Author Topic: Retirement activities  (Read 1487 times)

Roadrunner53

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1293
Retirement activities
« on: July 15, 2018, 09:01:08 AM »
What kind of activities do some of you plan to do when retired and are in an income range of $60,000 to $70,000? Not rich enough to travel the world but are at a decent comfort level.

Do some of you have a bucket list and work off it like each year travel to a new destination or learn a new hobby? Join clubs?

I never had time for extra curricular activities during my working years and have no kids to interact with. Just wondering what retirement things people are planning with smaller budgets.

APowers

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 781
  • Location: Colorado
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2018, 09:17:52 AM »
Imo, $60-70k/yr is more than enough to travel the world, or at least take _long_ overseas vacations. No, it's not enough to lord it up like travelling royalty, but renting an airbnb for a month in *random world country* should be completely within bounds.

Roadrunner53

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1293
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2018, 09:31:18 AM »
$60-$70,000 is not a lot of money depending on what part of the country you live in. I happen to live in CT, one of the most expensive states in the union. Have considered moving but no idea where to move.

spartana

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 187
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2018, 10:16:01 AM »
$60-$70,000 is not a lot of money depending on what part of the country you live in. I happen to live in CT, one of the most expensive states in the union. Have considered moving but no idea where to move.
Rent your house out and travel the world. You may actually earn more than enough to cover both your home base housing expenses and all your travel expenses. As mentioned above travel - especially longer term "slow travel" where you can rent an apt in one area for a month or 2 - can be pretty inexpensive. I've been retired a long time and live under $20K/year with a paid off house in a HCOL area and free medical and have plenty left over for travel each year. Some of it has been very low budget (a month camping in the Sierras) some of it is more expensive (a month vacation house rental in a nice ski resort town). However if you prefer a more tradition vacation of nice hotels, cruises, tours, and multiple flights a year it could become very expensive.

Otherwise the things I do in retirement are generally free or very low cost and involve active outdoorsy stuff.

Roadrunner53

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1293
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2018, 10:28:44 AM »
$60-$70,000 is not a lot of money depending on what part of the country you live in. I happen to live in CT, one of the most expensive states in the union. Have considered moving but no idea where to move.
Rent your house out and travel the world. You may actually earn more than enough to cover both your home base housing expenses and all your travel expenses. As mentioned above travel - especially longer term "slow travel" where you can rent an apt in one area for a month or 2 - can be pretty inexpensive. I've been retired a long time and live under $20K/year with a paid off house in a HCOL area and free medical and have plenty left over for travel each year. Some of it has been very low budget (a month camping in the Sierras) some of it is more expensive (a month vacation house rental in a nice ski resort town). However if you prefer a more tradition vacation of nice hotels, cruises, tours, and multiple flights a year it could become very expensive.

Otherwise the things I do in retirement are generally free or very low cost and involve active outdoorsy stuff.

How do you get free medical? Medicare costs for two of us are over $10,000 a year. Part B, Plan F, Plan D. No idea how you can live on $20K a year. My RE and car tax are around $6,000 a year total. We have a 2006 car and a 2009 car and a house that is 43 years old. Just those two expenses are $16K a year. Not too keen on renting out my house but is a good idea for those who want to try it.

spartana

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 187
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2018, 10:49:21 AM »
Military Vet with a service-connected disability who can use the VA for free. I live on $1500/month as a single debt free no kids woman. About half or less goes to cover basic expenses and the other half for fun stuff. My situation is unique to this forum probably due to having free medical and low expenses, including housing expenses in coastal SoCal,  when I FIREd (at 42). Plus most of my activities and hobbies are free or very low cost which helps a lot keeping spending low.

lhamo

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7625
  • Location: Seattle
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2018, 11:21:23 AM »
Our current hobbies/activities (I am turning 50 this year, DH is 60):

Gym (monthly membership about $30 each -- I could drop this to $10/month by changing gyms, but am splurging to go to the one DH likes (better weights))

Walking (we bought a house in an area that is good for walking)

Biking.  We live 1/2 a block from the area's major bike trail, that connects us to a huge network of other trails/bike routes -- this was also a deliberate part of our housing choice.  We just splurged on two new touring bikes from REI to take full advantage of this resource.

