Author Topic: Parents: How Concerned Are You About School Shootings/Lockdown Drills  (Read 2383 times)

tyort1

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--  The guys at work discussing that the proper # of concealed carry weapons to have on your person is 3 - "one on your hip, one in a shoulder holster under your arm, and another in an ankle holster "   This was a 60yr old and a 30 yr old.  I hope no-one accidentally bumps into the older one at night in the grocery store parking lot.

Can you please let me know what state this is, so I know where not to vacation?  I am not used to a concealed carry culture and would hate to unwittingly give offense to these people.  Easiest if I am just elsewhere.

Please.   concealed carry license holders are statistically more law abiding that police officers.  You also aren't likely to even know they're carrying unless you threaten them in a way that they fear for their lives.

Also, all 50 states offer concealed carry licenses. Some make it harder than others.

You know who's more likely to shoot you in an altercation?  Someone with a gun.  You know who's less likely to shoot you in an altercation?  Someone without a gun.

ncornilsen

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--  The guys at work discussing that the proper # of concealed carry weapons to have on your person is 3 - "one on your hip, one in a shoulder holster under your arm, and another in an ankle holster "   This was a 60yr old and a 30 yr old.  I hope no-one accidentally bumps into the older one at night in the grocery store parking lot.

Can you please let me know what state this is, so I know where not to vacation?  I am not used to a concealed carry culture and would hate to unwittingly give offense to these people.  Easiest if I am just elsewhere.

Please.   concealed carry license holders are statistically more law abiding that police officers.  You also aren't likely to even know they're carrying unless you threaten them in a way that they fear for their lives.

Also, all 50 states offer concealed carry licenses. Some make it harder than others.

Oh, so " I hope no-one accidentally bumps into the older one at night in the grocery store parking lot." was just a joke?  Not a funny joke, seriously.

There's no accounting for one's taste in humor. I personally don't find it funny since CCW holders gunning down people in parking lots for no reason simply does not happen on any regular basis.



You know who's more likely to shoot you in an altercation?  Someone with a gun.  You know who's less likely to shoot you in an altercation?  Someone without a gun.

non causa pro causa.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2019, 03:22:51 PM by ncornilsen »

six-car-habit

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--  The guys at work discussing that the proper # of concealed carry weapons to have on your person is 3 - "one on your hip, one in a shoulder holster under your arm, and another in an ankle holster "   This was a 60yr old and a 30 yr old.  I hope no-one accidentally bumps into the older one at night in the grocery store parking lot.

Can you please let me know what state this is, so I know where not to vacation?  I am not used to a concealed carry culture and would hate to unwittingly give offense to these people.  Easiest if I am just elsewhere.

Please.   concealed carry license holders are statistically more law abiding that police officers.  You also aren't likely to even know they're carrying unless you threaten them in a way that they fear for their lives.

Also, all 50 states offer concealed carry licenses. Some make it harder than others.

Oh, so " I hope no-one accidentally bumps into the older one at night in the grocery store parking lot." was just a joke?  Not a funny joke, seriously.

 Washington state - but you could probably lump Idaho into the same "groupthink".  I was serious about hoping no-one bumps into this guy - He's not outwardly violent, from what i can tell he just wouldn't consider trying to talk his way out of a physical crime being perpetrated on him, or just giving up his wallet.
 * edit to add - Maybe his talk is all some sort of macho fantasy tough guy bravado, " they can pry my gun out of my cold dead hands" sort of stuff . Nonetheless- if co-worker feels carrying 3 concealed guns is the best policy - thats a bit too much paranoia for my liking. What will be his thought process be 10 years from now when he's physically/mentally weaker than currently ?  *

  Later that week those two co-workers were watching videos of some guy out in a farm field practice drawing from the hip and spraying bullets at two wooden sillouettes a few feet away.  I'm talking emptying a 12 round clip in a couple seconds.  I brought up that with the amount of lead he was spraying, it went beyond self-defense, as the likelyhood someone survived  5 bullets beyond the intial shot or two that disabled them [ no longer a threat] was extremely low.  They defended it by saying it was a "sport" the youtube fellow was good at, and marvelling at his dexterity and "muscle memory".    They didn't get the idea that his "muscle memory" probably would condemn two "perps" to death , instead of simply mitigating the threat [ non-lethaly].
« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 02:43:02 AM by six-car-habit »

