Author Topic: Firearms in the home  (Read 346431 times)

Metric Mouse

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1900 on: November 09, 2016, 07:10:06 PM »

Just fluff, but it was a pretty large one day drop with no other plausible explanation I'm aware of. S&W went up that much under "ZOMG he's gonna take our guns!" Obama. One illustrative article:

http://www.cnsnews.com/blog/gregory-gwyn-williams-jr/654-million-gun-purchases-obama-took-office-91-more-bushs-first-term

I know I've seen lots more along those lines, but too lazy to Google. Regardless, I would think it's rather self-apparent. Gun nuts enthusiasts get scared the big bad Democrats are going to repeal the 2nd amendment and so they go on a buying spree. Seems to happen fairly reliably, but I could be wrong.

It does happen reliably; which is why firearm manufacturing companies have been a fantastic investment over the past few years. :D

And since these gun enthusiasts by and large keep their scary black rifles safely secured in their bunkers, there is very little downside to the buying sprees.  I wouldn't mind more affordable ammunition prices though.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2016, 07:21:42 PM by Metric Mouse »
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Lagom

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1901 on: November 09, 2016, 07:12:34 PM »
I don't mind the buying sprees either, just was making an observation. The alarmism is rather amusing, but I don't fear these people. They are not particularly mustachian, but I suppose we all need our hobbies.

MrRealEstate

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1902 on: November 10, 2016, 08:45:49 AM »

Wrong.  We should restrict access to firearms for IN residents...no more 30 caliber magazine clips, automatic AK-15's, ghost guns, shoulder things that go up, barrel shrouds, no weapons of war, scary black rifles, none of it.  It doesn't matter that all of these are currently legal there and there has never been a mass shooting and they rank in the top 10 states with the LEAST amount of gun violence.  It doesn't matter than these backwoods rednecks have shown to be responsible with them...I mean...who really needs any of that stuff?  If it could save just 1 life and stuff.  Reasons.

I can't tell if this one is a joke or serious? The "shoulder things that go up" really got me.

I thought I made the sarcasm extra thick on that one.

I live in CA, so all the things you quoted can be heard at least once a week on an interview on guns... it's quite disheartening.

hoosier

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1903 on: November 10, 2016, 11:49:30 AM »

Hmmm..... 4% rule for ammo usage?

If only ammo earned compound interest.  Talk about a conflict of interest for a gun enthusiast though.  Shoot 100 rounds now or 108 next year.....hhnnnnggh.

MishMash

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1904 on: November 10, 2016, 12:22:58 PM »
Cheap ammo...I kid you not...yardsales.  In the past month I purchased .357 hollowpoints 240 total rounds for 15 bucks total (currently priced at a buck a round), .308 ammo 300 rounds for 40 bucks total, a crate of .22 for 25 (something like 500 rounds give or take).  Also purchased a muzzleloader with scope and case for 80 and an old remington 12 gauge for 40.  All the ammo fired fine.  You can usually tell how well it's stored based on the boxes, where you find it etc. 

Also, if you are a hunter, cheaper than dirt in the summer has brand new  ammo for really good prices as well.

ooeei

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1905 on: November 10, 2016, 12:28:14 PM »
Cheap ammo...I kid you not...yardsales.  In the past month I purchased .357 hollowpoints 240 total rounds for 15 bucks total (currently priced at a buck a round), .308 ammo 300 rounds for 40 bucks total, a crate of .22 for 25 (something like 500 rounds give or take).  Also purchased a muzzleloader with scope and case for 80 and an old remington 12 gauge for 40.  All the ammo fired fine.  You can usually tell how well it's stored based on the boxes, where you find it etc. 

Also, if you are a hunter, cheaper than dirt in the summer has brand new  ammo for really good prices as well.

I suspect over the next few years this will happen more and more.  A quick search on any gun forum will come up with a "here's how much ammo I have" thread where people show off their 100,000+ rounds in their basement/extra bedroom.  Those people don't live forever, and eventually may even decide to downsize.  A Republican president will make them less worried about supply, and a few of them will start to question the wisdom of having $30,000+ worth of ammo in their house.  There's also the non negligible number of people who've been buying up in anticipation of a panic after Hillary was elected, and they'll need to unload stock eventually.  I may keep an eye out for good deals on guns that were bought for similar reasons.

MishMash

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1906 on: November 10, 2016, 12:41:45 PM »
Cheap ammo...I kid you not...yardsales.  In the past month I purchased .357 hollowpoints 240 total rounds for 15 bucks total (currently priced at a buck a round), .308 ammo 300 rounds for 40 bucks total, a crate of .22 for 25 (something like 500 rounds give or take).  Also purchased a muzzleloader with scope and case for 80 and an old remington 12 gauge for 40.  All the ammo fired fine.  You can usually tell how well it's stored based on the boxes, where you find it etc. 

