Author Topic: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...  (Read 493932 times)

Glenstache

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6100 on: February 15, 2019, 11:05:23 AM »
Ironically his right-wing pundits (e.g. Coulter) are publicly lambasting him for declaring a national emergency to get his funding.  Says Coulter: it's "designed for Trump to scam the stupidest people in his base for another 2 years"
I think this is just Coulter being jealous that someone else is scamming the stupidest people in the conservative base.

On a more serious note, Trump did give the opposition lawyers some really good material in the Rose Garden with this quote:
Quote
I want to do it faster. I could do the wall over a longer period of time. I didn’t need to do this, but I’d rather do it much faster…. I just want to get it done faster, that’s all.

That's about as close to saying that you are circumventing Congress for convenience as you can get without using those actual words. I'm really looking forward to how Sanders will spin this. My money is on, "If Congress had done their job to address this emergency, Trump wouldn't have had to make this declaration."

nereo

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6101 on: February 15, 2019, 11:36:39 AM »
Once again, Trump's own words and conduct will be used against him in legal challenges (much as they were for his first two travel bans).

What's interesting to me is that fight will take place almost entirely in Texas (red) and is already very unpopular among border towns like El Paso. It's going to get a heck of a lot less popular as private citizens are told they have to cede land and big ugly roads are built across national parkland in preparation for more barriers.

If you wanted to nudge deep-red Texas more purple I'm not sure you could devise a better way than unilaterally forcing a border wall through these towns.

GuitarStv

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6102 on: February 15, 2019, 11:41:03 AM »
Interesting commentary even from the GOP -
After failing to secure wall funding with a GOP held congress Trump tried to get it through a government shutdown, which didn't work. It's unpopular with the general public, unpopular in congress and unpopular with his own intelligence chiefs.

So he faced two choices - admit defeat or declare an emergency.  He's chosen the latter

What's interesting is that apparently even his own legal team has told him its unlikely stand up in court (which is no doubt why he's said, repeatedly, that 'we can do this, it's all very legal, it's in my power as President').  He's actually expecting the courts to block him at every turn - which I expect he'll use as a foil for the next 21 months.

Ironically his right-wing pundits (e.g. Coulter) are publicly lambasting him for declaring a national emergency to get his funding.  Says Coulter: it's "designed for Trump to scam the stupidest people in his base for another 2 years"

So weird to agree with something that Anne Coulter says.  I feel like I need a shower.

sol

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6103 on: February 15, 2019, 11:46:04 AM »
I'm really looking forward to how Sanders will spin this. My money is on, "If Congress had done their job to address this emergency, Trump wouldn't have had to make this declaration."

The whole "emergency" justification for the wall is kind of a new one, created out of political expediency.  Remember when we needed a wall to keep out terrorists?  Or when we needed a wall to keep out drugs?  Or to protect low-wage American jobs?  Or to keep out MS-13?

All of those reasons have fallen by the wayside, because they were all just post-hoc rationalizations for keeping out immigrant minorities that might threaten the conservative white voting bloc that keeps the GOP in power.  The only reason for the wall, all along, has been fear of brown people.  So it's an interesting development, I think, that being unable to fund the wall to keep out brown people he has been forced to resort to trying to fund the wall in order to "protect" brown people.  Calling the border situation a "humanitarian crisis" used to be a democratic talking point, an attempt to reframe the caravan as desperate refugees instead of an invading criminal army storming the gates.  Hilariously, Trump had to adopt the democrat's talking point on this issue in order to secure the funding his MAGA-hat wearing base wants because of racism.

I'm pretty sure you'd have a hard time finding a hardcore Trump supporter who wants the wall to be built who has expressed one iota of compassion for the "humanitarian crisis" that Tump is now using to justify his emergency declaration.  These folks don't care about refugees and their struggles.  They were calling for razor wire and armed guards with tear gas and fire hoses to turn back the caravan, remember?  They wanted to shoot these people, not rescue them. 

Glenstache

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6104 on: February 15, 2019, 11:54:44 AM »
I'm really looking forward to how Sanders will spin this. My money is on, "If Congress had done their job to address this emergency, Trump wouldn't have had to make this declaration."

