Author Topic: Grammar nazi  (Read 112626 times)

tmac

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #50 on: October 31, 2014, 02:07:17 PM »
I have my grammar nazi grandmother to thank for my twitches about this one:

Incorrect: "The reason is because...." It is redundant. The word reason implies because.

Correct: "The reason is that..."

CabinetGuy

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #51 on: October 31, 2014, 02:07:54 PM »
"Definately". I hate this one, and I hate it even more because I see a college grad doing it all the time. 

Sangwich instead of sandwich.


1967mama

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #52 on: October 31, 2014, 03:57:05 PM »
Walla instead of viola!

hdatontodo

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #53 on: October 31, 2014, 04:01:19 PM »
Walla instead of viola!
Uh it is voila

Dicey

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #54 on: October 31, 2014, 04:20:52 PM »
Payed vs. Paid.

As in "I just payed off my credit card." [Insert sound of screaming here.]

Also another memo favorite from the old boss archives:

"Thank you for your patients." No, the sender was not a medical professional.

I have no patience with that shit. I asked him what time my appointment was, but he didn't get it.
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Primm

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #55 on: October 31, 2014, 05:42:17 PM »
Walla instead of viola!
Uh it is voila

I think that's 1967mama's point, people who use walla instead of voila annoy her.

1967mama

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #56 on: October 31, 2014, 06:24:40 PM »
haha! typo! on voila! I've done that before on the forum, and somebody nailed me for it!

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #57 on: October 31, 2014, 06:28:03 PM »

One more pronunciation type of thing:   Jewelry is pronounced as it's written.   It is not Jool-a-ry.  It's Ju-El-Ree.  This seems so common now.

Jewellers sell jewellery. Jewelry is just bad old American English.
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Kriegsspiel

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #58 on: October 31, 2014, 06:35:19 PM »
I wouldn't've thought there were so many pet peeves to be had.

sheepstache

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #59 on: November 01, 2014, 06:42:25 AM »
I have my grammar nazi grandmother to thank for my twitches about this one:

Incorrect: "The reason is because...." It is redundant. The word reason implies because.

Correct: "The reason is that..."

Ha ha, yeah, stuff like that bugs me but doesn't make me mad, because I know it only bugs me because I happen to know the correct way but it's not something I expect everyone to pick up from everyday vernacular.

Like, things aren't "different than" because there's no quality that's greater or lesser being discussed, it's just different. So you say "different from."

Or, separately is with an "ar" while desperately is with an "er" but in american english we swallow both those syllables so I'm fine with people misspelling them in informal usage.


One more pronunciation type of thing:   Jewelry is pronounced as it's written.   It is not Jool-a-ry.  It's Ju-El-Ree.  This seems so common now.
Wait, where I come from it's jool-ry. Two syllables. Dialect thing? I'm also driven nuts by family pronounced with three syllables.

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #60 on: November 01, 2014, 07:30:02 AM »
Hampster.  Ugh - online ads are the best/worst.

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #61 on: November 01, 2014, 07:40:18 AM »
Congradulations.

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tmac

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #62 on: November 01, 2014, 07:47:15 AM »
I have my grammar nazi grandmother to thank for my twitches about this one:

Incorrect: "The reason is because...." It is redundant. The word reason implies because.

Correct: "The reason is that..."

Ha ha, yeah, stuff like that bugs me but doesn't make me mad, because I know it only bugs me because I happen to know the correct way but it's not something I expect everyone to pick up from everyday vernacular.

I restrain myself when I'm out and about, but I insist that my children say it properly. We're almost there. They say, "The reason is because-I-mean-is-that...."

It's like when I type the word third. I just can't get my fingers to do it right when I'm going fast, so it's spelled t-h-r-i-d-[backspace]-[backspace]-[backspace]-i-r-d.

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #63 on: November 01, 2014, 10:57:45 AM »

One more pronunciation type of thing:   Jewelry is pronounced as it's written.   It is not Jool-a-ry.  It's Ju-El-Ree.  This seems so common now.

Jewellers sell jewellery. Jewelry is just bad old American English.

I was prepared for a shaming, but I'm sticking to my guns and following Grammarist.com's explanation. One "L" is preferred in today's American English. 