Also, if you are a hunter, cheaper than dirt in the summer has brand new  ammo for really good prices as well.

I suspect over the next few years this will happen more and more.  A quick search on any gun forum will come up with a "here's how much ammo I have" thread where people show off their 100,000+ rounds in their basement/extra bedroom.  Those people don't live forever, and eventually may even decide to downsize.  A Republican president will make them less worried about supply, and a few of them will start to question the wisdom of having $30,000+ worth of ammo in their house.  There's also the non negligible number of people who've been buying up in anticipation of a panic after Hillary was elected, and they'll need to unload stock eventually.  I may keep an eye out for good deals on guns that were bought for similar reasons.

Yea pretty much.  I traded a canoe for a 9mm and 2k rounds of ammo right before the last Obama election.  Sold most of it post election for a fortune.  Waaaaaaaay more then we paid for the canoe.  And yes, the big scores this past month have been at estate sales.  One, the guy was a federal firearms contrator/trainer, I also bought a TON of extra clips for an assortment of weapons at around a buck a pop there, just wish I had gotten in earlier.  Other was an estate of an avid hunter. 

Lagom

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1907 on: November 10, 2016, 01:04:02 PM »
Hmm this is a good point. Once prices have dropped a bit, buying guns/ammo during Republican administrations and selling them during Democrat administrations might be a market timing strategy that could actually work consistently! ;)

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1908 on: November 10, 2016, 01:36:34 PM »
I was reading the contingency planning thread, and I realized that some of the posters feel the need to keep firearms in their house for protection.   I'm really not trolling, I'd like to understand your point of view better, because this seems foreign to me.

1.   Why don't you move to a less dangerous area?    It can't be much fun, being constantly on edge that someone is going to invade your house or assault you on the street.

There aren't any less dangerous areas. Living on yellow alert is a fact of life in America. Here, they train school children in the fine art of how to die. Duck and cover, because the Soviets are coming with bombs. Hide under your desk, because a gunman's loose in the building. We have so many people with a galloping case of untreated PTSD or another mental illness that you never know who's going to snap or when.

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2.  Do you regularly practice with your firearm?   (I used to shoot cans with a .22 when I was a kid, but that's about the limit of my experience.   When I eventually FIRE, I'd like to try some practical shooting if I can find a good range.   But I don't have time for another hobby right now.)

Of course. If the tool fits you properly you only need a minimal amount of training to get the level of accuracy you need. It's pretty stupid to own a tool and not be able to use it. However I would most likely use a different tool. Something quieter and more versatile.

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3.  If you have children or a spouse, how have you trained them to stay out of the way if there's an incident?  i.e. so they don't get shot?

Yes, although there are some weapons I'm training my kid to actually use. She knows the limits of her capability and how to GTFO.

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4.  How to you plan to deal with the first responders after an incident?

They most likely won't come unless I make enough noise for someone else to notice.

If I capture a home invader alive I would probably call for a pickup, but realistically the thug will be back on the streets in a day or two, so... it's probably best for everyone if they simply happen to wander off to an alley or an abandoned mesa somewhere with a wire coat hanger wrapped around their necks. I don't know that I'd necessarily pick that as my first choice, but I'm sure it would be a tempting option. In the worst case scenario, if I were to goof up and leave forensic evidence, I can still honestly say they were alive the last time I saw them. It might come down to whether or not the invader is someone I know. If the invader is a member of my daughter's extended family of origin, there could be complications to the coat hanger approach.

Seriously, who's going to come to somebody's house looking for a missing home invader? "Excuse me please, have you seen this thug? He said he was headed your way." "No, sorry, haven't seen a thing." "His van was found abandoned out here in the street." "Huh. Must be one of those alien abductions. Lucky for me." "Well, thanks for your time, have a nice day."

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Will the police arrest you?

Unless I do something really egregious such as vivisection, probably not.

If I were to shoot a home invader, hypothetically of course, I'd be likely to get a high five from the police especially if my shot placement is good. One more scumbag off the street is less work for them.  But the cleanup. Yuck.

The police won't arrest or file charges if they know they won't be able to get a grand jury to agree a crime has been committed. Grand juries are made up of ordinary people who have to live in this city, and they seldom see a problem with a home invader ceasing to exist. It's considered a kind of occupational hazard or a predictable consequence of bad decision making.

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Do you have a lawyer ready to call on your phone?

No need. I do everything pro se.

