Author Topic: Suburban Noise Pollution  (Read 3525 times)

effigy98

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #50 on: May 24, 2018, 05:37:25 PM »
HAHA, I have the same exact problem with my neighborhood. I hate it. I also hate the 100 cars that drive thru on the way home, to work, or just lost. I plan on moving once I hit my number and never again have to deal with constant engine noise everyday.

I use electric everything which is quiet, but almost every person in the neighborhood hires people to do their lawns.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2018, 05:39:10 PM by effigy98 »

Primm

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #51 on: May 31, 2018, 05:45:42 PM »
I suspect that a large part of the problem just comes down to people not sleeping at the same times.

I usually have to get up at 6 am . . . which means that I'm in bed by 10 most nights.  Many people don't get up until 9 or 10, which means that they're up until midnight or 1.  I don't like it when they're making loud noise after I've gone to bed, and they don't like it when I'm making loud noise first thing in the morning.

It all works out when everyone remembers that other people have different sleeping schedules and acts accordingly.

Except for those of us who work night shifts.

I never find myself very compassionate about people who complain about noise during the day, when they're awake. I'd love it to be quiet enough for me to sleep too, but ain't gonna happen.

It's worse when it's deliberate though, like the delivery guy who banged on my house, right beside the "night duty nurse sleeping, please do not disturb" sign. On my bedroom window. Yelling "I know you're there, I can hear the air conditioner running!".

Seriously? I'd be calling the company and complaining about that behavior. For that matter, if its hot enough for me to turn on the a/c, I'm leaving it on. Idiot.

Seriously. And yes, I did. The a/c is on during the day when I'm sleeping regardless of the temperature (does help that I live in a subtropical area where the daytime temp rarely drops below 20C), purely for the white noise.

GuitarStv

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #52 on: May 31, 2018, 05:50:48 PM »
There are far less energy intensive ways to generate white noise than running an air conditioner all the time.

Primm

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #53 on: May 31, 2018, 07:20:20 PM »
There are. And I've probably tried most of them in my 30 year career.

But I've worked out what works for me. Sleeping during the day isn't easy, and if I have to burn a bit more coal in order for me to be human overnight at work and actually save lives (including not actively killing my co-workers), then that's what I'm going to do.

Johnez

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #54 on: June 01, 2018, 11:46:23 AM »
You'll get used to the noise. It seems everywhere I move has some sort of unique annoying noise (traffic, children, birds, dogs) and the longer you live there the more you'll be able to tune out the noise as background noise. The hardest for me was birds actually, ha. Pidgeons used to get into the crevices of our building and just go to town flapping and doing their thing every morning.

DreamFIRE

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #55 on: June 01, 2018, 06:06:28 PM »
16 years in the same house, and my feelings haven't changed about the noises.  The best way to deal with it is to just mask them out with my own internal more pleasing sounds like music, TV, fan, filter, etc.  It's quiet in my house right now except for the central air, and I can hear birds chirping through the closed window, but that doesn't bother me.

BudgetSlasher

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #56 on: June 02, 2018, 07:16:19 PM »
You'll get used to the noise. It seems everywhere I move has some sort of unique annoying noise (traffic, children, birds, dogs) and the longer you live there the more you'll be able to tune out the noise as background noise. The hardest for me was birds actually, ha. Pidgeons used to get into the crevices of our building and just go to town flapping and doing their thing every morning.

I completely agree.

I actually adjust multiple time a year:

First, this time of year it is the birds; apparently I managed to sleep through a very frustrated tom-turkey yesterday so I think I have adapted.

Next, at the end of the summer and into fall when the leaf start to turn (before you can see it) and after they have fallen, I have to adjust to the perceived road noise (a short stretch of 45 MPH between two 55 MPH zones ~400 feet away).

Finally over winter I adjust to the cycling of the forced hot air system while sleeping.

I'm the kind of person that can be woken by a faucet on another floor dripping or the water softener recharging.

Anything out of the usual, like the neighbor's buddy with a 1970s Camero with straight-pipes starting at 12:30 AM, will jolt me.

smoghat

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #57 on: June 07, 2018, 06:35:44 AM »
You'll get used to the noise. It seems everywhere I move has some sort of unique annoying noise (traffic, children, birds, dogs) and the longer you live there the more you'll be able to tune out the noise as background noise. The hardest for me was birds actually, ha. Pidgeons used to get into the crevices of our building and just go to town flapping and doing their thing every morning.

Nope. Meanwhile I used to live in LA on Wiltshire Boulevard, the traffic never bothered me. Some noises are much more grating than others, particularly leaf blowers. Pidgins could be hell though.

