Author Topic: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!  (Read 5619 times)

Cranky

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #50 on: September 10, 2018, 05:27:40 AM »
I really like "The Non-Consumer Advocate"! I wish she'd write something every day.

I also like "Life After Money" which was discussed here a few years ago and a lot of people weren't very impressed, but her life is a lot more like mine that say, MMM's is.

OtherJen

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #51 on: September 10, 2018, 06:30:26 AM »
I really like "The Non-Consumer Advocate"! I wish she'd write something every day.

I also like "Life After Money" which was discussed here a few years ago and a lot of people weren't very impressed, but her life is a lot more like mine that say, MMM's is.

Thanks! That blog looks like fun and a lot more relatable.

Linda_Norway

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #52 on: September 10, 2018, 06:32:04 AM »
I like the article (just read it now) and presenting this as an alternative for people with good incomes. Unfortunately they didn't also interview a retiree with a low income, which would have been really badass.

I assume that those who were interviewed were all FIRE bloggers who like to have themselves on display. I can image that @spartana isn't very keen on being pictured in a national paper. This can change thy way people treat her.

I assume that this article will lead some new readers to this site. And maybe, some people will start thinking about consuming less.

By the way, on Friday I was sitting in a bus beside an man I hadn't met before. We came to talk about environmental issues and over-consumerism. I mentioned that I was doing the opposite, working on early retirement and spending very little. He responded well and thought it was a good idea. So not everyone thinks we are crazy people.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2018, 12:49:18 AM by Linda_Norway »

Dicey

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #53 on: September 10, 2018, 08:20:22 AM »
The interview requests crop up fairly often and there was a recent request to be part of a FIRE movie which is being made. There are also requests to individual FIREees via pm so you probably wouldn't see that. I think91st of us are a extremely private though and don't want to be "outed" or feel we don't have anything new or interesting to say.  Especially if we weren't in the high income, FIRE fast crowd of current bloggers. No one wants to hear about a working class person saving half their lowish salary for 20 years and retiring at 40 in a very modest way.  Boring ;-).
Spartana's route to retirement involved making a military committment of roughly twenty years. These articles draw too many naysayers. If dear Sparty were to agree to an interview, she'd be hit with a barrage of 'reasons" why her story not helpful to others, because it's "too late" (or too whatever) for them to replicate. She'd also give up her privacy. Who needs that? The fact is, she capitalized on the opportunities available to her at the time and made them work to her advantage. Every one of us made thousands of choices to get to where we are today, proving it can be done by virtually anyone with sufficient determination. Who needs to be criticized by random strangers on the internet?.Sparty's already had to cope with one crazy-ass weirdo, why risk another? Nope nope nope.

It's important to realize that the authors of articles like these are just trying to earn a living, working for an entity that's just trying to make a buck. Just because someone wrote an article in a mainstream publication does not mean that the concept of FIRE is now mainstream. Who among us is looking for external validation anyway? Typically, the answer is primarily the people looking to drive traffic to their blogs. Otherwise, why open themselves up to a barrage of criticism or scary nut job stalkers?

Recent example: when Liz of "The Frugalwoods" published her book, there was a huge backlash on this very site. For a while, she valiantly attempted to respond to the stones thrown. Finally, the furor subsided with the passage of time, but man, for a while it was fierce. Just last week, she finally told the story of her massive struggle with severe postpartum depression after Littlewoods was born. Yup, she was grappling with that monster while the naysayers were beating the shit out of her.  And we're far more polite than the rest of the internet. It kills me that while she was suffering, total strangers were blithely and vociferously diminishing their accomplishments. How awful for them.

Privacy has great value. Once lost, it is difficult, if not impossible, to regain.

Spartana, you sadly have learned this harsh lesson. Though I hate that you have been forced to regroup*, even on this forum. No way would I criticize you for wanting to shield yourself and protect the life you worked so hard to achieve.