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Or does your jurisdiction take the view that you're allowed to shoot in your home, so you don't expect to have issues with the authorities?

It's not a question of legality, it's a question of practicality.
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zolotiyeruki

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1909 on: November 10, 2016, 02:52:03 PM »
... It's considered a kind of occupational hazard or a predictable consequence of bad decision making.
Or, to use the vernacular, "play stupid games, win stupid prizes."

Metric Mouse

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1910 on: November 11, 2016, 01:18:03 AM »

Hmmm..... 4% rule for ammo usage?

If only ammo earned compound interest.  Talk about a conflict of interest for a gun enthusiast though.  Shoot 100 rounds now or 108 next year.....hhnnnnggh.

The answer is 'both'. :)
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Metric Mouse

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1911 on: November 11, 2016, 01:25:09 AM »
Hmm this is a good point. Once prices have dropped a bit, buying guns/ammo during Republican administrations and selling them during Democrat administrations might be a market timing strategy that could actually work consistently! ;)

Perhaps buying stocks of these companies would be more lucrative? After all, they may know the market much better than an individual, stocks take up less room in one's home than firearm collections, pose less physical danger to one's family and are even easier to sell.

If one is going to try to time the market, at least be Mustachian about it! :D
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Abe

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1912 on: November 13, 2016, 05:58:25 PM »
I'm interested in purchasing a handgun for personal protection. I have some handgun experience, but no shotgun or rifle & don't want something that large. Any recommendation on models to consider? Don't need anything fancy, just for close-range practice and for home protection. Cost is not necessarily a criteria if a given model is clearly superior to others.

ncornilsen

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1913 on: November 13, 2016, 06:06:16 PM »
I recommend a Ruger LCP with a laser sight.  6+1 capacity, fairly small. They're about $250

Metric Mouse

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1914 on: November 13, 2016, 06:17:00 PM »
A revlover with a 2.5 inch barrel or greater.  Easy to use, super safe, and rarely malfunction.   Much simpler to operate and clean than an auto, as well.
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Kris

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1915 on: November 13, 2016, 06:32:37 PM »
I'm interested in purchasing a handgun for personal protection. I have some handgun experience, but no shotgun or rifle & don't want something that large. Any recommendation on models to consider? Don't need anything fancy, just for close-range practice and for home protection. Cost is not necessarily a criteria if a given model is clearly superior to others.

Are you wanting to conceal carry? If not, I recommend the Beretta 92FS.
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Kriegsspiel

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1916 on: November 14, 2016, 07:30:52 AM »
I'm interested in purchasing a handgun for personal protection. I have some handgun experience, but no shotgun or rifle & don't want something that large. Any recommendation on models to consider? Don't need anything fancy, just for close-range practice and for home protection. Cost is not necessarily a criteria if a given model is clearly superior to others.

A Glock 22.

Chris22

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1917 on: November 14, 2016, 08:12:33 AM »
I have a hard time recommending a Glock to novices given that it doesn't have a safety. 

I know, I know, the safety is the trigger, but still, I like my firearm to have a safety on it.
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Kris

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1918 on: November 14, 2016, 08:18:07 AM »
I have a hard time recommending a Glock to novices given that it doesn't have a safety. 

I know, I know, the safety is the trigger, but still, I like my firearm to have a safety on it.

Exactly.
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JLee

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1919 on: November 14, 2016, 08:18:44 AM »
I have a hard time recommending a Glock to novices given that it doesn't have a safety. 

I know, I know, the safety is the trigger, but still, I like my firearm to have a safety on it.

Having carried various Glocks for years (I was issued a 22, 21, 21SF, personally own a 36), my biggest complaint about them is the trigger/guard.  If I'm shooting all day, for some reason the bottom of my trigger finger tends to rub the lower trigger guard and will eventually get rubbed raw.

I prefer the ergonomics of the Springfield XDM (it just feels right in my hands), but they don't have external safeties either.

Midwest

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1920 on: November 14, 2016, 08:23:07 AM »
I have a hard time recommending a Glock to novices given that it doesn't have a safety. 

I know, I know, the safety is the trigger, but still, I like my firearm to have a safety on it.



Having carried various Glocks for years (I was issued a 22, 21, 21SF, personally own a 36), my biggest complaint about them is the trigger/guard.  If I'm shooting all day, for some reason the bottom of my trigger finger tends to rub the lower trigger guard and will eventually get rubbed raw.

I prefer the ergonomics of the Springfield XDM (it just feels right in my hands), but they don't have external safeties either.

The regular XD's have a grip safety.  Does the XDM omit that?  I purchased the XD over the glock due to that feature.  Prefer the glocks trigger however.

