Author Topic: Grammar nazi  (Read 107156 times)

Primm

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Grammar nazi
« on: October 29, 2014, 05:39:44 PM »
Do you know what annoys me more than any grammatical error in recent times? People's tendency to use "then" instead of "than".

"...earning less then their parents".

"...working more then 40 hours a week".

It's fucking THAN, people!!! Then refers to time.

*sigh*

I'd love to know what annoys others. Just so I can put my little peeve into perspective.


Russ

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2014, 05:49:29 PM »
I'd love to know what annoys others.

grammar nazis?

Primm

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2014, 06:00:15 PM »
I'd love to know what annoys others.

grammar nazis?

:P  Failure to capitalise noted and ignored.

I'm not referring to casual language, by the way. I don't have a problem with that. It's using the completely wrong word, one that doesn't even mean what you intend, that gets my goat.

fartface

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2014, 06:11:22 PM »
My boss said, "for all intensive purposes" which made me laugh inwardly.

My friend sent me an email that read, "my next store neighbor has ammonia" which made me laugh outwardly.

My sister always says, "I seen him..." I keep telling her the word 'seen' requires the linking verb 'have' in front of it. She is a hillbilly.

Also, what has happened to -ly in our language? I didn't run quick...I ran quickly.


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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2014, 06:12:02 PM »
I'd love to know what annoys others.

grammar nazis?

:P  Failure to capitalise noted and ignored.

I'm not referring to casual language, by the way. I don't have a problem with that. It's using the completely wrong word, one that doesn't even mean what you intend, that gets my goat.

I had a Dutch roommate once who really had a hard time understanding the distinction, so maybe you could assume people aren't native english speakers to sooth yourself?
That's the sort of stuff that gets me too, because it's basic spoken english and easily corrected by just looking back over what you wrote. Why am I expected to spend time reading something that the author didn't even bother to read?

Andy_in_Aus

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2014, 06:21:14 PM »


Incorrect use of their, there, and they're, holy shit.

Also multiple exclamation marks at the end of a sentence, these are the two things that keep me awake at night.

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2014, 07:10:33 PM »


I'd love to know what annoys others. Just so I can put my little peeve into perspective.

Grammar Nazis (unless you're reading my PhD dissertation) are up there with the sub woofer in my neighbors apt  :)
« Last Edit: October 29, 2014, 07:12:48 PM by surfhb »

BlueHouse

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2014, 07:26:14 PM »
Improper use of reflexive pronouns. 

And I know this isn't related to grammar, but it does start with the mouth:  The sound of people chewing.  (sorry, I have nowhere else to say this)
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tracylayton

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2014, 08:02:57 PM »
I know somebody who spells  "think" as "thank" even though I explained to them that it is incorrect...can't teach an old dog new tricks,

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2014, 08:13:15 PM »
And I know this isn't related to grammar, but it does start with the mouth:  The sound of people chewing.  (sorry, I have nowhere else to say this)

+100

I have bad hearing. Background noise is amplified 5x more than conversation right in front of me. I hear chewing louder than anything.

As to the topic, I've loosened up. It doesn't matter unless someone is judging your writing ability. I'm not here to judge that. I notice it, but I try to let it slide since its irrelevant to the discussion. It is distracting and messes with my "flow" when reading, but not worth losing sleep.
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BlueHouse

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2014, 08:30:17 PM »
backwards formation of verbs:  incentivize; conversate (yeah, really);
imply/infer
principle/principal (especially on this site, when people are being sooooo judgemental and then make this error)
antidotal/anecdotal
since/because

Actually as I age I'm getting more relaxed and they don't bother me as much. 

I work with a guy who is Asian and doesn't speak English at home.  He's been here since he was two, so I used to feel he had no excuse for not speaking proper English, but he just doesn't practice it that much.  In any case, he will never advance at work because he cannot communicate well enough.  People just don't want to be bothered trying to figure out what he means when he says something that doesn't make sense.  It's a shame because he's smart, just lazy when it comes to language and words.   
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Charm14

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2014, 09:43:44 PM »
It bothers me when people mix up there/their/they're, or two/to/too, or you're/your.

If you have a problem with "alot", check out this comic:
http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.ca/2010/04/alot-is-better-than-you-at-everything.html

vern

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2014, 12:22:08 AM »
When people say, "I could care less."

When they mean, "I couldn't care less."
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secondcor521

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2014, 12:30:34 AM »
affect vs. effect, although that one is sort of understandable since the verbs have somewhat similar meanings.

it's vs. its, theirs vs. there's also.

Apple's "Think different" slogan will probably irritate me until the day I die.  I try not to think about it at all.