*Don''t tell Sam or Nords or any of the military folk, but your stories were the most relatable and inspirational to me and I'm sorry they're gone and the reason for that. I love that you stayed on post-FIRE, even if you post less than before. Your wisdom continues to be totally relatable, despite my utter lack of military experience  Understand that writing one's own story in a journal, even on line, is completely different that being interviewed by someone else for general publication.

Sorry if this is  ramble. I am writing under the effects of (good, post-FIRE type) stress and sleep deprivation. I've been thinking about this for some time and this way my first chance to respond.

spartana

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #54 on: September 10, 2018, 09:19:03 AM »
No just 12 years for me and left with no pension or military benefits other than the GI Bill for college and what I saved while in. Got a gov job after I was out and worked that for 10 years and saved saved saved!. Retired at 42 knowing Is get a $900/month pension once 50 from my job but no medical, plus $600/month from the VA for an military connected injury/disability. Bought COBRA, then a low cost BSBC plan then once the ACA cancelled that started to use the VA. Mainly just saved for 22 working years and REd

Oh yeah and crazy stalkers ;-). As for blogging I think most people could relate to my "work for 20 years and sock away a bunch of money instead of buying crap" but most lowwe income people have more challenges like kids, housing, etc so hard for them to do it even if their mindset was on FIRE and frugality. Much easier for the high income people to make changes.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2018, 10:14:21 AM by spartana »

Lews Therin

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #55 on: September 10, 2018, 09:36:04 AM »
I'd assume there's a silent minority of people who simply followed the recommendations from multiple blogs, and so have nothing new or interesting to add.

ME: Oh yea, I FIREd at 29, and aim for 20k spend yearly.
NYT: How?
ME: 50-70k salary average for 4 years, 20-40 for 4 years, and crazy amounts of FIRE blog reading.

NYT:.... You boring. Not news.

englishteacheralex

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #56 on: September 10, 2018, 09:57:53 AM »
The interview requests crop up fairly often and there was a recent request to be part of a FIRE movie which is being made. There are also requests to individual FIREees via pm so you probably wouldn't see that. I think91st of us are a extremely private though and don't want to be "outed" or feel we don't have anything new or interesting to say.  Especially if we weren't in the high income, FIRE fast crowd of current bloggers. No one wants to hear about a working class person saving half their lowish salary for 20 years and retiring at 40 in a very modest way.  Boring ;-).
Spartana's route to retirement involved making a military committment of roughly twenty years. These articles draw too many naysayers. If dear Sparty were to agree to an interview, she'd be hit with a barrage of 'reasons" why her story not helpful to others, because it's "too late" (or too whatever) for them to replicate. She'd also give up her privacy. Who needs that? The fact is, she capitalized on the opportunities available to her at the time and made them work to her advantage. Every one of us made thousands of choices to get to where we are today, proving it can be done by virtually anyone with sufficient determination. Who needs to be criticized by random strangers on the internet?.Sparty's already had to cope with one crazy-ass weirdo, why risk another? Nope nope nope.

It's important to realize that the authors of articles like these are just trying to earn a living, working for an entity that's just trying to make a buck. Just because someone wrote an article in a mainstream publication does not mean that the concept of FIRE is now mainstream. Who among us is looking for external validation anyway? Typically, the answer is primarily the people looking to drive traffic to their blogs. Otherwise, why open themselves up to a barrage of criticism or scary nut job stalkers?

Recent example: when Liz of "The Frugalwoods" published her book, there was a huge backlash on this very site. For a while, she valiantly attempted to respond to the stones thrown. Finally, the furor subsided with the passage of time, but man, for a while it was fierce. Just last week, she finally told the story of her massive struggle with severe postpartum depression after Littlewoods was born. Yup, she was grappling with that monster while the naysayers were beating the shit out of her.  And we're far more polite than the rest of the internet. It kills me that while she was suffering, total strangers were blithely and vociferously diminishing their accomplishments. How awful for them.

