Author Topic: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.  (Read 5334 times)

shelivesthedream

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #50 on: October 11, 2017, 02:22:42 PM »
"Play it again, Sam" is not in Casablanca.

I cannot believe there is no such thing as a sugar high. Please explain further.

A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #51 on: October 11, 2017, 03:28:07 PM »
"Play it again, Sam" is not in Casablanca.

I cannot believe there is no such thing as a sugar high. Please explain further.

Basically it's a combination of kids being hyperactive because they think they should be, and parents over-estimating how hyper the kids are.

http://scopeblog.stanford.edu/2012/10/31/debunking-a-halloween-myth-sugar-and-hyperactivity/

Tass

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #52 on: October 11, 2017, 03:42:22 PM »
If you make a mistake, you do it BY accident. "On accident" is not a grammatically correct phrase.

I've loosened up on most grammar errors because hey, life is short, but this one continues to grate.

ixtap

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #53 on: October 11, 2017, 04:37:31 PM »
Being in "shock," in medical terms, is when the body isn't getting enough blood flow. There are a few reasons this can happen, such as sepsis, but being stunned after an event is not one of them, despite media accounts.

Bullshit. Witnessing trauma can most definitely induce medical shock, dilated eyes, cold, clammy skin and all.

I mean, I have been there done that, but perhaps there is a different medical school definition of shock than the one we watch out for as first responders (not a trained first responder, but trained by and work with many who use this definition and have had patients die)?

When I was a first responder, we learned about "shock" as a loss of blood, usually due to injury.

You've had patients die from being stunned due to seeing a traumatic event? That was probably due to adrenaline to an already damaged heart causing...loss of blood flow. So, yeah, it can happen but this is shock:

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000039.htm
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/shock

The dictionary definition is https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/shock, which is maybe what the media means.

Though this is kinda like arguing about 1999 not being the last year of the millennium. :)

Not me, first responders in my organization, including the one who taught my last first aid class. The topic comes up because nationally our organization is likely to encounter folks suffering from hypothermia, in which case you should definitely not perform preventative shock treatment (ie DO NOT elevate the legs).

I have personally been treated for shock that did not involve blood loss, but I am happy to say I survived. They think that it was the combination of the trauma witness and my naturally low blood pressure. As in, many a provider has taken multiple readings when I am in for a normal check up. I guess it makes sense that an event that could cause a drop in blood pressure would not be good for me.

Travis

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #54 on: October 11, 2017, 05:13:11 PM »
Nothing is free. Whether it be money, energy, raw materials, or time. Everything has a cost born by someone or something, even if it's not you to personally.
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Zap

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #55 on: October 11, 2017, 06:00:04 PM »


PCV Valve(what do you think the V means) ATM Machine...

Ventilation. Positive crankcase ventilation.

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #56 on: October 11, 2017, 10:52:59 PM »
At some point years ago I realized that if I ever wanted to have an important song played in public I would have to read the lyrics and see what singers had to say about it; WAAAY to many songs have less well known meanings. 

It's amazing how many people missed the subtle drug references in Semi-Charmed Life.

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NoraLenderbee

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #57 on: October 12, 2017, 04:17:32 PM »
If you make a mistake, you do it BY accident. "On accident" is not a grammatically correct phrase.

I've loosened up on most grammar errors because hey, life is short, but this one continues to grate.

But it happened all of the sudden.

Dave1442397

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #58 on: October 12, 2017, 04:53:47 PM »
ALDI'S


ALDI

I work with someone who says "Costco's" all the time. Grr!

 I don't know where she grew up, but she also says something is "mayan" instead of "mine".

Dee

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #59 on: October 12, 2017, 05:37:03 PM »
My favourite misheard song lyric: "It's like a free high when you're already baked." (For "It's like a free ride when you've already paid.")

Irritating misconception: that you pay the same rate of income tax on all your income (so that you might wind up making less after getting a raise).

I was surprised to hear recently that the misconception of putting a wallet or other object in someone's mouth during a seizure to prevent biting down on tongue has persisted.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #60 on: October 13, 2017, 05:24:04 AM »
If you make a mistake, you do it BY accident. "On accident" is not a grammatically correct phrase.

I've loosened up on most grammar errors because hey, life is short, but this one continues to grate.

But it happened all of the sudden.

In Norway the sports commentators on TV often comment that a sportsman is "unlucky", while in fact the sportsman made a clear mistake. DH and I would rather call it "incapacitated" or something in the same boat. I think "unlucky" has more to do with an external factor influencing your race, while this was so clearly the person's own mistake.