Chris22

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1921 on: November 14, 2016, 08:28:32 AM »
I have a hard time recommending a Glock to novices given that it doesn't have a safety. 

I know, I know, the safety is the trigger, but still, I like my firearm to have a safety on it.



Having carried various Glocks for years (I was issued a 22, 21, 21SF, personally own a 36), my biggest complaint about them is the trigger/guard.  If I'm shooting all day, for some reason the bottom of my trigger finger tends to rub the lower trigger guard and will eventually get rubbed raw.

I prefer the ergonomics of the Springfield XDM (it just feels right in my hands), but they don't have external safeties either.

The regular XD's have a grip safety.  Does the XDM omit that?  I purchased the XD over the glock due to that feature.  Prefer the glocks trigger however.

Ditto
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JLee

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1922 on: November 14, 2016, 08:32:05 AM »
I have a hard time recommending a Glock to novices given that it doesn't have a safety. 

I know, I know, the safety is the trigger, but still, I like my firearm to have a safety on it.



Having carried various Glocks for years (I was issued a 22, 21, 21SF, personally own a 36), my biggest complaint about them is the trigger/guard.  If I'm shooting all day, for some reason the bottom of my trigger finger tends to rub the lower trigger guard and will eventually get rubbed raw.

I prefer the ergonomics of the Springfield XDM (it just feels right in my hands), but they don't have external safeties either.

The regular XD's have a grip safety.  Does the XDM omit that?  I purchased the XD over the glock due to that feature.  Prefer the glocks trigger however.

I forgot about that - you're right.

If the trigger safety is insufficient I don't see the grip safety adding a whole lot. When someone wants an external safety, I think of something that requires conscious intervention (i.e. not grip/trigger safeties that are automatically disengaged when you're holding the gun / pulling the trigger). It is certainly an added layer, though.

Chris22

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1923 on: November 14, 2016, 08:43:57 AM »
I have a hard time recommending a Glock to novices given that it doesn't have a safety. 

I know, I know, the safety is the trigger, but still, I like my firearm to have a safety on it.



Having carried various Glocks for years (I was issued a 22, 21, 21SF, personally own a 36), my biggest complaint about them is the trigger/guard.  If I'm shooting all day, for some reason the bottom of my trigger finger tends to rub the lower trigger guard and will eventually get rubbed raw.

I prefer the ergonomics of the Springfield XDM (it just feels right in my hands), but they don't have external safeties either.

The regular XD's have a grip safety.  Does the XDM omit that?  I purchased the XD over the glock due to that feature.  Prefer the glocks trigger however.

I forgot about that - you're right.

If the trigger safety is insufficient I don't see the grip safety adding a whole lot. When someone wants an external safety, I think of something that requires conscious intervention (i.e. not grip/trigger safeties that are automatically disengaged when you're holding the gun / pulling the trigger). It is certainly an added layer, though.

I can holster/unholster a weapon with a grip safety without engaging the safety, and that's one scenario I like there to be a safety present. 
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Metric Mouse

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1924 on: November 14, 2016, 08:46:31 AM »
I have a hard time recommending a Glock to novices given that it doesn't have a safety. 

I know, I know, the safety is the trigger, but still, I like my firearm to have a safety on it.

Having carried various Glocks for years (I was issued a 22, 21, 21SF, personally own a 36), my biggest complaint about them is the trigger/guard.  If I'm shooting all day, for some reason the bottom of my trigger finger tends to rub the lower trigger guard and will eventually get rubbed raw.

I prefer the ergonomics of the Springfield XDM (it just feels right in my hands), but they don't have external safeties either.

The dreaded Glock Knuckle.

This is why I like revolvers, or double action autos like Sigs - Long, heavy trigger pull. No safeties or levers or switches to get in the way when one needs to use their firearm, but enough of a trigger weight to reduce negligent discharges, even with people who are not as practiced with their firearm as the should be.
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Kriegsspiel

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1925 on: November 14, 2016, 01:24:18 PM »
Fuck safeties. Live life on the edge.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1926 on: November 15, 2016, 05:59:51 AM »
Fuck safeties. Live life on the edge.

Keep that booger hook off the bang switch, and the business end away from anyone's business.
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hoosier

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1927 on: November 15, 2016, 07:04:04 AM »
XDM has the grip safety. 

Best safety lies between your ears and dictates good trigger discipline.  Keep your finger off the trigger until your ready for it to go bang.

In the heat of the moment do you really want to deal with a safety?

Metric Mouse

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1928 on: November 15, 2016, 07:20:37 AM »
XDM has the grip safety. 

Best safety lies between your ears and dictates good trigger discipline.  Keep your finger off the trigger until your ready for it to go bang.

