Author Topic: Woman Retires at 28  (Read 1659 times)

lemonlyman

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Woman Retires at 28
« on: August 03, 2017, 09:02:47 AM »

neo von retorch

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2017, 09:27:28 AM »

Plugra

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2017, 10:48:33 AM »
Quote
How do you graduate Harvard in 3 years?  I'd rather stay the whole time to be there for 1 more year of hanging out with some of the most intelligent people in the world.   I'm impressed that she could do that - she must have been taking a ton of classes.

It's possible because you can earn advance standing in certain majors with AP credit and whatnot, and then you can sign up for some extra courses, and then graduate early.  A lot of the elite private colleges allow this because when the cost of attendance is $60-65k/yr there will be people who want to do it in three years.  Some parents who are not receiving financial aid would like little Jimmy to hurry up and graduate asap.

One of the underappreciated twists of paying for college is that the elite schools with the huge sticker prices can work out to be cheaper than the lesser known or bottom-tier schools.  The top universities have big endowments and more financial aid to offer, so students don't need to take on huge student loan debt. So the subject of this article probably paid rather little to attend and graduated with no debt, which is great. 






mxt0133

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2017, 02:13:21 PM »
But my main point is if you have the opportunity to go to Harvard, even if you have taken enough courses to graduate in 3 years, why not keep going in the 4th year to get even smarter / more educated / meet even more people.

Is there a reason why you think you can only do that in an elite college setting?  She already has the network and contacts.  Why stay at an institution if you have already gotten what you wanted out of it?  Seems like she got the piece of paper, which is the goal for most people that attend these prestigious institutions, and was ready to put it use.


Psychstache

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2017, 02:22:36 PM »
Quote
How do you graduate Harvard in 3 years?  I'd rather stay the whole time to be there for 1 more year of hanging out with some of the most intelligent people in the world.   I'm impressed that she could do that - she must have been taking a ton of classes.

It's possible because you can earn advance standing in certain majors with AP credit and whatnot, and then you can sign up for some extra courses, and then graduate early.  A lot of the elite private colleges allow this because when the cost of attendance is $60-65k/yr there will be people who want to do it in three years.  Some parents who are not receiving financial aid would like little Jimmy to hurry up and graduate asap.

One of the underappreciated twists of paying for college is that the elite schools with the huge sticker prices can work out to be cheaper than the lesser known or bottom-tier schools.  The top universities have big endowments and more financial aid to offer, so students don't need to take on huge student loan debt. So the subject of this article probably paid rather little to attend and graduated with no debt, which is great.

I think that depends on the school.  When I went to school, AP courses got you advanced to harder courses but didn't give you credit towards graduation.  But my main point is if you have the opportunity to go to Harvard, even if you have taken enough courses to graduate in 3 years, why not keep going in the 4th year to get even smarter / more educated / meet even more people.

Definitely agree that the ivy leagues are not as expensive as you think as they offer need based financial aid.

Dual-credit courses (classes that earn you high school and college credit, which are different from AP classes) have exploded in the last 10-15 years. It is not uncommon for high achieving high schoolers in good schools to graduate with 1-1.5 years of college credits under their belt.

Nately

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2017, 06:18:13 AM »
What she managed to save is impressive, and continuing to live on a lower amount relative to their income is admirable.

But, what's the difference here between "retiring" and "becoming a SAHM"?

RFAAOATB

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2017, 08:08:51 AM »
What she managed to save is impressive, and continuing to live on a lower amount relative to their income is admirable.

But, what's the difference here between "retiring" and "becoming a SAHM"?

Spousal dependence?  She has enough money to contribute her share of expenses and enough make it on her own after a divorce.

Miss Piggy

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2017, 09:35:30 AM »
But, what's the difference here between "retiring" and "becoming a SAHM"?

I'd say about $2.2 million.

talltexan

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2017, 02:26:26 PM »
I think retirement first, baby second should be kind of a normal thing around here.

BlueHouse

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2017, 02:49:45 PM »
Dual-credit courses (classes that earn you high school and college credit, which are different from AP classes) have exploded in the last 10-15 years. It is not uncommon for high achieving high schoolers in good schools to graduate with 1-1.5 years of college credits under their belt.
Most of my elective classes in my junior and senior years in college counted toward both an undergrad and a graduate degree (an honors program that you had to qualify for by asking).  (I never did the grad degree, but if I had, I could have finished very quickly)
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

talltexan

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #10 on: August 05, 2017, 01:38:36 PM »
College is expensive. If someone is willing to hire you after three years of it, take the deal!

Skopos

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2017, 10:06:14 AM »
Quote
How do you graduate Harvard in 3 years?  I'd rather stay the whole time to be there for 1 more year of hanging out with some of the most intelligent people in the world.   I'm impressed that she could do that - she must have been taking a ton of classes.

It's possible because you can earn advance standing in certain majors with AP credit and whatnot, and then you can sign up for some extra courses, and then graduate early.  A lot of the elite private colleges allow this because when the cost of attendance is $60-65k/yr there will be people who want to do it in three years.  Some parents who are not receiving financial aid would like little Jimmy to hurry up and graduate asap.

One of the underappreciated twists of paying for college is that the elite schools with the huge sticker prices can work out to be cheaper than the lesser known or bottom-tier schools.  The top universities have big endowments and more financial aid to offer, so students don't need to take on huge student loan debt. So the subject of this article probably paid rather little to attend and graduated with no debt, which is great.

I think that depends on the school.  When I went to school, AP courses got you advanced to harder courses but didn't give you credit towards graduation.  But my main point is if you have the opportunity to go to Harvard, even if you have taken enough courses to graduate in 3 years, why not keep going in the 4th year to get even smarter / more educated / meet even more people.

Definitely agree that the ivy leagues are not as expensive as you think as they offer need based financial aid.

Because the goal is not to get smarter, get more educated, or meet more people.  The goal is to get rich.

talltexan

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2017, 08:42:23 AM »
I actually think she deserves a lot of credit for figuring out how to get the Harvard credential so economically.

Everyone I talk to who is IN COLLEGE says not to graduate early. It's a comfortable life.

But remember: only 35% of adults have bachelor's degrees. These classes are often more than people can handle even over four or six years. So nothing but respect from me!

moof

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Re: Woman Retires at 28
« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2017, 11:28:19 AM »
I actually think she deserves a lot of credit for figuring out how to get the Harvard credential so economically.

Everyone I talk to who is IN COLLEGE says not to graduate early. It's a comfortable life.

But remember: only 35% of adults have bachelor's degrees. These classes are often more than people can handle even over four or six years. So nothing but respect from me!
3 years is quite impressive!  I ended up spending 5 years getting my engineering bachelor's degree, and it was hard work the whole way.  I do believe if I tried to take all my coursework in 3 years I would either go insane or die.

A combination of remedial classes (skipped a few years of high school...) and working student jobs to pay my own for from years 3-5 kept me from taking on the prescribed heavy class load.  I do feel like I got more out of some of my classes by taking them more spread out.  Some of the engineering classes were best done after certain math classes that were not prerequisites.  Summer classes for a lot of the humanities was another helpful way to keep from getting swamped beyond my own capabilities