A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #61 on: October 13, 2017, 07:09:12 AM »
Listening to a history podcast reminded me of something else:

It is not consensus position that the Mongols could have taken over Europe and only retreated due to the death of their leader. Mongol forces had huge difficulties dealing with stone castles, which were everywhere in Western Europe at the time by the time the Mongols invaded. There's also a lack of major grassland west of Hungary to feed Mongol horses.

The Mongols would have had to do the same thing they did in China: stop being a horde and start being imperial rulers. Which they weren't exactly inclined to do, especially since Europe is a much less attractive, and much more distant raiding target than the Middle East or China.



The Mongols DID come back to Europe 40 years after their first major invasion, and it was a failure. Hungary and Poland had both massively improve their defenses and repelled the Mongols at the gates.

DoubleDown

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #62 on: October 13, 2017, 11:04:04 AM »
Here are some exercise/physiology misconceptions we see a lot:

1. That women shouldn't lift weights because they'll get "too muscular and bulked up." Yeah, fat chance (no pun intended). Maybe if you hit the gym for 3-4 hours every day doing for a few years doing very intense weight training with very heavy weights, religiously follow an extremely careful diet, and add some daily hormonal and protein supplements, you might start to build up some bulk you think is "too much." Otherwise, there is 0% chance of anyone (men included) getting "too muscular."

2. That our feet somehow need cushioning, or that our arches need "support." News flash: An arch IS support.

3. That stretching (especially static stretching) prior to exercise prevents injury. I'll admit following this for decades since it was the conventional wisdom, but recent evidence finds contrary (i.e., that injuries actually increase when athletes stretch prior to activity). Instead, we should just do a quick warm-up (like calisthenics or running in place) and perhaps some dynamic stretching prior to more rigorous exertion.
"Not all quotes on the internet are accurate" -- Abraham Lincoln

ketchup

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #63 on: October 13, 2017, 11:07:55 AM »
3. That stretching (especially static stretching) prior to exercise prevents injury. I'll admit following this for decades since it was the conventional wisdom, but recent evidence finds contrary (i.e., that injuries actually increase when athletes stretch prior to activity). Instead, we should just do a quick warm-up (like calisthenics or running in place) and perhaps some dynamic stretching prior to more rigorous exertion.
I've heard that stretching can make sense to do *after* a workout instead, is there merit to that?

GuitarStv

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #64 on: October 13, 2017, 11:24:32 AM »
3. That stretching (especially static stretching) prior to exercise prevents injury. I'll admit following this for decades since it was the conventional wisdom, but recent evidence finds contrary (i.e., that injuries actually increase when athletes stretch prior to activity). Instead, we should just do a quick warm-up (like calisthenics or running in place) and perhaps some dynamic stretching prior to more rigorous exertion.
I've heard that stretching can make sense to do *after* a workout instead, is there merit to that?

Yep.  I've always found that it reduces muscle soreness the next day.  It will also help you increase flexibility which is beneficial to reduce many common injuries.

pbkmaine

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #65 on: October 13, 2017, 11:29:33 AM »
Mary Magdalene was not a prostitute.

ketchup

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #66 on: October 13, 2017, 11:36:26 AM »
3. That stretching (especially static stretching) prior to exercise prevents injury. I'll admit following this for decades since it was the conventional wisdom, but recent evidence finds contrary (i.e., that injuries actually increase when athletes stretch prior to activity). Instead, we should just do a quick warm-up (like calisthenics or running in place) and perhaps some dynamic stretching prior to more rigorous exertion.
I've heard that stretching can make sense to do *after* a workout instead, is there merit to that?

Yep.  I've always found that it reduces muscle soreness the next day.  It will also help you increase flexibility which is beneficial to reduce many common injuries.
That's definitely something I could use.  I might be able to deadlift x lbs or run a y minute mile, but I'm about as flexible as 3/4" plywood.

MNBen

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #67 on: October 13, 2017, 11:40:08 AM »
In Norway the sports commentators on TV often comment that a sportsman is "unlucky", while in fact the sportsman made a clear mistake. DH and I would rather call it "incapacitated" or something in the same boat. I think "unlucky" has more to do with an external factor influencing your race, while this was so clearly the person's own mistake.

The sports commentator comment reminded me that somehow the use of "He's out with a concussion!" has turned into "He's out with a hamstring!" or "He's out with a knee!".   No, healthy people have a hamstring and a knee!

- Grammar & general knowledge police

Laura33

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #68 on: October 13, 2017, 02:45:14 PM »
2. That our feet somehow need cushioning, or that our arches need "support." News flash: An arch IS support.

