Author Topic: Grammar nazi  (Read 117139 times)

Basenji

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #450 on: August 25, 2015, 11:49:48 AM »
Are you people serious?  The grammar nazis want to create secret grammar police?  You can practice grammar national socialism in the confines of your thread until you're blue in the face, but there's no way the rest of us are going to sit back and let you establish the grammar gestapo.
You're correct, we need to change our political metaphor to something more palatable, how about Grammar Spring? Non-Violence Grammar? Slow Words Movement? Occupy English?

KittyCat

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #451 on: August 25, 2015, 12:07:12 PM »
This one was mentioned before: using "whom" incorrectly.

Another one that gets to me is the confusion between "me" and "I", and it happens quite frequently. "Me and her will do it." "Want to go to the store with so-and-so and I?"

MDM

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #452 on: August 25, 2015, 12:53:14 PM »
Are you people serious?  The grammar nazis want to create secret grammar police?  You can practice grammar national socialism in the confines of your thread until you're blue in the face, but there's no way the rest of us are going to sit back and let you establish the grammar gestapo.
You're correct, we need to change our political metaphor to something more palatable, how about Grammar Spring? Non-Violence Grammar? Slow Words Movement? Occupy English?
If there's going to be a secret grammar police, then make it the Grammar Inquisition, because...
...nobody expects the Grammar Inquisition!

Basenji

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #453 on: August 25, 2015, 02:17:36 PM »
Are you people serious?  The grammar nazis want to create secret grammar police?  You can practice grammar national socialism in the confines of your thread until you're blue in the face, but there's no way the rest of us are going to sit back and let you establish the grammar gestapo.
You're correct, we need to change our political metaphor to something more palatable, how about Grammar Spring? Non-Violence Grammar? Slow Words Movement? Occupy English?
If there's going to be a secret grammar police, then make it the Grammar Inquisition, because...
...nobody expects the Grammar Inquisition!

Damn it, so good. So so good.

Maigahane

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #454 on: August 25, 2015, 02:29:50 PM »
General opinions on double contractions?

Example I've probably used most: wouldn't've. As in, "Y'all wouldn't've gone to the movies if the weather was nice out."
Ha. I've done double contractions a few times, though always when writing as a dialogue.

I just spent way too long reading this entire thread and I'm surprised that no one has mentioned since/sense/cents. I have two friends that mix those up every time! "I haven't seen you sense last week", or even better "I haven't seen you cents forever". And these two friends read a lot so prior commenters' theories that reading helps grammar/spelling isn't foolproof

Plus I just spent a lot of time proofreading my comment checking for errors

mlejw6

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #455 on: August 26, 2015, 07:39:33 AM »
Are you people serious?  The grammar nazis want to create secret grammar police?  You can practice grammar national socialism in the confines of your thread until you're blue in the face, but there's no way the rest of us are going to sit back and let you establish the grammar gestapo.
You're correct, we need to change our political metaphor to something more palatable, how about Grammar Spring? Non-Violence Grammar? Slow Words Movement? Occupy English?
If there's going to be a secret grammar police, then make it the Grammar Inquisition, because...
...nobody expects the Grammar Inquisition!

MDM wins the thread!
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Cheddar Stacker

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #456 on: August 27, 2015, 09:58:20 AM »
since/sense/cents

Why not throw scents into that mix?

The English language is simply crazy.
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shelivesthedream

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #457 on: August 27, 2015, 03:03:55 PM »

I just spent way too long reading this entire thread and I'm surprised that no one has mentioned since/sense/cents. I have two friends that mix those up every time! "I haven't seen you sense last week", or even better "I haven't seen you cents forever".

OMFG NO. That cannot be real.

sol

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #458 on: August 27, 2015, 05:58:18 PM »

I just spent way too long reading this entire thread and I'm surprised that no one has mentioned since/sense/cents. I have two friends that mix those up every time! "I haven't seen you sense last week", or even better "I haven't seen you cents forever".

