Author Topic: Personal organizers  (Read 1046 times)

Rasputin

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Personal organizers
« on: January 25, 2019, 05:20:56 PM »
What, if any, personal organizers do you use? Filofax? Franklin? Daytimer? How do you use them? Goal-setting? Etc.

Gone_Hiking

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2019, 08:57:49 PM »
After attempting to go paperless with Google Tasks and Outlook Tasks, I decided to go back to Daytimer.  The calendar has space for goal setting and notes.  Two pages for to-dos are included at the beginning of each month, and two pages of note spaces are included at the end.  There is also a longer list of calendars, currently 2019, 2020, and 2021 in full-page format, and years 2022-2025 in half-page format, that are perfect IMHO for longer-term goal visualization.

soccerluvof4

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2019, 04:48:35 AM »
Yea we go about as far as google calendar and thats the extent of it. Beyond that , paper and pencil for my old fashion lists to get done

Peachtea

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2019, 02:13:17 PM »
Have you heard of bullet journaling? Iíve used this system for a little over a year and love it. There are lots of resources online on how to do it. Donít get distracted by all the ďcutesyĒ stuff and Pinterest worthy example pages, itís actually a really effective method.

With bullet journaling you can use any notebook or journal you want, but there are ones you can buy that are more set up for it. I admit that I paid $20 for cute, compatible one but you can use a regular $1 notebook to see if you like it. The journals recommended come with a table of contents, page numbers, and dots/lines to make it easier; but you can make your own table of contents and number the pages of any notebook. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FWRVTMO/ref=twister_B07CQT8KC7?_encoding=UTF8&th=1

The reason bullet journaling is so awesome is because if you are a list person you now have one place for all your lists, plus your calendar. So I have a list of everyoneís bday, my reading list, my read list, my yearly calendar, monthly calendar, monthly to do list, daily to do list, workout log, investment plan, expense tracker, holiday lists and recipes, etc all in one place and itís amazing. My work and home lists are all together, so Iím no longer bringing home post it notes from the office for my life list or vice versa. When I think of something it goes in the journal.

Essentially the basics are that you use the table of contents and page numbers so that anytime you have a new list you log it into the TOC to find quickly later. You have a few pages for a ďfuture logĒ things youíll need to enter in upcoming months: like wedding dates or vacation dates that are months out or things you need to remember to do 3 months from now. You create whatever random lists as you need them (birthday, book or show recs, specific project to do lists). Every month you create a calendar and monthly to do list, referring to your future log to see if thereís anything important to include. And after that each day you need a daily to do list you create it. There is a system of checks/arrows that indicate whether you completed something or moved it to another day/month. The benefit of this system is you never run out of space or waste pages. If you donít have much going on in January, maybe you only use a couple pages. Then in February when youíre slammed at work, maybe you need 10 pages for all your daily lists. Since you make it as you go, itís always the right amount of space. And you can ďinterruptĒ your daily log with a new page/list (maybe grocery list or etc), because you just log that page # in the TOC so you can find it later.

My monthly calendar takes less than 5 min to set up, itís just:
January 2019
X 1 Tu   New Years (off work)
   2 W    work conf 9-5pm
X 3 Th   Friendís party 6:30 pm
   4 F     dentist 10 am (123 main st. Suite 100) Dr. dentist

The simpler you design your calendars and lists, the more likely you are to actually use it. For example, I used to have a full blown ďhabits chartĒ but it was too much of a pain to keep up. So now on my calendar, I just put an x on the margin for days I workout. I actually log it and can see how many times a week I workout. (Before I had more details, but didnít regularly log it).

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2019, 01:57:23 PM »
I use Trello with a GTD-style layout, and Google Calendar for scheduling tasks.  I make sure to set the calendar event to notify me ahead of time via email that it's coming up, with a lead time appropriate for the event, which could be 24 hours for something like a dentist appt, or 2 weeks for things like birthdays.  I really like this system as it's pretty simple, but powerful enough to handle anything I need to put in it.  If you're trying to get tasks organized I highly recommend Getting Things Done if you haven't read it, before you try to set up a system, as he talks about some larger themes that I feel are important.

Moonwaves

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2019, 04:01:53 AM »
I did a Franklin-Covey course years ago in my first job and still incorporate aspects of what I learned there. I have a small Paperblanks calendar (one week per two-day spread and a pocket at the back that I can keep stamps in. It also comes with a small address book and this year I've repurposed that as my meal planner/for shopping lists). I also have a bigger notebook that I use as a bullet journal. Lists, lists and more lists. Notes from lectures or events I attend. Words I want to look up. Notes on what I've cooked and questions for my dietician. Spending diary. Agree with Peachtea about how great it is.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2019, 04:56:39 AM »
I use a GTD website/app called Doit.im for tasks, projects and goals. While working, I pay for the Pro version and use it at work, on phone and iPad. I think it works very easily.

DH and I use Wunderlist on our phones and iPads to share lists for shopping or packing. This app works on iPhone and Android. I guess Wunderlist could also be used for task/project/goal management, but I like Doit better.

I have recently started to use Evernote for pasting in notes that I want to keep for later use. I don't love Evernote, but it can take screenshots and put them in the notebook and is free. Earlier I tried to use Doit for it, but that is more suited for just finishing tasks.

zoe2dot

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2019, 12:46:39 PM »
Another vote for bullet journaling
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/27/books/how-to-bullet-journal.html

Search instagram for #bujo or #bulletjournal for ideas

Don't get overwhelmed by the art component - I use it for the monthly planning and the collections.