The whole "emergency" justification for the wall is kind of a new one, created out of political expediency.  Remember when we needed a wall to keep out terrorists?  Or when we needed a wall to keep out drugs?  Or to protect low-wage American jobs?  Or to keep out MS-13?

All of those reasons have fallen by the wayside, because they were all just post-hoc rationalizations for keeping out immigrant minorities that might threaten the conservative white voting bloc that keeps the GOP in power.  The only reason for the wall, all along, has been fear of brown people.  So it's an interesting development, I think, that being unable to fund the wall to keep out brown people he has been forced to resort to trying to fund the wall in order to "protect" brown people.  Calling the border situation a "humanitarian crisis" used to be a democratic talking point, an attempt to reframe the caravan as desperate refugees instead of an invading criminal army storming the gates.  Hilariously, Trump had to adopt the democrat's talking point on this issue in order to secure the funding his MAGA-hat wearing base wants because of racism.

I'm pretty sure you'd have a hard time finding a hardcore Trump supporter who wants the wall to be built who has expressed one iota of compassion for the "humanitarian crisis" that Tump is now using to justify his emergency declaration.  These folks don't care about refugees and their struggles.  They were calling for razor wire and armed guards with tear gas and fire hoses to turn back the caravan, remember?  They wanted to shoot these people, not rescue them.

See also: racist gaslighting. Nothing new here, and Sanders explanations will have only a tenuous relationship to any truth, as per usual.

Importantly, we should not forget McConnnell's central role in this whole fiasco. He enabled Trump through this whole shitshow by not bringing the original budget (which may have actually even been veto-proof) to a vote back in December. 

bacchi

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6105 on: February 15, 2019, 12:09:27 PM »
Importantly, we should not forget McConnnell's central role in this whole fiasco. He enabled Trump through this whole shitshow by not bringing the original budget (which may have actually even been veto-proof) to a vote back in December.

This quote from John Malcolm of the Heritage Foundation is great,

Quote from: https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/does-trumps-national-emergency-set-a-problematic-precedent-for-conservatives/
“The real shame is that Congress hasn’t worked with him to come up with a more workable solution that responds to those threats. It seems to me that they’re not doing that because they just don’t like this president.
[emphasis added]

This means that your own party doesn't like the President. (But I suspect that Malcolm only means the Dems don't like him.)

OtherJen

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6106 on: February 16, 2019, 08:17:30 AM »
Once again, Trump's own words and conduct will be used against him in legal challenges (much as they were for his first two travel bans).

What's interesting to me is that fight will take place almost entirely in Texas (red) and is already very unpopular among border towns like El Paso. It's going to get a heck of a lot less popular as private citizens are told they have to cede land and big ugly roads are built across national parkland in preparation for more barriers.

If you wanted to nudge deep-red Texas more purple I'm not sure you could devise a better way than unilaterally forcing a border wall through these towns.

From Reuters: Texas landowners file first lawsuit to block Trump's national emergency declaration

bacchi

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6107 on: February 16, 2019, 10:22:39 AM »
Once again, Trump's own words and conduct will be used against him in legal challenges (much as they were for his first two travel bans).

What's interesting to me is that fight will take place almost entirely in Texas (red) and is already very unpopular among border towns like El Paso. It's going to get a heck of a lot less popular as private citizens are told they have to cede land and big ugly roads are built across national parkland in preparation for more barriers.

If you wanted to nudge deep-red Texas more purple I'm not sure you could devise a better way than unilaterally forcing a border wall through these towns.

From Reuters: Texas landowners file first lawsuit to block Trump's national emergency declaration

The first of many, I'm sure. If Trump loses in 2020, the wall will never get built.

DavidAnnArbor

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6108 on: February 16, 2019, 06:48:50 PM »
Once again, Trump's own words and conduct will be used against him in legal challenges (much as they were for his first two travel bans).

What's interesting to me is that fight will take place almost entirely in Texas (red) and is already very unpopular among border towns like El Paso. It's going to get a heck of a lot less popular as private citizens are told they have to cede land and big ugly roads are built across national parkland in preparation for more barriers.