Gardening.  Keep costs down by using mostly native plants, getting starters and gardening supplies (bricks and paving stones for building terraces, etc) from neighbors for free, planting new things mostly from seed rather than paying more for seedlings and starter plants)

Reading.  Visit the library about once a week. 

Music.  Spotify family subscription keeps us all happy, listening jointly and individually.

Podcasts.  I listen to a lot while working in the garden, cleaning house, and walking.

Cooking.  DH and I both enjoy cooking and trying new recipes.

I was volunteering at the food bank for awhile, but stopped when I messed up my shoulder lifting heavy boxes.  Will probably go back to that eventually.

When the weather is crappy DH and I like to visit different coffee shops around town as a way of getting out of the house/avoiding cabin fever.  I buy an annual local discount coupon book that offers tons of 2 for 1 coffee coupons for this purpose -- more than pays for itself (also includes lots of other restaurant, grocery, and service coupons).

DreamFIRE

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1108
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2018, 12:13:55 PM »
$60-$70,000 is not a lot of money depending on what part of the country you live in. I happen to live in CT, one of the most expensive states in the union. Have considered moving but no idea where to move.

Also, while I was aware from your previous Medicare expense discussions, you didn't mention that there were two of you in the OP.  That makes a difference.  I'm single, so $60K to $70K would be more than enough to do some traveling.  I'm actually planning for $50K/yr spending.

A relevant thread:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/what-do-you-plan-to-do-in-fire/
« Last Edit: July 15, 2018, 12:17:44 PM by DreamFIRE »

Saving in Austin

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 96

JoJo

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1118
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2018, 10:06:28 AM »
$60,000 for two is still possible for long traveling, but you have to pick the right places.  Western Europe is out but eastern is in.  Most of Latin America and Southeast Asia is do-able on that budget.  Also parts of Africa if you don't splash out on expensive tours & accom.  The key for me is mixing expensive days with cheaper days... if I really want to do a tour that costs $500 for 3 days I do it, but then I try to keep it under $50 for some days so it averages out. 

I'm single and try to shoot for $100 per day.  Preferably this includes flights, but sometimes it's hard to stick to that.  I lived it up in Bali for $50 a day - private accom with a pool, nice garden, and breakfast.  Always something nice for dinner.  By the sea, I paid $3.75 for dinner - a grilled fish (that I picked), rice, salad and fruit for desert.  Plus an average of one activity per day - a tour and/or entrances to sites, a show, etc.  With 2 people it would have been a bit cheaper, or could have upgraded to a nicer room. 

I got the CSR card and this basically gives me 4.5 cents back per $1 spent on travel.  It adds up quickly and I'm on the pace to earn an international flight every 2 years or so.    https://thehotflashpacker.com/chase-sapphire-reserve-review/

Roadrunner53

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1293
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2018, 10:15:24 AM »
$60,000 for two is still possible for long traveling, but you have to pick the right places.  Western Europe is out but eastern is in.  Most of Latin America and Southeast Asia is do-able on that budget.  Also parts of Africa if you don't splash out on expensive tours & accom.  The key for me is mixing expensive days with cheaper days... if I really want to do a tour that costs $500 for 3 days I do it, but then I try to keep it under $50 for some days so it averages out. 

I'm single and try to shoot for $100 per day.  Preferably this includes flights, but sometimes it's hard to stick to that.  I lived it up in Bali for $50 a day - private accom with a pool, nice garden, and breakfast.  Always something nice for dinner.  By the sea, I paid $3.75 for dinner - a grilled fish (that I picked), rice, salad and fruit for desert.  Plus an average of one activity per day - a tour and/or entrances to sites, a show, etc.  With 2 people it would have been a bit cheaper, or could have upgraded to a nicer room. 