In the heat of the moment do you really want to deal with a safety?

Those few extra seconds can be such a mood killer.

Oh, we weren't talking about that kind of 'safety'. :D
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hoosier

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1929 on: November 15, 2016, 08:22:45 AM »
XDM has the grip safety. 

Best safety lies between your ears and dictates good trigger discipline.  Keep your finger off the trigger until your ready for it to go bang.

In the heat of the moment do you really want to deal with a safety?

Those few extra seconds can be such a mood killer.

Oh, we weren't talking about that kind of 'safety'. :D

Nope...but same still applies.

Handgun safeties are a weird topic, but if you understand a little more about the history of them, it helps (me) understand why they aren't ALWAYS needed.  This is NOT a complete, chronological, or comprehensive history, BTW.

First we had wheel guns (revolvers).  Single action revolvers don't have safeties because nobody with any common sense would have one cocked unless you are ready to shoot.  You don't carry one in that condition.  Double action revolvers are pretty much drop safe (meaning you can drop one and it won't go off)...you have to pull the trigger...HARD...to get them to shoot.

After we had wheel guns for a while, a guy by the name of John Moses Browning invented a new type of semi automatic pistol...the 1911.  It was designed to be carried "cocked and locked"...but wasn't necessarily drop safe so a manual safety was used.  Manual safeties became all the rage - everyone had to have them - mostly because everyone built semi-autos a lot like the 1911.  The 1911 also had a grip safety on the backstrap to prevent the gun from firing unless it was gripped by a human hand.  Note: later 1911s had firing pin blocks to make them drop safe.

Years later another guy, Gaston Glock, developed a new type of pistol - the striker fired semi-auto.  He didn't use a manual safety - some people liked it, others were horrified.  Striker fired guns are drop safe because the firing pin is blocked until you pull the trigger.  The only way for a striker fired gun to go bang is if the trigger is pulled.  Now, it is possible for something to accidentally snag the trigger, so a trigger safety was introduced.  Trigger safeties aren't completely fool proof, but they add a layer of protection.

There are plenty of other semi-auto guns out there with some or all of these features.  Most have firing pin blocks,  many have trigger safeties, a few have a grip safeties, some have manual safeties.  For eaxample:

XD Line - Grip safety, trigger safety, firing pin block.

M&P Line - Trigger safety, optional manual safety, firing pin block.

Back to my point.  Don't put your finger on the trigger until you want it to shoot...and it won't.  A manual safety is, in my opinion, not needed to make the weapon any more safe provided you have good trigger discipline.  Its just one more thing you have to do, when you don't have a lot of time to do it.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2016, 12:15:06 PM by hoosier »

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1930 on: November 16, 2016, 07:22:31 AM »
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Kris

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1931 on: November 16, 2016, 07:44:07 AM »
Some of you might be interested in this:

http://monsterhunternation.com/2016/11/14/a-handy-guide-for-liberals-who-are-suddenly-interested-in-gun-ownership/

Nice piece of condescending trash.

For the record, a bunch of us asshole liberals already own guns.

And I'm a lot less worried about protecting myself from a tyrannical government than I am about protecting myself from a bunch of fear-driven right wing types who think people who disagree with them should be shot.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2016, 08:38:00 AM by Kris »
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Metric Mouse

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1932 on: November 16, 2016, 09:49:06 AM »
Some of you might be interested in this:

http://monsterhunternation.com/2016/11/14/a-handy-guide-for-liberals-who-are-suddenly-interested-in-gun-ownership/

Nice piece of condescending trash.

For the record, a bunch of us asshole liberals already own guns.

And I'm a lot less worried about protecting myself from a tyrannical government than I am about protecting myself from a bunch of fear-driven right wing types who think people who disagree with them should be shot.

Is that a statistical likelihood where you  live?  In my neck of the woods, far more people are shot at left-wing protests.  Thankfully gun crime is on the decline, at a national level.
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Kris

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1933 on: November 16, 2016, 09:59:06 AM »
Some of you might be interested in this:

http://monsterhunternation.com/2016/11/14/a-handy-guide-for-liberals-who-are-suddenly-interested-in-gun-ownership/

Nice piece of condescending trash.

For the record, a bunch of us asshole liberals already own guns.

And I'm a lot less worried about protecting myself from a tyrannical government than I am about protecting myself from a bunch of fear-driven right wing types who think people who disagree with them should be shot.

Is that a statistical likelihood where you  live?  In my neck of the woods, far more people are shot at left-wing protests.  Thankfully gun crime is on the decline, at a national level.