One more pronunciation type of thing:   Jewelry is pronounced as it's written.   It is not Jool-a-ry.  It's Ju-El-Ree.  This seems so common now.
Wait, where I come from it's jool-ry. Two syllables. Dialect thing? I'm also driven nuts by family pronounced with three syllables.
Yeah, sheepstache, that's pretty much how I say it too unless I'm trying to make a point that if a third syllable is added, put it in the right place to represent tits actual spelling.
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smilla

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #64 on: November 01, 2014, 12:31:06 PM »
I've noticed a disturbing trend of people dropping 'to be' in typing . . . writing that something 'needs done' makes me wince.

I think that might be a southern thing. I used to hear that all the time in the South, but I don't hear it too much in the mid-Atlantic region.

I first heard Scottish friends say it (needs done, needs fixed, needs murdered etc.), but I do hear it occasionally from other people these days and I suspect I have said it myself.  I like it.  It has a ring of brisk practicality to me.  :)  I have yet to see it written, aside from the above.

P.S.  Was it a faux pas to use :) in a grammar thread?

daverobev

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #65 on: November 01, 2014, 03:40:08 PM »

One more pronunciation type of thing:   Jewelry is pronounced as it's written.   It is not Jool-a-ry.  It's Ju-El-Ree.  This seems so common now.

Jewellers sell jewellery. Jewelry is just bad old American English.

I was prepared for a shaming, but I'm sticking to my guns and following Grammarist.com's explanation. One "L" is preferred in today's American English. 

Ah, sorry, I meant "bad old" not "bad, old". I know "jewelry" is current in American English. I just think American English is bad. In the English they speak in England, it is jewellery.

I am, of course, English.
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sheepstache

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #66 on: November 01, 2014, 04:14:05 PM »
to represent tits actual spelling.

I wouldn't normally snicker at typos on a forum, but in this thread they seem particularly funny.

Kriegsspiel

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #67 on: November 01, 2014, 06:21:46 PM »
I thought it breast not to mention it, since they're obviously trying so hard.

BlueHouse

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #68 on: November 01, 2014, 10:27:28 PM »
to represent tits actual spelling.

I wouldn't normally snicker at typos on a forum, but in this thread they seem particularly funny.

I think that's a sign it's time for me to quit this post!  :)
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Andy_in_Aus

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #69 on: November 02, 2014, 12:09:30 AM »
It's been said that Shakespeare would be furious at what we have done to the English language since his time.

Conversely,  future generations are going to end up with a version of English that is nothing like what we are all complaining about (quite legitimately imo).

In the end, it's an evolving beast.

hdatontodo

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #70 on: November 02, 2014, 06:00:22 AM »
It's been said that Shakespeare would be furious at what we have done to the English language since his time.

Conversely,  future generations are going to end up with a version of English that is nothing like what we are all complaining about (quite legitimately imo).

In the end, it's an evolving beast.
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GuitarStv

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #71 on: November 03, 2014, 06:33:49 AM »
I thought it breast not to mention it, since they're obviously trying so hard.

It's always one thing or amother with you people . . .

rocksinmyhead

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #72 on: November 03, 2014, 07:18:48 AM »
"I did good."  <-- Oh really?  Were you Mother Theresa or a boy scout?  You mean, 'did well'?

"Today's special: Pancake's"  <-- Oh, you bloody greengrocers' apostrophe!  How I hate thee.  (Ironically, there are huge debates about where to put the apostrophe in "greengrocers' apostrophe".)

Haha, I never knew it was called a greengrocers' apostrophe. Love it (the nickname... hate the error!)

RetiredAt63

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #73 on: November 03, 2014, 08:15:21 AM »
Our fingers and our brains need to communicate more (better?). You don't want to see what my fingers do to "students". And of course "form" and "from", "teh" and "the", and  "adn" and "and".  I do a lot of spelling correction.

I love all the above posts.  I did much too much proofreading as a teacher, and now I can't stop.

We need Latin in schools!  I.e. is id est, e.g. is exemplia gratia, et. al. is et alia, and so on.  If people knew what the abbreviations were short for, maybe they would use them properly?  And, a period goes after every abbreviation, so i.e. is i.e. not ie. The plural of radius is radii, and the plural of ulna is ulnae, because they are from Latin. 