I wonder if some of it isnít Moustachian. Here I am, doing my own yard work with a manual, push reel mower, raking my leaves and I have to hear some neighbors landscapers three gas powered leaf blower going off. Neighbor is off to work at some godforsaken job in finance. Probably thinks heís got it made.

Iím 50, enjoying my garden and making art, and sitting on over $6 million if you count the House.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #58 on: June 07, 2018, 03:30:35 PM »
it's noisy in the real country (i.e. agricultural areas).  There are the trucks, and the big trucks, and the tractors, and the combines, and the neighbour's cattle, and the coyotes at night, and the birds early in the morning, and the snow plow in winter, and . . . . . . . .
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DreamFIRE

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #59 on: June 07, 2018, 05:19:15 PM »
it's noisy in the real country (i.e. agricultural areas).  There are the trucks, and the big trucks, and the tractors, and the combines, and the neighbour's cattle, and the coyotes at night, and the birds early in the morning, and the snow plow in winter, and . . . . . . . .

Hmmm, that doesn't match my real experience.  I lived in the real country surrounded by fields for quite a few years, and I still have close relatives living in such areas, and I continue to bike through those areas to escape dangerous city traffic.  I rarely heard/hear the cattle and other livestock that were around, never heard the coyotes, the birds chirping didn't bother me (still have in the city), snow plows were only after the occasional snowfall (still have in the city) and a complete non-issue.   The vast majority of the time, the only sound coming from those fields is the wind rustling through the crops, and the traffic was much lower than in the city.   I would sure prefer that quietness over my semi-quiet suburbian life, which is still better than many city areas.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #60 on: June 07, 2018, 05:51:00 PM »
it's noisy in the real country (i.e. agricultural areas).  There are the trucks, and the big trucks, and the tractors, and the combines, and the neighbour's cattle, and the coyotes at night, and the birds early in the morning, and the snow plow in winter, and . . . . . . . .

Hmmm, that doesn't match my real experience.  I lived in the real country surrounded by fields for quite a few years, and I still have close relatives living in such areas, and I continue to bike through those areas to escape dangerous city traffic.  I rarely heard/hear the cattle and other livestock that were around, never heard the coyotes, the birds chirping didn't bother me (still have in the city), snow plows were only after the occasional snowfall (still have in the city) and a complete non-issue.   The vast majority of the time, the only sound coming from those fields is the wind rustling through the crops, and the traffic was much lower than in the city.   I would sure prefer that quietness over my semi-quiet suburbian life, which is still better than many city areas.

Well, I find the birds and such not a noise issue but some do.   No-one bikes here, cars on 60 k/h roads do 80 or 90 and there are no paved shoulders.  And in the Great White North, one snowfall can mean multiple passes by municipal snow plows.  Of course that is a Good sound, since it means the roads will be clear.  But it is still a noise.
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GuitarStv

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Re: Suburban Noise Pollution
« Reply #61 on: June 08, 2018, 07:38:38 AM »
it's noisy in the real country (i.e. agricultural areas).  There are the trucks, and the big trucks, and the tractors, and the combines, and the neighbour's cattle, and the coyotes at night, and the birds early in the morning, and the snow plow in winter, and . . . . . . . .

Hmmm, that doesn't match my real experience.  I lived in the real country surrounded by fields for quite a few years, and I still have close relatives living in such areas, and I continue to bike through those areas to escape dangerous city traffic.  I rarely heard/hear the cattle and other livestock that were around, never heard the coyotes, the birds chirping didn't bother me (still have in the city), snow plows were only after the occasional snowfall (still have in the city) and a complete non-issue.   The vast majority of the time, the only sound coming from those fields is the wind rustling through the crops, and the traffic was much lower than in the city.   I would sure prefer that quietness over my semi-quiet suburbian life, which is still better than many city areas.

Well, I find the birds and such not a noise issue but some do.   No-one bikes here, cars on 60 k/h roads do 80 or 90 and there are no paved shoulders.  And in the Great White North, one snowfall can mean multiple passes by municipal snow plows.  Of course that is a Good sound, since it means the roads will be clear.  But it is still a noise.

My dad is a farmer near Perth, Ontario.  There are plenty of 60 kph roads with no shoulders where cars do 80 or 90, but I actually find cycling in the area much more peaceful and relaxing than around here in Toronto simply because the traffic volume is so much less.  I bring my bike every time we visit.

(Actually, speaking of no shoulders and higher speeds - highway 511 between Perth and Calabogie is one of the nicest bike rides I've ever done.  It's a truly gorgeous stretch of undulating hills, rocks, forested area, and streams and lakes, and I try to ride it whenever the opportunity arises.)