Author Topic: "Charity starts at home" vs GiveWell Philosophy  (Read 8753 times)

RidetheRain

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Re: "Charity starts at home" vs GiveWell Philosophy
« Reply #100 on: November 03, 2017, 05:55:18 PM »
I'm a bit of a charity begins at home type of person, but mostly I just do things differently at home than I do abroad.

For example, I like to donate time to local smaller charities but $$ to domestic&international charities for disaster relief, water cleanup, etc. I generally don't give a lot of dollars figuring I can do more later.

However, I also participate heavily in the Kiva Micro-loan agency. I figure the best way to support a country with a bunch of people with a bunch of problems is to help stimulate their economy through business finance. It gives small business a chance to grow when they wouldn't otherwise have the credit. I started doing this after I heard about TOMs putting some local people in some poor country out of work because they make shoes that no one will buy anymore. Charity in the wrong place just makes more people dependant on charity. I still don't know if I'm doing the best thing, but it doesn't seem wrong?
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AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: "Charity starts at home" vs GiveWell Philosophy
« Reply #101 on: November 03, 2017, 06:11:14 PM »
I'm a bit of a charity begins at home type of person, but mostly I just do things differently at home than I do abroad.

For example, I like to donate time to local smaller charities but $$ to domestic&international charities for disaster relief, water cleanup, etc. I generally don't give a lot of dollars figuring I can do more later.

However, I also participate heavily in the Kiva Micro-loan agency. I figure the best way to support a country with a bunch of people with a bunch of problems is to help stimulate their economy through business finance. It gives small business a chance to grow when they wouldn't otherwise have the credit. I started doing this after I heard about TOMs putting some local people in some poor country out of work because they make shoes that no one will buy anymore. Charity in the wrong place just makes more people dependant on charity. I still don't know if I'm doing the best thing, but it doesn't seem wrong?

I also believe that microfinancing is the best way to support people in developing countries. It lets people decide for themselves what they need, and encourages folk to take action in their own communities. Why do we need to hand out charity with all it's humiliations, when we can just give autonomy?

arebelspy

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Re: "Charity starts at home" vs GiveWell Philosophy
« Reply #102 on: November 03, 2017, 06:21:47 PM »
We've had long discussions on Kiva.

Many, including myself, have problems with their practices.  Search the forums for "Kiva" for discussion.

Just wanted to mention in case you aren't aware of the issues with them... but if you do read, and are okay with it, and that's what you enjoy, more power to you! :)
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RidetheRain

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Re: "Charity starts at home" vs GiveWell Philosophy
« Reply #103 on: November 27, 2017, 02:38:01 PM »
We've had long discussions on Kiva.

Many, including myself, have problems with their practices.  Search the forums for "Kiva" for discussion.

Just wanted to mention in case you aren't aware of the issues with them... but if you do read, and are okay with it, and that's what you enjoy, more power to you! :)

I definitely know that Kiva can be a problem, but I don't think it's a fault that sinks service totally. There are functions to filter potential loans by average cost to borrower and information about interest rates or lack thereof. It's definitely something you need to be constantly on the lookout for, but I've never felt that the potential for usury should discount the entire idea. I agree with the general sentiment that it's not a charity. Just like with picking a charity to find a "good one" you have to look around on Kiva to find actual value between the typical (and outright bad) loans.

I admit I did learn a few things on the forums while looking at previous Kiva discussions. But no one seemed to notice that there are gradations. Not every loan is 20-30% interest.
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