For me all of these sorts of things jump out of the page at me and I can't help noticing them.  I've taken to providing two lists whenever someone asks:  a list of substantive comments and a list of nitpicks.  That way people who care can fix both lists, and those folks of the more relaxed persuasion can just focus on the first one.

Also, I vacillate between being a grammar Nazi and appreciating the creative way people use and evolve the language.
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1967mama

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #14 on: October 30, 2014, 01:02:56 AM »
I once had a teacher tell me she would make antidotal comments on a child's report card.

marty998

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2014, 01:50:00 AM »
I know somebody who spells  "think" as "thank" even though I explained to them that it is incorrect...can't teach an old dog new tricks,

Well, who'd have thunk it!

I don't like it when people say "I didn't do nothing" and variations.

Cheddar Stacker

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #16 on: October 30, 2014, 06:40:36 AM »
I'd love to know what annoys others.

grammar nazis?
Ha Ha! Yeah. There allways tellen us how to speak write when their never write they're selves.  Their should be a place we can send alot of them for help.

Well played spartana.
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Milizard

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2014, 07:06:17 AM »
This isn't grammar so much as spelling, but seeing "rediculous" and "boarders" is like nails on a chalkboard to me.

MandalayVA

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2014, 07:55:14 AM »
Where to begin ...

"Alright" is ALL WRONG.  It's "all right."

The "there/they're/their" and "your/you're" confusion.  Oops, forgot "to/too/two."

You want to "lose" weight, not "loose" weight (this one really drives me up the wall).

Shortening words--"totes" instead of "totally," "deets" instead of "details," "redic" instead of "ridiculous," etc.

People who actually say "Oh em gee" instead of "oh, my God."  This is common in my workplace.

And don't even get me started on textspeak.  My oldest niece (25) sends me an e-mail or IMs me and it takes me half an hour to decipher it.  It's like reading illiterate hieroglyphics.

« Last Edit: October 30, 2014, 08:19:19 AM by MandalayVA »
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frugalnacho

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #19 on: October 30, 2014, 08:00:01 AM »
It bothers me when people mix up there/their/they're, or two/to/too, or you're/your.

If you have a problem with "alot", check out this comic:
http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.ca/2010/04/alot-is-better-than-you-at-everything.html

I don't remember where, but I saw a comic that basically said "alot" is not a word, just like "abunch", "afew", etc are not words.  That has always stuck with me and I think about it every time I see "alot" or "a lot". 

NumberCruncher

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #20 on: October 30, 2014, 08:37:11 AM »


Incorrect use of their, there, and they're, holy shit.

Also multiple exclamation marks at the end of a sentence, these are the two things that keep me awake at night.

I know what you mean!!! Ignorant people - their always messing that up. ;)  Couldn't resist...


I mostly hate it when grammar gets ambiguous. Language is meant to communicate, not confuse.

daverobev

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #21 on: October 30, 2014, 08:47:27 AM »
"I went to the store Monday" vs "I went to the store on Monday".

"Won't be beat!" is the strapline of a supermarket here.

Incorrect use of take and bring.

It's and its. Your and you're.
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GuitarStv

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2014, 09:43:03 AM »
I've noticed a disturbing trend of people dropping 'to be' in typing . . . writing that something 'needs done' makes me wince.

secondcor521

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2014, 02:51:05 PM »
I remembered another one, but it's pronunciation, not grammar.  Whatev's. (<- ;-P )

Pronouncing "et cetera" as either "ek-SET-ruh" or "et-SET-ruh".  I believe it is pronounced as it is spelled -- at least that is how my Latin teacher taught me:  "Et SET-er-uh".  Although the "et-SET-ruh" might just be sloppy, not wrong.

Things I like in terms of creative language are things like "google" becoming a verb, and the way Mark Twain wrote the accents of his characters in Huck Finn.
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secondcor521

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #24 on: October 30, 2014, 02:52:49 PM »
Oh, and another one is people misusing Latin abbreviations.  i.e. and e.g. mean two different things.  And it is not "ie." and "eg."  But now I'm getting really picky.
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Bob W

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #25 on: October 30, 2014, 03:06:39 PM »
ppl wh thnk tht lngg is st n stn, nd cnt adpt
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BlueHouse

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #26 on: October 30, 2014, 06:31:04 PM »
I've noticed a disturbing trend of people dropping 'to be' in typing . . . writing that something 'needs done' makes me wince.

I think that might be a southern thing. I used to hear that all the time in the South, but I don't hear it too much in the mid-Atlantic region.

You want to "lose" weight, not "loose" weight (this one really drives me up the wall).
Yes!  This one is so much easier than desert/dessert!

