Author Topic: Toronto man builds park stairs for $550, irking city after $65,000 estimate  (Read 2750 times)

Lis

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Toronto man builds park stairs for $550, irking city after $65,000 estimate

This popped up on my newsfeed this morning and I got a good chuckle.

Mississippi Mudstache

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That's awesome.
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dividendman

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Quote
I thought they were talking about an escalator

Hahaha.

Sigh, but they have taped off the stairs so nobody can use them while the city gets another estimate.

Roboturner

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SeaEhm

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Wonder what the $65,000 steps would look like.  Seems like they would be a bit different than the 8 steps this guy put in.

I am not a contractor, but that price sounds a bit steep and it irks me that many contractors milk the government for far too much.  However, taping off the steps isn't something negative especially if the property is public.  Takes one person to fall on these steps, sue the city, and then $65k will be a drop in the bucket.
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Ichabod

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Wonder what the $65,000 steps would look like.  Seems like they would be a bit different than the 8 steps this guy put in.

I am not a contractor, but that price sounds a bit steep and it irks me that many contractors milk the government for far too much.  However, taping off the steps isn't something negative especially if the property is public.  Takes one person to fall on these steps, sue the city, and then $65k will be a drop in the bucket.

Reading the article, people were falling down and hurting themselves on the steep path prior to the steps being installed. I understand there could be liability, but it's likely safer now.

And while the article said the steps are taped off... the photograph showed that the tape had been pushed aside. I'm pretty sure the steps are being used.

WildJager

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Wonder what the $65,000 steps would look like.  Seems like they would be a bit different than the 8 steps this guy put in.

I am not a contractor, but that price sounds a bit steep and it irks me that many contractors milk the government for far too much.  However, taping off the steps isn't something negative especially if the property is public.  Takes one person to fall on these steps, sue the city, and then $65k will be a drop in the bucket.

Reading the article, people were falling down and hurting themselves on the steep path prior to the steps being installed. I understand there could be liability, but it's likely safer now.

And while the article said the steps are taped off... the photograph showed that the tape had been pushed aside. I'm pretty sure the steps are being used.

Yeah, that tape looks really daunting to get past.

jooniFLORisploo

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:)))))   Awesome story!!!

Miss Piggy

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I am not a contractor, but that price sounds a bit steep

I see what you did there.

obstinate

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I am also not a contractor, but I notice:
  • Ground-wood contact.
  • The center-mounting of the supports for a few of the middle stairs.
I'm also curious about how deep the foundation for these stairs go. I wonder how well they'll hold up in rain.

It's still cool, but I suspect there's good reason for the city to remove them.

A Definite Beta Guy

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I am also not a contractor, but I notice:
  • Ground-wood contact.
  • The center-mounting of the supports for a few of the middle stairs.
I'm also curious about how deep the foundation for these stairs go. I wonder how well they'll hold up in rain.

It's still cool, but I suspect there's good reason for the city to remove them.

Read about this a few days ago. There is no foundation for the stairs.

Basically a death trap, especially in Canadian winter.

Maenad

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Quote from: A Definite Beta Guy
Read about this a few days ago. There is no foundation for the stairs.

Basically a death trap, especially in Canadian winter.

Yeah, while the $65,000 estimate sounds exorbitant, the guy doesn't win any awards with me for building something that will rot out in a year or warp from frost heave and then be just as dangerous. Doing something half-assed and expecting kudos because it was cheaper is not something to celebrate.

jooniFLORisploo

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It seems to me like a good interim, temporary solution, preventing the issues currently happening in the current weather. Hopefully this gives the Powers some time to sort out a long-term, all-weather solution that costs less than $65k.

Mississippi Mudstache

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I am also not a contractor, but I notice:
  • Ground-wood contact.
  • The center-mounting of the supports for a few of the middle stairs.

Uh...Do Canadians not have treated lumber? A staircase like that built with treated lumber rated for ground contact could easily last 50 years. The center-mounted supports are a bit odd, but shouldn't be a safety issue if proper fasteners were used.
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obstinate

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I am also not a contractor, but I notice:
  • Ground-wood contact.
  • The center-mounting of the supports for a few of the middle stairs.

Uh...Do Canadians not have treated lumber? A staircase like that built with treated lumber rated for ground contact could easily last 50 years. The center-mounted supports are a bit odd, but shouldn't be a safety issue if proper fasteners were used.
This is why the disclaimer. :P I had a rotting fence in my previous house and the inspector said it was because of "ground wood contact." Thanks for the correction.

scottish

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It seems to me like a good interim, temporary solution, preventing the issues currently happening in the current weather. Hopefully this gives the Powers some time to sort out a long-term, all-weather solution that costs less than $65k.

Sometimes you have to embarrass the bureaucrats to get them moving.

A Definite Beta Guy

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It seems to me like a good interim, temporary solution, preventing the issues currently happening in the current weather. Hopefully this gives the Powers some time to sort out a long-term, all-weather solution that costs less than $65k.

Sometimes you have to embarrass the bureaucrats to get them moving.
Yup, that's probably the end-game....probably worth $550, too.

anonymouscow

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I remember all sorts of things being build by boy scouts like small bridges over creeks.

There is probably less of an expectation of things being up to code on a hiking path than a city park.

Maybe if the city was more willing to work with people they could have supplied the plans and just inspected it in the end.