Sugaree

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--  The guys at work discussing that the proper # of concealed carry weapons to have on your person is 3 - "one on your hip, one in a shoulder holster under your arm, and another in an ankle holster "   This was a 60yr old and a 30 yr old.  I hope no-one accidentally bumps into the older one at night in the grocery store parking lot.

Can you please let me know what state this is, so I know where not to vacation?  I am not used to a concealed carry culture and would hate to unwittingly give offense to these people.  Easiest if I am just elsewhere.

Please.   concealed carry license holders are statistically more law abiding that police officers.  You also aren't likely to even know they're carrying unless you threaten them in a way that they fear for their lives.

Also, all 50 states offer concealed carry licenses. Some make it harder than others.

Oh, so " I hope no-one accidentally bumps into the older one at night in the grocery store parking lot." was just a joke?  Not a funny joke, seriously.

 Washington state - but you could probably lump Idaho into the same "groupthink".  I was serious about hoping no-one bumps into this guy - He's not outwardly violent, from what i can tell he just wouldn't consider trying to talk his way out of a physical crime being perpetrated on him, or just giving up his wallet.
 * edit to add - Maybe his talk is all some sort of macho fantasy tough guy bravado, " they can pry my gun out of my cold dead hands" sort of stuff . Nonetheless- if co-worker feels carrying 3 concealed guns is the best policy - thats a bit too much paranoia for my liking. What will be his thought process be 10 years from now when he's physically/mentally weaker than currently ?  *

  Later that week those two co-workers were watching videos of some guy out in a farm field practice drawing from the hip and spraying bullets at two wooden sillouettes a few feet away.  I'm talking emptying a 12 round clip in a couple seconds.  I brought up that with the amount of lead he was spraying, it went beyond self-defense, as the likelyhood someone survived  5 bullets beyond the intial shot or two that disabled them [ no longer a threat] was extremely low.  They defended it by saying it was a "sport" the youtube fellow was good at, and marvelling at his dexterity and "muscle memory".    They didn't get the idea that his "muscle memory" probably would condemn two "perps" to death , instead of simply mitigating the threat [ non-lethaly].

That attitude is common here in the south too (shocker, right?).  I work with a guy that...he's just *itching* to shoot someone in self-defense.  We can't carry or have guns in our vehicles here, but he is armed any time he's not on his way to or from work.  I don't get the compulsion myself, but whatever.  At least he properly secures his weapons when he's not carrying them.  We had a rash of thefts last xmas where in one weekend 6 different people in a single neighborhood had loaded guns stolen out of unlocked cars in their driveways.  If you can't secure your weapon then you should lose your CCW.  And at least one city in the state is trying that.  I hope it passes.

gaja

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Active shooter drills are GOOD.

Can you show me the data you're using that backs up this claim?

Oh none, that's my opinion. I think bringing up a credible threat and then practicing for it is a good thing. We do this at work all the time. I don't think we'll have any good data until we get a few thousand more active shooter events in areas where people have gone through drills. The drills are imperfect but at the very least it gets us all thinking about what we could/would/should do.

1) Fire is quite likely to happen during those kids life, they are therefore learning a useful skill for later in life
2) What action to take during a fire is clear cut, and it is proved that training for that type of action makes it more likely to survive if a fire happens
3) The fire drills are aimed at reducing fear and panic, to create a habit of "if we hear the alarm, we calmly go outside". I don't think I've met any kids that are afraid of them. It is either seen as an extra break, or really boring

Compare this to terror/shooter drills;
1) Much less likely to happen
2) No science behind what you should do - it could even be more efficient for kids to scream a lot and run around to draw fire away from eachother
3) Creates fear in kids, and increases fear in kids that are already afraid

I am very happy that my kids don't have to go through other drills than for fire. They have experienced one lockdown, and that was because the factory next door had a ammonia spill, and it could be harmful for them to go outside. Everything was calm and ordered, and the air was clear by the time the school day was over.