I got the CSR card and this basically gives me 4.5 cents back per $1 spent on travel.  It adds up quickly and I'm on the pace to earn an international flight every 2 years or so.    https://thehotflashpacker.com/chase-sapphire-reserve-review/

Good idea on spending by mixing expensive days with cheaper days. We plan to up our income as of January 2019. We will be off ACA and no longer restricted by income limits as required to keep income low and qualify for the subsidy. I am craving to go to Myrtle Beach and seeing some shows and eating seafood. Anyone been to Myrtle Beach lately? I have not been there in probably 20 years. Loved it back then.

MasterStache

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1564
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2018, 12:21:29 PM »
Hmm, well yesterday I played 18 in the morning with a retired co-worker. Even took notice of all the drones heading to their jobs while I was heading to the links on a cool 65 degree morning. Had lunch with my brother afterwards. Then went to a soccer game in the evening courtesy of a free ticket from the neighbor.

Today was a bit more laid back as I did some gardening in the morning, mowed the lawn, dropped my daughter off at gymnastics (via my e-bike), then walked a couple miles through the local park with our dog.

Did all this while reminding myself it's the middle of the week and thinking about all the miserable years I spent as a cubicle rat. FWIW the friend I played golf with is in his 60s and is in shock and awe still that I retired a few days shy of 41.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2018, 12:23:26 PM by MasterStache »

Dave1442397

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 770
  • Location: NJ
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2018, 07:32:16 PM »
Anyone been to Myrtle Beach lately? I have not been there in probably 20 years. Loved it back then.

We spent a week there back in 2013, and that was enough for me. Nice place, but nothing that would make me want to go back, if only because there are so many other places I want to see.

A friend just retired and bought a house on the beach down there, and she loves it.

Life is definitely slower down there. I was constantly amazed to pull away from green lights on my bicycle and not get passed by the cars that were at the light at the same time for a few hundred yards, at least. Not like NJ.

GreenEggs

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 436
  • Location: Here & There
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2018, 11:06:15 PM »
I enjoy working with my hands, creating things from a variety of materials.


I've taken a pottery class and really enjoyed it.  The moist clay is a "friendly" material to work with.  It feels good in your hands.  It flows like a liquid, moving almost like it's alive.


I also enjoy working with wood, metal, and glass.  Glassblowing is similar to pottery, but it's as a calm and friendly material, at least not for a novice.  Also, clay is an inexpensive material that is so easy to recycle (before it's fired) compared to other materials. 


If you have an interest in working with the other materials they're all great too.  I'd recommend learning at a community college, if you can, because that's an affordable place to learn.  You-tube is also a great place to learn.


I really want the try scuba diving, but have no idea what it cost.  Kiteboarding is also something I've been wanting to try.  RVing in a van, rather than a huge RV is on our do-to list. 


We're going to put some real estate on the market next month, and will reach FI when it sells.  There's so much we've talked about doing, and I'm really looking forward to seeing what we actually choose when we get there. :) 

sparkytheop

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 607
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2018, 03:31:40 AM »
I'm hoping to have a lot of spending money in my retirement, but there are a lot of things I can still do even if it is cut in half.

I enjoy traveling.  When I get too old and cranky to want to deal with international travel, the hassle of flying, trying to communicate with a language barrier, etc, I hope to get a truck with a camper/camper van/small RV/whatever, and just drive around where I feel like going.

I started quilting two years ago and really enjoy that.  This can be as cheap or as expensive as you want to make it.

I have been interested in photography since I was a kid and bought my first camera in grade school.  This is something that can also be as cheap or expensive as you want to make it.

I have fun with pottery, woodworking, and other hobbies as well.  I want to learn how to weld and work on cars, along with other "handy" things.  Fortunately, I have a friend who will be willing to teach me.

