Author Topic: Cookbook: Ottolenghi - Simple  (Read 1606 times)

Linea_Norway

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Cookbook: Ottolenghi - Simple
« on: February 12, 2019, 07:08:42 AM »
Hi.

When I visited my relatives at Christmas, I saw that my SIL got herself this cookbook, which seemed to have very inspiring recipes. When I visited my mother, I saw the same cookbook there. I mentioned that I thought it would be a good cookbooks. My mother did what she usually does in those cases, she gave it to me. Under condition that I copied one of the recipes inside it.

https://www.amazon.com/Ottolenghi-Simple-Cookbook-Yotam/dp/1607749165/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

I like reading in the cookbook. One very simple, and Mustachian thing I picked up, was eating the leaves of the cauliflower. I used to throw them away, but now I just roast them.

I made a number of dishes in the book. One that we really liked a lot was sweet potato mash with lime. That is a great combination. I also made a dish with chicken breasts and dates, which was very tasteful. And I tried my mother's favorite dish, the roasted celeriac. The latter was not as tasteful as expected. Maybe I will somehow insert the coriander into the celeriac next time.

A few days ago I made fish (cod) and used the dried barberries which are in the trout recipe. The berries didn't have that much taste. Next time I will put them in fluid for a much longer time.

A challenge is that many recipes are based on north African ingredients. Here in Norway we have some ethnic shops that sell all sorts of foreign ingredients, but not everything. I ended up making my own sesame paste (Tahini), before I later found it in a shop. I made my own preserved lemons. But the process did not go completely well and I had to throw away a few. Instead of the rose harissa, I made my own harissa from an online Jamie Oliver recipe. Instead of rose petals, I used cicely (Myrrhis Odorata), which is also sweet and which I had picked in the spring last year. Later my DH bought a jar of other harissa in Sweden. I could not find black garlic for a good price. Making it myself would be possible in my food dryer, but it requires the dryer to run for a month. Therefore too expensive. So maybe I'll buy it online at Amazon some time. I found Sumac in the ethnic shops. I haven't been able to find za'atar.

Anyone else who is interested in this cookbook?
Is this a Mustachian cookbook? Probably not in particular. But I have gotten feedback at home that I seem to be more inspired when cooking from it, which is positive for home cooking. And I try to be as Mustachian as possible by using it.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 07:18:55 AM by Linda_Norway »

wenchsenior

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Re: Cookbook: Ottolenghi - Simple
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2019, 05:06:27 PM »
How "simple" are these recipes, for a very indifferent cook, do you think?  I think Ottolenghi's books are amazing, but his stuff tends to be fairly elaborate and/or require some unusual ingredients.  If this one really is simpler, I will give it a look.

BNgarden

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Re: Cookbook: Ottolenghi - Simple
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2019, 05:19:31 PM »
You really have to pick and choose your recipe based on what flavour profiles you think go well together.  DH cooked two vegetable recipes that my (really good cook) SD and I thought each contained two very different flavour profiles fighting each other.  (For ref., these were: roasted beets with yogurt and preserved lemon as well as tomato, chard and spinach w toasted almonds.)  They each had ingredients we'd leave out in future (or really severely reduce the amounts).  (Dill OR preserved lemon in the first--either one would be good without the other; mint and lime in the latter--both were too heavy-handed and didn't add to the dish.)

I can see some breakfast dishes that sound really yummy, and don't have clashing ingredients (to my eyes / taste-buds). 

I don't think the recipes are particularly simple; you still need to get all your ingredients sorted and prepped first.  If you're quick at that, then perhaps the cooking itself is simpler than most of his books' recipes?

And, no, not particularly mustachian (at least where I live in Cda).  If you have a fully stocked pantry / nearby ethnic grocers with his staple ingredients in bulk, maybe...

Linea_Norway

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Re: Cookbook: Ottolenghi - Simple
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2019, 05:22:56 AM »
How "simple" are these recipes, for a very indifferent cook, do you think?  I think Ottolenghi's books are amazing, but his stuff tends to be fairly elaborate and/or require some unusual ingredients.  If this one really is simpler, I will give it a look.

Most do require unusual ingredients. And lots of them are not very simple. But there are some that are really not that difficult. I would advise the book for someone who is interested in cooking and wants to be inspired for some new dishes, with partly north African flavours.

wenchsenior

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Re: Cookbook: Ottolenghi - Simple
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2019, 08:30:08 AM »
He probably should have titled it, "Simpler" LOL.

I might still browse through it if it shows up at the library.  I did that with Jerusalem and copied some amazing recipes.

ETA: He has a dessert cookbook out as well, for the truly ambitious.

zee dot

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Re: Cookbook: Ottolenghi - Simple
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2019, 03:04:13 PM »
I make the cauliflower cake often.

The herbs for the crust were not something I normally stocked in my pantry but I tuck in left over veggies and it just sucks them up.  It's a good base recipe that I use with different cheeses etc.  So while I make the standard recipe it's really become more of a "what can I do with xyz" recipe for me.   

Linea_Norway

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Re: Cookbook: Ottolenghi - Simple
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2019, 11:44:36 PM »
I make the cauliflower cake often.

The herbs for the crust were not something I normally stocked in my pantry but I tuck in left over veggies and it just sucks them up.  It's a good base recipe that I use with different cheeses etc.  So while I make the standard recipe it's really become more of a "what can I do with xyz" recipe for me.

I made that one too, usually improvising with what I have.