Eh, gotta disagree here.  I have extremely high arches and have worn flats all my life, and I ended up with all sorts of issues -- plantar fasciitis, problems with the sesamoid bones, knee problems, you name it.  Custom arch supports have saved the day and returned me to normal activity.
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Kris

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #69 on: October 13, 2017, 02:49:57 PM »
2. That our feet somehow need cushioning, or that our arches need "support." News flash: An arch IS support.

Eh, gotta disagree here.  I have extremely high arches and have worn flats all my life, and I ended up with all sorts of issues -- plantar fasciitis, problems with the sesamoid bones, knee problems, you name it.  Custom arch supports have saved the day and returned me to normal activity.

I agree. I donít have particular problems in this area, but my husband does. Yes, arches are support. But when our feet evolved arches, we werenít walking around on concrete all day or spending long periods of time standing on hard surfaces.
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

Rubic

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #70 on: October 13, 2017, 03:26:21 PM »
The woman who won a million dollars from McDonald's for spilling hot coffee on her lap:

    The Truth About the McDonald's Coffee Lawsuit

I had to educate more than one attorney about the facts of this case,
but Adam Conover does it in a more entertaining manner.


DoubleDown

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #71 on: October 13, 2017, 03:40:34 PM »
2. That our feet somehow need cushioning, or that our arches need "support." News flash: An arch IS support.

Eh, gotta disagree here.  I have extremely high arches and have worn flats all my life, and I ended up with all sorts of issues -- plantar fasciitis, problems with the sesamoid bones, knee problems, you name it.  Custom arch supports have saved the day and returned me to normal activity.

I agree. I donít have particular problems in this area, but my husband does. Yes, arches are support. But when our feet evolved arches, we werenít walking around on concrete all day or spending long periods of time standing on hard surfaces.

I'm not talking about anyone with some kind of structural deformity which may necessitate some kind of intervention. It makes perfect sense that some may need various forms of assistance, just like someone may need orthodontics to correct bite problems with their jaw or teeth, etc. But for 99% of us, that's probably not the case.

Plus (and I don't know about anyone's personal situation, so bear with me here), we could/should ask: Are problems with the feet in these cases because of some kind of in-born problem, or are the problems in fact the result of wearing footwear our whole lives??? I can say that since I took up running barefoot about 10 years ago (mostly on concrete or asphalt), my feet, ankles, calves, etc. have gotten SO much stronger. My arch actually raised because of the strengthened muscles and my foot size went down about 1/2 size as a result. Perhaps improper footwear worn over decades were the culprits in your cases instead of the other way around. Wearing shoes removes the tactile feedback our feet normally would get, causing us to walk and run in unnatural and unhealthy ways. Plus they act like a cast does on a broken limb -- the limb atrophies because it doesn't get exercised in the cast. Our feet are engineering marvels, but we screw them by wearing shoes all the time.
"Not all quotes on the internet are accurate" -- Abraham Lincoln

Kris

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #72 on: October 13, 2017, 03:57:15 PM »
2. That our feet somehow need cushioning, or that our arches need "support." News flash: An arch IS support.

Eh, gotta disagree here.  I have extremely high arches and have worn flats all my life, and I ended up with all sorts of issues -- plantar fasciitis, problems with the sesamoid bones, knee problems, you name it.  Custom arch supports have saved the day and returned me to normal activity.

I agree. I donít have particular problems in this area, but my husband does. Yes, arches are support. But when our feet evolved arches, we werenít walking around on concrete all day or spending long periods of time standing on hard surfaces.

I'm not talking about anyone with some kind of structural deformity which may necessitate some kind of intervention. It makes perfect sense that some may need various forms of assistance, just like someone may need orthodontics to correct bite problems with their jaw or teeth, etc. But for 99% of us, that's probably not the case.

Plus (and I don't know about anyone's personal situation, so bear with me here), we could/should ask: Are problems with the feet in these cases because of some kind of in-born problem, or are the problems in fact the result of wearing footwear our whole lives??? I can say that since I took up running barefoot about 10 years ago (mostly on concrete or asphalt), my feet, ankles, calves, etc. have gotten SO much stronger. My arch actually raised because of the strengthened muscles and my foot size went down about 1/2 size as a result. Perhaps improper footwear worn over decades were the culprits in your cases instead of the other way around. Wearing shoes removes the tactile feedback our feet normally would get, causing us to walk and run in unnatural and unhealthy ways. Plus they act like a cast does on a broken limb -- the limb atrophies because it doesn't get exercised in the cast. Our feet are engineering marvels, but we screw them by wearing shoes all the time.

Yes, I think that's quite possible.

But, I think it's also just that -- possible.