I have a lot of simple pleasures...  Relaxing in a hammock, reading a good book, sitting by a campfire/bonfire, cooking, baking, playing in a creek, walking by the riverside or a beach, playing with dogs, etc.

MasterStache

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1564
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2018, 06:06:37 AM »
Anyone been to Myrtle Beach lately? I have not been there in probably 20 years. Loved it back then.

We spent a week there back in 2013, and that was enough for me. Nice place, but nothing that would make me want to go back, if only because there are so many other places I want to see.

A friend just retired and bought a house on the beach down there, and she loves it.

Life is definitely slower down there. I was constantly amazed to pull away from green lights on my bicycle and not get passed by the cars that were at the light at the same time for a few hundred yards, at least. Not like NJ.

+1

Went to Myrtle Beach as a child and went back just a couple years ago. World of difference. All the places I used to love going are gone. Well most anyways. It's ok but there are other places that are far better. The Destin Ft. Walton Beach FL area is beautiful. White sandy beaches are breathtaking.

Warlord1986

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1052
  • Age: 32
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2018, 11:04:57 AM »
$60,000 for two is still possible for long traveling, but you have to pick the right places.  Western Europe is out but eastern is in.  Most of Latin America and Southeast Asia is do-able on that budget.  Also parts of Africa if you don't splash out on expensive tours & accom.  The key for me is mixing expensive days with cheaper days... if I really want to do a tour that costs $500 for 3 days I do it, but then I try to keep it under $50 for some days so it averages out. 

I'm single and try to shoot for $100 per day.  Preferably this includes flights, but sometimes it's hard to stick to that.  I lived it up in Bali for $50 a day - private accom with a pool, nice garden, and breakfast.  Always something nice for dinner.  By the sea, I paid $3.75 for dinner - a grilled fish (that I picked), rice, salad and fruit for desert.  Plus an average of one activity per day - a tour and/or entrances to sites, a show, etc.  With 2 people it would have been a bit cheaper, or could have upgraded to a nicer room. 

I got the CSR card and this basically gives me 4.5 cents back per $1 spent on travel.  It adds up quickly and I'm on the pace to earn an international flight every 2 years or so.    https://thehotflashpacker.com/chase-sapphire-reserve-review/

Good idea on spending by mixing expensive days with cheaper days. We plan to up our income as of January 2019. We will be off ACA and no longer restricted by income limits as required to keep income low and qualify for the subsidy. I am craving to go to Myrtle Beach and seeing some shows and eating seafood. Anyone been to Myrtle Beach lately? I have not been there in probably 20 years. Loved it back then.

Myrtle Beach is awful. Folly Beach is much nicer.

Roadrunner53

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1293
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2018, 11:18:10 AM »
I am mostly interested in the entertainment at Myrtle Beach. Is there entertainment at Folly Beach?

bluebelle

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 199
  • Location: Toronto
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2018, 11:35:19 AM »
oh, I've got a list of them!  Our after-tax target expenses are in your target range.  We are moving to a lakefront property in retirement (<2 years off woohoo!)
1) hiking/walking trails - there are a ton where we're moving to
2) drowning worms pretending to fish (done from a cheap used boat)
3) learning to kayak (have to buy a kayak, but free after that)
4) lots of good motorcycle roads where we'll be moving, or take some trips without 'work' getting in the way
5) get involved the small town community we're moving to (been watching their facebook posts - they have 'stuff' I'd like to get involved with
6) play euchre at the 'seniors' centre (I'll be 56 at retirement - and I'll have grown out all colour in my hair by then, so I'll "pass")
7) learning to 'can' foods
8) I really want to find some volunteer work.  If I could help young people with numeracy (number literacy), credit, savings etc, I'd like that.  Too many folks don't understand the impact of compounding.
9) I want to try some slow travel.  Hubby isn't good with 10 countries in 10 days type of travel, can't move him too quickly, or pack too much in to a day.  I want to find some that involve cooking classes in local cusine (I don't want the 5 star resort type, but actual local cusine.)
10) take some courses (just for the heck of it)