OMFG NO. That cannot be real.

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MMMaybe

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #459 on: August 27, 2015, 11:35:59 PM »
I need this...(maybe we all do!)

FLA

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #460 on: August 27, 2015, 11:45:05 PM »
I cannot tell you how often I was called the HoSPIC nurse over the years.  That always made me cringe, just having that whole Spic reference even though they didn't know the real name for hospice.  No one was being racist. 

If you are a Grammar Nazi, nursing is not for you.  You meet the sweetest people who have horrible grammar and you do not care.  Even if your inner GN is pushing to come out. 

BlueHouse

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #461 on: August 28, 2015, 04:16:32 AM »
What's up with "acrost the board"

Do people spell it this way too, or is this just some weird pronunciation.  I'm talking about highly educated people.
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Maigahane

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #462 on: August 28, 2015, 07:32:49 AM »
since/sense/cents

Why not throw scents into that mix?

The English language is simply crazy.
Lol, I thought of that one after posting this but haven't seen that one get messed up like the others


I just spent way too long reading this entire thread and I'm surprised that no one has mentioned since/sense/cents. I have two friends that mix those up every time! "I haven't seen you sense last week", or even better "I haven't seen you cents forever".

OMFG NO. That cannot be real.
I wish it wasn't real, I really do

TheBuddha

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #463 on: August 28, 2015, 11:29:25 AM »
I hear "heighth" a lot, but don't often see it written that way.
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AllieVaulter

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #464 on: August 28, 2015, 02:53:07 PM »
I'm not a grammar nazi at all.  I read a lot, but I'm hard pressed to actually know the terminology associated with grammar.  I usually make word choices based on "which sounds right".  (Apparently, I'm also in the camp that thinks quotations go with the phrase and don't always end outside punctuation...)  I've found this thread thoroughly fascinating.  And educational.  Thanks for that.

Despite my non-expertise, I'll put another vote in the Oxford comma camp.  I always use them.  As Cathy said, they just make things more clear.  I'm all for simple and clear speech.  (This is also why my writing tends towards short sentences.  I'm uncertain of the rules for more complicated and longer sentences, so I just don't write them).  Even here, I'm thinking "hmmm... the comma in that last sentence is probably supposed to be a semicolon... 

Here's my confession:  When I'm talking, I'll say "drownding" instead of "drowning" and "demond" instead of "demon".  For absolutely no reason.  I know it's the wrong word.  I would never type or write it that way.  And it's not even like I can blame my upbringing because I'm fairly certain that my parents don't say those words incorrectly.  I've been working on trying to fix them, but it's hard to change ingrained speech patterns.  My dad inserts "r" into random words (mostly warshing and Warshington) which is a regional thing.  Anyone know of a region that inserts "d" into random words? 

RidinTheAsama

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #465 on: August 28, 2015, 05:13:24 PM »
Here's my confession:  When I'm talking, I'll say "drownding" instead of "drowning" and "demond" instead of "demon".  For absolutely no reason.  I know it's the wrong word.  I would never type or write it that way.  And it's not even like I can blame my upbringing because I'm fairly certain that my parents don't say those words incorrectly.  I've been working on trying to fix them, but it's hard to change ingrained speech patterns.  My dad inserts "r" into random words (mostly warshing and Warshington) which is a regional thing.  Anyone know of a region that inserts "d" into random words?

Unless you are in some odd lines of work I hope you are not often having to speak about drownding demonds!  And with the word use being so infrequent I can see why you are still working to break your bad habits - not enough repetition!

I recommend seeking out an old and haunted rec-center where you could become a life guard or pool maintenance professional.  Should provide good opportunities to accelerate your learning curve.

Gerard

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #466 on: September 03, 2015, 11:41:06 AM »
  Anyone know of a region that inserts "d" into random words?