More statistically likely than the number of times a tyrannical government put my life in jeopardy? Clearly.
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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1934 on: November 16, 2016, 06:42:41 PM »
Thanks for the advice on which gun model to purchase, will probably go with the Beretta as I'm more familiar with them. I'm worried about corrupt police or getting caught in cross-fire between gangs (happens a lot, mostly to people who sit outside after 10pm). Also if you don't have a gun, it makes you a target for harassment by drunkards at night in my neighborhood. Luckily I only have 7 months left in Chicago.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2016, 06:45:07 PM by Abe »

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1935 on: November 16, 2016, 07:47:09 PM »
None of those are good situations to be in. I'm not certain a firearm would improve them.
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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1936 on: November 16, 2016, 08:02:52 PM »
Neither am I. Unfortunately people from my university are routinely robbed at gunpoint with minimal follow-through by the police. It's so common it's become the butt of morbid email jokes. Just got another alert since my last post. Their advice is basically take a beating otherwise you may die if you resist a robbery. Also don't go outside alone. I wouldn't trust the CPD with my toaster, much less my life.

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1937 on: November 18, 2016, 10:15:32 AM »
Who do the police call when they get in trouble? Concealed carry permitted citizens.
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/11/15/passerby-shoots-kills-motorist-assaulting-deputy-after-traffic-stop.html
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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1938 on: November 18, 2016, 12:08:29 PM »
Neither am I. Unfortunately people from my university are routinely robbed at gunpoint with minimal follow-through by the police. It's so common it's become the butt of morbid email jokes. Just got another alert since my last post. Their advice is basically take a beating otherwise you may die if you resist a robbery. Also don't go outside alone. I wouldn't trust the CPD with my toaster, much less my life.

Good god what university? 

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1939 on: November 18, 2016, 03:32:35 PM »
http://monsterhunternation.com/2016/11/14/a-handy-guide-for-liberals-who-are-suddenly-interested-in-gun-ownership/

Hey, that's Larry Correia's web site.     He's a writer of the same caliber as John Ringo, i.e. he tells a great story and occassionally let's his political views show.

Thanks for that.   I'm a fan, even though I'm a gun-control advocating lefty.

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1940 on: November 19, 2016, 01:47:08 PM »
http://monsterhunternation.com/2016/11/14/a-handy-guide-for-liberals-who-are-suddenly-interested-in-gun-ownership/

Hey, that's Larry Correia's web site.     He's a writer of the same caliber as John Ringo, i.e. he tells a great story and occassionally let's his political views show.

Thanks for that.   I'm a fan, even though I'm a gun-control advocating lefty.

Thanks for the link. Great read.
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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1941 on: November 19, 2016, 04:02:46 PM »
Neither am I. Unfortunately people from my university are routinely robbed at gunpoint with minimal follow-through by the police. It's so common it's become the butt of morbid email jokes. Just got another alert since my last post. Their advice is basically take a beating otherwise you may die if you resist a robbery. Also don't go outside alone. I wouldn't trust the CPD with my toaster, much less my life.

Good god what university?

I would guess University of Chicago, based on what I know of that area.

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1942 on: November 20, 2016, 07:22:33 PM »
You nailed it. We had yet another email yesterday, but this time they only used fists. Big improvement. I drive in and out of the neighborhood so haven't had to deal with the crime as much as the undergrads. One guy tried to carjack me with a knife at a red light but didn't account for the fact that I'd speed rapidly in reverse to get away. Since it gets dark at 5pm here, I guess no going outside for the rest of winter.

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1943 on: November 21, 2016, 03:25:23 PM »
Tried to float the idea of working towards owning a handgun with a bio-metric safe to the wife. We have 10 month old daughter and I think her mother defensive instincts took over since she shot me down aggressively.

I feel like to some degree I would be a more responsible citizen excising my right to bear arms and taking the time to brush up on my shooting every once and a while so I can safely and effectively use and keep the weapon. Since we do live in a country to values the 2nd amendment.

However from a necessity stand point it is tough to make the argument. We live in a pretty well off suburb of San Diego. Violent crime is nearly non existent save probably some domestic issues. Armed home invasion is exceedingly rare. Home defense is a pretty far out argument and I would never try to do conceal carry even if it were possible because day to day I am just too absent minded to be trusted with a fire arm like that. It seems easier to make the counter argument about possible accidents with a child and a hand gun for now.

She didn't really like the, just in case shit hits the fan and having ready access to a fire arm would be nice, either. That would likely be my only reason for really owning a gun anyway. A last resort if we needed to accomplish something for our families safety in a situation where I needed the extra persuasive power.