Roadrunner53

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1293
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2018, 11:53:42 AM »
oh, I've got a list of them!  Our after-tax target expenses are in your target range.  We are moving to a lakefront property in retirement (<2 years off woohoo!)
1) hiking/walking trails - there are a ton where we're moving to
2) drowning worms pretending to fish (done from a cheap used boat)
3) learning to kayak (have to buy a kayak, but free after that)
4) lots of good motorcycle roads where we'll be moving, or take some trips without 'work' getting in the way
5) get involved the small town community we're moving to (been watching their facebook posts - they have 'stuff' I'd like to get involved with
6) play euchre at the 'seniors' centre (I'll be 56 at retirement - and I'll have grown out all colour in my hair by then, so I'll "pass")
7) learning to 'can' foods
8) I really want to find some volunteer work.  If I could help young people with numeracy (number literacy), credit, savings etc, I'd like that.  Too many folks don't understand the impact of compounding.
9) I want to try some slow travel.  Hubby isn't good with 10 countries in 10 days type of travel, can't move him too quickly, or pack too much in to a day.  I want to find some that involve cooking classes in local cusine (I don't want the 5 star resort type, but actual local cusine.)
10) take some courses (just for the heck of it)

My Mom canned everything she could get her hands on! When she couldn't grow it she would buy it and can it. My favorites were her pickles and sweet cinnamon beets. She made jams, you name it! She won a bunch of ribbons at a country fair too. She would stay up late at night finishing up. Get yourself a Blue Book and follow the instructions. She did both types. Under pressure and not under pressure. She was a dynamo!

FIRE@50

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 294
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Maryland
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2018, 12:01:53 PM »
Travel, hiking, golf. Not necessarily in that order.

I've gone to Myrtle Beach for a week each of the last two February's. It is just a laid back golf trip with some other guys. I love it. So many good courses down there and dirt cheap in the winter.

TheWifeHalf

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 499
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #21 on: July 20, 2018, 02:24:58 PM »
TheHusbandHalf is retiring in Jan, I haven't worked in years. He will be 62, me 60.

We've been doing a 'pretend we're retired' since Jan, and any day that the weather is nice enough, he goes to the golf course 1 1/2 miles away. Plus he's taken a few trips to other courses. I have seen the relationship between him and our oldest son really improve from all their golf trips they've taken. He got 87 the other day - that's good for him. I think seeing how much work he's putting into it, with good results, is making our son kind of proud. THH drove him around since he was 10 and sort of let his game go to the back burner. Me? I don't golf and probably never will.

As he has our whole life, if I ask for something, I almost always get it. I'm never foolish enough to think he goes to a big quilt show just for the lunch, he does it for me!

I am a homebody. Our acre and home are always being worked on because of my ideas.
We've talked about going to Canada, hopefully to see the oil's effects on Alberta and the scenery on the way driving there. We love Canada, and envision driving all over it.  There are US states we want to visit, family too.

Ohio has been changed to a Zone 6, rather than the cooler zone 5 planting zone, so I think we're going to stay here a while. Maybe forever?

Maybe I'll find some volunteer work, possibly with the local 4H program.  I used to be a leader of a county dog club, might do that again, or sewing, I've heard that's becoming more popular. Who knows?

There's so much in this house that has a story, I want to categorize everything, and write 'our story.'  So when I die, the kids will at least know what they're throwing away. Both THH's, and my family have pretty extensive genealogy that has been done, I might gather all that up and add it to 'the story.'

One thing I know I'm going to do:
When I was in my late teens/early 20's, the local paper had a picture of a guy who was going all over North America, pulling what looked to be a buggy (like the Amish used). His last name was the same as my mother's maiden name with a unique spelling, and she always said her family was 'French Canadian'  Believe it or not, I still have the newspaper clipping, and I'm going to find out if the guy, probably dead, was related to us. It sounds like something we'd do!