This is almost certainly hypercorrection -- people who speak one of the many dialects that simplify syllable-final consonant clusters (as in "I get aroun'" for "I get around") often insert some extra Ts and Ds just to be on the safe side. Sometimes a few words become especially frequently hypercorrected. Drown>drownd is one of them; another I've heard pretty often is "hearst" for "hearse". It's basically the same as the "Warshington" example you give, except for t/d instead of R. (Another one I hear a lot is "Chicargo").
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RetiredAt63

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #467 on: September 04, 2015, 10:22:36 AM »
I've heard drownded and spayded, I assume they meant drowned and spayed.
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AllieVaulter

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #468 on: September 04, 2015, 10:46:24 AM »
I've heard drownded and spayded, I assume they meant drowned and spayed.

I don't know...  I could easily see "spaded" mean "getting brained with a spade".  It all depends on whether or not there's a "y" in the word.  :)

kiwichick

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #469 on: September 05, 2015, 05:05:52 PM »
People who say "brought" when they clearly mean "bought". It does my head in.

MMMaybe

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #470 on: September 05, 2015, 06:47:49 PM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/34149177/harry-styles-proves-hes-a-stickler-for-good-grammar


This is the amusing moment Harry Styles corrected a One Direction fan's bad grammar after spotting her sign in the crowd at a show in the US.
The singer, 21, motioned for the banner reading 'Hi Harry. Your so nice' to be handed to him, before wasting no time in fixing the omission.
He took out a pen and added the missing apostrophe and letter 'e' to make it 'You're so nice'.




RetiredAt63

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #471 on: September 08, 2015, 11:44:47 AM »
Good for him.  It irks me when there is bad grammar in a song, just to get the rhyme, especially when I can come up with an equally good, grammatically correct, alternate. 

Think Bryan Adams "Run to You"  "She says her love for me could never die
But that'd change if she ever found out about you and I"

He could have said "She says her love for me will always be
But that'd change if she ever found out about you and me"

Thank you all for the chance to vent  ;-)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/34149177/harry-styles-proves-hes-a-stickler-for-good-grammar


This is the amusing moment Harry Styles corrected a One Direction fan's bad grammar after spotting her sign in the crowd at a show in the US.
The singer, 21, motioned for the banner reading 'Hi Harry. Your so nice' to be handed to him, before wasting no time in fixing the omission.
He took out a pen and added the missing apostrophe and letter 'e' to make it 'You're so nice'.
The measure of civilization is how people treat one another.

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MandalayVA

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #472 on: September 23, 2015, 07:21:31 AM »
Reviving the thread to point out a new thing that pings my Grammar Nazi--when the hell did "hangry" become a thing?  I'm seeing it more and more.  Seriously, is it that hard to type "hungry?" I knew it was a thing when Mrs. Frugalwoods used it; I literally said "oh, God, no, not you too."
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Maigahane

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #473 on: September 23, 2015, 08:23:20 AM »
Hangry is when you're so hungry you're angry and need a snickers :)

MandalayVA

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #474 on: September 23, 2015, 09:39:27 AM »
Hangry is when you're so hungry you're angry and need a snickers :)

I don't watch TV that much so I must have missed that commercial.  :D
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Philociraptor

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #475 on: September 23, 2015, 10:33:02 AM »
Hangry is when you're so hungry you're angry and need a snickers :)

I don't watch TV that much so I must have missed that commercial.  :D

It was not born on TV, keep your smugness in check; "hangry" has been around quite awhile, it's a combination of hungry and angry, minus the Snickers bit.

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #476 on: September 23, 2015, 03:18:11 PM »
I always find it funny when someone is correcting someone's grammar or spelling and makes several grammatical and spelling mistakes while doing so.

I tend to notice when people mix up its and it's. I think I notice it more often because it's one of those mistakes that ends up making it into professional advertisements.