Privacy has great value. Once lost, it is difficult, if not impossible, to regain.

Spartana, you sadly have learned this harsh lesson. Though I hate that you have been forced to regroup*, even on this forum. No way would I criticize you for wanting to shield yourself and protect the life you worked so hard to achieve.

*Don''t tell Sam or Nords or any of the military folk, but your stories were the most relatable and inspirational to me and I'm sorry they're gone and the reason for that. I love that you stayed on post-FIRE, even if you post less than before. Your wisdom continues to be totally relatable, despite my utter lack of military experience  Understand that writing one's own story in a journal, even on line, is completely different that being interviewed by someone else for general publication.

Sorry if this is  ramble. I am writing under the effects of (good, post-FIRE type) stress and sleep deprivation. I've been thinking about this for some time and this way my first chance to respond.

Dicey! Totally! I read Liz's blog post last week and put the same thing together myself about her PPD and all the hate for her book on the internet. When the book came out and I started reading all the vitriol, I already felt bad for her with a new baby.

Yeah, the publicity of a blog/book about my own life sounds pretty horrible. Even being interviewed for a newspaper article sounds awful. You're the one who told me that you participated in an article about finances once and lived to regret it. I appreciated that advice and turned down a chance for an interview in a local paper on the strength of that advice. It's true that after enough time people tend to forget and move on, but I wouldn't enjoy the months of people noticing me.

FINate

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #57 on: September 10, 2018, 11:13:34 AM »
The NYT article is more even-handed than most that I've seen from big media. At least those profiled are not painted as complete weirds. At the same time it's clear we're far from mainstream.

It's very much written from the perspective of an outsider looking in with a sense that it's a problem to be solved. The tagline suggests that people FIRE because work is too stressful. Later it's suggested that the problem is lack of agency at work. Either way, the message is clear: FIRE is a reaction to negative forces rather than positive proaction. So we therefore need to make work less stressful and/or empower people at work to solve the FIRE problem. It is unwilling to accept that there are legitimate alternatives, that a life of meaning and purpose doesn't require working for a paycheck until old age (and consuming along the way). The end of the article further reinforces this with the anecdote about Mr Long and how maybe, just maybe, he was simply burnt out. The icing on the cake is the bit about his new "work" to watch 1000 movies.  This is nothing more than a thinly veiled criticism of the movement from an establishment threatened by those who no longer buy-in to the unholy union of consumerism and puritan work ethic that drives much of our economy. It's in the same vein as remarks I sometimes get, usually from older men, that I'm "like a stay at home mommy" (also incredibly misogynistic) or that I must watch TV or nap all day. Because only paid employment can provide fulfillment?
« Last Edit: September 10, 2018, 11:24:47 AM by FINate »

FINate

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #58 on: September 10, 2018, 11:22:16 AM »
Also, I thought this quote from Vicki Robin was odd:

Quote
But Vicki Robin, who wrote that financial guide with Joe Dominguez, said the FIRE crowd is a different breed of dropout than those in the ’90s. “Our aim was not just to have a whole bunch of people quit their jobs,” Ms. Robin said. “Our aim was to lower consumption to save the planet. We attracted longtime simple-living people, religious people, environmentalists.”

I don't have the book in front of me (borrowed from library), but I could swear that in her book she praises the ability to volunteer instead of work for a paycheck - the freedom that comes from not being beholden to an employer. So if you volunteer and find you don't like it, it's easy to just quit. Or maybe I'm confusing things with another book? Either way, I'm have difficulty reconciling her quote with a book that extols FI. What's the point of continuing to waste your life's energy with paid employment if you're FI?

ETA - Yes, if you really love your work and would do it for free you may choose to keep doing it in FI. Yet there's still the problem that you can enjoy your work while not wanting to commit to a regular work schedule that gets in the way of other things you'd like to do.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2018, 11:37:30 AM by FINate »

sol

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #59 on: September 10, 2018, 12:09:08 PM »
Either way, the message is clear: FIRE is a reaction to negative forces rather than positive proaction. So we therefore need to make work less stressful and/or empower people at work to solve the FIRE problem.