I'm going to find just one person who has the same last name as my maiden name, who is NOT related to me. I was told it can't be done, and that  right there makes me think I'm going to do it.  I have 85 first cousins, only 6 on my mom's side, and some are grandparents, so it's going to take me awhile.

I have enough projects and ideas to keep me busy for 100 years!


FindingFI

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 86
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #22 on: July 24, 2018, 06:28:50 AM »
I like cooking almost a much as I like eating, so getting more adventurous with new cooking techniques and recipes that take a lot longer to prepare.

And photography, I understand the basics, but there so much practice involved get great shots consistently.

Slow travel would be awesome!  Our trips now are the kind that require another day or two to recover from since we want to see and do as much as possible with the limited time that we have outside our sad, gray cubicles.

My other half and I are also in the process of starting up a CNC plasma cutting business, so we can make that as big or small as we want.

Most I'm looking forward to waking up everyday and doing whatever we want instead of hopping in the car to go work on someone else's goals and ambitions :)

Just Joe

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1994
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #23 on: July 24, 2018, 09:10:33 AM »
CNC Plasma cutter: what brand equipment do you favor? I have a PlasmaCAM and Hypertherm plasma cutter. Small beans but considering upgrading.

Metta

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 641
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #24 on: July 26, 2018, 12:37:29 PM »
I've taken a pottery class and really enjoyed it.  The moist clay is a "friendly" material to work with.  It feels good in your hands.  It flows like a liquid, moving almost like it's alive.

What do you wear when you do pottery? And will clay come out in the wash if your clothing gets messed up? (This is actually what is keeping me from trying pottery.)

----------------------

As to me, I lead a blissful life doing the following:

I have entered into writing and writing culture in ways that truly please me. I take classes and I co-run one large writing group and run a smaller writing group. I also write, which takes several hours of my day.

I draw and photograph nature.

I walk/hike.

I do yoga and meditate.

I cook and try to learn more about cooking and baking.

I've taken up my tea tasting hobby again (which is my second most expensive hobby after writing classes).

I game and am working on writing for gaming magazines.

I crochet (primarily to keep me from interrupting everyone in my writing groups).

I have a lot of friends from my time working and have made a number of new friends since FIREing. I could actually spend nearly everyday going out with someone if I didn't purposely take control of my schedule. As is, I see one or more of my friends about three times a week. I try to encourage us to do things that are free or inexpensive and about half of my experiences are that.

I also have to take care of the normal things in life that aren't as much fun. So cleaning, lawn care, taking care of my elderly mother's issues when they come up, write letters to congress critters, and so forth.

I love my life! (Though I am certain that it sounds somewhat dull to the more travel-minded people here.)

GreenEggs

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 436
  • Location: Here & There
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2018, 07:50:12 AM »
I've taken a pottery class and really enjoyed it.  The moist clay is a "friendly" material to work with.  It feels good in your hands.  It flows like a liquid, moving almost like it's alive.

What do you wear when you do pottery? And will clay come out in the wash if your clothing gets messed up? (This is actually what is keeping me from trying pottery.)

----------------------




Metta,


The clay isn't dirty, so it washes away easily.  It's very pure and clean.  It has a very soothing and theraputic feel. 


Throwing pots on the wheel is the most difficult pottery process to learn, but the spinning wheel and flowing clay is almost magical.


There are other methods of forming clay that are easier and allow for more creativity because you aren't limited to the vessel form or to the size that is based on your skill level.


My advice to concentrate on learning the forming skills before bothering to fire and glaze pieces, because you'll be a beginner for a while and you really don't want to pay for and own many of the ugly beginner things you will make at first.  Just enjoy the learning process until you are making decent work.  Take some pictures to document your progress instead of dragging home a bunch of "stuff" that you really will not want later.