I find the US culture for fear very strange, and hope it doesn't spread to my part of the world. More fear does not make us safer. We had a horrible terrorist act in 2011 that killed 77 people, 69 of them on a summer camp on the island of Utya. Many more were hurt and traumatized. But we can't and won't let that fucking idiot and his right wing terrorist ideas win. The summer camps on Utya started back up in 2015. My kids will probably want to go there in a few years. It will be scary as hell, but I plan to smile and cheer them on, and hope they have as much fun there as I had in the 90's.


"When one man could cause so much evil - think about how much love we can create together" (Helle Gannestad, AUF, 23.07.2011)

Parizade

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I find the US culture for fear very strange, and hope it doesn't spread to my part of the world. More fear does not make us safer.

It doesn't make us safer, it does make us easier to manipulate. Afraid of school shootings? Buy the latest in Lockdown Equipement and safety training. Afraid of abductions? Buy the latest child tracking wristband and software. Afraid of terrorists? Vote for me, I'll lock the borders. Afraid of climate change? Vote for me, I'll shut down polluters. Afraid of crime? buy at least 3 guns and a conceal carry permit.

Fear turns you into "consumer sucka"

ChpBstrd

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Active shooter drills are GOOD.

Can you show me the data you're using that backs up this claim?

Oh none, that's my opinion. I think bringing up a credible threat and then practicing for it is a good thing. We do this at work all the time. I don't think we'll have any good data until we get a few thousand more active shooter events in areas where people have gone through drills. The drills are imperfect but at the very least it gets us all thinking about what we could/would/should do.

1) Fire is quite likely to happen during those kids life, they are therefore learning a useful skill for later in life
2) What action to take during a fire is clear cut, and it is proved that training for that type of action makes it more likely to survive if a fire happens
3) The fire drills are aimed at reducing fear and panic, to create a habit of "if we hear the alarm, we calmly go outside". I don't think I've met any kids that are afraid of them. It is either seen as an extra break, or really boring

Compare this to terror/shooter drills;
1) Much less likely to happen
2) No science behind what you should do - it could even be more efficient for kids to scream a lot and run around to draw fire away from eachother
3) Creates fear in kids, and increases fear in kids that are already afraid

I am very happy that my kids don't have to go through other drills than for fire. They have experienced one lockdown, and that was because the factory next door had a ammonia spill, and it could be harmful for them to go outside. Everything was calm and ordered, and the air was clear by the time the school day was over.

I find the US culture for fear very strange, and hope it doesn't spread to my part of the world. More fear does not make us safer. We had a horrible terrorist act in 2011 that killed 77 people, 69 of them on a summer camp on the island of Utya. Many more were hurt and traumatized. But we can't and won't let that fucking idiot and his right wing terrorist ideas win. The summer camps on Utya started back up in 2015. My kids will probably want to go there in a few years. It will be scary as hell, but I plan to smile and cheer them on, and hope they have as much fun there as I had in the 90's.


"When one man could cause so much evil - think about how much love we can create together" (Helle Gannestad, AUF, 23.07.2011)

Im starting to think having at least a little bit of courage is a requirement for being free. To run around ones whole life trying to resolve fear is to be under the control of fear.

Then I think about how consumerist culture conditions us to think every minor inconvenience is just the lack of some product or service we need to buy. Feeling awful about something you saw on the media you bought? Glorious Leader offers to save you from that emotion for the price of one vote.

To be either free or courageous requires us to admit we and our loved ones might die at any moment, and to accept that there is no product or leader who can change this ultimate fact of our existence. Not weapons nor politicians nor religious leaders can change it, despite all their product promises. Those who cannot accept their inherent vulnerability are doomed to fall for such promises/scams - the price of life on an emotional treadmill.