This is one of the ancillary secrets of the FI lifestyle.  Working for The Man to put food on your table is inherently stressful, because you are subjugating your own desires out of fear.  It's modern day slavery, in which an elite class lives a life of relative luxury due to the servitude of the masses who toil on their behalf.  The fact that we've figured out how to make the slavery voluntary does not change the fundamental power dynamic; some people work for a living, and other people reap the profits of that work.

So all of the talk about making work better, of empowering people to pursue their dreams at work, is just misdirection.  It's just another way to keep the slaves toiling.  Real freedom is not needing to toil for anyone's interest other than your own, on your own time, at your own schedule, at work of your choosing.  You will never get that as long as you have traditional employment.  You will always be part of the servant class.

Consumerism is just another tool to keep you toiling, so all of the blogosphere rallying cry against it is kind of missing the larger point.  Yes, of course you need to give up mindless spending, but the real secret is to give up mindless working in order to continue the mindless spending.  To use the unfortunate example of American history, you don't set a man free by telling him he needs to stop getting whipped by the plantation owner, you set him free by telling him to stop picking the cotton.  It's the larger economic system in which he works for someone else's benefit that is the ultimate problem, not the tools the plantation owner uses to enforce that economic system.  Fight the power, not the means.

Quote
Because only paid employment can provide fulfillment?

I'm with you.  Paid employment doesn't provide fulfillment, it actively prevents you from finding fulfillment.

Fortunately for us, we live in a historic moment.  Possibly more than at any time in history, today it is possible for an industrious slave to buy his own freedom by the time he reaches middle age.  The ability to purchase a slice of corporate profits indefinitely has been a real game changer, compared to the options available to pre-revolution France, or class-bound India, or the slaves of the American South.

spartana

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #60 on: September 10, 2018, 02:03:54 PM »
I'd assume there's a silent minority of people who simply followed the recommendations from multiple blogs, and so have nothing new or interesting to add.

ME: Oh yea, I FIREd at 29, and aim for 20k spend yearly.
NYT: How?
ME: 50-70k salary average for 4 years, 20-40 for 4 years, and crazy amounts of FIRE blog reading.

NYT:.... You boring. Not news.
Yeah nothing too new from the financial front but there are still the social and emotional aspects of dealing with FIREing to write/talk about that you rarely read about on blogs. Most seem to focus on money. LivingAFI (Dr. Doom's blog) was great for that stuff. Lots of angst there. My friend who suggested I blog said he rarely saw FIRE blogs that dealt being a FIREee and dealing with things like divorce, dating/new relationships, solo travel, becoming ill or preparing for your parents or your own old age care as a single childless person,  having no fall back person if SHTF, etc. Things most people pursuing FIRE probably won't ever deal with and have no interest in.

chaskavitch

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #61 on: September 11, 2018, 02:30:58 PM »
Update from the NYT, "Your questions about FIRE, answered": https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/11/style/what-is-fire-financial-independence-retire-early.html

There are currently 4 comments.  Three of them are about how it's mean and irresponsible to not plan to pay for your children's entire college education.  One of them wants "someone" to rerun their FIRE/4% withdrawal calculations starting in bad years like 1968, because then it will almost certainly fail.

catccc

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #62 on: September 11, 2018, 11:23:15 PM »
Nice article!  I've spent a lot of time on these forums, and previously, the early retirement forums.   I am curious where the lines are drawn regarding lean/regular/fat fire.  I've heard the terms thrown around a bit, but not really with numbers.  I'd guess I'm in the regular FIRE zone, currently at $1M and hoping to pull the plug at $1.5M.

