Author Topic: The science of self control  (Read 931 times)

humanemustache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 16
The science of self control
« on: July 05, 2017, 03:40:14 AM »
I went from sedentary academic to 100-mile marathon runner—thanks to the science of self-control:
https://qz.com/1019928/i-went-from-sedentary-academic-to-100-mile-marathon-runner-thanks-to-the-science-of-self-control/

While this specific article is about running ridiculously long distances, I think the lessons it contains are extremely applicable to those of us actively avoiding finance-related face-punching. Specifically, the three factors for building self-control:

  • Standards are the reference points you use to determine whether a given action is appropriate or desirable—whether you should order a third drink, for example, or wake up at 5 am every day. Our standards originate from our cultural surroundings, what people teach us, and our personal beliefs.
  • Monitoring is the second part of self-control. If you want to control your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, you have to keep track of them.
  • Strength refers to how much energy you have to control your impulses. Your strength waxes and wanes as the day goes on, usually peaking in the morning and plunging at night. You can also build up strength through practicing self-control.

Seems relevant to saving.


« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 05:17:35 AM by humanemustache »

2Cent

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 394

eve steps

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • http://www.evesteps.com/
    • Eve Steps
Re: The science of self control
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2017, 05:09:07 AM »
Thanks for sharing
My fashion and life style magazine http://www.evesteps.com/

humanemustache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 16
Re: The science of self control
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2017, 05:19:06 AM »
Thanks for sharing. Use this link instead https://qz.com/1019928/i-went-from-sedentary-academic-to-100-mile-marathon-runner-thanks-to-the-science-of-self-control/

No problem! Thanks for letting me know that my attempt to be savvy with a hyperlink was not a good idea :P

Linda_Norway

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1407
Re: The science of self control
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2017, 05:25:38 AM »
Thanks for sharing.

Yes, self control is an interesting thing. I often notice my own total lack of self control, preferring to sit in a chair watching telly, instead of going to run. But on some occasions I have had enormous will power.

Once I ran a marathon. That was after taking a break from running after a whole year of being uninspired. First I registered for a half marathon half a year in the future. I managed to train 3 times a week, later 4 times and was very motivated to do that. Then I registered for the full marathon and managed to run 8 hours a week on average, because I was terrified of being not well enough trained to reach the finish line. It also helped to tell everybody else that I had planned this, as an extra motivation. During the race I ran on asphalt all the time, which was unexpectedly hard on my legs. So I was in pain already before halfway. My body wanted to quit the remaining time. But I did some serious talking to myself the rest of the race, telling myself how proud I would be if I would finish in my planned time. And eventually I did.

The other time is when I decided I wanted to lose weight, 8 kgs. I managed to motivate myself and had a clear goal. Got some good tool to help counting calories and managed it quite easily.

I also once went to a course where there was an exam at the end. I decided I really wanted to pass that exam. So I bought a book on the subject already before the course and read that. During the course I studied really hard. And passed as one of the few.

But in day-to-day life I cannot always feel the motivation to do something, like now to pick up running again. I have been starting twice the last few month, both away from home in a nice environment. But at home I cannot not climb over the door step. And also when I need to do chores, I so much have the feeling that I deserve to relax in the evening, instead of doing these chores.
As the person in the article says, watching TV costs a lot of time. If you cut that out, you have time to do many things.

Luckily with MMM at least, I have found a new clear goal. Now it is so much easier not to buy lots of stuff. Now my priorities are very clear: save money for retirement. For my heath and training issues, I haven't set any goals this year, and that makes that I cannot get myself started for real. Yes, I know what to do about it, I am just not in the mood.

human

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 753
Re: The science of self control
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2017, 05:31:14 AM »
A marathon is 26miles.

humanemustache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 16
Re: The science of self control
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2017, 06:37:55 AM »
Yes, self control is an interesting thing. I often notice my own total lack of self control, preferring to sit in a chair watching telly, instead of going to run. But on some occasions I have had enormous will power.

But in day-to-day life I cannot always feel the motivation to do something, like now to pick up running again. I have been starting twice the last few month, both away from home in a nice environment. But at home I cannot not climb over the door step. And also when I need to do chores, I so much have the feeling that I deserve to relax in the evening, instead of doing these chores.
As the person in the article says, watching TV costs a lot of time. If you cut that out, you have time to do many things.

Luckily with MMM at least, I have found a new clear goal. Now it is so much easier not to buy lots of stuff. Now my priorities are very clear: save money for retirement. For my heath and training issues, I haven't set any goals this year, and that makes that I cannot get myself started for real. Yes, I know what to do about it, I am just not in the mood.

Maybe self-control of the consumerist variety is a bit easier because it doesn't require the same blood, sweat and tears as marathon training? It doesn't hurt to not spend $20 on shit you don't need and there is quite an obvious benefit to not doing so most of the time. Whereas, running 3-7 times a weeks for hours on end, injuring yourself, not having the energy to do other things, etc. all for the sake of a footrace of a distance long enough that there is a major divide about whether or not it is actually good for your long-term health or not? That can be a bit tougher I guess.

A marathon is 26miles.

Correct. And an ultramarathon (as the author calls his 100-mile footraces) is anything more than that. Can't blame the author for the editor's silly decision with the title.