Of course English is weird, since it has incorporated so many languages.  The plural of mouse is mice, but the plural of house is houses. The plural of goose is geese, but the plural of moose is moose.  I thought I had trouble learning the 16 irregular verbs in French, but English - I pity people coming to it as adults.

It's like when I type the word third. I just can't get my fingers to do it right when I'm going fast, so it's spelled t-h-r-i-d-[backspace]-[backspace]-[backspace]-i-r-d.
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rocksinmyhead

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #74 on: November 03, 2014, 08:43:52 AM »
I've noticed a disturbing trend of people dropping 'to be' in typing . . . writing that something 'needs done' makes me wince.

I think that might be a southern thing. I used to hear that all the time in the South, but I don't hear it too much in the mid-Atlantic region.

I first heard Scottish friends say it (needs done, needs fixed, needs murdered etc.), but I do hear it occasionally from other people these days and I suspect I have said it myself.  I like it.  It has a ring of brisk practicality to me.  :)  I have yet to see it written, aside from the above.

P.S.  Was it a faux pas to use :) in a grammar thread?

It's definitely a thing in parts of Pennsylvania too. I started saying it as a joke to make fun of my friends and boyfriend, and now sometimes I accidentally say it for real! Ahhh!!

hybrid

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #75 on: November 03, 2014, 01:58:15 PM »
Surprised no one has hit on this one yet, maybe I missed it. For me, it's the improper use of the word Nazi. Absolutely nothing compares to the Nazis, and yet all sorts of people casually refer to grammar nazis, soup nazis, feminazis, fill-in-your-nazis as if the comparison is in order. I used to as well until someone set me straight.
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sheepstache

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #76 on: November 03, 2014, 02:41:09 PM »
Surprised no one has hit on this one yet, maybe I missed it. For me, it's the improper use of the word Nazi. Absolutely nothing compares to the Nazis, and yet all sorts of people casually refer to grammar nazis, soup nazis, feminazis, fill-in-your-nazis as if the comparison is in order. I used to as well until someone set me straight.

Oh I always think it's interesting that the term has evolved this way though. Even though Nazis are unquestionably the bad guys, as a suffix it conveys a measure of respect. Grammar nazis are vicious, intolerant and inhuman, sure, but they're also good at grammar, damned good, better than everyone else. I think it says really interesting things about our attitudes towards competency and morality.

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #77 on: November 03, 2014, 02:44:18 PM »
Surprised no one has hit on this one yet, maybe I missed it. For me, it's the improper use of the word Nazi. Absolutely nothing compares to the Nazis, and yet all sorts of people casually refer to grammar nazis, soup nazis, feminazis, fill-in-your-nazis as if the comparison is in order. I used to as well until someone set me straight.

Grammar Khmer Rouge somehow just doesn't have the same ring.  :D

I understand what you're saying, though.
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Gerard

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #78 on: November 03, 2014, 02:54:23 PM »
OK, someone's had at the "nazi" part, so I'll have a go at the "grammar". Almost none of the things on here are grammar. Some are pronunciation, some are punctuation, but most are spelling, which is at the same time so trivial that it shouldn't annoy me ('cause it's so unrelated to intelligence, and for most of the history of English wasn't standardized), but so fix-able that it does.

I will point out that many of the actual grammar and pronunciation things on here -- seen, needs done, srimp, sangwich, different than/from, won't be beat, I went to the store Monday, jewel-uh-ry, since/because -- are actually okay in some or even most varieties of English, and most of them used to be more widespread. "Seen" is even part of a list of features the linguist Jack Chambers calls "angloversals", because they're so widespread. "Different from/than/to" varies even in highly formal writing and speech, depending on which (English-speaking) country you're in.

So <edit:for these features, it's> definitely not a matter of individual speakers "who should know better" screwing up through laziness or defiance. It's people speaking a variety of English that's different from (than?) yours. If someone from the eastern US got pissed off at me because I pronounce "cot" and "caught" the same, I'd be pissed off right back.