Malkynn

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #63 on: September 12, 2018, 04:18:50 AM »
Nice article!  I've spent a lot of time on these forums, and previously, the early retirement forums.   I am curious where the lines are drawn regarding lean/regular/fat fire.  I've heard the terms thrown around a bit, but not really with numbers.  I'd guess I'm in the regular FIRE zone, currently at $1M and hoping to pull the plug at $1.5M.

There are no lines.
They are vague concepts that you define for yourself based on your own personal needs.

maizeman

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #64 on: September 12, 2018, 04:37:56 AM »
I think the terms originated on reddit, and I don't particularly care for then, but it seems to be a way to segregate the community in terms of what people think it is or isn't okay to hold each other accountable for:

LeanFIRE seems to mean you're allowed to criticize people who you think are spending on luxuries that probably don't actually make them happier, but you're not allowed to criticize people for not having enough saved or having an unrealistically optimistic view of future expenses or future desired lifestyle changes.

FatFIRE seems to mean you're allowed to criticize people who you think have cut back spending to the point that it compromises their happiness and/or future security, but you're not allowed to criticize people for basing their FIRE plans on ridiculously clown-car levels of conspicuous consumption and/or ridiculously pessimistic assumptions about safe withdrawal rates.

Linda_Norway

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #65 on: September 12, 2018, 05:19:49 AM »
Nice article!  I've spent a lot of time on these forums, and previously, the early retirement forums.   I am curious where the lines are drawn regarding lean/regular/fat fire.  I've heard the terms thrown around a bit, but not really with numbers.  I'd guess I'm in the regular FIRE zone, currently at $1M and hoping to pull the plug at $1.5M.

My definition:
Regular: You can continue to live like you do now in a frugal way. Maybe downsize to get there.
Lean: You need to make some badass choices to cut down costs make ends meet, maybe take a side-gig for the money and downsize.
Fat: You can live like you do now, can afford to travel around the world, pay for your children's education and continue to live in a clown house.

spartana

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #66 on: September 12, 2018, 08:26:19 AM »
Nice article!  I've spent a lot of time on these forums, and previously, the early retirement forums.   I am curious where the lines are drawn regarding lean/regular/fat fire.  I've heard the terms thrown around a bit, but not really with numbers.  I'd guess I'm in the regular FIRE zone, currently at $1M and hoping to pull the plug at $1.5M.

There are no lines.
They are vague concepts that you define for yourself based on your own personal needs.
This^^^. To me lean FIRE just means you have enough passive income to mean all "your" basic expenses without earned income. Whether  that's $500/month or $5000/month just depends on your own unique situation. Fat FIRE to me means you have a passive income far beyond your basic expenses and that extra allows you to do and buy "all the things" if you want.

catccc

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #67 on: September 12, 2018, 09:08:06 AM »
Nice article!  I've spent a lot of time on these forums, and previously, the early retirement forums.   I am curious where the lines are drawn regarding lean/regular/fat fire.  I've heard the terms thrown around a bit, but not really with numbers.  I'd guess I'm in the regular FIRE zone, currently at $1M and hoping to pull the plug at $1.5M.

There are no lines.
They are vague concepts that you define for yourself based on your own personal needs.
This^^^. To me lean FIRE just means you have enough passive income to mean all "your" basic expenses without earned income. Whether  that's $500/month or $5000/month just depends on your own unique situation. Fat FIRE to me means you have a passive income far beyond your basic expenses and that extra allows you to do and buy "all the things" if you want.

I like these answers.

Nords

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #68 on: September 12, 2018, 10:14:19 AM »
Anyone else think it's kind of weird that Mr. 500 (or whatever his blogger superhero name is) moved to Longmont?  Uprooting your family, with young children, so you can fanboy on your favorite blogger?  That's one serious man crush on Pete.  I wonder if that is awkward for Pete. I kind of hope it is.   
Wow, Tom, I think you can lighten up a little.