Take us back to the time when we were all wandering around on dirt and grass all day, and give us a generation or so of walking around barefoot, and then I guess we'll see.
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

DoubleDown

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #73 on: October 13, 2017, 04:58:03 PM »
2. That our feet somehow need cushioning, or that our arches need "support." News flash: An arch IS support.

Eh, gotta disagree here.  I have extremely high arches and have worn flats all my life, and I ended up with all sorts of issues -- plantar fasciitis, problems with the sesamoid bones, knee problems, you name it.  Custom arch supports have saved the day and returned me to normal activity.

I agree. I donít have particular problems in this area, but my husband does. Yes, arches are support. But when our feet evolved arches, we werenít walking around on concrete all day or spending long periods of time standing on hard surfaces.

I'm not talking about anyone with some kind of structural deformity which may necessitate some kind of intervention. It makes perfect sense that some may need various forms of assistance, just like someone may need orthodontics to correct bite problems with their jaw or teeth, etc. But for 99% of us, that's probably not the case.

Plus (and I don't know about anyone's personal situation, so bear with me here), we could/should ask: Are problems with the feet in these cases because of some kind of in-born problem, or are the problems in fact the result of wearing footwear our whole lives??? I can say that since I took up running barefoot about 10 years ago (mostly on concrete or asphalt), my feet, ankles, calves, etc. have gotten SO much stronger. My arch actually raised because of the strengthened muscles and my foot size went down about 1/2 size as a result. Perhaps improper footwear worn over decades were the culprits in your cases instead of the other way around. Wearing shoes removes the tactile feedback our feet normally would get, causing us to walk and run in unnatural and unhealthy ways. Plus they act like a cast does on a broken limb -- the limb atrophies because it doesn't get exercised in the cast. Our feet are engineering marvels, but we screw them by wearing shoes all the time.

Yes, I think that's quite possible.

But, I think it's also just that -- possible.

Take us back to the time when we were all wandering around on dirt and grass all day, and give us a generation or so of walking around barefoot, and then I guess we'll see.

Agreed on every point! That's why I've always like you so much on this site :-)
"Not all quotes on the internet are accurate" -- Abraham Lincoln

Kris

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #74 on: October 13, 2017, 05:08:47 PM »
2. That our feet somehow need cushioning, or that our arches need "support." News flash: An arch IS support.

Eh, gotta disagree here.  I have extremely high arches and have worn flats all my life, and I ended up with all sorts of issues -- plantar fasciitis, problems with the sesamoid bones, knee problems, you name it.  Custom arch supports have saved the day and returned me to normal activity.

I agree. I donít have particular problems in this area, but my husband does. Yes, arches are support. But when our feet evolved arches, we werenít walking around on concrete all day or spending long periods of time standing on hard surfaces.

I'm not talking about anyone with some kind of structural deformity which may necessitate some kind of intervention. It makes perfect sense that some may need various forms of assistance, just like someone may need orthodontics to correct bite problems with their jaw or teeth, etc. But for 99% of us, that's probably not the case.

Plus (and I don't know about anyone's personal situation, so bear with me here), we could/should ask: Are problems with the feet in these cases because of some kind of in-born problem, or are the problems in fact the result of wearing footwear our whole lives??? I can say that since I took up running barefoot about 10 years ago (mostly on concrete or asphalt), my feet, ankles, calves, etc. have gotten SO much stronger. My arch actually raised because of the strengthened muscles and my foot size went down about 1/2 size as a result. Perhaps improper footwear worn over decades were the culprits in your cases instead of the other way around. Wearing shoes removes the tactile feedback our feet normally would get, causing us to walk and run in unnatural and unhealthy ways. Plus they act like a cast does on a broken limb -- the limb atrophies because it doesn't get exercised in the cast. Our feet are engineering marvels, but we screw them by wearing shoes all the time.

Yes, I think that's quite possible.

But, I think it's also just that -- possible.

Take us back to the time when we were all wandering around on dirt and grass all day, and give us a generation or so of walking around barefoot, and then I guess we'll see.

Agreed on every point! That's why I've always like you so much on this site :-)

Aww! Thanks! *blushes*

And also, for the record, I took up barefoot running a while ago, and really liked it. Until I apparently pushed too hard, and borked my ankles so bad that I had to stop. Twas a bummer. Plus  I live in Minnesota, so doing that in January wasnít going to be an option, anyway. But while it lasted, it was really great.
Please note: Libertarian4321 did not vote for either Hillary or Trump. He voted for Gary Johnson, who was the Libertarian candidate.

scottish

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #75 on: October 13, 2017, 05:37:17 PM »


PCV Valve(what do you think the V means) ATM Machine...

Ventilation. Positive crankcase ventilation.