Sorry if I'm harrumphy about this, but at work I sometimes have to deal with idiot colleagues who give bad marks to papers written by students with different (usually regional) grammars. As a result, local dialect-speaking students get worse marks than people who sound like the prof, even if they know more about the actual subject.

That said, anyone over 12 who spells "lose" as "loose" should be struck about the head and neck with a ball peen hammer.

<edited for clarity of anaphor.>
« Last Edit: November 03, 2014, 03:02:47 PM by Gerard »
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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #79 on: November 03, 2014, 02:56:12 PM »
I think there are a few things that still equate to Nazis.  I grew up with white supremacists, for example, and the Nazi analogy is useful.  Also people who would use/misuse eugenics. People who blitzkrieg. Or other people who have committed or been victims of mass genocide, e.g. Native Americans, Armenians, Rwandans, Japan and China, aboriginal Australians, and the Turks.

It's not like the Nazis had a patent on evil, there were just a lot more movies made about the holocaust than other, sometimes larger, events.  So this sanctimonious feigned grievance over appropriation of the word Nazi is probably misplaced.  Unless you're really way more upset about Christopher Columbus than you are about Hitler.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2014, 06:28:29 PM by sol »

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #80 on: November 03, 2014, 04:17:48 PM »
"Couple" instead of "couple of."

Wrong: "I need to pick up a couple things."

Right: "I need to pick up a couple of things."
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Hadilly

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #81 on: November 03, 2014, 05:48:14 PM »
I hate it when people use "well" and "good" interchangeably. Also, "reign" and "rein" are very different, yet the former is frequently misused (on this forum no less). While I'm at it, "hesitant" does not mean "reticent" ever!

Grid

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #82 on: November 03, 2014, 07:06:33 PM »


I'd love to know what annoys others. Just so I can put my little peeve into perspective.

Grammar Nazis (unless you're reading my PhD dissertation) are up there with the sub woofer in my neighbors apt  :)

subwoofer*, unless you're talking about your neighbor that really likes Penn Station. 

I am surprised I have something to contribute.  I admittedly have to watch myself with homophones (their/they're/there), though others' simple mistakes with grammar and spelling still bother me.  I come fresh from the realm of online dating, and if I had a nickel for every time I read part of an "easy going" woman's profile, I'd have about $5. 

Similar to the issue with "easygoing", a misuse of dashes bothers me.  It's a half-baked attempt at grammar, not a "half baked" attempt.  It's a poverty-stricken family, not one that's "poverty stricken". 

Lastly, I abhor American English's current grammar conventions regarding the use of quotes.  I won't go into detail, but I totally ranted about it in the Off-Topic section of this forum a few months back.  Before I posted, I didn't know that the conventions I was using were the same conventions already in place for the Australians and the British, which is awesome.  One of those conventions is to only place those things inside the quotes that are truly being quoted, including punctuation.  Perhaps some of you were bothered by my use of ""easygoing"," earlier.  No apologies there!

Edit:  please don't take offense surfhb, I only comment in the spirit of the thread!  Plus the visual of a sucky neighbor that likes foot-long sandwiches is entertaining.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2014, 07:13:44 PM by Grid »
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Gerard

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #83 on: November 03, 2014, 07:36:36 PM »
Oh! I've got two new ones! People who say "dash" when they mean "hyphen" (they're different things), and those who say "quotes" when they mean "quotations".

(Actually, I don't care about either... I'm just having a go at Grid!) :-)
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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #84 on: November 04, 2014, 07:04:02 AM »
Wow and I thought my knickers were in a knot over poor grammar, misspellings and improper punctuation.

I've nothing on some of you!
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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #85 on: November 04, 2014, 07:39:52 AM »
Gerard, I like the distinction you draw between regional usage and true grammar or spelling issues.  I’ve lived throughout the US and the UK, and have enjoyed picking up useful or entertaining figures of speech.  Apparently US speakers use the term “perSnickety”, while the Scots prefer “pernickety”.  As you can imagine, they’re a bit… (wait for it…) persnickety about the whole debate.  Now that I’m in Texas, I heartily embrace “ya’ll” as a wonderfully useful word that helps avoid the ambiguity of “you”.  I’m sure things like that, combined with the true mistakes we all make while speaking, makes me seem less verbally competent to some listeners.  Oh well: you can’t please them all!