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1944 on: November 21, 2016, 03:30:45 PM »
I bought an AR-15 recently.  My wife was pretty annoyed.  However, this weekend while I was out of town picking it up, the cops knocked on the door of our house at 830PM on Saturday in a very nice, moderately well to do suburb, and informed her the house across the street, next to a cop, was robbed earlier that day.

She was much less mad about the new gun.


Also, if your wife is resistant to a handgun, consider a shotgun or other long gun.  MUCH less likely your kid will injure herself or others with a long gun given its heft, complexity, etc. 
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Metric Mouse

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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1945 on: November 21, 2016, 03:31:59 PM »
Tried to float the idea of working towards owning a handgun with a bio-metric safe to the wife. We have 10 month old daughter and I think her mother defensive instincts took over since she shot me down aggressively.

I feel like to some degree I would be a more responsible citizen excising my right to bear arms and taking the time to brush up on my shooting every once and a while so I can safely and effectively use and keep the weapon. Since we do live in a country to values the 2nd amendment.

However from a necessity stand point it is tough to make the argument. We live in a pretty well off suburb of San Diego. Violent crime is nearly non existent save probably some domestic issues. Armed home invasion is exceedingly rare. Home defense is a pretty far out argument and I would never try to do conceal carry even if it were possible because day to day I am just too absent minded to be trusted with a fire arm like that. It seems easier to make the counter argument about possible accidents with a child and a hand gun for now.

She didn't really like the, just in case shit hits the fan and having ready access to a fire arm would be nice, either. That would likely be my only reason for really owning a gun anyway. A last resort if we needed to accomplish something for our families safety in a situation where I needed the extra persuasive power.

Owning a Firearm is a serious life decision. If everyone in your household is not at least accepting of the responsibility, then it is probably better to wait.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2016, 04:39:53 AM by Metric Mouse »
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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1946 on: November 21, 2016, 05:15:47 PM »
Tried to float the idea of working towards owning a handgun with a bio-metric safe to the wife. We have 10 month old daughter and I think her mother defensive instincts took over since she shot me down aggressively.

I feel like to some degree I would be a more responsible citizen excising my right to bear arms and taking the time to brush up on my shooting every once and a while so I can safely and effectively use and keep the weapon. Since we do live in a country to values the 2nd amendment.

However from a necessity stand point it is tough to make the argument. We live in a pretty well off suburb of San Diego. Violent crime is nearly non existent save probably some domestic issues. Armed home invasion is exceedingly rare. Home defense is a pretty far out argument and I would never try to do conceal carry even if it were possible because day to day I am just too absent minded to be trusted with a fire arm like that. It seems easier to make the counter argument about possible accidents with a child and a hand gun for now.

She didn't really like the, just in case shit hits the fan and having ready access to a fire arm would be nice, either. That would likely be my only reason for really owning a gun anyway. A last resort if we needed to accomplish something for our families safety in a situation where I needed the extra persuasive power.

Owning a Firearm is a serious life decision. If everyone in yiur household is not at least accepting of the responsibility, then it is probably better to wait.

This.

I want to take a moment to just say that, as a woman, one thing that I've been very bothered by in the "gun community," if there is one, is the casual misogyny of "oh, you know, the wife doesn't understand my thing with guns, hahaha..." implying that "the wife" is somewhat clueless and irrational. In the gun classes I've taken, the instructors casually toss off this stuff, and the male students laugh knowingly. It's fucking irritating.

And I say this as a woman. And a liberal. Who has three guns in my home. And who is a better shot than my husband.

Yes. Women probably as a whole tend to be less comfortable with guns than men. But guys, maybe you could be less dismissive of that attitude as just "silly woman-ness"? 
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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1947 on: November 22, 2016, 04:03:23 PM »
Tried to float the idea of working towards owning a handgun with a bio-metric safe to the wife. We have 10 month old daughter and I think her mother defensive instincts took over since she shot me down aggressively.

I feel like to some degree I would be a more responsible citizen excising my right to bear arms and taking the time to brush up on my shooting every once and a while so I can safely and effectively use and keep the weapon. Since we do live in a country to values the 2nd amendment.

However from a necessity stand point it is tough to make the argument. We live in a pretty well off suburb of San Diego. Violent crime is nearly non existent save probably some domestic issues. Armed home invasion is exceedingly rare. Home defense is a pretty far out argument and I would never try to do conceal carry even if it were possible because day to day I am just too absent minded to be trusted with a fire arm like that. It seems easier to make the counter argument about possible accidents with a child and a hand gun for now.

She didn't really like the, just in case shit hits the fan and having ready access to a fire arm would be nice, either. That would likely be my only reason for really owning a gun anyway. A last resort if we needed to accomplish something for our families safety in a situation where I needed the extra persuasive power.