One more pronunciation type of thing:   Jewelry is pronounced as it's written.   It is not Jool-a-ry.  It's Ju-El-Ree.  This seems so common now.

I really like the subtleties of great words, so it kind of bothers me when so many people misuse the words that the meaning/hidden meanings/ shibboleths are lost.  I used to love the word gourmand, but now so many people use it incorrectly that it seems to have lost its meaning.  I liked being smug and judgemental in using that word.   I also really hate that the new "standard" thanks to spell-check for spelling is Judgmental vs. judgemental.   Also Advisor vs. Adviser.  The word "advisor" is part of my company name and I can no longer include it in a document without the squiggly red line under it.  Thanks Microsoft!

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bonjourliz

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #27 on: October 30, 2014, 07:49:47 PM »
Craigslist has some terrible English.  I have seen chester drawers and rod iron for sale. 

sol

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #28 on: October 30, 2014, 08:00:56 PM »
The Oatmeal shares your pain:  http://theoatmeal.com/comics/misspelling

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #29 on: October 30, 2014, 08:17:32 PM »
...so maybe you could assume people aren't native english speakers to sooth yourself?

Sooth: Noun meaning truth (archaic)
Soothe: Verb (with object) meaning gently calm (a person or their feelings)

So, sheepstache, I am confused. Was that your point? Were you just being funny? Or did you not take time to read your own comment? I just can't tell.
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sheepstache

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #30 on: October 30, 2014, 09:27:59 PM »
...so maybe you could assume people aren't native english speakers to sooth yourself?

Sooth: Noun meaning truth (archaic)
Soothe: Verb (with object) meaning gently calm (a person or their feelings)

So, sheepstache, I am confused. Was that your point? Were you just being funny? Or did you not take time to read your own comment? I just can't tell.

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BlueHouse

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #31 on: October 31, 2014, 05:07:19 AM »
Did I miss it or did we completely overlook irregardless? 
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MayDay

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #32 on: October 31, 2014, 06:29:01 AM »
Like the pp with the Asian coworker not getting ahead, I don't care how you talk/type, but my brain will get confused trying to decipher your incorrect word choices, and then there is a higher chance I won't try to interact with you in the future.

And also you will appear uneducated which will subconsciously and/or consciously make me think you aren't very smart.

 It's pretty easy to tell when someone isn't a native English speaker (accent and general sentence structure and word choice) and they get a free pass.  Grammar doesn't bother me much within reason but using the wrong word just hurts my brain. 
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stripey

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #33 on: October 31, 2014, 06:33:50 AM »
Did I miss it or did we completely overlook irregardless?

^ Bingo. One of the most annoying incorrect words ever.

BlueHouse

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #34 on: October 31, 2014, 06:43:23 AM »
Just curious, how many people were taught the subjunctive mood and how many still use it?  (If I were rich vs If I was rich)

I notice as time goes by and I have fewer people to converse with that were taught this manner of speech, it's disappearing from my conversations. Sometimes I hear myself and then think ooooh, where did THAT come from? 
I've also read that there was never any basis in the language for subjunctive mood, but that it was introduced in some fancy school in England in the 19th century as a shibboleth to identify who did or didn't have proper breeding, schooling, etc. there is something to say about language evolution if words can be bred IN for the exclusive purpose of selective exclusion.  But I guess that's where all slang starts too? 
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LibrarIan

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #35 on: October 31, 2014, 07:08:51 AM »
It annoys me when people say, "I resemble that remark." When someone says this, they are almost never attempting to be humorous and they really mean to say, "I resent that remark."

Using travesty instead of tragedy. They really don't mean the same thing.

GuitarStv

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #36 on: October 31, 2014, 07:17:56 AM »
A travesty can often be a tragedy, and a many tragedies are caused by travesties.

NumberCruncher

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #37 on: October 31, 2014, 07:22:38 AM »
Just curious, how many people were taught the subjunctive mood and how many still use it?  (If I were rich vs If I was rich)

I notice as time goes by and I have fewer people to converse with that were taught this manner of speech, it's disappearing from my conversations. Sometimes I hear myself and then think ooooh, where did THAT come from? 
I've also read that there was never any basis in the language for subjunctive mood, but that it was introduced in some fancy school in England in the 19th century as a shibboleth to identify who did or didn't have proper breeding, schooling, etc. there is something to say about language evolution if words can be bred IN for the exclusive purpose of selective exclusion.  But I guess that's where all slang starts too?

I'm in my 20s and was taught the distinction by my grammar nazi mom (but don't remember it being taught in school).