Thank you.   That was bugging me.

scottish

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #76 on: October 13, 2017, 05:42:12 PM »
3. That stretching (especially static stretching) prior to exercise prevents injury. I'll admit following this for decades since it was the conventional wisdom, but recent evidence finds contrary (i.e., that injuries actually increase when athletes stretch prior to activity). Instead, we should just do a quick warm-up (like calisthenics or running in place) and perhaps some dynamic stretching prior to more rigorous exertion.
I've heard that stretching can make sense to do *after* a workout instead, is there merit to that?

Yep.  I've always found that it reduces muscle soreness the next day.  It will also help you increase flexibility which is beneficial to reduce many common injuries.
That's definitely something I could use.  I might be able to deadlift x lbs or run a y minute mile, but I'm about as flexible as 3/4" plywood.

Hmmm.   If I don't stretch before I run I get plantar fasciitis, achilles tendonopathy and patella femoral syndrome and it's not much fun at all.   I find that my muscles tighten up while I sleep and I need to do yoga and/or stretching when I get up in the morning just to keep everything working properly.

I always suspected that those studies were done on teenagers!   Is it true?   You guys can do endurance activities without stretching out first?

Travis

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #77 on: October 13, 2017, 06:17:37 PM »
3. That stretching (especially static stretching) prior to exercise prevents injury. I'll admit following this for decades since it was the conventional wisdom, but recent evidence finds contrary (i.e., that injuries actually increase when athletes stretch prior to activity). Instead, we should just do a quick warm-up (like calisthenics or running in place) and perhaps some dynamic stretching prior to more rigorous exertion.
I've heard that stretching can make sense to do *after* a workout instead, is there merit to that?

Yep.  I've always found that it reduces muscle soreness the next day.  It will also help you increase flexibility which is beneficial to reduce many common injuries.
That's definitely something I could use.  I might be able to deadlift x lbs or run a y minute mile, but I'm about as flexible as 3/4" plywood.

Hmmm.   If I don't stretch before I run I get plantar fasciitis, achilles tendonopathy and patella femoral syndrome and it's not much fun at all.   I find that my muscles tighten up while I sleep and I need to do yoga and/or stretching when I get up in the morning just to keep everything working properly.

I always suspected that those studies were done on teenagers!   Is it true?   You guys can do endurance activities without stretching out first?

I imagine those rules apply to folks who aren't already old and beat up.  If I don't stretch first, I mostly definitely will pull a muscle the moment I pick up something heavy or start to run.  The Army now subscribes to the "warm up first, stretch last" philosophy, but I think for some of us it's just too late and we simply do whatever works for us.
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GuitarStv

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #78 on: October 13, 2017, 09:21:24 PM »
3. That stretching (especially static stretching) prior to exercise prevents injury. I'll admit following this for decades since it was the conventional wisdom, but recent evidence finds contrary (i.e., that injuries actually increase when athletes stretch prior to activity). Instead, we should just do a quick warm-up (like calisthenics or running in place) and perhaps some dynamic stretching prior to more rigorous exertion.
I've heard that stretching can make sense to do *after* a workout instead, is there merit to that?

Yep.  I've always found that it reduces muscle soreness the next day.  It will also help you increase flexibility which is beneficial to reduce many common injuries.
That's definitely something I could use.  I might be able to deadlift x lbs or run a y minute mile, but I'm about as flexible as 3/4" plywood.

Hmmm.   If I don't stretch before I run I get plantar fasciitis, achilles tendonopathy and patella femoral syndrome and it's not much fun at all.   I find that my muscles tighten up while I sleep and I need to do yoga and/or stretching when I get up in the morning just to keep everything working properly.

I always suspected that those studies were done on teenagers!   Is it true?   You guys can do endurance activities without stretching out first?

I imagine those rules apply to folks who aren't already old and beat up.  If I don't stretch first, I mostly definitely will pull a muscle the moment I pick up something heavy or start to run.  The Army now subscribes to the "warm up first, stretch last" philosophy, but I think for some of us it's just too late and we simply do whatever works for us.

We always did dynamic stretching as part of warmups in martial arts . . . move through motions with slowly increasing range until you get close to your limits.  (Like, rather than do a hurdler's stretch, do leg raises . . . they start at about your waist, then advance to your naval, then your chest, then your head, then over your head.)  I've done something similar ever since and found that it works much better than static stretching before exercise.  I regularly do hundred plus km rides and heavy weight lifting with just a few minutes of dynamic leg stretching to limber up.

With static stretches they seem to work best at the end of a workout.  You're already loose, so you can push the static stretch further to increase flexibility.  (If you try to do this before being loose and warmed up you will run great risk of pulling a muscle.)