Mindy & Carl (Mr. 1500 of 1500 Days to FI) reached their FI on his income and on a series of real-estate “live-in rehabs”.  They’d buy a crappy property, rehab it while living in it, sell it after two years (for tax-free capital gains), and repeat. 

Now that they’re FI and can work whenever/wherever they want, Mindy took a job at BiggerPockets.  She says it’s the best one she’s ever had— managing the site & forums of the nation’s largest real-estate investor community and co-hosting a podcast.  Carl has really mellowed out and started being less introverted.  They enjoy the Colorado climate, the outdoor recreation, and the people.

It’s not only about Pete, although it’s convenient that they’re so close to his co-working business and have so many real-estate investors (and FI aspirants) coming through the area.  Carl also might have a strong interest in craft beer.

I wish they would have highlighted some of the FIRE folks who didn't so heavily monetize their blogs... My favorite people are ones like LivingaFI/Dr. Doom, who created awesome content, but then didn't cash in on it.
We bloggers frequently get interview requests from freelancers, and occasionally from masthead journalists.  We tend to refer the people who we know will want to do the interviews.  The writers are typically on deadline and not typically interested in chasing down people who don’t seem interested in doing interviews. 

Maybe if you contacted your favorites then they’d be more inclined to do interviews.  Or maybe they’re not at all interested in the publicity.  I’d enjoy an update from LivingaFI.

Another thing I liked about the article and the way it portrayed the subject was the unconventional pose it used for Scott and Taylor Rieckens, with him sitting and her standing next to the chair he's sitting in, seeming to loom tall... which, in my view, is not a typical pose for heterosexual couples. (I pause here to consider that it may be because she is indeed taller than him [I don't know if this is the case] and this was a way to camouflage something about the couple that might mark them as atypical.) In any case, I really like the pose. And I will follow the links to the FI blogs I didn't know about prior to this article.
They’re a perfectly normal family.  They’re both about 5’9” (my height), although I didn’t whip out a tape measure.  A few months ago I spent a thoroughly enjoyable three hours with them (they were house-sitting by Kauai’s Hanalei Bay) as part of the documentary’s interviews.  There was also surfing, although I don’t know whether that’ll make the cut.

The “Playing With FIRE” documentary is in final editing (after more than two years of filming!) and might have a trailer next month.  It’ll probably be out before the end of the year, and I know the book is releasing in January.

K-ice

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #69 on: September 13, 2018, 07:23:59 PM »
Good article & comments. There are lots of other people & blogs to follow.

spartana

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #70 on: September 14, 2018, 09:18:30 AM »
Anyone else think it's kind of weird that Mr. 500 (or whatever his blogger superhero name is) moved to Longmont?  Uprooting your family, with young children, so you can fanboy on your favorite blogger?  That's one serious man crush on Pete.  I wonder if that is awkward for Pete. I kind of hope it is.   
Wow, Tom, I think you can lighten up a little.

Mindy & Carl (Mr. 1500 of 1500 Days to FI) reached their FI on his income and on a series of real-estate “live-in rehabs”.  They’d buy a crappy property, rehab it while living in it, sell it after two years (for tax-free capital gains), and repeat. 

Now that they’re FI and can work whenever/wherever they want, Mindy took a job at BiggerPockets.  She says it’s the best one she’s ever had— managing the site & forums of the nation’s largest real-estate investor community and co-hosting a podcast.  Carl has really mellowed out and started being less introverted.  They enjoy the Colorado climate, the outdoor recreation, and the people.

It’s not only about Pete, although it’s convenient that they’re so close to his co-working business and have so many real-estate investors (and FI aspirants) coming through the area.  Carl also might have a strong interest in craft beer.

I wish they would have highlighted some of the FIRE folks who didn't so heavily monetize their blogs... My favorite people are ones like LivingaFI/Dr. Doom, who created awesome content, but then didn't cash in on it.
We bloggers frequently get interview requests from freelancers, and occasionally from masthead journalists.  We tend to refer the people who we know will want to do the interviews.  The writers are typically on deadline and not typically interested in chasing down people who don’t seem interested in doing interviews. 