Sign up for a class.  You'll love it.  :)

pecunia

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 454
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2018, 09:32:24 AM »
Not sure I'll be in that income category until I get SS.  Not there yet, but this post helps.

I think I will require the first six months to mentally decompress after a lifetime of work.

Then, I plan on writing the Great American Novel about a retiree making about $65,000 / year.

spartana

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 187
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #27 on: July 28, 2018, 10:18:51 AM »
Not sure I'll be in that income category until I get SS.  Not there yet, but this post helps.

I think I will require the first six months to mentally decompress after a lifetime of work.

Then, I plan on writing the Great American Novel about a retiree making about $65,000 / year.
Well Jacob over at ERE.com wrote about retiring on $6500/ year so you might have some competition ;-)

DreamFIRE

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1108
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #28 on: July 28, 2018, 12:39:12 PM »
Not sure I'll be in that income category until I get SS.  Not there yet, but this post helps.

I think I will require the first six months to mentally decompress after a lifetime of work.

Then, I plan on writing the Great American Novel about a retiree making about $65,000 / year.

But don't you have other funds available, so that your spending will be much higher?  For example, I'm planning on $24k/yr income when I FIRE but nearly $50K/yr spending.  Not sure about the OP.

pecunia

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 454
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #29 on: July 28, 2018, 01:16:07 PM »
Dreamfire:
Quote
But don't you have other funds available, so that your spending will be much higher?  For example, I'm planning on $24k/yr income when I FIRE but nearly $50K/yr spending.  Not sure about the OP.

Oh,.....I think you guys misunderstood me.  I am still working.  I do have a stash that I will apply the 4 percent (or less) rule to.  I hope to add to the stash.  Then the safe withdrawal rate should put me in the stated income category.  Social Security will augment that to put me securely in the category.  I could withdraw SS now, but waiting a few years brings that up.  My needs are pretty simple with no car or house payment.

I really need to get started on that novel.  A best seller will surely firm up the income.

DreamFIRE

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1108
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #30 on: July 28, 2018, 02:43:58 PM »
Dreamfire:
Quote
But don't you have other funds available, so that your spending will be much higher?  For example, I'm planning on $24k/yr income when I FIRE but nearly $50K/yr spending.  Not sure about the OP.

Oh,.....I think you guys misunderstood me.  I am still working.  I do have a stash that I will apply the 4 percent (or less) rule to.  I hope to add to the stash.  Then the safe withdrawal rate should put me in the stated income category.  Social Security will augment that to put me securely in the category.  I could withdraw SS now, but waiting a few years brings that up.  My needs are pretty simple with no car or house payment.

I really need to get started on that novel.  A best seller will surely firm up the income.

That's what I thought you meant, that after you quit working, your FIRE income would put you at $60K/yr income (assume MAGI), but if you have a Roth, cash, or principal in a taxed brokerage accounts, which don't count as income, just as I do, you could spend even more than your $60K income as I will be able to do (24k income / 50k spending).  Either way, it sounds like you are set with SS coming in a matter of years as well.

I factor in SS in 15 years also, however, I have my spreadsheet laid out to control my utilization of different stash and income sources so that my spending will stay pretty steady when I start taking SS.  My MAGI will go up, so a little more will go to taxes.  I do include a small uptick in planned spending beginning at age 65 due to Medicare costs for the different parts/supplementals so that my discretionary spending can remain consistent.  Of course, other unplanned or unforeseen things can come up to mess with my budget, but I account for things which I can expect or are highly likely.  I have a nice cushion of discretionary income that I can borrow from if I have to.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2018, 02:52:45 PM by DreamFIRE »

FindingFI

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 86
Re: Retirement activities
« Reply #31 on: July 30, 2018, 07:36:10 AM »
CNC Plasma cutter: what brand equipment do you favor? I have a PlasmaCAM and Hypertherm plasma cutter. Small beans but considering upgrading.

We have a Hypertherm that we picked up second-hand, so it was just as much about opportunity and choice.