One issue that still bothers me is fewer/less.  It was a sad day when Target changed the signs above their express checkouts to read “10 items or less”.  I understand slipping up while speaking, but using the wrong term on signage in a major store is less forgivable.

Grid

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #86 on: November 04, 2014, 08:13:52 AM »
Oh! I've got two new ones! People who say "dash" when they mean "hyphen" (they're different things), and those who say "quotes" when they mean "quotations".

(Actually, I don't care about either... I'm just having a go at Grid!) :-)

You have points there!  I've never thought about either of them.  :)  Haha.
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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #87 on: November 04, 2014, 08:16:33 AM »

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #88 on: November 04, 2014, 08:30:42 AM »
As an offender of grammatical errors, I apologize.  I wish I could keep all the errors straight.  In my defense in middle school I went to my English Teacher and asked for help (at a public school).  She refused to help me or even get me a tutor to help me with it saying she didn't understand what I was having trouble with.  Granted I should have went to my parents and sought help elsewhere but at the time I took that to mean it did not matter.  While going through College I did learn a bit more and have straightened out some to a degree but still have room to go.  For some of us Grammar just is not something that pops out to us.  It doesn't come easy and the time to study and learn all of it even if we want to just doesn't exist. 

I should find a website or a course that would help me learn it.  Sucking at grammar doesn't make someone stupid.  The same as not being able to swing a hammer doesn't make someone stupid.  Insert any activity and the statement works.

Sorry Gramar Nazi's, I do try.

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #89 on: November 05, 2014, 10:36:44 AM »
Initially I opened this topic to see the response to the video I had in mind. That being said, certain things (most of which have been mentioned earlier) take away from the actual point. I would almost consider it a weakness.

Anyway, this is a Grammar Nazi:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4vf8N6GpdM
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daverobev

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #90 on: November 05, 2014, 05:35:03 PM »
As an offender of grammatical errors, I apologize.  I wish I could keep all the errors straight.  In my defense in middle school I went to my English Teacher and asked for help (at a public school).  She refused to help me or even get me a tutor to help me with it saying she didn't understand what I was having trouble with.  Granted I should have went to my parents and sought help elsewhere but at the time I took that to mean it did not matter.  While going through College I did learn a bit more and have straightened out some to a degree but still have room to go.  For some of us Grammar just is not something that pops out to us.  It doesn't come easy and the time to study and learn all of it even if we want to just doesn't exist. 

I should find a website or a course that would help me learn it.  Sucking at grammar doesn't make someone stupid.  The same as not being able to swing a hammer doesn't make someone stupid.  Insert any activity and the statement works.

Sorry Gramar Nazi's, I do try.

Intended with hugs and smiles, not finger waving:

Granted I should have *gone* to my parents. I went. English certainly is an odd language.

The apostrophe denotes belonging. David's car. It can also denote missing letters; e.g. David's a grammar Nazi. The letter 's' with no apostrophe denotes plurality. There were many cars. I am, therefore, a grammar Nazi; many people in this thread are grammar Nazis.

(My FIL has a saying, un-asked for advice is criticism. I like the saying. I am working on it...)
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justajane

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #91 on: November 05, 2014, 06:11:08 PM »
This is a regional faux pas, but I can't stand it when people around the Midwest say "had went" instead of "had gone." This is especially unfortunate, because my husband does it.

The other day I heard my six year old say it. I informed him that even though his father says this and I love him despite this tendency, I will continue to correct him until he excises that from his speech.

Goldielocks

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #92 on: November 05, 2014, 06:37:09 PM »
It's "rein in," not "reign in."

After all the good ones that were posted, this one actually had me laughing out loud (LOL).


Boy, that is some mental image.   I think my "drama queen" daughter could demonstrate "reign in" quite nicely.

Two of mine: 

As someone noted, the loss of "ly" on the end of adverbs.   e.g., When I say, "He completed that task quickly", I cringe when the "ly" is left off by others.

