Author Topic: Kondo-style decluttering and frugality  (Read 4429 times)

I'm a red panda

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Re: Kondo-style decluttering and frugality
« Reply #50 on: January 31, 2019, 08:15:01 AM »


I did get rid of my box of buttons. Because despite sewing a ton, I almost NEVER went to find a button.

Hahha, my button box is large. It's a by product of my side hustle of selling thrifted clothing. What doesn't sell has all buttons, trims and zips removed and collected for bulk sale. When the button box is full, I sell it online. The last button box got me $60. I sold a few button sets individually also - shaped ones for kid's clothing, or shell or wood ones.

I do cut all the clasps and stuff off bras, and friends give me theirs.  Findings are expensive and I like to sew my own.

StarBright

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Re: Kondo-style decluttering and frugality
« Reply #51 on: January 31, 2019, 09:03:53 AM »
@Malkynn  - I don't think people think the whole concept is privileged - but certainly the idea of only keeping things that spark joy reads as privilege if you haven't read the whole book.

I had a winter coat and several warm shirts that were gifted to me several years ago when money was quite tight. I hated that coat and the shirts didn't really fit but they were warm, money was tight, so I kept them. Throwing them out (even though I disliked them) was not really an option. I would have rolled my eyes big time if someone had said "just throw them out."

Obviously we've gotten deeper into the discussion here (I really appreciate the conversation on Shinto, etc) but from a very surface level, criticisms of privilege aren't surprising.

I will also say that as a sibling of someone with severe OCD, Kondo's description of her childhood compulsion for neatness was a red flag for me as well. BUT - how amazing that she was able to create a career for herself that is such a perfect fit for her personality!

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Kondo-style decluttering and frugality
« Reply #52 on: January 31, 2019, 09:45:35 AM »
I think the actual MK would not say to throw those items out, but to reframe how you think about them. Appreciate them for keeping you warm, for being free when you couldn't afford other options, mentally thank them and the person who gave them to you every time you wear them.

Of course the price of fame is people judging you on the headlines. I'm not invested in defending her, but I think the reframing toward gratitude fits with the message of this site.

Prairie Stash

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Re: Kondo-style decluttering and frugality
« Reply #53 on: January 31, 2019, 01:57:22 PM »
I had a winter coat and several warm shirts that were gifted to me several years ago when money was quite tight. I hated that coat and the shirts didn't really fit but they were warm, money was tight, so I kept them. Throwing them out (even though I disliked them) was not really an option. I would have rolled my eyes big time if someone had said "just throw them out."
I still have to read the book.

However, I suspect the coat "sparked joy" every time it was freezing outside. You don't have to like something to find joy in it. Does the book say you need to like something to find joy in it? Although the terms are often synonymous, the concept of joy can spring from unlikely places.

I have had several ugly free coats in my life. I didn't like most of them (probably because I hated the fact I was poor and the jacket was an outward showing reflection of my poverty and I struggled with it), but I wore them for their warmth. I found joy in staying warm, which extended to the jacket, but I never learned to like their ugly appearance from an aesthetic view. In hindsight, they sparked joy but I was angry about being poor, thats a demon entirely seperate from the coat that needed dealing with. 

I read the article from the professor deriding the winter jacket; she should try not having a jacket for a week and I guarantee it would spark joy the next time she wore it. In that case joy is synonymous with appreciation.

Chranstronaut

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Re: Kondo-style decluttering and frugality
« Reply #54 on: February 05, 2019, 08:15:41 AM »
  In scenario 2, they need to address the deep psychological wounds caused by their (typically lifetime of) poverty.  For both groups, way more intervention then Marie Kondo is needed to tidy up.
I won't argue with this.  I feel like KonMari strategies can compliment this work, or possible be inspiration to seek the greater help.  Ultimately a person needs to be ready for it (tidying or therapy), and you will get out of it what you put into it. 

After a childhood as a low income hand-me-down packrat, I needed to learn self-reflection and how to separate my emotions from my things.  In that way, the KonMari method was like therapy for me.   It was truly life changing, not because being tidy is so special, but because it taught me a strategy to cope with loss, fill my mind with gratitude, and created a paradigm shift in how I view mementos.

I read the article from the professor deriding the winter jacket; she should try not having a jacket for a week and I guarantee it would spark joy the next time she wore it. In that case joy is synonymous with appreciation.
Kondo's book does offer perspective on items without joy, but instead focuses on their utility and need, as you point out.  Her chapter on miscellaneous/komono covers this idea.