Malaysia41

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #38 on: October 31, 2014, 07:31:08 AM »
Improper use of reflexive pronouns. 

And I know this isn't related to grammar, but it does start with the mouth:  The sound of people chewing.  (sorry, I have nowhere else to say this)

My dad chews very loudly.  The sheer volume of it has annoyed me since as far back as I can remember.   In the last decade I realized I'm just like him.  It sucks.  When I chew, my mouth is closed and I'm not trying to be loud.  So when other people are near I chew slower.  That seems to soften it.  Alone, I don't care.  I just chew.

Does this make you like me less Cheddar Stacker?  I'd understand if it did. 

Full disclosure: I have allergies and sometimes, just sometimes, I open-mouth breathe and wheeze.  Yet, I loathe open-mouth breathers!  Oh the journey of self-discovery sure does soften our mighty judgements.  Does it not?

Okay getting back to grammar: it irks me when I see a mixing up of the subject & direct object forms.  It's 'between you an ME' goddammit!  Just because 'I' sounds fancy doesn't make it grammatically correct when referring to one's self as a direct object.  Hint: use me.  No, no no, don't use ME, use the word 'me'.  Shit, see?  This is how I get myself into trouble.
 
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Malaysia41

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #39 on: October 31, 2014, 07:38:52 AM »
Just curious, how many people were taught the subjunctive mood and how many still use it?  (If I were rich vs If I was rich)

I notice as time goes by and I have fewer people to converse with that were taught this manner of speech, it's disappearing from my conversations. Sometimes I hear myself and then think ooooh, where did THAT come from? 
I've also read that there was never any basis in the language for subjunctive mood, but that it was introduced in some fancy school in England in the 19th century as a shibboleth to identify who did or didn't have proper breeding, schooling, etc. there is something to say about language evolution if words can be bred IN for the exclusive purpose of selective exclusion.  But I guess that's where all slang starts too?

I was taught this.

« Last Edit: October 31, 2014, 07:41:51 AM by Malaysia41 »
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MandalayVA

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #40 on: October 31, 2014, 07:57:23 AM »
Two more, sadly seen on this very board:

It's "I was not fazed," not "phased."  I've also seen "fazed" used when "phased" was meant, e.g. "fazed out of this project."

It's "rein in," not "reign in."



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frugalnacho

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #41 on: October 31, 2014, 07:57:51 AM »
I've noticed a disturbing trend of people dropping 'to be' in typing . . . writing that something 'needs done' makes me wince.

I think that might be a southern thing. I used to hear that all the time in the South, but I don't hear it too much in the mid-Atlantic region.

You want to "lose" weight, not "loose" weight (this one really drives me up the wall).
Yes!  This one is so much easier than desert/dessert!

One more pronunciation type of thing:   Jewelry is pronounced as it's written.   It is not Jool-a-ry.  It's Ju-El-Ree.  This seems so common now.

I really like the subtleties of great words, so it kind of bothers me when so many people misuse the words that the meaning/hidden meanings/ shibboleths are lost.  I used to love the word gourmand, but now so many people use it incorrectly that it seems to have lost its meaning.  I liked being smug and judgemental in using that word.   I also really hate that the new "standard" thanks to spell-check for spelling is Judgmental vs. judgemental. Also Advisor vs. Adviser.  The word "advisor" is part of my company name and I can no longer include it in a document without the squiggly red line under it.  Thanks Microsoft!

I thought both versions were acceptable (advisor vs adviser)?  Either way you can right click the word and add it to the dictionary in microsoft word so it won't think you've misspelled it.

I am also confused by the italicized part.   What do you mean the new standard? It's always been judgmental as far as I know.

A good way to remember desert/dessert is that dessert spelled backwards is stressed.

sheepstache

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #42 on: October 31, 2014, 08:17:46 AM »
...so maybe you could assume people aren't native english speakers to sooth yourself?

Sooth: Noun meaning truth (archaic)
Soothe: Verb (with object) meaning gently calm (a person or their feelings)

So, sheepstache, I am confused. Was that your point? Were you just being funny? Or did you not take time to read your own comment? I just can't tell.

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Don't you mean somebody's won? or maybe somebodies won? Or maybe some buddy won? :-)

Oh good! I was going to announce that first prize was a pun joke, second prize was two pun jokes, but I didn't see how anyone could get second prize but now you have.</run-on sentence>

Okay getting back to grammar: it irks me when I see a mixing up of the subject & direct object forms.  It's 'between you an ME' goddammit!  Just because 'I' sounds fancy doesn't make it grammatically correct when referring to one's self as a direct object.  Hint: use me.  No, no no, don't use ME, use the word 'me'.  Shit, see?  This is how I get myself into trouble.
 