Bardo

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #477 on: September 27, 2015, 06:35:07 AM »
Reviving the thread to point out a new thing that pings my Grammar Nazi--when the hell did "hangry" become a thing?  I'm seeing it more and more.  Seriously, is it that hard to type "hungry?" I knew it was a thing when Mrs. Frugalwoods used it; I literally said "oh, God, no, not you too."

What do you mean by "become a thing"?  What does that even mean?




Grid

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #478 on: September 27, 2015, 12:38:18 PM »
Reviving the thread to point out a new thing that pings my Grammar Nazi--when the hell did "hangry" become a thing?  I'm seeing it more and more.  Seriously, is it that hard to type "hungry?" I knew it was a thing when Mrs. Frugalwoods used it; I literally said "oh, God, no, not you too."

What do you mean by "become a thing"?  What does that even mean?

When something "becomes a thing", to me it means that it's become popular enough somewhere to be used for communication without it necessarily having to be defined every time it's used.  For instance, on Imgur, "catsnake" became a thing sometime in the last year.  It's now just another (more entertaining) way to say "ferret".
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Bardo

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #479 on: September 28, 2015, 05:32:38 AM »
Reviving the thread to point out a new thing that pings my Grammar Nazi--when the hell did "hangry" become a thing?  I'm seeing it more and more.  Seriously, is it that hard to type "hungry?" I knew it was a thing when Mrs. Frugalwoods used it; I literally said "oh, God, no, not you too."

What do you mean by "become a thing"?  What does that even mean?

When something "becomes a thing", to me it means that it's become popular enough somewhere to be used for communication without it necessarily having to be defined every time it's used.  For instance, on Imgur, "catsnake" became a thing sometime in the last year.  It's now just another (more entertaining) way to say "ferret".

I see.  Thanks.  I suppose that as a Grammar Nazi I always have somewhat of an internal recoil towards slang and neologisms. 

sol

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #480 on: September 28, 2015, 08:29:28 AM »
I always find it funny when someone is correcting someone's grammar or spelling and makes several grammatical and spelling mistakes while doing so.

With that in mind, I suggest you review all 10 pages of this thread and make us a list of the grammar and spelling mistakes people have made while correcting someone else's grammar and spelling mistakes.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #481 on: October 02, 2015, 08:00:02 AM »
Capitals!  I have seen people mention frozen on various web sites, and I think of the adjective, as in "my dinner is frozen, I need to thaw it", and they are talking about Frozen, the Disney movie.  Uppercase/lowercase makes a difference!  Remember the old Polish/polish reminder?

Of course incorrect homonyms are all over the place, sigh.  Rain/rein/reign seems to be a hard one for people to manage these days.
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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #482 on: October 02, 2015, 09:55:37 AM »
Actual quote from the FB page of a "friend" from high school:

"Just wondering how many people stayed up to watch the lunar eclipse I tried to get pics of it not so good need more money for bigger lense lol"


That is all. 
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RetiredAt63

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #483 on: October 02, 2015, 01:13:41 PM »
Textese - no grammar, no punctuation, no spelling.

Remember Avril Lavigne's Sk8er boi?

I once saw an email a student sent to a professor asking for a major favour.  It looked like it was composed on a cell phone.  It was so bad that once we removed all identifying information, we all used it as an example for our students of "what not to do!".

Actual quote from the FB page of a "friend" from high school:

"Just wondering how many people stayed up to watch the lunar eclipse I tried to get pics of it not so good need more money for bigger lense lol"


That is all.
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TheBuddha

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #484 on: October 02, 2015, 05:18:19 PM »
Is the word "feeling" being replaced by "feel"?

Quote from reddit: "I know this feel"
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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #485 on: October 03, 2015, 01:10:52 AM »
That's a neologism and a fun one at that. Normally you'll use it with an 's' - so if a movie's a tearjerker you say it gives you all the feels or that you have all the feels, for example.

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #486 on: October 03, 2015, 08:56:14 AM »
That's a neologism and a fun one at that. ...