If you wanted to nudge deep-red Texas more purple I'm not sure you could devise a better way than unilaterally forcing a border wall through these towns.

From Reuters: Texas landowners file first lawsuit to block Trump's national emergency declaration

What a horrific experience it is for these homeowners to have their lives upended this way!

DavidAnnArbor

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Re: So Let's Speculate about the Future of a Full Trump Presidency...
« Reply #6109 on: February 16, 2019, 06:58:21 PM »
Here's a Washington Post article reviewing McCabe's memoir of working in the FBI with Jeff Sessions as head of the Justice department,

"He didn’t read intelligence reports and mixed up classified material with what he had seen in newspaper clips. He seemed confused about the structure and purpose of organizations and became overwhelmed when meetings covered multiple subjects. He blamed immigrants for nearly every societal problem and uttered racist sentiments with shocking callousness.
This isn’t how President Trump is depicted in a new book by former deputy FBI director Andrew McCabe. Instead, it’s McCabe’s account of what it was like to work for then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
The FBI was better off when “you all only hired Irishmen,” Sessions said in one diatribe about the bureau’s workforce. “They were drunks but they could be trusted. Not like all those new people with nose rings and tattoos — who knows what they’re doing?”"

It’s a startling portrait that suggests that the Trump administration’s reputation for baseness and dysfunction has, if anything, been understated and too narrowly attributed to the president.
The description of Sessions is one of the most striking revelations in “The Threat,” a memoir that adds to a rapidly expanding collection of score-settling insider accounts of Trump-era Washington. McCabe’s is an important voice because of his position at the top of the bureau during a critical series of events, including the firing of FBI chief James Comey, the appointment of special counsel Robert S. Mueller, and the ensuing scorched-earth effort by Trump and his Republican allies to discredit the Russia probe and destroy public confidence in the nation’s top law enforcement agency. The work is insightful and occasionally provocative. The subtitle, “How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump,” all but equates the danger posed by al-Qaeda and the Islamic State to that of the current president.

But overall, the book isn’t the comprehensive account McCabe was presumably capable of delivering. He seems reluctant to reveal details about his role in conflicts at key moments, rarely shedding meaningful new light on areas of the Trump-Russia-FBI timeline established by Mueller, news organizations and previous authors.

McCabe is a keen observer of detail, particularly when it comes to the president’s pettiness. He describes how Trump arranges Oval Office encounters so that his advisers are forced to sit before him in “little schoolboy chairs” across the Resolute Desk. Prior presidents met with aides on couches in the center of the room, but Trump is always angling to make others feel smaller.
McCabe was known as a taciturn figure in the bureau, in contrast to the more garrulous Comey. His book reflects that penchant for brevity, with just 264 pages of text. Even so, he documents the president’s attempts to impair the Russia probe and his incessant attacks on the FBI, describing the stakes in sweeping, convincing language.
“Between the world of chaos and the world of order stands the rule of law,” McCabe writes. “Yet now the rule of law is under attack, including from the president himself.”

Inevitably, the book includes disturbing new detail about Trump’s subservience to Russian President Vladimir Putin. During an Oval Office briefing in July 2017, Trump refused to believe U.S. intelligence reports that North Korea had test-fired an intercontinental ballistic missile — a test that Kim Jong Un had called a Fourth of July “gift” to “the arrogant Americans.”
Trump dismissed the missile launch as a “hoax,” McCabe writes. “He thought that North Korea did not have the capability to launch such missiles. He said he knew this because Vladimir Putin had told him so.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/andrew-mccabes-disturbing-account-of-working-for-sessions-and-trump/2019/02/14/91eba5a4-3081-11e9-813a-0ab2f17e305b_story.html?utm_term=.9f66323c83ba

EscapeVelocity2020

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@DavidAnnArbor That is terrifying.  Anyone who thinks it's a breath of fresh air having a child at the controls of your Airbus A380 flight, even if it was just one time, better have a parachute!  The flight still has a long way to go before it reaches its destination.

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Corrupt politicians are like cockroaches.   If you do see them during the day, it's usually because roach overcrowding has forced them out into the open.