Secondly, an uncommon error has stayed in my mind for over 20 years -- I reviewed a professionally prepared environmental report, that used the term "Heads of cattles", over and over again for 200 pages.
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My largest peeve, is the use of tablets that auto correct, or make it difficult to write / type using the on-screen keyboard.  This is the source of far too many of my own horrible errors in this forum.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2014, 07:01:53 PM by goldielocks »

DollarBill

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #93 on: November 05, 2014, 07:46:56 PM »
Initially I opened this topic to see the response to the video I had in mind. That being said, certain things (most of which have been mentioned earlier) take away from the actual point. I would almost consider it a weakness.

Anyway, this is a Grammar Nazi:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4vf8N6GpdM
Nice one!

domustachesgrowinhouston

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #94 on: November 05, 2014, 08:15:37 PM »
Word Crimes...lol
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Gv0H-vPoDc

Funny video.  Seems we have a number of cunning linguists here as well.

sheepstache

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #95 on: November 05, 2014, 09:02:01 PM »
Let's not forget people whose curiosity is peaked.

But, yeah, I definitely appreciate that language is a living thing and there are a lot of things native speakers say that are legitimately part of the language even if they don't belong in a formal setting. Which is sort of why several of my pet peeves had to do with writing in a stilted, unnatural style. (The famous "misunderestimated me" is another one. Not sure why 'he's just a plain-spoken guy' was the common excuse for stuff like that. That's sort of the opposite way plain-spoken people talk.)

Secondly, an uncommon error has stayed in my mind for over 20 years -- I reviewed a professionally prepared environmental report, that used the term "Heads of cattles", over and over again for 200 pages.
Not a grammar thing but something I saw in a cover letter introducing the writer's novel that has haunted me ever since. " . . . suddenly the facade grinds to a halt."  Pretty sure charade was the word she was reaching for there.

Sorry Gramar Nazi's, I do try.

The apostrophe denotes belonging. David's car. It can also denote missing letters; e.g. David's a grammar Nazi. The letter 's' with no apostrophe denotes plurality. There were many cars. I am, therefore, a grammar Nazi; many people in this thread are grammar Nazis.

I think he was having a go at us.

Initially I opened this topic to see the response to the video I had in mind. That being said, certain things (most of which have been mentioned earlier) take away from the actual point. I would almost consider it a weakness.

Anyway, this is a Grammar Nazi:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4vf8N6GpdM
Nice one!
Ah, I thought it might be this one.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3y0CD2CoCs

solon

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #96 on: November 06, 2014, 04:44:17 AM »
Not to go all sentence fragment on you.


usmarine1975

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #97 on: November 06, 2014, 06:56:39 AM »

Sorry Gramar Nazi's, I do try.

The apostrophe denotes belonging. David's car. It can also denote missing letters; e.g. David's a grammar Nazi. The letter 's' with no apostrophe denotes plurality. There were many cars. I am, therefore, a grammar Nazi; many people in this thread are grammar Nazis.


I think he was having a go at us.

I really do wish I was having a go at you.  Sadly my grammar is just that bad.  I need to take a couple weekends to study the rules and learn them.  Anyone have any good websites or tools to use?

frugalnacho

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #98 on: November 06, 2014, 07:14:51 AM »

Sorry Gramar Nazi's, I do try.

The apostrophe denotes belonging. David's car. It can also denote missing letters; e.g. David's a grammar Nazi. The letter 's' with no apostrophe denotes plurality. There were many cars. I am, therefore, a grammar Nazi; many people in this thread are grammar Nazis.


I think he was having a go at us.

I really do wish I was having a go at you.  Sadly my grammar is just that bad.  I need to take a couple weekends to study the rules and learn them.  Anyone have any good websites or tools to use?

I know people that have been living and speaking the language for their entire lives and still make mistakes.  If a couple weekends was enough for you to learn and correct all your mistakes you would already be an english genius.

Grid

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #99 on: November 06, 2014, 07:43:35 AM »


I really do wish I was having a go at you.  Sadly my grammar is just that bad.  I need to take a couple weekends to study the rules and learn them.  Anyone have any good websites or tools to use?

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/ is always a useful site.   I think you would find clicking on "General Writing" and then looking at the "Mechanics", "Grammar", and "Writing" sections to be most useful.
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