Just Joe

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #79 on: October 15, 2017, 04:14:12 PM »
Mary Magdalene was not a prostitute.

I was in my 20s before began to realize that religion was an interpretive thing that not everyone agreed on. Why? Nobody around that I could have have objective discussions with. Everyone I knew just repeated what they were told, apparently seldom questioning anything.

Self-study answered a ton of questions and opened a multitude of new questions. Thank you library and internet.

Got a little older and quit worrying about the details. Basically a non-topic to me these days.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2017, 04:17:18 PM by Just Joe »

Dicey

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #80 on: October 15, 2017, 11:03:27 PM »
Back to song lyrics...
Amy Grant wrote "It Takes A Little Time" which contains the following lyric:

"It takes a little time sometimes
To get the Titanic turned back around
"

Um...no. I'm pretty sure it didn't turn back around before it SANK.
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Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #81 on: October 16, 2017, 12:57:46 AM »
This could just be me:

Working from home means I am working from home. It does not mean I am at home watching TV and you can come over or ask me to watch your children or help you paint. Would you drop your children off at my office?

Psychstache

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #82 on: October 16, 2017, 09:14:47 AM »
2. "I'll Be Watching You" by The Police is about stalking, not love. Stop playing it as a love song, because that's hella creepy.

Sting has said this over and over - too bad people don't pay attention.

That would be "Every Breath You Take" rather than "I'll be watching you," which is a lyric in the song. This message has been brought to you by your anal retentive song name misconception correction service.


J Boogie

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #83 on: October 16, 2017, 10:17:28 AM »
Jesus of Nazareth was probably not born in Bethlehem.  He was most likely born in Nazareth.

David was born there, and crowned King of Israel there, so tradition held that the Messiah would come from Bethlehem.

The New Testament says that Joseph returned to his ancestral home of Bethlehem to participate in a census... and brought his 8-9 month pregnant wife with on this 90-mile journey.  There's only so much we can know definitively about history, but based on what we know about that census, I'd bet that Jesus was not born in Bethlehem.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Census_of_Quirinius


Travis

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #84 on: October 16, 2017, 12:54:52 PM »
This could just be me:

Working from home means I am working from home. It does not mean I am at home watching TV and you can come over or ask me to watch your children or help you paint. Would you drop your children off at my office?

My wife works from home. It's more difficult for her to get her work done because there are so many real or potential distractors. Her hours are logged online so it's not like she can just walk away for an hour and make it up somewhere. She still works defined hours and has to log in her lunch and coffee breaks.  It's great that she has no commute, but it's not some stress-free cakewalk.
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Timodeus

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #85 on: October 16, 2017, 02:35:49 PM »
1) I often hear people misquote the Bible as saying "Money is the root of all evil" as if money itself is evil, yet the actual verse is "The love of money is a root of all kinds of evil"

Similarly, a lot of people think the saying, "God helps those who helps themselves" comes from the Bible, but it doesn't.
That sounds more like a Ben Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac thing.

It's from Aesop's Fables and other early greek literature.

Hercules and the Waggoner
"A Waggoner was once driving a heavy load along a very muddy way. At last he came to a part of the road where the wheels sank halfway into the mire, and the more the horses pulled, the deeper sank the wheels. So the Waggoner threw down his whip, and knelt down and prayed to Hercules the Strong. "O Hercules, help me in this my hour of distress," quoth he. But Hercules appeared to him, and said:
"Tut, man, don't sprawl there. Get up and put your shoulder to the wheel."
The gods help them that help themselves.

AlanStache

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #86 on: October 16, 2017, 03:11:21 PM »
...
It's from Aesop's Fables and other early greek literature.

Hercules and the Waggoner
"A Waggoner was once driving a heavy load along a very muddy way. At last he came to a part of the road where the wheels sank halfway into the mire, and the more the horses pulled, the deeper sank the wheels. So the Waggoner threw down his whip, and knelt down and prayed to Hercules the Strong. "O Hercules, help me in this my hour of distress," quoth he. But Hercules appeared to him, and said:
"Tut, man, don't sprawl there. Get up and put your shoulder to the wheel."
The gods help them that help themselves.

Aesop stole that from Chris Rock. 
https://quotefancy.com/media/wallpaper/1600x900/19080-Chris-Rock-Quote-I-d-always-end-up-broken-down-on-the-highway-When.jpg
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runbikerun

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #87 on: October 18, 2017, 08:14:37 AM »
Explosions in space don't make a noise.

THANK YOU.

This drives me completely bananas every time. I think Serenity is one of very few movies I've seen which do it properly.

Ann

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #88 on: October 18, 2017, 11:05:19 AM »


PCV Valve(what do you think the V means) ATM Machine...