Yes! And people who indiscriminately use 'whom' because they're trying to sound formal.

Or pronouncing the plural of "premise" as "premiseez." It's not a greek ending. Don't say it like a greek ending.

Not a grammar thing, but using more formal language than you need to in a way that doesn't make sense.
Couple businesses I work with have started beginning all their emails with, "Please be advised." Like, even when I asked a simple question and they're answering it. "Hey, could you please let me know when the fire drill is?" "Please be advised the fire drill is at 10am." Well shit, hoss, thanks, consider me advised.
A piece of equipment goes missing. "Can someone please confirm what happened to [equipment]?" No, because nobody else has proposed an idea that could be confirmed. You can just say, "Does anyone know what happened to to [equipment]?" Professional does not equal stilted.

BlueHouse

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #43 on: October 31, 2014, 09:12:07 AM »
I thought both versions were acceptable (advisor vs adviser)?  Either way you can right click the word and add it to the dictionary in microsoft word so it won't think you've misspelled it.
I think they are both acceptable, but one is more prevalent here in the US and the other in the UK.  At the time I chose my company name, I chose the one that was common in the US (and also the only one I had ever even known).  Now, less than 10 years later, and Microsoft calls attention to the fact that it doesn't like it.  I can change it in my dictionary, but when I send correspondence to my clients, their dictionaries probably don't include my spelling.  I have a lot of scientists and engineers as clients and contrary to what one finds on MMM, they're often not great with language AND they are judgemental -- very quick to think someone else is the nincompoop because Microsoft says so (no offense meant to you guys who are masters of language). 

Quote
I am also confused by the italicized part.   What do you mean the new standard? It's always been judgmental as far as I know. 
Hmmm.  Maybe I just remember it differently.  I thought this was also UK vs. US.  I wouldn't pronounce that word the same way without the "e".  I haven't been willing to give up that extra "e", but maybe I'll rethink that. 
[/quote]
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Better Change

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #44 on: October 31, 2014, 09:52:11 AM »
Ugh, the confusion of plural versus possessive.  Analysis of my work e-mails indicates that 80% of Michiganders don't know the difference.

"Employee's should report to this building...." 

Every damn day.


Cheddar Stacker

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #45 on: October 31, 2014, 11:46:15 AM »
My dad chews very loudly.  The sheer volume of it has annoyed me since as far back as I can remember.   In the last decade I realized I'm just like him.  It sucks.  When I chew, my mouth is closed and I'm not trying to be loud.  So when other people are near I chew slower.  That seems to soften it.  Alone, I don't care.  I just chew.

Does this make you like me less Cheddar Stacker?  I'd understand if it did. 

+1 to this whole thing, no bullshit, and we're still cool.
Indecision may or may not be my problem.

GuitarStv

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #46 on: October 31, 2014, 11:56:12 AM »
My dad chews very loudly.  The sheer volume of it has annoyed me since as far back as I can remember.   In the last decade I realized I'm just like him.  It sucks.  When I chew, my mouth is closed and I'm not trying to be loud.  So when other people are near I chew slower.  That seems to soften it.  Alone, I don't care.  I just chew.

Does this make you like me less Cheddar Stacker?  I'd understand if it did. 

Most foods don't need to be chewed at all.  Pretty much any cooked vegetable can be eaten without chewing, pasta of most varieties doesn't need chewing, slow cooked meats, tons of variety of bread (lubricate with butter), rice, etc.  The key is to keep a large glass of water nearby at all times.  It should be possible to eat most meals without chewing more than 20 - 30 times.  :P

domustachesgrowinhouston

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #47 on: October 31, 2014, 12:06:02 PM »
I find it mildly annoying that all cars run good.  Also languages that have words like farther/further that make me have to think too hard about which one I need to use.

Gone Fishing

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #48 on: October 31, 2014, 12:48:20 PM »
A few local favorites:

Pacific instead of Specific
Partial instead of Parcel
Flustrated instead of Frustrated or Flustered
Laxidaisical instead of Lackadaisical
Srimp instead of Shrimp
Sale instead of sell

There are a few more but I can't think of them at the moment.  I will amend as needed...

Kaspian

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Re: Grammar nazi
« Reply #49 on: October 31, 2014, 01:43:19 PM »
"I did good."  <-- Oh really?  Were you Mother Theresa or a boy scout?  You mean, 'did well'?

"Today's special: Pancake's"  <-- Oh, you bloody greengrocers' apostrophe!  How I hate thee.  (Ironically, there are huge debates about where to put the apostrophe in "greengrocers' apostrophe".)
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