Owning a Firearm is a serious life decision. If everyone in yiur household is not at least accepting of the responsibility, then it is probably better to wait.

This.

I want to take a moment to just say that, as a woman, one thing that I've been very bothered by in the "gun community," if there is one, is the casual misogyny of "oh, you know, the wife doesn't understand my thing with guns, hahaha..." implying that "the wife" is somewhat clueless and irrational. In the gun classes I've taken, the instructors casually toss off this stuff, and the male students laugh knowingly. It's fucking irritating.

And I say this as a woman. And a liberal. Who has three guns in my home. And who is a better shot than my husband.

Yes. Women probably as a whole tend to be less comfortable with guns than men. But guys, maybe you could be less dismissive of that attitude as just "silly woman-ness"?
well its not just women. I recently dated a guy who ended up being severely bothered by the fact that I own various firearms (obviously not dating any longer). Of course he was more "silly paranoid woman you don't need guns".  Sigh...can't win ;-). But I don't see men assuming their female SOs  don't like or want guns in the home as misogynist, as I assume it was something discussed and expressed already.

ETA no I wouldn't give up owning firearms if a potential SO required it. I woyld make some accommodations for him but that would be a deal breaker.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2016, 04:06:18 PM by spartana »
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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1948 on: November 22, 2016, 04:13:26 PM »
Tried to float the idea of working towards owning a handgun with a bio-metric safe to the wife. We have 10 month old daughter and I think her mother defensive instincts took over since she shot me down aggressively.

I feel like to some degree I would be a more responsible citizen excising my right to bear arms and taking the time to brush up on my shooting every once and a while so I can safely and effectively use and keep the weapon. Since we do live in a country to values the 2nd amendment.

However from a necessity stand point it is tough to make the argument. We live in a pretty well off suburb of San Diego. Violent crime is nearly non existent save probably some domestic issues. Armed home invasion is exceedingly rare. Home defense is a pretty far out argument and I would never try to do conceal carry even if it were possible because day to day I am just too absent minded to be trusted with a fire arm like that. It seems easier to make the counter argument about possible accidents with a child and a hand gun for now.

She didn't really like the, just in case shit hits the fan and having ready access to a fire arm would be nice, either. That would likely be my only reason for really owning a gun anyway. A last resort if we needed to accomplish something for our families safety in a situation where I needed the extra persuasive power.

Owning a Firearm is a serious life decision. If everyone in yiur household is not at least accepting of the responsibility, then it is probably better to wait.

This.

I want to take a moment to just say that, as a woman, one thing that I've been very bothered by in the "gun community," if there is one, is the casual misogyny of "oh, you know, the wife doesn't understand my thing with guns, hahaha..." implying that "the wife" is somewhat clueless and irrational. In the gun classes I've taken, the instructors casually toss off this stuff, and the male students laugh knowingly. It's fucking irritating.

And I say this as a woman. And a liberal. Who has three guns in my home. And who is a better shot than my husband.

Yes. Women probably as a whole tend to be less comfortable with guns than men. But guys, maybe you could be less dismissive of that attitude as just "silly woman-ness"?
well its not just women. I recently dated a guy who ended up being severely bothered by the fact that I own various firearms (obviously not dating any longer). Of course he was more "silly paranoid woman you don't need guns".  Sigh...can't win ;-). But I don't see men assuming their female SOs  don't like or want guns in the home as misogynist, as I assume it was something discussed and expressed already.

ETA no I wouldn't give up owning firearms if a potential SO required it. I woyld make some accommodations for him but that would be a deal breaker.

Yeah, I'm sure it is something they previously discussed. It's just the dismissiveness of the tone. It would be different if the men talked about their wives'/SOs' preferences in a neutral manner. But it's always in this "isn't that ridiculous, wink wink" tone. Ugh. The first gun safety class I took, I was the only woman in it, and the instructor kept doing it, and then looking at me, too, as if trying to enlist me in the whole thing. Like, hey, you're one of the sensible ones. Isn't my wife ridiculous? I mean, there are perfectly valid reasons for not being comfortable having a firearm in your house. Whatever happened to having respect for your partner?
« Last Edit: November 22, 2016, 04:20:00 PM by Kris »
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Re: Firearms in the home
« Reply #1949 on: November 22, 2016, 06:25:29 PM »
I hear and understand Kris. I'm probably just jaded and tune it all out now. Beside firearms it sports or vehicles or porn ;-). And on the male side of not "getting it" its  women's  purses and shoes and designer clothes (if I'm gonna stereotype I'm going ALL the way ;-)!). But yeah, I agree, that kind of stuff bothers me from both directions.
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