Ventilation. Positive crankcase ventilation.

Thank you.   That was bugging me.

I was thinking:  Packed Cell Volume.

We're both correct!  (and apparently Pollution Control Value and 24 other things).

DoubleDown

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #89 on: October 19, 2017, 11:02:13 AM »
Not sure how many people buy into TV/movie tropes, but some that bug me include:

1. Car doors do not deflect bullets. Neither do couches, drywall, or a flimsy wooden table flipped over to "shield" you

2. Car gas tanks (or any gas tanks) do not explode when shot with a bullet

3. The CIA/NSA/FBI/etc. do not have all that directed, real-time satellite coverage and other wizardry to instantly pull up a visual of an area. Like, "Get me a visual of that landing strip in Zaire." It's particularly great when the satellites or public surveillance cameras are able to "follow" a subject's movements, zoom in in real time, and even change angles to another vantage point for the benefit of the viewers

4. On a related note, they also do not have instantaneous access to all information in the universe on their laptops. Like the lead character will say to the technician on their laptop surrounded by monitors and other gadgets, "Pull up the schematics for that 747 aircraft. Who is on that flight? Cross-reference the passenger manifest with known terrorists who were in London yesterday. Now show me if any of those people had a degree in engineering and was small enough to fit in the avionics compartment." One second later, the technician, who is furiously typing on the laptop, as an entire dossier appears on screen, complete with photos of a bad guy in sunglasses and likely carrying a military rifle, will say: "Done. Imran Abudullah Khan, originally from Islamostan. Just arrived from Karachi yesterday. A real bad guy. Part of the Haqballah terrorist network. He definitely could have fit in that space and planted the bomb."
« Last Edit: October 19, 2017, 11:08:31 AM by DoubleDown »
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AlanStache

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #90 on: October 19, 2017, 11:50:16 AM »
4. On a related note, they also do not have instantaneous access to all information in the universe on their laptops. Like the lead character will say to the technician on their laptop surrounded by monitors and other gadgets, "Pull up the schematics for that 747 aircraft. Who is on that flight? Cross-reference the passenger manifest with known terrorists who were in London yesterday. Now show me if any of those people had a degree in engineering and was small enough to fit in the avionics compartment." One second later, the technician, who is furiously typing on the laptop, as an entire dossier appears on screen, complete with photos of a bad guy in sunglasses and likely carrying a military rifle, will say: "Done. Imran Abudullah Khan, originally from Islamostan. Just arrived from Karachi yesterday. A real bad guy. Part of the Haqballah terrorist network. He definitely could have fit in that space and planted the bomb."

So you have been watching The Black List.  :-)

I have had irl less than technical people think all us tech workers can do this sort of magic on the fly.  "Sorry no I can not take the Fourier transform of this stream of hex in my head."  It might get back to https://xkcd.com/1425/ where the difference between trivial and impossible can seem very arbitrary to someone 'on the outside'.

Also when the good guys merge two totally different technologies in 20sec to stop the bad guy; see Warehouse 13, Eureka, Stargate, etc.
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GuitarStv

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #91 on: October 19, 2017, 12:23:37 PM »
I hear Islamostan's a really nice place this time of year.  :P

markbike528CBX

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #92 on: October 19, 2017, 12:37:44 PM »
Not sure how many people buy into TV/movie tropes, but some that bug me include:

1. Car doors do not deflect bullets. Neither do couches, drywall, or a flimsy wooden table flipped over to "shield" you

2. Car gas tanks (or any gas tanks) do not explode when shot with a bullet

snip...

Movie trope irritation, silencer on revolver, totally silent, even though there is a gap between barrel and cylinder.
Automatics and one-shots can be silenced to one extent or another

ministashy

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #93 on: October 19, 2017, 12:38:30 PM »
Personal pet peeve:  'Survival of the fittest' does NOT mean that the strongest/most fit human/lion/insect/whatever is the one that survives.  It means that the organisms best suited to their specific environment are the ones most likely to survive. 

A Definite Beta Guy

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #94 on: October 19, 2017, 12:46:55 PM »
Personal pet peeve:  'Survival of the fittest' does NOT mean that the strongest/most fit human/lion/insect/whatever is the one that survives.  It means that the organisms best suited to their specific environment are the ones most likely to survive.
I remember some prof in college saying he preferred "survival of the fit" to get this across.

AlanStache

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #95 on: October 19, 2017, 12:48:26 PM »
Personal pet peeve:  'Survival of the fittest' does NOT mean that the strongest/most fit human/lion/insect/whatever is the one that survives.  It means that the organisms best suited to their specific environment are the ones most likely to survive.
I remember some prof in college saying he preferred "survival of the fit" to get this across.