Maybe if you contacted your favorites then they’d be more inclined to do interviews.  Or maybe they’re not at all interested in the publicity.  I’d enjoy an update from LivingaFI.

Another thing I liked about the article and the way it portrayed the subject was the unconventional pose it used for Scott and Taylor Rieckens, with him sitting and her standing next to the chair he's sitting in, seeming to loom tall... which, in my view, is not a typical pose for heterosexual couples. (I pause here to consider that it may be because she is indeed taller than him [I don't know if this is the case] and this was a way to camouflage something about the couple that might mark them as atypical.) In any case, I really like the pose. And I will follow the links to the FI blogs I didn't know about prior to this article.
They’re a perfectly normal family.  They’re both about 5’9” (my height), although I didn’t whip out a tape measure.  A few months ago I spent a thoroughly enjoyable three hours with them (they were house-sitting by Kauai’s Hanalei Bay) as part of the documentary’s interviews.  There was also surfing, although I don’t know whether that’ll make the cut.

The “Playing With FIRE” documentary is in final editing (after more than two years of filming!) and might have a trailer next month.  It’ll probably be out before the end of the year, and I know the book is releasing in January.
But will we see you surfing? That's the good stuff ;-).

I'm actually very curious to see how the movie comes out and what comments it will generate from the public. I suppose it will be mixed reviews like most of the articles. Plus it may only show a small segment of the FIRE population (bloggers like yourself) due to the rest of us ERees hiding when people want to interview us ;-).

Nords

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #71 on: September 15, 2018, 06:26:07 AM »
But will we see you surfing? That's the good stuff ;-).
I sure hope so!  No promises, but we were out there for an hour. 

I even arranged for Scott to run over me so that the filming crew would force him to include that scene.  (Just kidding, Scott!)  It all depends on the context that they’re trying to present to the other 330 million Americans watching the documentary, and admittedly surfing Hanalei Bay might be pretty niche to everyone who’s more than 30 miles from a coastline.

I'm actually very curious to see how the movie comes out and what comments it will generate from the public. I suppose it will be mixed reviews like most of the articles. Plus it may only show a small segment of the FIRE population (bloggers like yourself) due to the rest of us ERees hiding when people want to interview us ;-).
Ironically most of us bloggers are even more introverted than most people... it’s why we become bloggers in the first place.  Otherwise we’d be motivational speakers and YouTube rockstars.

Maybe the documentary will drive more people into the mainstream and they’ll be doing more of the interviews.  “Playing with FIRE” is very marketable but I think the real interest is in FI without implying that you have to “retire”.

Last week I was at CampFI with over 40 other people who are already on the path to FI.  (Although one skeptical spouse really had his eyes opened and has now fully thrown in with the rest of the cult.)  I got zero questions about the flaws in the 4% Safe Withdrawal Rate or asset allocation.  I got hundreds of questions about “life after FI”.  I hope the documentary picks up on that from all of the interview footage.

FireLane

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Re: We are finally boring and mainstream! Hooray! - FIRE in NY Times!
« Reply #72 on: September 15, 2018, 01:43:01 PM »
Last week I was at CampFI with over 40 other people who are already on the path to FI.  (Although one skeptical spouse really had his eyes opened and has now fully thrown in with the rest of the cult.)  I got zero questions about the flaws in the 4% Safe Withdrawal Rate or asset allocation.  I got hundreds of questions about “life after FI”.  I hope the documentary picks up on that from all of the interview footage.

That's how I feel too. Once you've read one post about the 4% SWR, you've read them all. The basic principles of FIRE are simple, and I don't need them repeated on every personal finance blog I read.

What I really want to hear about is how people live their lives post-RE. I want to know what cool adventures they're having, how they occupy their time on a daily basis, what new challenges they've encountered.