfully stressed out about something that is 1) none of your business and 2) out of your control.  Live and let live...

Amen.  You havenít talked to her for 10 years because she said she was going to pave over her yard?  Really?

Damn, Iím thankful youíre not my neighbor.  Maybe if you had made different choices over the past decade, youíd know what your friend next door was planning.  Since you have a Cold War going on, youíll just get to live with the consequences.

Is there more to the Cold War story?  I donít know you and I donít want to judge you unfairly.

Prairie Stash

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #32 on: September 14, 2018, 12:18:20 PM »
Even if she were to pave her front yard, how does this materially or even immaterially affect you? 

This argument has been raised several times, and I kinda get it.  It's somebody else's property - why do you care.  The thing is, there are reasons why bylaws exist.  If it's like the one limiting the amount of a yard that can be paved that we have in Toronto, it's because our sewer and wastewater drainage system depends upon a certain percentage of the surface of the city being green grass and dirt . . . this absorbs rainwater and eases stresses on the sewers.  If enough people pave over their driveway, then the drainage system will not cope with heavy rains . . . meaning it starts to back up and dump waste water into people's basements.

So, reporting someone who paves over their entire front yard can help prevent tens of thousands of dollars of flood damage to you, or other people in your city.  That's a pretty big material impact, right?

This is actually a big enough problem in some communities in Calgary to have gotten as far as my department to map and monitor the problem. Weíve been asked to use aerial photography to detect problem locations and measure the extent of the problem in some communities. Itís a HUGE impact on drainage infrastructure.

Apparently (in Calgary) all it takes is one person to pave over their tiny yard, and suddenly everyone else wants to do it too.
In Winnipeg (population 700,000) they are redoing back alleys to slow down drainage. Paving the front while the city repaves the alley would be counter productive.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/canoe-sewage-winnipeg-1.4816381
"We're hoping to do some work with what they call green infrastructure ó you know, you repave a back alley in a certain way so that it slows the drainage of (storm) water into the system," said Brian Mayes, a city councillor who chairs the city's water and waste committee.

But yeah, its easier to say it doesn't matter then try to understand why a city would have a bylaw. People would rather complain out of ignorance and rip on things they don't undertand.

craiglepaige

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #33 on: September 14, 2018, 12:34:42 PM »
Blue lines are utility markings that get done so no workers break stuff.

You sound awfully stressed out about something that is 1) none of your business and 2) out of your control.  Live and let live...

Amen.  You havenít talked to her for 10 years because she said she was going to pave over her yard?  Really?

Damn, Iím thankful youíre not my neighbor.  Maybe if you had made different choices over the past decade, youíd know what your friend next door was planning.  Since you have a Cold War going on, youíll just get to live with the consequences.

Is there more to the Cold War story? I donít know you and I donít want to judge you unfairly.


That's a funny line. 
I'm going to judge you, I just want to do it fairly ;)

Johnez

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2018, 01:24:36 PM »
It's entirely appropriate to insist that the city enforce their zoning ordinances, just like any other law. But until your neighbor actually violates them, I would try to enjoy life and not worry about it.

Thanks for the replies!

I'm getting way too frothed up over this front yard situation, as some have noted. I admit it. That's why I posted here, in an attempt to find some way to reduce my stress.

After reading these responses, I plan to say nothing to the neighbor at this point, wait to see what happens, and if she does something I don't like that also violates a zoning ordinance, then call zoning.

Less stressed already.

Sometimes just making the choice can help =)

Can the thread just stop here. All the useful replies ended after this post....

Silverado

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #35 on: September 14, 2018, 04:39:32 PM »
It's entirely appropriate to insist that the city enforce their zoning ordinances, just like any other law. But until your neighbor actually violates them, I would try to enjoy life and not worry about it.

Thanks for the replies!

I'm getting way too frothed up over this front yard situation, as some have noted. I admit it. That's why I posted here, in an attempt to find some way to reduce my stress.

After reading these responses, I plan to say nothing to the neighbor at this point, wait to see what happens, and if she does something I don't like that also violates a zoning ordinance, then call zoning.

Less stressed already.

Sometimes just making the choice can help =)

Can the thread just stop here. All the useful replies ended after this post....

Uh, good idea, but no.

I doubt most people ever consider the drainage impacts of this type of thing. I have read about it before and still did not think of that angle until one of you brought it up.

OP, relax, but make the call as soon as it goes in the full pave direction, when there may be a chance to halt it.

electriceagle

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #36 on: September 15, 2018, 06:38:54 AM »
Maybe I'll be calling the cops, or the zoning officer on her, depending what she does.  That would be pretty awful.

That would be pretty awful. The best action to take in this situation is probably to go for a walk in the park and forget about it.

accolay

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #37 on: September 15, 2018, 12:54:32 PM »
Yeah, I agree with others. Call about the ordinance if it's paved over, but not until then. Focus your energies on your own yard and make it the best in the neighborhood as an example of what a yard could look like instead of concrete. Circle of influence and all...

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Talk to Neighbor, or not, about her plans for her front yard?
« Reply #38 on: September 16, 2018, 07:48:52 AM »
Yeah, I agree with others. Call about the ordinance if it's paved over, but not until then. Focus your energies on your own yard and make it the best in the neighborhood as an example of what a yard could look like instead of concrete. Circle of influence and all...

I like this idea =) And offer plant cuttings to anyone who wants them! It's amazing the small but cool influence I've had just offering hydrangea cuttings to neighbors when we're talking. The north facing sides of houses here often get soggy (PNW), and it's nice seeing hydrangeas instead of just moss on several houses now!