A descriptivist might argue that all of the "errors" we discuss in this thread are really just emerging usages that haven't widely caught on yet, which is actually true to a certain extent. Whether something is perceived as an error or as a neologism depends in large part on the audience.
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Gerard

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #487 on: October 03, 2015, 01:15:18 PM »
A descriptivist might argue that all of the "errors" we discuss in this thread are really just emerging usages that haven't widely caught on yet, which is actually true to a certain extent. Whether something is perceived as an error or as a neologism depends in large part on the audience.

Yes. Although presumably intent and shared knowledge contribute, too. If somebody says "feels" instead of "feelings", they know that they're playing with the language, and expect the audience to know it, too. Whereas if they say "give it to him and I", they're either misunderstanding a prescriptive rule, but contributing to an emerging usage, or that (emerged?) usage is the only one they know.
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Kris

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #488 on: October 03, 2015, 01:29:34 PM »
A descriptivist might argue that all of the "errors" we discuss in this thread are really just emerging usages that haven't widely caught on yet, which is actually true to a certain extent. Whether something is perceived as an error or as a neologism depends in large part on the audience.

Yes. Although presumably intent and shared knowledge contribute, too. If somebody says "feels" instead of "feelings", they know that they're playing with the language, and expect the audience to know it, too. Whereas if they say "give it to him and I", they're either misunderstanding a prescriptive rule, but contributing to an emerging usage, or that (emerged?) usage is the only one they know.

Exactly,  I very much enjoy the playfulness and rich imagery of many neologisms.  The potential for creative expression is one of the things I find most pleasurable about language in general.  But I find it irritating to the extreme when I see language being changed by default because legions of people don't understand grammar
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shelivesthedream

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #489 on: October 04, 2015, 01:57:43 AM »
A descriptivist might argue that all of the "errors" we discuss in this thread are really just emerging usages that haven't widely caught on yet, which is actually true to a certain extent. Whether something is perceived as an error or as a neologism depends in large part on the audience.

Yes. Although presumably intent and shared knowledge contribute, too. If somebody says "feels" instead of "feelings", they know that they're playing with the language, and expect the audience to know it, too. Whereas if they say "give it to him and I", they're either misunderstanding a prescriptive rule, but contributing to an emerging usage, or that (emerged?) usage is the only one they know.

That's always my scale for judgement - do I think they are saying X because they don't know that it's supposed to be Y (fiery doom! Imbecile! Repent of your stupid ways!), or because they are making a kind of joke by deliberately being wrong/colloquial (I do this a lot online because it adds tone to an otherwise flat piece of text)?

TheBuddha

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #490 on: October 07, 2015, 07:32:30 PM »
Not grammar but pronunciation - nobody seems to pronounce the "i" in the word "verbiage". It comes out "verbage". Drives me nuts.
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Gerard

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #491 on: October 08, 2015, 03:40:28 PM »
Not grammar but pronunciation - nobody seems to pronounce the "i" in the word "verbiage". It comes out "verbage". Drives me nuts.

Is there maybe a dialect thing here, or a distinction I'm not aware of? I hear the same thing with "foliage". Maybe it's by analogy with carriage and marriage?
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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #492 on: October 08, 2015, 04:06:15 PM »
In another thread, and at our local grocery store, things "can't be beat". Can't be beaten, surely.

Going back two pages, but I'd never heard or seen "stanch" vs "staunch". "He was a staunch advocate of xyz", for example. And yes, "staunch the flow".

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TheBuddha

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #493 on: October 08, 2015, 04:38:31 PM »
Not grammar but pronunciation - nobody seems to pronounce the "i" in the word "verbiage". It comes out "verbage". Drives me nuts.

Is there maybe a dialect thing here, or a distinction I'm not aware of? I hear the same thing with "foliage". Maybe it's by analogy with carriage and marriage?