Some people have the misconception that 'prof' is in some way bad or wrong; but I am not one of them.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2017, 07:14:14 AM by AlanStache »
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Travis

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #96 on: October 19, 2017, 01:49:36 PM »
4. On a related note, they also do not have instantaneous access to all information in the universe on their laptops. Like the lead character will say to the technician on their laptop surrounded by monitors and other gadgets, "Pull up the schematics for that 747 aircraft. Who is on that flight? Cross-reference the passenger manifest with known terrorists who were in London yesterday. Now show me if any of those people had a degree in engineering and was small enough to fit in the avionics compartment." One second later, the technician, who is furiously typing on the laptop, as an entire dossier appears on screen, complete with photos of a bad guy in sunglasses and likely carrying a military rifle, will say: "Done. Imran Abudullah Khan, originally from Islamostan. Just arrived from Karachi yesterday. A real bad guy. Part of the Haqballah terrorist network. He definitely could have fit in that space and planted the bomb."

So you have been watching The Black List.  :-)

I have had irl less than technical people think all us tech workers can do this sort of magic on the fly.  "Sorry no I can not take the Fourier transform of this stream of hex in my head."  It might get back to https://xkcd.com/1425/ where the difference between trivial and impossible can seem very arbitrary to someone 'on the outside'.

Also when the good guys merge two totally different technologies in 20sec to stop the bad guy; see Warehouse 13, Eureka, Stargate, etc.

My IT-related misconception ire is mostly aimed at Hollywood, but every now and then a real person has these wacky beliefs too. 

Most criminal hacking takes time more than it takes skill as the problem is usually the gullibility of the user.  I can build a $10 million network with the most expensive firewalls money can buy, but if you click on that link in your email that swears it is from the Bank of Nigeria, you can bypass it all and I can't stop them.  Very rarely can a hack do physical damage.  You can't "tell" a computer to blow itself up, but you can create a virus that gets so deep into a computer you need to replace half the components.  As DoubleDown stated above, you can't just snap your fingers and any random bit of information appears at your fingertips.  Google is great and gets you results in seconds. If it's not readily available on Google, grab a snack because you're going to be there a while. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JiLy7wZeqa4

Just prior to this scene, the bad guy asked his lackey for the radio frequency and call sign of the fighter pilot. Not only is this information not available within 5 seconds, it may not be on any internet at all.  Even if it was, a couple guys in a truck aren't going to get access to it.  I have access to that network and it could take me an hour unless I knew exactly where to look for it.  The radio the pilot was talking on probably isn't hooked up to the military internet, but there they go hacking away to have a conversation.


http://www.cracked.com/personal-experiences-1262-5-hacking-myths-you-probably-believe-thanks-to-movies.html

http://www.cracked.com/video_18953_5-stupid-things-movies-believe-about-hacking.html

These about sum it up.

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DoubleDown

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #97 on: October 19, 2017, 09:04:55 PM »
1. A lot of people wrongly believe that it's warmer in summer because the Earth is closer to the Sun. Of course that makes no sense at all since the seasons are reversed in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, but I guess they don't think it through that far. If you are under this misconception, it's warmer in the summer because the Earth is tilted on its axis and receives more direct rays from the sun in the summer (your hemisphere is "facing" the sun more directly).

2. While in orbit around the earth, objects and people are not weightless because they are outside of earth's gravitational field. They are still very much under the influence of earth's gravity. They are weightless because they are constantly "falling" to the earth (but being kept in orbit by maintaining a high velocity parallel to the earth's surface). Same as if you throw a baseball parallel to the ground -- the ball is falling to the earth but is doing most of its travel parallel to the ground. At much higher speeds, and with occasional boosts to the ball's speed, you could keep it perpetually going around the earth, still falling, and therefore weightless. The velocity has to be just enough to offset the gravitational pull to the ground, but not too fast such that you go off into space. At that equilibrium, you are weightless.
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Travis

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Re: Misconceptions people have that you'd like to correct.
« Reply #98 on: October 19, 2017, 09:26:36 PM »
1. A lot of people wrongly believe that it's warmer in summer because the Earth is closer to the Sun. Of course that makes no sense at all since the seasons are reversed in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, but I guess they don't think it through that far. If you are under this misconception, it's warmer in the summer because the Earth is tilted on its axis and receives more direct rays from the sun in the summer (your hemisphere is "facing" the sun more directly).



For you Netflixers out there, there's a BBC documentary called "Orbit" that explains everything having to do with the Earth's tilt, rotation, and orbit and everything on the planet those things affect. Really awesome show.
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