I'm using a cheapo notebook and having done it for a month am THRILLED with the progress I've made on my habits and goal development.

Johnez

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2019, 04:15:47 PM »
Another vote for bullet journaling
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/27/books/how-to-bullet-journal.html

Search instagram for #bujo or #bulletjournal for ideas

Don't get overwhelmed by the art component - I use it for the monthly planning and the collections.

I'm using a cheapo notebook and having done it for a month am THRILLED with the progress I've made on my habits and goal development.

The video in the article has changed my life.  Thanks for sharing it.

I actually checked out bullet journals years ago and thought the whole concept silly.  Some of people's "spreads" were insane in complexity and creativity.  Didn't think it was a good way to organize my life.

But the INDEX.  OMG.  Why didn't I think of that???  And the idea that I can just keep going and going, and screw it if a day takes 3 lines or a whole page.  Doesn't matter!  And the collections, holy crap.  Christmas list.  To do list.  Ideas.  Quotes.  School Assignment lists.  Habits.  EVERYTHING.  All indexed and damn I love this thing.  I use a $5 notebook and a cheap ball point, maybe I'll graduate to washi tape and 36 different color pages and a Leuchtterm1917 notebook and a fountain pen when I finish this one lol, probably not though since this thing doesn't require any of that to work.


Rasputin

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2019, 05:10:59 PM »
Can one use the concepts of bullet journal while using, say, a Franklin Covey planner?

Peachtea

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2019, 06:58:09 AM »
Doesnít look like it would be compatible with Franklin Covey planner (from google images). Not enough space and too pre-broken down. It works best with a blank notebook. If you want a nice (looking) planner instead of a regular notebook, just get the Leuchtterm1917 for bullet journaling. Itís cheaper than the Franklin Covey planner. My favorite part of the Leuchtterm1917 is that itís ďlay flatĒ so you can write one handed without wrestling the pages down. It looks like Iíll get at least two years out of mine, so Iím okay with the $20 cost. My coworker is nearly done with 2 in one year. Iíd probably try finding a cheaper notebook/journal if I burned through them that quickly.

merula

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2019, 07:36:18 AM »
I'm also a big fan of bullet journalling; I've been at it for 2+ years.

I also do not do any of the artsy stuff; I just have two pages with a box for each month, a monthly summary and a daily log.

I have a major issue with the entire concept of an "index" at the front of a book. A list of what a book contains that's at the front isn't an index, it's a table of contents. Indices are by definition at the back.  So my index is at the back, which also means that I don't really have to guess how many pages it'll be. I just start at the very last page and work my way forward.

BlueHouse

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2019, 09:04:48 AM »
I'm great at organizing and making lists and calendar entries, but I'm shit at opening the task list, organizer, calendar, etc.  So I constantly miss things, or don't do things and then end up with a massive list of to-dos.

I use google calendar a lot, and google tasks when i remember to look at them. 

I recently started using Todoist and I think this one may stick.  It seems good for people like me because it includes a daily email of things that are due TODAY and lets you reschedule things easily.  You can have multiple projects or categories or labels or tags to keep things organized.  There's also something called Karma that shows how many items that were scheduled actually get done, so that motivates me to get some things off my list.  I can also use it with Alexa, on my phone, or on my desktop.  I've only been using it a few weeks so far, but I've reviewed my tasks every day since I've started and made progress every day, so that's an improvement over everything else I've used so far.

dashuk

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Re: Personal organizers
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2019, 02:20:02 PM »
I use some of the ideas from bullet journalling, but in Orgzly on my android phone.

http://www.orgzly.com

Initially ended up with it because I wanted something non-cloud and where the underlying file was plain text, but it was only after a brief foray into paper bullet journalling that I figured out a good way of using it.

Bits I use from bullet journalling:

 - monthly log/calendar
 - daily log (but nested under the monthly log so I can fold/unfold the whole month)
 - future log (think about this thing in approximately this month)
 - the general ethos of just write it down quickly and get it out of your head until a sensible time to review and deal with it.

Things I gain from it not being a notebook:

 - Rightly or wrongly, I've always got my phone
 - I don't index. I can get to a month quickly by collapsing everything and scrolling. I file non-date collections under the day I started them, but just tag them 'collection' so I can find them all. Also use a few other tags like 'links' and 'spending'.
 - Has TODO/DONE states, so don't have to try and mentally parse things from multiple pages and decide what to do, just filter for all TODO. Ethos of bullet journal seems to be very much you don't rewrite your tasks, you just leave them where they are and 'reflect' by flicking through, but I can't deal with it, so would end up migrating stuff forwards every week or so.
 - I can create monthly logs in advance, so I can use it as my proper calendar. I just have them all nested under 'Future', which is also my future log, then move them up when the month arrives.
 - Because it's foldable, I can start from a nice bullet-journal-esque short note saying 'email X about Y', but if I'm sat on a train or whatever I can draft the actual thing right there under the task.

Nerdy/niche point:

 - Underlying file format is Emacs Org-mode. Laptop is Linux so when I want to really write stuff with a proper keyboard I can just plug my phone in, sync the file across, and work on it there in something that understands the file format and folds/unfolds the same way.


You could almost certainly do all this in something like Evernote, probably more prettily, but see initial point about simplicity and non-cloudness/control of my own data.