The "carriage-marriage" analogy is a good one and I hadn't thought of it. I do think it started as a dialect thing (southern) but has caught on everywhere. There are certain sounds dropped in southern speech, for example in North Carolina the word "field" will be pronounced "filled". So I can understand southerners saying "verbage", but the rest of the country has no excuse.
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Gerard

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #494 on: October 09, 2015, 06:23:36 AM »
The recurring discussion here of whether people who do things different are breaking rules or using different rules reminded me of a paper I heard recently, about "u-fronting", the way young folks and southerners and Californians pronounce words like "dude" with their tongue raised farther forward in the mouth, so that sometimes people write it "dewd" to show the pronunciation they mean. The rules for it are actually quite cool, so I thought my fellow word nerds would enjoy it:

1. Pronounce all words where old Northerners say "oo" (rude, moon, toot) as "ew" (rewd, mewn, tewt)...
2. ...unless they're followed by an L (i.e., pool, tool, fool, don't become pewl, tewl, fewl)...
3. ...unless that word with a following L is "cool" (i.e., cool does become kewl)...
4. ...unless that "cool" actually means the temperature (i.e., temperature cool doesn't become kewl).

Language is fun!
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Philociraptor

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #495 on: October 09, 2015, 09:13:41 AM »
The recurring discussion here of whether people who do things different are breaking rules or using different rules reminded me of a paper I heard recently, about "u-fronting", the way young folks and southerners and Californians pronounce words like "dude" with their tongue raised farther forward in the mouth, so that sometimes people write it "dewd" to show the pronunciation they mean. The rules for it are actually quite cool, so I thought my fellow word nerds would enjoy it:

1. Pronounce all words where old Northerners say "oo" (rude, moon, toot) as "ew" (rewd, mewn, tewt)...
2. ...unless they're followed by an L (i.e., pool, tool, fool, don't become pewl, tewl, fewl)...
3. ...unless that word with a following L is "cool" (i.e., cool does become kewl)...
4. ...unless that "cool" actually means the temperature (i.e., temperature cool doesn't become kewl).

Language is fun!

I heart linguistics!

Kris

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #496 on: October 10, 2015, 09:24:12 AM »
I imagine this might have been mentioned further up, but I have seen this so many times in the past few days, and it's driving me crazy:

Why is it so hard for people to make a plural possessive?!  I just don't understand how adults don't know that if you're talking about the house that belongs to your parents, it's your parents' house, not your parent's house!!!
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TheBuddha

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #497 on: October 10, 2015, 12:14:34 PM »
I imagine this might have been mentioned further up, but I have seen this so many times in the past few days, and it's driving me crazy:

Why is it so hard for people to make a plural possessive?!  I just don't understand how adults don't know that if you're talking about the house that belongs to your parents, it's your parents' house, not your parent's house!!!

Because we're living in a post-knowledge world :) Carrying around knowledge in your head is so 20th century, that's what computers are for. If spellcheck doesn't flag it, it must be correct.

Either that, or it was always this way and the internet just exposes us to the writing of many more people.

I've developed a new respect for English teachers. They must weep every day.


« Last Edit: October 10, 2015, 12:17:01 PM by TheBuddha »
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sol

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #498 on: October 10, 2015, 01:12:58 PM »
Why is it so hard for people to make a plural possessive?!  I just don't understand how adults don't know that if you're talking about the house that belongs to your parents, it's your parents' house, not your parent's house!!!

Plural possessives are the only version of that construction that doesn't pronounce both instances of the letter S.  When you talk about the boss's house or James's house the princess's house, you say them both.  If you put a bunch of princesses together in a house, then you don't pronounce the possessive S when you talk about the princesses' house.

So I get why people get that one wrong. It's pronounced identically to the house belonging to a single parent, it's just more confusing because we hardly ever talk about the house belonging to a single parent because parents are typically a matched set, and thus almost always referred to in the plural.

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #499 on: October 11, 2015, 01:30:09 PM »
I saw a new one today in the forums - "tea totaler". But then maybe it was appropriate, because the thread's OP considered tea a recreational drug.